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IF You think you know

...


Community, history, entrepreneurship.

...you’re in for a little surprise.

Introduction–2

We’re in the midst of transformation, and you get to experience it. All around our city you see new faces and their shops, start-ups, restaurants, installations, stages, and hangouts. The innovators

Entertainment–4

are here and the energy is contagious. And we’ve never lost our sense of community and pride.

Food–12

Shopping–20

Hotels–24

Business–28

Outdoors & Museums–32

This is the Durham you never expected. Visiting–36


GOOD NEIGHBORS

21st Century

DURHAM

Durham has always had its charms, and its history.

Duke and Durham make good

Twenty-five years ago downtown

More of us started appreciating

So take a stroll. Appreciate the old

Durham had become a little too quiet,

downtown, with all its possibilities. We

buildings, and the new ones. Indulge

a little too empty. And, as elsewhere,

wanted to work and live there. One-way in coffee and conversation at Cocoa

the visionaries saw the opportunity.

streets became two-way streets full of

Cinnamon. Line up at The Parlour

the city’s growth. The University

Some lived downtown when few others

the curious, the adventurous, the new

for homemade ice cream. Visit our

were. Entrepreneurs and artists found

Durhamites–planning on making

fair-trade clothing stores. Join the fun

and its alumni are major factors in

ideal workspaces in those magnificent

downtown home.

at one of our many festivals. Sample

early- and mid-century buildings.

neighbors. Duke has long been investing in the city and nurturing

Durham’s transformation. We have

artisan foods at the Farmers’ Market.

strong ties with many of the key businesses in the city. Our students

Entrepreneurship is in our genes. Textiles and tobacco

Investors saw the potential too. Mills

GOT GRIT. Beneath it all, that special

Shop Brightleaf Square. Stroll along

became apartments; tobacco ware-

sense of Durham as a community

the water course at the American

and the economic power of “Black Wall Street” helped

houses became shopping destinations.

keeps us together. We pride ourselves

Tobacco Campus. Dine at one of our

Nightlife reappeared. The creation of

on authenticity, verve, independence,

award-winning restaurants. And at

the Durham Performing Arts Center,

self-reliance, a willingness to risk,

the end of the day, catch your breath—

started, as in other cities, with artists and innovators of

the new Durham Bulls Athletic Park,

and willingness to share. You’ll notice

and a sunset—at the rooftop bar of

the Research Triangle. The University

and the renovations of the American

it with just about every conversation

the Durham Hotel. In the distance,

all stripes, Frank Konhaus ’80 among them. Thousands

is a major tenant in many of the office

Tobacco Campus anchored the

you have with the people that make

silhouetted against the dusky sky in

transformation. Festivals like Art of

Durham work. Not everything is shiny

the West, you just might catch a

buildings. Over 3,500 Duke employees

Cool, the Full Frame Documentary

and bright, but we’re genuine to the

glimpse of Duke Chapel.

Film Festival, and the Durham Blues

core. We love the Bull City, and we

Festival kept things lively, and moving.

can’t wait to share it.

create 20th Century Durham; the most recent renaissance

came to see the installations he made possible.

have opportunities to intern with tech, life science, and research companies located in and around Durham and in

work in downtown Durham. We are a driving force behind the American Underground and other vital business incubators that support start-ups. The relationship between business leaders, local government, and the University is invaluable. Come and see what we have made in Durham— a thriving, vibrant, and fascinating community. A great place to live, work, start a business, raise a family, and spend your college years.

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R. Timothy Smith, Jr. performs at the Durham Hotel’s rooftop bar during Art of Cool. Promoting jazz-influenced music and alternative soul, Art of Cool finds its largest audience in Durham. With the Durham Blues Festival, Moogfest, and more, the city is alive with the hottest sounds in the region. We’ve got an ear for great music.

Nightlife in Durham— is roaring. Catch great regional, national, and homegrown acts every night of the week. The Quebe Sisters Band from Texas takes the stage at Motorco Music Hall, one of Durham’s premiere music venues featuring regional and national acts. Parts & Labor Restaurant and Garage Bar, part of the Motorco complex, is a favorite with locals.

Storming the stages

Venues run from sophisticated to bohemian, from traditional theaters and neighborhood clubs to major venues.Whatever gets your heart pounding— music, dance, drama, comedy, concerts, film. Get ready for a hot time.

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R. Timothy Smith, Jr. performs at the Durham Hotel’s rooftop bar during Art of Cool. Promoting jazz-influenced music and alternative soul, Art of Cool finds its largest audience in Durham. With the Durham Blues Festival, Moogfest, and more, the city is alive with the hottest sounds in the region. We’ve got an ear for great music.

