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Table of Contents Table of Contents Section 1: Introduction • Welcome Letter • Meet the UCAE Staff

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Section 2: Rights and Responsibilities of a Student Organizations • Relationship to the University • Benefits • Organization Status Renewal • Awards for Recognized Student Organizations

pg 3

Section 3: Starting a Student Organization • Student Organization Finance Committee • Fraternity and Sorority Life • Types of Organizations

pg 4-5

Section 4: Organizational Practices • Recruitment • Effective Meetings • Managing conflict • Delegation • Leadership Transitioning • Teambuilding • DukeGroups.com • Online Presence

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Section 5: Finances • Accounts • Funding • Purchases, Payments, and Deposits • Budgeting

Section 6: Programming Guide • Why plan events? • Space Requests • Policies • UCAE Teams

pg 12-14

Section 7: Policies • Duke Community Standard • UCAE Policies • Trademark Licensing • Off-campus event protocol

pg 15-17

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Table of Contents Section 8: Advisors • Roles of Advisors • Selecting Advisors • Building a relationship with Advisors

pg 18

Section 9: Risk Management • Types of Risk • Mitigating Risk

pg 19

Section 10: Hazing • Policy • Facts, Myths, Alternatives

pg 20-21

Section 11: Leadership • Officer Responsibilities

pg 22

Section 12: Inclusivity • Duke University Statement/Commitment • Non-discrimination and Harassment Policy • Center for LGBT Life • Center for Multicultural Affairs • International House • Jewish Life at Duke • Mary Lou Williams Center for Black Culture • Muslim Life at Duke • Women’s Center

pg 23-24

Section 13: General Resources • DiDA • LAUNCH • Corporate Risk Management • Office of Trademark Licensing • University Archives

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Section 1: Introduction Welcome Greetings,

As members of the UCAE Student Involvement team, we would like to welcome you to the 2012-2013 academic year. Your involvement in student organizations can play a positive role in your college experience and influence the greater Duke community. Our role is to help you and your organization(s) maximize your potential by building character, engaging in collaboration, and promoting campus-wide and global citizenship. The 2012-2013 Student Organization Handbook is the first step in fulfilling this role. This document will provide your organization with the tools and resources to navigate your way through the complex and ever-changing nature of Duke University. The student organizations of today will be able to shape the culture, reputation, and history of the Duke of tomorrow. From cultural showcases to national competitions to local and global service projects, student organizations present an opportunity for students to express passion, reflect on experiences, and understand diverse voices and perspectives. During your time at Duke, we hope that you take the opportunity to explore multiple organizations to expand your knowledge and experiences. Along with this handbook, we have created a student organization resource series that includes workshops, videos, and handouts regarding areas of policy knowledge, financial management, organizational management, and community building. Be sure to check out our website, studentaffairs.duke.edu/ucae/student-organizations, to see our upcoming events and access our online resources. We hope that this handbook serves as a valuable tool for your organization’s success and we look forward to working with you and your organization. Your experiences as a student leader at Duke will be challenging and rewarding, and we are excited to see what you accomplish. ~ UCAE Student Involvement Team

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Section 1: Introduction What is UCAE?

About Us University Center Activities & Events (formally OSAF and Event Management) UCAE strives to offer the Duke community and external customers help with event planning and campus programming needs. Our nine unique teams provide a wide array of services available to Duke community members and campus visitors. Mission and Goals Mission We envision a collaborative organization that harnesses the individual creative talents of a diverse staff and facilitates a model of student learning and development that is unique amongst our peers. Through excellence in both student and event services, we aim to create a holistic environment that incorporates a best practices approach in both the transformational and transactional, where learning and mentorship is embedded within the daily lives of students and staff alike, and resulting in personal development and transferable skills. Goals An organization that is student-centric and recognizes learning takes place both in and out of the classroom, and that creates opportunities for students to expand their knowledge and skills in new settings. • An organization that is exemplary of the best practices in entrepreneurship and fosters innovation. • An organization that provides integrated support services that embrace and further the strategic goals and initiatives of the Division and the University. • An organization that is agile and resourceful and channels realized efficiencies into furthering the goals and mission of the department. • An organization that seeks to maximize revenue in order to support department and Division objectives and minimize reliance on general allocation resources. Teams Student Activities Student Activities is led by David Pittman and consists of the Leadership Development and Social Action Team and the Student Involvement Team. The Student Activities cluster is responsible for student organization support and advising, programs such as Leadershape and Alternative Break Program, the Duke Bikes program, DiDA and the Hub, as well as many other opportunities for involvement. Event and Production Services Event and Production Services is led by Chuck Catotti and consists of the Media Services Team, Conference and Event Services Team, Theater Operations Team, Special Event and Facility Operations Team, University Box Office and Visitor Information Team and the Technical Services Team. The Event and Production Services cluster is responsible for the planning and execution of all sizes of events on campus, from sporting events to graduation. Business and Administration The Business and Administration cluster includes the Business and Finance Team who is responsible for departmental accounts, student organization accounts, office management and serving as UCAE’s liaison to payroll and HR.

