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anthropology | latinx studies | border studies

Fencing In Democracy Border Walls, Necrocitizenship, and the Security State

MIGUEL DÍAZ-BARRIGA and MARGARET E. DORSEY January 192 pages, 28 illustrations paper, 978-1-4780-0693-0 $24.95/£19.99 cloth, 978-1-4780-0605-3 $94.95/£79.00

Border walls permeate our world, with over thirty nation-states constructing them. Anthropologists Margaret E. Dorsey and Miguel Díaz-Barriga argue that border wall construction manifests transformations in citizenship practices that are aimed not only at keeping migrants out but also enmeshing citizens into a wider politics of exclusion. For a decade, the authors studied the U.S.-Mexico border wall constructed by the Department of Homeland Security and observed the political protests and legal challenges that residents mounted in opposition to the wall. In Fencing In Democracy Dorsey and Díaz-Barriga take us to those border communities most affected by the wall and often ignored in national discussions about border security to highlight how the state diminishes citizens’ rights. That dynamic speaks to the citizenship experiences of border residents that is indicative of how walls imprison the populations that they are built to protect. Dorsey and Díaz-Barriga brilliantly expand conversations about citizenship, the operation of U.S. power, and the implications of border walls for the future of democracy. GLOBAL INSECURITIES A series edited by Catherine Besteman and Daniel M. Goldstein

Margaret E. Dorsey is Associate Professor of Sociology and Anthropology at the University of Richmond. Miguel Díaz-Barriga is Professor of Sociology and Anthropology at the University of Richmond.

latin american history | anthropology | indigenous studies

Mesoamerican Experiences of Illness and Healing REBECCA DUFENDACH , issue editor A special issue of Ethnohistory

The sixteenth-century encounter between Mesoamericans and Europeans resulted in a tremendous loss of life in indigenous communities and significantly impacted their health and healing strategies. Contributors to this special issue of Ethnohistory address how indigenous people experienced bodily health in the wake of this encounter. By exploring archival indigenous and Spanish-language documents, contributors address how bodily health was experienced in the wake of the European encounter and uncover transformations of health discourses and experiences of illness. They investigate eclectic healing practices and medical chants; changing notions of the causes of illnesses; and the language of cleansing ceremonies, bone-setting, midwifery, and maternal medicine. Contributors Sabina Cruz de la Cruz, Rebecca Dufendach, Servando Hinojosa, Timothy W. Knowlton, Gabrielle Vail, Edber Dzidz Yam

September 142 pages, 13 illustrations Volume 66, number 4 paper, 978-1-4780-0520-9 $15.00/£11.99

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Rebecca Dufendach is a research associate at the Getty Research Institute.

Profile for Duke University Press

Duke University Press Fall and Winter 2019 Catalog  

The Fall & Winter 2019 catalog from Duke University Press.

Duke University Press Fall and Winter 2019 Catalog  

The Fall & Winter 2019 catalog from Duke University Press.