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Back to Durham

Be Different Dorian worked on Wall Street. Got caught up in that hectic pace. “I wasn’t really living life. So I left and worked as a barista. I learned people are all the same. And that something as simple as coffee brings us together. I knew then what I was going to do. The first step was to get back to Durham.”

BEYÚ CAFFÉ

For Dorian, the conventional restaurant business model wasn’t enough. “You’ve got to strive to be more,” Dorian claims. “Sure, it’d be easier just to be a restaurant, but the city is changing, and it’s important to support that change. Be a little different. That’s Durham, man.”

It’s one of those unforgettable places. There’s an ease about Beyú Caffé that’s hard to pin down. Immediately, you sense the warmth. You hear it in the voices of the customers, see it in the smiles of the waitstaff. You savor it in the expertly brewed coffee and scrumptious food. Dorian Bolden ‘02 wanted to create a place that feels like home. “Where everybody fits in. It’ll be a coffee house. And a restaurant and bar. And, oh yeah, a jazz club, too. Beyú Caffé is all of these things. I’ve created my own niche. And it’s turned out to be a great way to bring our community together.”

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Keep it Durm A microcosm of a city that’s transforming itself, Beyú reflects Durham in all its newfound openness– young, inclusive, broad in its interests, diverse in its cultural backgrounds. “It’s a gathering place for people from all walks of life,” Dorian says. “Community leaders hold breakfast meetings, business professionals close deals at lunch. And at night, well, everyone loves the jazz.” “One of the big issues is how to preserve our cultural vibrancy, our rich history, and what we call ‘Durm Grit.’ ” He contracted the city name, like the locals have been doing for years. “These are the things that keep Durham authentic. And that authenticity is bringing more people to Durham.” “The Beyú feels like home to a lot of us. I call it Durham’s living room—relaxed, friendly. We’re on a first name basis and that’s what Durham’s all about.” Dorian’s eyes light up. His broad smile draws you in. “And the Beyú Caffé? That’s all about giving back to the city I love.”

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Durham is a crossroads for music. Blues, jazz, rock, alt, bluegrass, hip hop, Piedmont. The local music scene bends and blends genres. Stand at Old Five Points, hear music fill the air. If you’re up for a show, we raise the curtain on over 450 performances a year. From Broadway musicals to Shakespeare, classic, modern and experimental theater.

“The world’s greatest dance festival.”–New York Post Every summer for six weeks, Durham hosts the American Dance Festival, the country’s most prestigious modern dance event. Founded in 1934, ADF has been enhancing the art of modern dance through instruction, workshops, and events. Headquartered in Durham, this world-renowned institution is a communion of dance, dancers, and choreographers. By presenting new and classic modern works created by well-known and emerging choreographers, ADF continues to attract young dancers and a broader audience. Catch all the moves. Come see some of the most talented dancers in the world leap, slide, pivot, chassé on stages at DPAC and Duke University. We’re steppin’ out in Durham.

Dance to the Music Sabrosura, Duke’s Latin dance troupe, performs during AWAAZ, Duke’s largest student-run production featuring over 20 groups of performers.

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Bill Fick ‘86 is a new master of a grand old craft— printmaking. “From the start, I was interested in the traditional printing process. It’s as old as Gutenberg.” Bill starts by rendering a sketch on linoleum and then using chisels to cut the relief. “The medium was disdained by the art community for years, but after Picasso and Matisse created and printed some lino-cuts, well, thinking changed. Printing is not merely a reflection of the art, it is the art itself. There are no reproductions with this process. We create an edition. Each rendering is an original piece of art.” It all happens at Supergraphic, a fine arts print production company Bill and his partner opened in Golden Belt in 2014. Clients are primarily artists familiar with relief printing. The art is created through a collaborative process between artist and printer. “The idea is to have artists come to SG and work with us to achieve their final product. It’s labor intensive and takes a good deal of time. We have an outreach program, connecting with more artists across the country, getting more people to understand what we do. Not reproducing, but making original art by hand.”

THE ARTS

We see a vacant space. We turn it into a gallery. We make the old fabulous and the new intriguing. Local artists have taken over old offices, warehouses, renovated churches, and mills for studios and galleries. Golden Belt is the center of energy for a thriving art community housed in a restored textile mill. It features studios and galleries where artists work and collectors buy.

new master

Old Craft

The Art Scene in Durham “There’s always been a core of artists here,” Bill Fick says, “but when I moved back in ‘04, the art scene was quite different than it is today.” Artists set up studios and established galleries downtown, gravitating to the old buildings. Rent was cheap. The light was great. They gave off the right vibe. As the renaissance took hold, buildings were renovated, the tax base increased. Many artists migrated east to the Golden Belt neighborhood where the last historic textile mill was renovated to include artists’ studios and exhibit space. Durham Arts Guild has a gallery in the mill and curates. Golden Belt studios are open to the public every third Friday. Working artists sell their work. You can feel the creative energy.