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Section 2: Rights and Responsibilities Relationship to Duke University

The Duke University campus is designated as a educational environment for the intellectual growth and enjoyment of its community members. Student organizations, part of the Duke experience since about 1924, are a vibrant and enriching part of student life on campus. Duke recognizes the distinct and permanent influence that student organizations have on the campus community and learning. The actions and views of student organizations at Duke University does not necessarily represent the view of the University. Benefits There are many benefits to being a recognized student organization on campus. Tangible benefits include: • Space reservations on campus • On-campus financial account • Ability to apply for funding • Legitimacy on campus • Access to all services provided by UCAE • Access to the Duke Innovative Design Agency (DiDA) Intangible benefits include: • Meet and interact with people with the same interests • Learn from organizations with different missions through collaboration • Promote campus-wide and global citizenship by taking part in something bigger than yourself • Understanding yourself by reflecting on your leadership style and your role within an organization Organization Status Renewal To stay compliant with University policies, the President and Treasurer of each student organization must complete a policy and financial training, respectively, each academic year. Each Spring semester, student organizations must re-register their organization for the upcoming school year. Re-registration includes updating information on DukeGroups.com, a signed advisor agreement, and registering for the fall activities fair. Awards for Recognized Student Organizations The Duke University Leadership and Service Awards program is a celebration of leadership and service and an opportunity to recognize a select number of individuals and organizations whose influence and achievements have made a significant impact on University life and beyond. Previous ‘Leading at Duke Leadership and Service Awards’ winners include: Outstanding New Student Organization Ubuntu (2010) Greek Women’s Initiative (2011) Duke Students for Gender Neutrality (2012) Outstanding Student Organization Center for Race Relations (2010) Blue Devil’s United (2011) Blue Devil’s United (2012) 3


Section 3: Starting a Student Organization Student Organization Finance Committee (SOFC)

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There are a few types of student organizations. This handbook primarily focuses on undergraduate organizations recognized by the Student Organization Finance Committee (SOFC). The end of this section will cover basic information regarding other type of student organizations. Student Organization Finance Committee (SOFC) The SOFC is an up to 17-person undergraduate committee elected by the DSG Senate to allocate the student fund to recognized and chartered student groups. The main duties of the SOFC are: • overseeing the Programming Fund, which is open to all recognized and chartered groups; • running the Annual Budgeting process, through which money is allocated to chartered groups for the upcoming year; • reviewing and recommending nascent student groups for recognized and chartered status; Students must follow these steps to start a student organization: 1. Formulate a clear purpose to your group. Check DukeGroups.com to ensure similar groups do not exist. 2. Decide if you wish to become a RECOGNIZED or CHARTERED organization. Some difference include: RECOGNIZED organizations may be selective; may charge membership dues; has access to the programming fund (event-based funding, non-capital expenditures) CHARTERED organizations may not be selective; may not charge membership dues (unless mandated by a national chapter) has access to the programming fund; has a need for annual budget funding (capital expenditures, retreats, travel, etc.) 3. Write a Constitution Constitutions must have the following components: • Official group name • The group’s recognition source • The group’s mission or purpose statement • The group’s requirements for membership • The roles and responsibilities of group officers • The requirements for voting on group issues • The structure and timing for officer elections • The requirements for amending the constitution • A list of amendment dates and other important certifications or milestones for the group A sample constitution may be found on the UCAE and SOFC website. 4. Apply to SOFC to become a recognized group at Duke Download the application at dsg.dukegroups.duke.edu/sofc 5. Send the COMPLETED APPLICATION and CONSTITUTION to: sofcgroups@gmail.com. SOFC will schedule a time for you to appear before the committee to discuss your new group. Do not forget to bring hard copies of your forms and the required signatures to the meeting, and be sure to have done your research and thought through all of the previous steps. 6. If your group is approved: • Email a program coordinator in UCAE Student Involvement to set-up an appointment • Don’t forget to register with dukegroups.com (Without doing so you will not be eligible to apply for funding) 4


