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asian studies

Critique and Cosmos After Misao Miyoshi

ROB WILSON and PAUL A. BOVÉ , issue editors A special issue of boundary 2: an international journal of literature and culture

August 228 pages, 7 illustrations Volume 46, number 3 paper, 978-1-4780-0519-3 $12.00/£9.99

This special issue aims to channel the energies, tactics, critical forces, and comparative poetics Masao Miyoshi (1928–2009) carried out in his work from the 1970s on: coming to terms with his concept of aftering (the act of prolonging and transforming impacts across cultural, political, and disciplinary borders) and its temporal, border-crossing, translational, field-reframing, and revisionary effects. Contributors do not assess his scholarship and photography in any memorial, critical, or honorific sense. Instead, they seek to renew the critical visions that he distributed across various fields, from Asian to Asian American studies and beyond. Each takes seriously the mandate inside Miyoshi’s work that cultural criticism envision its work broadly and courageously. Essays address the state of Japan studies; China’s role in twentieth-century geopolitics, particularly involving Tibet; the critical ethos of “the planetary” in the Anthropocene; and the Korean film Snowpiercer, whose plot represents an embodiment of killer capitalism. Contributors Paul A. Bové, Tsering Wangmo Dhompa, Arif Dirlik, Harry Harootunian, Reginald Jackson, Mary Layoun, Christine L. Marran, George Solt, Keijiro Suga, Stefan Tanaka, Chih-ming Wang, Rob Wilson

Rob Wilson is Professor of Literature, Creative Writing, and Cultural Studies at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and the author of numerous books, including Reimagining the American Pacific: From South Pacific to Bamboo Ridge and Beyond, also published by Duke University Press. Paul A. Bové is Distinguished Professor of English at the University of Pittsburgh and editor of boundary 2.

asian studies

Archives, Archival Practice, and the Writing of History in Premodern Korea JUNGWON KIM , issue editor

A special issue of Journal of Korean Studies

THE JOURNAL OF KOREAN STUDIES

A R C H I V E S , A R C H I VA L P R A C T I C E , A N D T H E W R I T I N G O F H I S T O RY I N P R E M O D E R N K O R E A G UES T EDITED BY JUNGWON K IM

VOLUME 24

NUMBER 2

OCTOBER 2019

September 220 pages Volume 24, number 2 paper, 978-1-4780-0521-6 $14.00/£10.99

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In premodern Korea, archives were gathered and housed not only in official or state storerooms but also in unofficial sites such as the libraries of lineage associations and local academies. Contributors to this special issue reveal how these archives cast light on what and who were left out of the conventional historiography of premodern Korea, taking the archive beyond its usual definition as a collection of historical documents of the past. Topics include how premodern Korean record-keeping was used to shape contemporary historiographical knowledge of Chosŏn Buddhism; the role of the Catholic Archives in documenting life in Chosŏn Korea; and whether the term “archive,” as used in European traditions, is relevant to premodern Korean traditions. By addressing topics such as the formation and use of archives and the role of archives in the circulation of knowledge, contributors invite a vital conversation about how histories of the archive might reshape stories about premodern Korea. Contributors Ksenia Chizhova, Jungwon Kim, Sung-Eun Thomas Kim, Franklin Rausch, Graeme Reynolds, Sem Vermeersch, Sixiang Wang, Yuan Ye

Jungwon Kim is King Sejong Assistant Professor of Korean Studies in the Humanities at Columbia University.

Profile for Duke University Press

Duke University Press Fall and Winter 2019 Catalog  

The Fall & Winter 2019 catalog from Duke University Press.

Duke University Press Fall and Winter 2019 Catalog  

The Fall & Winter 2019 catalog from Duke University Press.