“It’s great to be part of this creative community. I love my studio in Golden Belt. There are always other artists here I can bounce ideas off of.” Chandler Thomas ‘14 creates encaustic art coaxing colored wax with a blowtorch. She melds this difficult process with her oil painting and sculpture, producing intriguing 2D and 3D pieces that break the borders of the frame.

“Artists and creatives like Durham. It’s a comfortable place to live, not super expensive, there’s a great deal of support from the community, and there’s a lot of stuff going on.” Bill Fick–artist, educator, printmaker

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With a cadre of talented chefs opening up restaurants all over town, Durham boasts some of the best food in the country. The national press notices. From grills and diners to new wave bistros, restaurateurs are remaking Durham's kitchen.

COOKING WITH FIRE

Pizzeria Toro

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Bistec a la Plancha, Empanadas, Chana Masala, Tapas, Bรกnh Mi, Cubano, Schnitzel, Unagi. . . And of course you can still chow down on authentic Southern-style barbecue with all the sides. Is that the smell of slow cooked pork in the air?

Guglhupf A bit of culinary Germany in Durham. Guglhupf is a bakery, cafe, and restaurant. Their outstanding bakers, trained in the European tradition, turn out irresistible pastries, danishes, cookies, donuts, and breads. Stop by for brunch, lunch, or dinner.

Imported buffalo mozzarella, homemade San Marzano marinara,

Guglhupf fuses Viennese elegance with the

fresh dough baked in an open wood-fired oven. Is there a

heartiness of German fare. Meals are

better way to make a pie? The ricotta dumplings with sweet

prepared with locally sourced produce.

corn are sublime. Popular with, well. . . everyone.

Located just a 7-minute drive from campus. 13


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Guglhupf A bit of culinary Germany in Durham. Guglhupf is a bakery, cafe, and restaurant. Their outstanding bakers, trained in the European tradition, turn out irresistible pastries, danishes, cookies, donuts, and

Pizzeria Toro

breads. Stop by for brunch, lunch, or dinner.

Imported buffalo mozzarella, homemade San Marzano marinara,

Guglhupf fuses Viennese elegance with the

fresh dough baked in an open wood-fired oven. Is there a

heartiness of German fare. Meals are

better way to make a pie? The ricotta dumplings with sweet

prepared with locally sourced produce.

corn are sublime. Popular with, well. . . everyone.

Located just a 7-minute drive from campus. 13


Authentic Barbecue

We have a

TASTE for the

unexpected

It’s difficult to visit Durham and not sample our authentic barbecue. The Pit serves up some of the best whole-hog, pit-cooked barbecue you’ll ever taste. Only free-range, locally raised hogs used. 18 hours in the smoker renders the pork sweet, tender, and succulent. The Pit offers variations on regional Southern barbecue. Want more? Don’t miss the Original Q-Shack, Hog Heaven, Picnic, Bullock’s, and some of our other great barbecue joints.

Comfort Food

The all-time breakfast of champions—slow cooked steel-cut oats topped with a harvest of fresh fruit. Sit down to a generous bowl at the Mad Hatter Bakeshop & Cafe, adjacent to Duke’s East Campus. Popular with Duke students and locals. Simple, fresh comfort foods. Breakfast all day. If you’re an oatmeal connoisseur you’ll also find hearty bowls at Elmo’s Diner and The Durham Hotel.

Fusion: Asian Pacific Durham Style

We have a taste for the unexpected. And our palate has become as inclusive as everything else in Durham. We relish all cuisines, Asian Pacific among them. Poke, sushi, pho, ramen are all over town. And we’re biting (or slurping). It’s fresh, healthy, adventurous, and much of it is locally sourced. Taste the magic at M-Sushi, Dashi Ramen, Basan, Sake Bomb, Pho & Poke House, and Zenfish.

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Z

E

N

F

I

S

Few small local businesses better exemplify the transformation of Durham than Bulldega. Bulldega is an urban market owned and operated by Yvette West, a retired Duke Hospital RN. It’s a melding of the old and the new, of local history, and the unfolding story being written by today’s Durhamites.