Section 3: Starting a Student Organization Types of Organizations

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7. Make your group sustainable SOFC meets every Tuesday night starting at 7pm to hear funding and new group requests. Applications for new groups are accepted on a rolling basis during the academic school year. For more information about the application process, please visit the SOFC website: dsg.dukegroups.duke.edu/sofc. Other Types of Student Organizations Fraternity and Sorority Life The Duke Greek community offers undergraduates a fraternal experience that complements the mission of the University. In partnership with faculty, staff, alumni, families, and (inter)national organizations, we challenge and educate students in the areas of leadership, cultural awareness, personal and group development, scholarship, and civic responsibility. Fraternities & Sororities have been an integral part of Duke University since 1872 (then known as Trinity College). Greek organizations at Duke are comprised of groups of individuals with various interests. They are bonded together by common goals and aspirations. These bonds are strengthened by honor, friendship, truth, knowledge, and character. Greek membership carries with it many benefits including leadership opportunities, academic support, an emphasis on service, and a bond of brotherhood or sisterhood. Duke University recognizes that fraternities and sororities are an integral part of the campus community and can have a positive impact for members and non-members. The privilege of fraternities and sororities to exist as part of the University brings with it a high level of responsibility. To achieve mutual success for the University and its Greek organizations, there must be trust and shared responsibility. This success relies on the following commitments from the University, individual chapters, Governing Councils, national/international fraternal organizations, and student members. Graduate and Professional Student Council (GPSC) The Graduate and Professional Student Council of Duke University (GPSC – pronounced ‘gypsy’) is the umbrella student government organization for Duke’s nine graduate and professional schools. Our purpose is to: • represent and advocate on behalf of graduate and professional students at Duke University; • serve as a liaison among the student governments of the graduate and professional schools of the University; • serve as a liaison between graduate and professional students and the University Administration; • nominate graduate and professional student representatives to University committees; • program events of interest to the graduate and professional student community; and financially support the programming of graduate and professional student groups. Departmental Departmental organizations are organizations that are not recognized by SOFC, Office of Fraternity and Sorority Life, or GPSC. These organizations are housed within a specific department at Duke. Departmental organizations have the same benefits as all other recognized organizations except for the ability to apply for funding. Funding and accounts must be housed by the sponsoring department. The sponsoring department is solely responsible for the student organization’s activity and presence on campus.

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Section 4: Organizational Practices Recruitment, Meetings, Conflict

Recruitment Recruitment refers to the process of screening, and selecting qualified people for a job at an organization or firm, or for a vacancy in a volunteer-based some components of the recruitment process, mid- and large-size organizations and companies often retain professional recruiters or outsource some of the process to recruitment agencies. Word of mouth: one of the best ways to recruit members • Have your group members pass on information about your club; usually people are more likely to join if they already know at least one member Advertisement: a great way for student clubs to catch the eye of new members • Through facebook • Through tabling at club fairs • Through handing out flyers Event Recruiting: works to create a larger membership base • At your event, whether on or off campus, try to entice new people to want to join your club • Provide easily accessible information about your organization at the event Running Effective Meetings Before the meeting: • Define the purpose of the meeting • Develop an agenda with the officers and advisor(s) • Choose an appropriate meeting time and length • Choose a location that is easily accessible for all members • Advertise the time and place of the meeting to your members During the meeting: • Greet the members and make them feel welcome • Start on time and end on time • Review and follow the agenda and set priorities for the meeting • Encourage group discussion and feedback • Keep minutes of the meeting and send them to all group members in case a question or problem arises • Summarize the accomplishments of that meeting and end on a unifying or positive note After the meeting: • Send the minutes of the meeting to all group members in case a question or problem arises • Discuss any problems that arose during the meeting and come up with ways to improve them • Put unfinished business on the agenda for the next meeting Managing Conflict The 8 essential steps to conflict resolution 1. Create an effective atmosphere 2. Clarify perceptions of the conflict What is everyone’s perception of the conflict? Is it relevant? 3. Focus on individual and shared needs 4. Build shared positive power This seeks to promote the constructive capabilities of all parties involved in a conflict 5. Look to the future, then learn from the past Use the past to see what might have gone wrong, then focus on the present-future to help under stand and act on the realization of the past

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Section 4: Organizational Practices Delegation, Leadership Transitioning, Teambuilding, Online Presence

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6. Generate options All parties must creatively suggest and imagine a wide range of possible ways to resolve the conflict 7. Develop “do-ables” – stepping stones to action A doable is an action that embodies the following: 1. It stands a good chance of being accomplished 2. It does not favor one party at the expense of other parties 3. It meets both shared and individual needs 4. It usually requires the participation of all parties 8. Make mutual-benefit agreements Mutual-benefit agreements must be built on clarified perceptions of the conflict, the partners involved in the conflict, and the specific steps each partner has agreed to take to improve the relationship They also replace demands and are built on “do-ables”