H

Who would believe so much goodness comes from a Poke Bowl? Micro greens, quinoa, mango, roasted seaweed, edamame, fresh fish. . . .“One of the things that makes ZenFish different is that we source most of our ingredients locally,” says owner Janet Lee ‘12. “We want our customers to be aware of the effort and pride our local growers put into their amazing

Just around the corner

In 2005 Yvette and her husband bought the old Durham Telephone Exchange across from City Hall. They carefully restored the building, preserving its early century character and idiosyncrasies. You can still see the original ceiling, floors, and walls as well as the bulky metal-clad wooden fire door designed to automatically shut as fire burns through the thick-weighted rope. It looks as if it might still work. “Oh, I wouldn’t trust it,” Yvette cautions.

BULLDEGA URBAN GROCERY

produce. We tell the story behind the ingredients and even offer tours of the farms and greenhouses. I feel the love

Bulldega is the first market of its kind in the city, offering a variety of groceries, fresh fruit, vegetables, meat, household, and personal items. The majority of the products are locally sourced, from Durham and environs. You can also find artisan soaps, lotions, candles, bric-a-brac. In the back of the shop beyond the barnwood table, a rotating exhibit features the work of Durham artists.

in Durham. Everyone is so supportive. ZenFish is more than poke bowl. It’s about community and giving back.” ZenFish philosophy is summed up in a simple message painted on the floor. “Eat well. Do good.”

Bulldega conjures up old Durham and the corner grocery. “Our customer base is growing. Office workers stop in for lunch items, or a ‘grab and go’ meal. Locals walking home pick up the groceries they need to prepare fresh dinners. Guests at nearby hotels stop in to pick up personal items, snacks to take back to the room. We’ve even had tourists purchasing mementos of their stay in Durham. Sometimes people just come in to talk.” Yvette likes the way Durham is changing. “Cool, little shops are popping up all over town. We’ve become a real urban community.”

Carly West stops by for some locally grown tomatoes and a hug from her mom, Yvette.

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The Durham Farmers’ Market is a snapshot of the regional North Carolina farming community and a

DURHAM farmers’ market

Chat with local farmers and merchants. Buy homemade specialties, local produce, fresh baked breads, artisan foods, local wines, hand-cut flowers, and handcrafted items. Get there early enough and you can help unload the trucks.

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Discover an amazing variety of foods, whipped up by intrepid

great way to spend a morning or afternoon. Browse stalls.

FOOD TRUCK RODEO

cooks in wildly painted step vans. You can find them all over Durham. Every Saturday a fleet of these mobile kitchens corral on Foster Street around Central Park by the Farmers’ Market. Great food. Loads of fun. Hard not to overeat.

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Passion for shopping? Our town is full of the extraordinary. Check out our unique, locally-owned specialty, fair trade and import shops,

Spend IT All in one place

antique and vintage emporiums, galleries, gift shops, and high-end boutiques. Discover the latest fashions, local crafts, and all things Durham.

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All Things Durham– Those special shops you seek when you travel are open for business all over Durham. From City Center to Central Park, Brightleaf to American Tobacco, Rockwood to Golden Belt, Ninth Street to Southpoint. The unique items featured on these pages represent just a sample. Featured products are from: Morgan Imports, Chet Miller, Parker & Otis, Zola Crafts, Regulator Books, Wentworth & Leggett Rare Books, High Strung Violins & Guitars, Runaway Clothing, James Kennedy Galleries, and others. There are many more diverse and remarkable shops waiting for you. Visit them all. Some are bound to become your favorites. The Streets at Southpoint– If you’re in the mood to shop traditional, visit the Streets at Southpoint, one of our region’s most popular malls located in South Durham. With 165 stores and a million square feet of shopping space, there’s plenty for the whole family, including local vendor kiosks, restaurants, food courts, a band stage, and a 17-screen movie multiplex including an IMAX theater. And with major national brands including Nordstrom, Macy’s, Apple, and Barnes & Noble, we’ll keep you plenty busy.

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This is Rebecca Kuhn’s stand against the exploitation of women workers in the global fashion industry. Liberation Threads promotes fair trade.“So many people in Durham who are knowledgeable about fair trade have already found us. And we’re reaching out to those who may not be aware.”

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th street

Walk along the quintessential avenue of Durham. Mom and Pops, boutiques, diners, pubs, bookstores, yoga, even a vinyl shop. No wonder Ninth Street brings us all out— the locals, Duke students, visitors, tourists. Everyone ends up on eclectic Ninth Street at some point.

Artisan bracelet created by local artist Marci Lew of Ubasti Studio. African wild olive bowls crafted in Kenya for Swahili African Modern, a member of the Fair Trade Federation.

Liberation Threads attracts your everyday woman who enjoys fashion, clothes, and shopping. And there’s another level of ‘feel good’ about your purchase. All the items come from fair trade countries or are made in America.

Patterns for freedom LIBERATION THREADS

Rebecca has lived in Durham for over 17 years.“I chose to live and work in places that have a progressive, collaborative, unique vibe. Durham has a long history of inclusiveness and the fair trade concept is part of our renaissance. This city’s resurgence is so much more than simply financial revitalization. It is a moral and ethical renaissance as well. We’re all moving towards a Durham that is more embracing of things that are good and just and right. There’s space for everyone here.”

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After exploring the wonders of Durham, nothing will benefit your welfare more than an uninterrupted night’s sleep. As with all things Durham, our lodging offers something for everyone—including the extraordinary.

The comfort zone In the past few years several new hotels have opened. In addition to the usual chains, you’ll find unique accommodations, comfortable bed and breakfasts, exceptional dining, and a big helping of our Southern hospitality.

Events, music, stargazing, yoga classes, and the spectacular panoramic view make the rooftop bar at the Durham Hotel a hot spot for locals. Five floors down there’s a world-class restaurant with a nationally-renowned chef. The menu features creative takes on traditional entrees. 24


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HEART AND SOUL THE DURHAM HOTEL

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Durham will be Durham “We wanted to do something the community could take pride in. But you don’t The Durham Hotel is just down the presume to tell Durham what it needs. This street. Its exuberant façade conjures town is fiercely independent and adamant images of the space race, the about protecting its authenticity.” freewheeling sixties. That ovate Durham has a strong Historic Restoration silo and all those soaring verticals seem to launch the building higher Commission and redevelopment projects are subject to stringent requirements.“We than its five stories. took the process seriously,” says Daniel, Urban Pioneers “determined to preserve as much of the After Duke, Daniel traveled, lived building as possible. We wanted to capture in Seattle, San Diego, New York. that spirit of Durham independence.” “But for some reason, I kept coming Through intelligent renovation, the hotel back to Durham.” He met his wife and embodies the heart and soul of Durham. they moved downtown. Permanently. The unique building retains all its “We felt like urban pioneers. There were mid-century charm and raises the bar for only a few of us. But things were in flux,” redevelopment projects in town. And it’s Daniel says. “Once the renovation of the still one of the finest examples of our city’s American Tobacco Campus began, we architectural excellence. knew Durham was changing dramatically.” the Bull, and you’re in the heart of downtown Durham. In a little over ten minutes.

“We’d take a bus from campus into town,” Daniel Robinson ‘97 recalls of his undergrad days at Duke. “Today students walk. Durham has become a walking town. It’s a short stroll from East Campus to downtown.” Along Main Street are ethnic restaurants, local pubs, consignment shops, interesting mid-century buildings, and Brightleaf Square with all its shops tucked in the renovated tobacco warehouses. Make a left onto Chapel Hill Street, pass

Daniel hooked up with fellow Duke grads, and purchased the old Home Savings Bank building on Chapel Hill Street.“We started looking at the space and realizing how cool it was. It would make a great boutique hotel just when Durham needed more hotels to accommodate the rising number of visitors.”

Events, music, stargazing, yoga classes, and the spectacular panoramic view make the rooftop bar at the Durham Hotel a hot spot for locals. Five floors down there’s a world-class restaurant with a nationally-renowned chef. The menu features creative takes on traditional entrees. 24

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King’s Daughters Inn Tucked away in a shady neighborhood just across from Duke’s East Campus, The King’s Daughters Inn was a retreat for single women for over 95 years. Today this historic landmark is owned by Deanna and Colin Crossman ‘04 and has become Durham’s most famous bed and breakfast. Painstakingly restored, the 1911 building boasts many original architectural elements—grand staircase, balcony, arched windows, 2-story gabled sunroom. The guest rooms are spacious and well-appointed. The most important meal of the day at the Inn includes their ever-popular chocolate chip waffles.

21c Museum Hotel Up all night? An irrepressible urge to see thought-provoking art? Wander over to 21c on Corcoran. You don’t have to be a guest to enjoy the astounding gallery. The hotel is open to the public 24/7. Rotating and permanent pieces, single and group artist shows, commissioned installations, cultural events. Stay in rooms with terrazzo floors and unreachable ceilings. On-site dining at the Counting House. Drop by anytime. Durham offers many choices for the weary traveler. Complementing our boutique hotels and inns are familiar hospitality brands including Marriott, Hilton, aLoft, and others. You’ll also find two exquisite hotels located on Duke’s campus. The Washington Duke Inn & Golf Course offers classic style and elegance. And if you’re looking for a more contemporary setting, you’ll find the JB Duke sets new standards for sophistication.