Delegation How should you delegate? • Clearly articulate the desired outcome • Clearly identify constraints and boundaries • If possible, include other members in the delegation process • Match the amount of responsibility with the amount of authority • Establish and maintain control When should you delegate? 4 main questions to ask yourself: 1. Does the task provide an opportunity to grow and develop someone’s skills? 2. Is this a task that will possible recur in the future? 3. Do you have enough time to delegate the job effectively? 4. Is this a task that I should delegate? Tasks for long-term success do need your attention Leadership Transitioning • Once new leader is elected, have a transition retreat with both old and new leaders • Encourage informal meetings between incoming and outgoing officers • Leave behind any files that will be helpful to the new leader (constitution, meeting minutes, organization passwords, etc) • Orient incoming officers to resources used in the past • Share effective leadership qualities and skills you previously learned • Share the organization’s structure and documents with the new leader • Outgoing, incoming, and Advisor should all meet to establish a lasting relationship Teambuilding There are many different ways to build a cohesive team. By being intentional about the teambuilding exercises and hosting a proper facilitation, groups will be able to see tangible results quickly. It’s important to set realistic expectations relative to the size of your organization. It’s more likely a group of seven will be able to find a team identity quicker than a group of 25. Below are some other notes about teambuilding to keep in mind: • Members will feel more connected to your group if they know other members better. • Formal team building activities can help with this as can informal get-togethers outside of your regular group meet- ings. Set goals for your group with the entire group if it’s small enough, or have the executive board set goals for the entire group. 7


Section 4: Organizational Practices Delegation, Leadership Transitioning, Teambuilding, Online Presence

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Online Presence DukeGroups.com Features of DukeGroups.com • You can link to and share content between your DukeGroups site and your organization’s social media platforms (Facebook, Twitter) • You can create “private” executive officer pages within your site to share information specifically with your organization’s leadership • A modern and effective way of advertising your organization’s events is through social media (facebook, twitter, flickr, etc) • Maintain accurate rosters • Host elections by uniqueID login

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Section 5: Finances

Accounts Student organization accounts, known as fundcodes, are opened approximately four weeks after a student organization is officially recognized AND listed in the DukeGroups.com directory. Fundcodes are unique seven digit numbers that are used to identify student organizations to reserve space and make financial transactions. Fundcodes should be kept private among the President, Treasurer, and Advisor of the organization. If you do not know your organization’s fundcode, visit or email the UCAE Business Office. Monthly financial statements are generated by fundcode; treasurers are expected to review these statements on a monthly basis by requesting it from UCAE Business Office. Funding The primary source of funding for SOFC-recognized groups will come from SOFC. In addition to recognizing and chartering student organizations, SOFC is charged with allocating a portion of the student activities fee to student organizations. Steps to apply for funding: 1. Download application from the SOFC website at dsg.dukegroups.duke.edu/sofc 2. Fill out event information (time, place, date, expected number of attendees, fundcode, etc) 3. Create a line item budget.

Bad Example: Non-specific, vague, requests are not direct quotes Item/Category

Request $200.00 $50.00 $250.00 $1,000.00 $25.00 $100

Food Decorations Venue Speaker Fee Advertising Misc. Total from this page

Granted

Amount Spent

$1,625.00

Good Example: Lists exact pricing, very specific, all within the scope of SOFC funding capabilities Item/Category

Request $85.20 $350.00 $1,000 $25.00

4 large pizzas from Lilly’s Pizza Great Hall (supervision and staff) Speaker fee for John Doe Posters, flyers, and DiDA board Total from this page

Granted

Amount Spent

$1,460.20

4. Submit application with SPECIFIC budget to SOFC at dukefunding@gmail.com at least 2 weeks before your event. 5. Wait to hear back on hearing date and time. 6. Present your proposed budget and be prepared to answer any questions SOFC may have. SOFC will contact within 48 hours of hearing.