The Washington Duke Inn & Golf Club 26

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Durham has always been about businesses, large and small. More than ever it’s now a springboard for new ideas, new products, new ways of doing things. It helps that we’re situated of the largest research it came fromon thethe edge park in the country.

F E E L

T H E

E N e r g y

future

The Launch PAd

ORGANIC TRANSIT

Resources like the Google for Entrepreneurs Tech Hub, American Underground, and the Duke Innovation and Entrepreneurship Initiative give a push forward. The energy is palpable, and the results are visible every day.

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dAP hcnuaL ehT F E E L

T H E

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E N e r g y

Rob Cotter started fabricating the ELF solar pedal trike in an old furniture warehouse downtown. “As we finished each part, we would put it in the display window. Just to have something in there. A sign of life. People thought it was an interactive art exhibit. One day a black limo pulls up and this guy who looks like Jerry Seinfeld gets out, stares in the window, and says,‘This your place? What’s it all about?’ That night at DPAC, Mr. Seinfeld opened his monologue saying, ‘Durham, you gotta love Durham, any place that sells pedal drives has gotta be cool.’ ” Organic Transit’s ELF attracts attention all over Durham. You can’t miss them zipping around town with their sturdy composite shells in dazzling colors. Combining pedal power and solar power assist the ELF does over 30 mph, and with zero emissions, is billed as “the most efficient vehicle on the planet.”

it came from the

future ORGANIC TRANSIT

“Durham, you gotta love Durham, any place that sells pedal drives has gotta be cool.” – Jerry Seinfeld

Innovation Encouraged Rob, a former speed cyclist, came up with the idea of dual powered vehicle in New York City. “I suddenly realized the need for a bike with an assist to move people and things around in congested urban areas. “I came to Durham because of its culture of innovation. The community is supportive.” Rob gets a lot of support from Duke interns. Since 2014, OT has engaged over 40, many from the Nicholas School of the Environment. “They perform a range of activities from engineering to marketing. I currently have a group of students writing a 160-page build manual. Really impressive work.” Sustainable Solution At Amazon’s recent Radical Urban Transit Salon, a conference projecting what future cities will look like, several presenters endorsed ELF. Rob was delighted. As more people move into downtown areas like Durham, Amazon anticipates growing retail Internet sales will need smaller, lighter, cleaner delivery vehicles. ELF offers a sustainable solution. OT has sold over 800 ELFs—all handmade. OT is currently evaluating ways to streamline the fabrication process. “We’ve found an efficient way to ‘mass produce’ that remains essentially hand assembled.” Rob plans on expanding manufacturing into other areas of North Carolina. “But we’ll always have a presence here in Durham. We’ve developed strong relationships in the community and I’m hoping to expand the internship program. We’re making the future here in Durham. It’s a good place to be.”

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“I’m originally from New Jersey,” says Rich West ‘79, “but I feel more at home in Durham than anywhere else.”

Tatiana Birgisson ‘12 has a knack for brewing delicious teas. They were so good her friends insisted she go commercial. “It was just a sort of hobby at first. I started selling the teas to offices in town and one day I noticed people preferred my teas to energy drinks. It was my Aha! moment. I thought it was just tea—turns out, I created a healthy energy drink.”

Rich first discovered Durham as a Duke student. After graduating, he landed a job in Los Angeles. When the company expanded to the East Coast, he was given an opportunity to return to Durham. “I jumped on it. I always wanted to come back to Durham.” After a year, the company went bust. Turns out, it was the best thing that could have happened to Rich. Giant Steps He had no intention of leaving town again. Over the next several years he started a number of medical supply and life sciences companies. “Durham is the perfect location to start a business,” Rich claims, “especially in the life sciences.” The Research Triangle is home to the world’s largest convergence of life sciences companies. With his successful ventures, Rich was earning a reputation as a start-up expert. He was approached by Advanced Liquid Logic, a Duke Engineering spin-off. They had invented a completely new way of handling liquids using micro-processing. “Not only had they miniaturized the technology, they had automated it. It was giant leap forward.” Rich ran the company for nine years before the technology was sold. That’s My Baby In 2015, the technology was licensed back to create Rich’s newest venture—Baebies, a company focused exclusively on newborn screening and pediatric diagnostics. “We use existing diagnostic protocols with our technology to detect the presence of potentially life-threatening genetic disorders.” The company just completed a successful clinical trial and by the close of next year Rich predicts Baebies will be operating in over 20 countries.