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Section 5: Finances

Transactions All transactions of money through your fundcode must be initiated by the President, Treasurer, Advisor, or any specially designated members (social chair, philanthropy chair, etc.) and executed by UCAE Business and Finance. It is important that all transactions for your organization be made directly through your organization’s account. Students should not use departments to make purchases on behalf of their student organization. Purchasing, Payments, and Deposits There are multiple ways to make purchases out of a student organization account. The type of purchase method will depend on the vendor or purchase type. The list of forms can be found at studentaffairs.duke.edu/ucae/forms. Each type of purchase will require a form. Procurement Card Staff in UCAE Business and Finance have procurement cards (p-cards) for student organizations to use. Students must first fill out the P-Card Request Online Form found on the website. The advantage of using staff procurement cards is being taxexempt from North Carolina vendors and that no member has to purchase anything from their own pocket. Cash Advance Students have the option to get a cash advance from the cashier’s office. The maximum cash advance is $200 and will be posted to the student personal bursar account until receipts and leftover money has been returned. This is a good option if the vendor is cash only or if members do not wish to use personal funds. Interdepartmental Request and Invoice (IRI) This method of payment is used for internal purchases of the University. Purchases from the Lobby Shop for last minute drinks for an event or Great Hall for supervision and maintenance would be the most appropriate time to use the IRI form. The student will need a UCAE Business and Finance staff member to sign off on the IRI form prior to making any purchase. Students must then get a copy of the receipt to turn back in to UCAE. Reimbursements Students who make purchases on behalf of the organization may be reimbursed out of their student organization account. It can take up to 4 weeks to process the reimbursement so it is important that the student can afford and is willing to front the money knowing it may take 4 weeks to be reimbursed. It is not recommended that purchases over $200 be paid for out of pocket. It is important that the student is making purchases allowable by the University and is following University policies. T-shirts, mugs, towels, or any paraphernalia purchased on behalf of the student organization must use an approved licensed vendor. Students who do not use approved vendors and submit for reimbursement may not get reimbursed out of their student organization account. If students have any questions about this, they should email or visit UCAE Business and Finance. Check Request When organizations need to pay an individual or a vendor that only accepts checks, students will need to submit a four (4) documents. Checks generally take about three to four weeks to be processed so students should submit forms as soon as possible to ensure timely payment to vendors. 1. Account Payable (AP) Check Request form 2. W-9 of individual or vendor 3. Invoice or contract - documentation of agreed price. Students CANNOT sign any contract. Bring the contract to UCAE Conference and Event Services for assistance 4. Independent Contractor Checklist (ICC) 10


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Section 5: Finances

Transfer Organizations have the ability to transfer money from one fundcode to another for co-sponsorships or payment for services. Transfer forms are most commonly used when student organizations transfer unused money back to SOFC. Travel Travel forms are used when student organizations go on organization sponsored trips such as retreats, competitions, or conferences. Be sure to keep your receipts! Deposits A deposit form is used to deposit cash or checks into the student organization account. Organizations will typically use this method after collecting funds for a fundraiser. Budgeting Budgets are made up of general guidelines to outline expenses of an organization. UCAE Business and Finance does not have organization budgets; rather they can offer organizations their balance, which informs the budget. Currently there is not an online system available for students to view account balances. Students will need to contact UCAE Business and Finance to receive an account balance. Incoming executive board members should check their balance at the beginning of the academic year. Even though SOFC is a great resource to apply for funding, groups may have money in their account that rolls over year to year from fundraisers in years past or sponsorships the organization has gained over the years. Student organizations are not businesses; the goal is not to make money. Good budgeting and financial practices through a student organization lens means that an organization has spent about as much as they have received from fundraisers, SOFC, etc. Unless the organization is saving money from fundraisers to make a large purchase, account balances should be as close to zero ($0) as possible at the end of the academic year. Once the organization knows how much money is in their account, the treasurer, president, and advisor (and other relevant executive board members) should review the organization’s plan for budgeting. This is essential if the group has received annual budget funds from SOFC. To check which organizations have received annual budget money for the 2012-2013 school year, visit the SOFC website: http://dsg.dukegroups.duke.edu/get-funding/sofc/annual-budget/. Often times the previous year’s executive board will apply for the annual budget and not transition properly so the current executive board knows what the money was allocated for. Again, SOFC is likely to audit organizations that receive the annual budget, so it is imperative that your organization spends money only on what was allocated by line item. Approved line item budgets can be found on the annual budget page of SOFC’s website.

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Section 6: Programming Guide Why plan events?