Where Great Businesses Are Born

RICH WEST–START-UP GURU

To grow the business Tatiana joined a group of aspiring entrepreneurs. They met in the basement at American Underground, a Durham business incubator. “At first I felt like I didn’t fit in. They were tech oriented. But in time I recognized the lessons I was learning about how to build a business were invaluable. I simply ran MATI like a tech start-up.” Tatiana’s proprietary formula yielded a brew that boosted caffeine and delivered great flavor without added sugars. She delivered her five-minute pitch at Google’s Demo Day competition, and captured first prize. In 2017, she was named to “Forbes 30 Under 30 Entrepreneurs to Watch.”

Tatiana moved out of the basement some time ago to a spacious ground floor office at American Underground that overlooks bustling Main Street. “In Durham, when you walk down the street, people smile and say ‘hi.’ You might not know them, you might never have a conversation with them, but they’re in a great mood, and it tells you people around here care about one another. That’s one of the things that makes this town so great.” Another is the robust start-up culture. MATI is currently sold in over 500 stores throughout the region. That’s over 750,000 cans a year. There’s bound to be one on the shelf for you.

POWER ELIXER MATI HEALTHY ENERGY

“It’s all come together in the Research Triangle. Tech giants, start-ups, small business, hospitality, retail,”says Rich, “You see it all in Durham.”

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There’s a river that flows through woodlands, by scenic bluffs, past early homesteads and mills. Just northwest of town you’ll find one of North Carolina’s favorite parks. The Eno River State Park offers boating, fishing, swimming, rock climbing, picnicking, and 30 miles of hiking trails. Five access areas. Easy to find. Easier to lose yourself for a while.

A FAMILY

EXPEDITION

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The scenic Mountain-to-Sea trail runs along the banks of the Eno River all the way east to Falls Lake and the Neuse River. It’s quite a trek. Make it what you want. Light, moderate, challenging trails. Duke Forest It’s no wonder Duke has one of the most beautiful campuses in the country. We sit on the doorstep of the great Duke Forest—7,000 acres of pristine Eastern woodland and lush, rolling meadows. Set aside in 1931 for teaching, research, and recreation, the forest is a boon for our students, faculty, and the growing Durham community. Exploring this vital ecosystem, Duke students conduct environmental research and learn the imperative of stewardship. Designated trails and forest roads are open to the public year round. It’s a terrific place for the family to spend some time hiking, horseback riding, mountain biking, fishing, picnicking, or simply taking in the splendor. Duke University owns and manages the forest and hosts numerous events, tours, and activities throughout the year. Our students love Duke Forest. You will too. Find out more on Facebook and at dukeforest.duke.edu.

Durham’s 69,000 acres are overflowing with parks and recreation areas. There’s much to discover.

take The AIR

Trails to blaze. Rivers to ford. History to explore. Sights to behold. Gather the family. Find your own Durham. GPS optional.

Everyone Needs a Little Space Take the air. See the sights. Find your path. Pick up the Hiking and Biking Map at the Durham Convention and Visitors Bureau on West Main Street. They’ll point you in the right directions.

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There’s a river that flows through woodlands, by scenic bluffs, past early homesteads and mills. Just northwest of town you’ll find one of North Carolina’s favorite parks. The Eno River State Park offers boating, fishing, swimming, rock climbing, picnicking, and 30 miles of hiking trails. Five access areas. Easy to find. Easier to lose yourself for a while.

A FAMILY

EXPEDITION

serca 000,96 s’mahruD htiw gniwoflrevo era .saera noiThe tascenic erceMountain-to-Sea r dna sktrail raruns p along the banks of the Eno River all the way east to Falls Lake and the Neuse River. It’s quite a trek. .revocsidMake ot ithwhat cuyou mwant. s’erLight, ehmoderate, T challenging trails.

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Duke Forest It’s no wonder Duke has one of the most beautiful campuses in the country. We sit on the doorstep of the great Duke Forest—7,000 acres of pristine Eastern woodland and lush, rolling meadows. Set aside in 1931 for teaching, research, and recreation, the forest is a boon for our students, faculty, and the growing Durham community. Exploring this vital ecosystem, Duke students conduct environmental research and learn the imperative of stewardship. Designated trails and forest roads are open to the public year round. It’s a terrific place for the family to spend some time hiking, horseback riding, mountain biking, fishing, picnicking, or simply taking in the splendor. Duke University owns and manages the forest and hosts numerous events, tours, and activities throughout the year. Our students love Duke Forest. You will too. Find out more on Facebook and at dukeforest.duke.edu.