Events are a great way to showcase student organizations. Programming events provides an outlet for creativity and experiences to complement or supplement the classroom experience. Programming events can provide a different avenue to experience culture, politics, recreation, and art. They build community and enroucarge collaborations. They range from academically focused and philantropic to social gatherings and political discourse. Whatever the occasion, well-planned events can contribute greatly to the daily life of the Duke community. Event Planning Questions to consider 1. Who is the target audience? 2. When is the most appropriate time to hold this event? 3. Where is the most appropriate venue to have this event? 4. What are the major expenses? What are the minor expenses? 5. Where is our funding source? 6. Who is helping plan? (securing venue, securing funds, advertising, content of event, etc) 7. Who is helping on the day of the event? (set-up, breakdown, etc) 8. What is the timeline from inception to execution? Be sure to include checkpoints! Target Audience It is important that the student organization always keeps the target audience in mind. Be realistic in setting this audience. Just because an event is open to the entire student body, doesn’t mean that “entire student body” is the target audience. The organization should ask itself, “Who would be interested in going to this event?” and “How do we get these students to our event?” Timing Finding the appropriate timing is two-fold. First the organization needs to see what other events are happening during there proposed event. If it’s homecoming weekend, a basketball night, or just other programs going on, the organization should really think critically at the timing of the event. Once a date has been confirmed, the organization needs to evaluate if the event is far enough ahead to plan and execute a successful program. Things to consider include: personal schedules (midterms, finals, travel), applying for funding and purchasing supplies, coordinating with venue, coordinating with catering, coordinating with speaker(s), executing publicity plan, etc. Venues Factors that will influence the venue will be anticipated size of the audience (again, just because it’s open to everybody, doesn’t mean that everybody will show up), type of event (speaker, dance performance, panel, social), and availability. Information about any venue on campus can be found on the UCAE Conference and Event Services (CES) website: events. duke.edu. UCAE CES manages and reserves various UCAE facilities including, but not limited to Bryan Center Plaza, West Main Quad, and Griffith Board Room. Depending on the venue selection, there may be requirements for ticketing through the Box Office, approved caterers, security or technical services. Organizations should consult with UCAE CES to ensure all venue policies are followed. UCAE Policies UCAE is a dynamic organization that aims to provide exceptional services. UCAE is constantly changing with the landscape of the University and adapting to student needs and culture. That being said, internal UCAE policies are also dynamic to make 12


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Section 6: Programming Guide UCAE Teams

the experience of student organizations and events as smooth and successful as possible. For the most up to date policies, please visit the UCAE website: studentaffairs.duke.edu/ucae. Students are expected to check the website regularly to stay informed on the most up to date policies. Non-event specific policies can be found in the “Policies” section of this handbook on page 15. Off-campus events Student organizations hosting off-campus events should refer to the “Off-campus event protocol” section on page 17. UCAE Teams Business and Finance The Business and Finance team serve every single area within UCAE by ensuring the flow of all financial information runs smoothly and appropriately as well as supporting student organization finance. The team also manages payroll, revenue collection, invoice payments, student p-card transaction, reimbursements and more. Conference and Event Services Whether it’s a theater, a meeting room, or the outdoor plaza, Conference & Event Services can assist with finding the right location, securing rentals, and working through the planning process from concept to completion. Leadership Development and Social Action The Leadership Development and Social Action Team is responsible for fulfilling the commitments laid forth in the 2011 Leadership Engagement Alliance Report, conducting seminars and workshops for students and staff on various topics, facilitating personal and professional development tools such as DiSC, the Life Values Inventory and StrengthsQuest, and many more programs and opportunities designed to enhance one’s knowledge, skills and abilities. Media Services Media Services provides professional media production services, from concept to completion, to the Duke University and Medical Center community. Whether it’s a live broadcast on a major news network, a field production unit ENG style, or a studio recording of a scripted program, our experienced staff of professionals can help you get the final product you need at market competitive prices. With a combined 80+ years of broadcast and studio production experience, our staff is ready to help. Special Event and Facility Operations Special Events Services provides a one-stop service approach for sponsors of special events throughout the campus including major University events such as Commencement, Convocation, and Alumni Reunions weekends as well as many of Duke’s athletic events. It also provides support services such as special event equipment including tents, stages, tables and chairs. Special Events acts as a referral for facilities and services provided by other Duke departments and off-campus commercial suppliers ensuring event sponsors find the best campus site for an event while helping to secure the services needed for the event at the lowest cost and highest quality. Student Involvement The Student Involvement Team is committed to providing a wide variety of ways for Duke undergraduate and graduate students to pursue their interests and actively engage in the Duke and Durham communities. We do this through advising student leaders, coordinating programs, and providing support for student organizations.

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Section 6: Programming Guide UCAE Teams

Technical Services Technical Services provides equipment and services across the campus. Our extensive inventory includes sound systems from a mic and podium to a concert PA. Audio-visual equipment includes digital portable projectors to good old fashioned slide projectors. We even have portable power distribution systems available in many West Campus locations and can arrange for large power portable systems when necessary. Our professional staff can deliver, set-up, and operate the equipment for your event. Technical Services assists departments and student organizations throughout the Duke campus including Duke Athletics, academic classes and meetings, student organized bands and speakers, and University-wide events such as Graduation and Convocation. Theater Operations Duke’s Theater Operations staff provides operational and technical support to theaters across campus, including Baldwin Auditorium, Page Auditorium, Sheafer Lab Theater, Reynolds Theater, and Griffith Film Theater. The department works with both producers and presenters in bringing the performing arts to the stage on campus. University Box Office and Visitor Information The University Box Office and Information Desk is located on the top floor of the Bryan Center. The Box Office is open weekdays from 11:00am - 6:00pm and one hour prior to events at performance venues. The Information Desk is open weekdays from 8:30am - 8:30pm and weekends from 10:00am - 8:30pm. To order tickets please visit our main website tickets.duke.edu.

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Section 7: Policies Policies

Listed below are the most relevant policies for student organizations. For the most up-to-date policies, make sure your check the UCAE website or appropriate office. Duke Community Standard The Duke Community Standard expresses a standard for behavior—a set of expectations of students who claim membership in Duke’s learning community. All incoming undergraduates, upon admittance to Duke, are required to sign a pledge to adhere to these values and to conduct themselves in accordance with these values throughout their undergraduate careers. Likewise, upon completion of each academic assignment, students may be asked to reaffirm their commitment to the Duke Community Standard by signing a statement indicating that they have adhered to the Duke Community Standard in completing the assignment. The Duke Community Standard, thus, is a statement of principles. The specific policies, or rules and regulations of the university, define the conduct for which students can be held accountable. Event Policies Students and student organizations may host events any time during the academic year, except during reading period, exams, and new student orientation, unless authorized by the vice president for Student Affairs, the vice provost and dean of undergraduate education, or their designee. The university reserves the right to withhold event hosting privileges if proper advance arrangements are not secured. For a comprehensive list of DCS policies related to events be sure to refer to the 2012-2013 Duke Community Standard. Noise Students and groups are expected to respect the rights of others at all times. During specified hours, higher noise levels are permitted but must remain at a level considerate of those students who wish to study or sleep: East, Central, West Campuses: Quiet hours are in effect at all times other than as noted below, when reasonable levels of noise will be permitted: 5:00 p.m.-7:00 p.m. Monday-Thursday 5:00 p.m.-2:00 a.m. Friday 1:00 p.m.-2:00 a.m. Saturday 1:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m. Sunday West Campus: Amplified sound is permitted on the Plaza between noon and 1 p.m. on weekdays. Events with alcohol Events with alcohol must: • Be designated as BYOB or distribution, but not both. A university-approved bartender must facilitate distribution. the area of distribution must be clearly defined and alcohol is not permitted outside of that area. Events with alcohol are subject to security coordinated by Duke Police and must follow the university alcohol policy. • Have one party monitor for every 25 expected guests. Gambling It is against North Carolina state law and Duke University policy to gamble, with the exception of the state lottery. A person/organization is gambling if he/she/it operates, plays, or bets at any game of chance at which any money, property, or other thing of value is bet. Raffles of any kind, including those sponsored by student groups, are also 15


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Section 7: Policies

prohibited. A “raffle” is defined as “a game in which the prize is won by random drawing of the name or number of one or more persons purchasing chances” (N.C.G.S. §14-309.15). Poker nights and casino games are permitted only if no admission is charged, no buy-in is required, and no real money is wagered. UCAE Policies UCAE is a dynamic organization that aims to provide exceptional services. UCAE is constantly changing with the landscape of the University and adapting to student needs and culture. That being said, internal UCAE policies are also dynamic to make the experience of student organizations and events as smooth and successful as possible. For the most up to date policies, please visit the UCAE website: studentaffairs.duke.edu/ucae. Students are expected to check the website regularly to stay informed on the most up to date policies. Trademark Licensing Trademark Uses That May Not Require Approval Some uses of Duke trademarks by Duke departments, groups and registered student organizations may not require prior approval from Duke’s Office of Trademark Licensing, including: • The use of Duke trademarks by Duke departments, groups, and registered student organizations in the ordinary course of conducting Duke business provided they make no changes to the design or approved colors of Duke trademarks, and adhere to the Guidelines contained in this policy. Examples include the use of unmodified Duke trademarks on stationery, business cards, reports, official Duke catalogs, publications, reports and similar materials, and materials used in academic courses. • Use of the Duke name or other of its trademarks in connection with news reporting and other fair uses that do not undermine Duke’s rights to its trademarks. Trademark Uses That Require Approval • All uses of Duke trademarks on products require prior approval from the Office of Trademark Licensing, even if the proposed uses do not involve the sale of a product; e.g., promotional items for conferences or meetings, items for fundraisers, items for giveaways, gifts, etc. • All uses of Duke trademarks on Internet websites, online publications, and in domain names require prior approval from Duke’s Office of Trademark Licensing. All other uses, except those listed above in the section “Trademark Uses That May Not Require Approval.” Domain Names No Duke student organization, or any individual acting on their behalf, may register a domain name that incorporates “Duke,” “Duke University,” “Blue Devils” or any other Duke trademark or variation or derivative thereof that may suggest an association with Duke without the prior written approval of Duke’s Office of Trademark Licensing. Products must be Purchased from Licensed Manufacturers Only (Duke Licensees) All products bearing Duke’s trademarks must be purchased only from Duke licensees. To ensure consistency in the use of Duke’s trademarks, and to ensure compliance with a wide range of requirements associated with the manufacture and use of Duke’s trademarks, products bearing Duke’s trademarks may be purchased only from companies that are officially licensed by Duke to manufacture or distribute products bearing its trademarks. There are some 400 companies officially licensed by Duke to manufacture products which bear Duke’s trademarks. Sweatshop Issues Duke is committed to conducting its business affairs in a socially responsible and ethical manner. Duke has taken a leadership role in efforts to ensure decent and humane working conditions in factories. Duke requires that all manufactur16