.drof ot sreviR .ezalb ot sliarT .dloheb ot sthgiS .erolpxe ot yrotsiH .ylimaf eht rehtaG .mahruD nwo ruoy dniF .lanoitpo SPG

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Everyone Needs a Little Space Take the air. See the sights. Find your path. Pick up the Hiking and Biking Map at the Durham Convention and Visitors Bureau on West Main Street. They’ll point you in the right directions.

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Museum of Life+Science Get to know some of the wildest denizens of Durham at the Museum of Life+ Science. Over 60 indigenous species roam our 84 acres of pristine Piedmont woodland. Fox, opossum, black bear, beaver, red fox, bobcat, raccoon, longtail weasel, short-tail shrew, alligator, parasaurolophus. That last one hangs around the Dinosaur Trail with a few of his Cretaceous friends. So much to do–interactive exhibits, rainforest, stream garden, insectarium, farmyard, field trips, and one of the largest butterfly conservatories in the world. Bring the family. Do not feed the dinosaurs. Duke Lemur Center Tucked away in Duke Forest, the Lemur Center is one of the world’s largest sanctuaries and research centers for this endangered primate native to Madagascar. Over 200 lemurs and several other species are living it up at the Duke Lemur Center on 80 acres of preserved forest. Take a tour. Do some face time with these lovable creatures. Durham History Durham is unique among southern cities. Pioneering inclusiveness. Brightleaf tobacco. End of Civil War. Black Wall Street. Birthplace of Piedmont blues. Research Triangle Park. Find out all about us at the Museum of Durham History on West Main. Bull City photographs, artifacts, walking tours. Four important Civil War sites are located in Durham: Bennett Place, Leigh Place, Brassfield Station, Durham Station. Events, reenactments, exhibits.

Where the compass always points to discovery 34

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HERE’S WHAT THEY’RE SAYING ABOUT OUR CITY:

DUKE UNIVERSITY Visiting Duke for the first time? High school students and their families should sign up for an Information Session and Campus Tour. Information sessions, conducted by admissions officers, and campus tours, led by current students, are offered throughout the year, Monday through Saturday. Go to admissions.duke.edu/setting/plantrip to view the schedule and register.

#1 Most Tolerant City –The Daily Beast

#1 Foodiest Town –Bon Appétit

Interested in engineering?

#2 Best College Town –Livability

#3 America’s Most Educated Cities –The Daily Beast

#3 Destination to Visit in the World in 2016 –Jetsetter

#4 Happiest Metropolitan Area –U.S. National Bureau of Economic Research

#5 Geekiest City in America –Forbes

#7 Best Place to Live in the U.S. –U.S. News & World Report

#12 Top Places to Launch Your Own Business –Fortune Small Business

PLAN your VISIT!

The Pratt School of Engineering offers engineeringspecific tours. For more information and to schedule a tour, go to pratt.duke.edu/undergrad/applicants/ walking-tours. Want to make the most of your visit? If you’ve visited campus previously or have more time to spend, we recommend taking a self-guided tour of East Campus, sitting in on a class, and sampling Duke’s dining options. You may also wish to tour the Sarah P. Duke Gardens (gardens. duke.edu), the Nasher Museum of Art (nasher.duke. edu), or the Duke Lemur Center (lemur.duke.edu – reservations required). Students who would like to schedule individual appointments with professors may contact the directors of undergraduate studies in the departments of their choice. We regret that we are unable to offer on-campus interviews.

DURHAM To learn more about Durham and to plan a visit, we suggest checking out durham-nc.com and durham.duke.edu. Here you’ll find information about traveling to Durham, touring the city, arts and entertainment, food and drink, recreation, history, events, shopping, and more. To get information about Raleigh-Durham International Airport (RDU)—only a 20-minute drive from downtown Durham—visit rdu.com. To find and book a hotel room, go to durham-nc.com/hotels-inns. To learn about visiting North Carolina, go to visit.nc.com.

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Durham booklet created by Fallano Faulkner


Office of Undergraduate Admissions 2138 Campus Drive Box 90586 Durham, NC 27708-0586 admissions.duke.edu

Profile for Duke University

Durham, North Carolina... You're in for a Little Surprise  

Learn about Durham, North Carolina, home to Duke University and a diverse population of vibrant, creative, spirited people and myriad experi...

Durham, North Carolina... You're in for a Little Surprise  

Learn about Durham, North Carolina, home to Duke University and a diverse population of vibrant, creative, spirited people and myriad experi...

Profile for dukeuniv

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