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Section 7: Policies

ers of products bearing Duke’s trademarks strictly adhere to a Code of Conduct in the manufacture of those products. Duke prohibits products bearing its trademarks from being manufactured in abusive and unfair labor conditions. Issues addressed in the Code of Conduct include, but are not limited to: wages & benefits, working hours, overtime compensation, child labor, forced labor, health and safety, non-discrimination, and harassment or abuse. In addition, Duke requires all of its licensees to publicly disclose the names and locations of all of their factories which manufacture products that bear Duke’s trademarks. Duke Licensees are required to subject those factories to independent monitoring of factory labor conditions through two organizations with which Duke is affiliated, the Worker Rights Consortium and the Fair Labor Association. Approval Process Send an e-mail to the Director of Trademark Licensing, Jim Wilkerson at jim.wilkerson@duke.edu. Include the following information: your department/organization, requestor’s name, e-mail address and telephone number, description of product(s) to be ordered, quantity desired, the date the product is needed, and artwork including all names/logos to appear on product. Please describe the purpose/event the product is being ordered for; the start and end date of the event; whether the product is being sold or given away; and if the product is being sold, where the proceeds from the sales will be directed. The review and approval process can take up to two weeks. Appropriate Use of Trademarks In instances where there is uncertainty regarding the appropriate use of any Duke trademarks, the Director of Trademark Licensing will consult with Duke’s Executive Vice President, the Senior Vice President of Public Affairs and Government Relations, and/or Duke’s Office of Legal Counsel. Duke reserves the right to disapprove any use of its trademarks, even if such use is not explicitly prohibited by this policy or these guidelines. Contact For the complete policy visit: http://www.trademarklicensing.duke.edu/policy.pdf. For further information or assistance, contact Duke’s Office of Trademark Licensing at 919-684-2065. Off-campus event protocol For all student groups organizing or participating in a field trip or sponsoring a special event off-campus, the Duke University Participation Agreement should be completed. Participation Agreement forms can be found on the Duke Corporate Risk Management website: http://finance.duke.edu/insurance/forms/index.php. Prior to the distribution of the participation agreement, the sponsoring campus group should send a copy of the participation agreement, accompanied by a description of the activity, to Corporate Risk Management. Corporate Risk Management will approve the form, and notify the appropriate department. All participating students or members should sign the form. The signed forms should be maintained by the sponsoring campus group.

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Section 8: Advisors Role of Advisors

Duke University requires that all recognized student organizations have an advisor. An advisor must be a full-time employee of Duke University, either as a faculty member or staff member. Student organizations are run and managed by students themselves, but advisors can play a key role in offering guidance and advice. The role of the advisor may not be clearly defined or presented in advance of the school year. Student organization advising is not a science; there is no equation that can be applied to make a successful advisor/advisee relationship; instead it is the art of human development and understanding the changing needs of a group. Advisors are also often seen as the knowledge holder for the group because of the transitory nature of student organizations. Here are some typical roles that advisors often find themselves in: • • • • • • •

Maintaining a consistent mentor relationship with organization officers (president, treasurer, etc.) Assisting in university policy interpretation for the group Mediating internal conflict Providing expertise in a specific area of study Assisting in connecting group with campus resources Advocating for the group within the university, department, or community Acting as the primary contact source from university administration in times of crisis, discipline, or disorganization.

It is recommended that students and advisors meet regularly (weekly, biweekly, monthly) to update each on the progress and status of the organization. The consistency and regularity that student and advisors should meet will vary depending on the nature of the organization and the schedules of each. Selecting an Advisor Organizations seek new advisors every year. While there is a benefit of having consistency from year to year, sometimes an advisor can get too busy, go on a sabbatical, leave Duke, or is no longer able to support the student organization. If the student organization is looking to find a staff or faculty that have similar interests as the organization, the corresponding department is a natural place to start. For example, if the organization is a performance group, the theater department may be ideal. Similarly if the organization is focused around a specific population, an identity center or language department may be best. Whatever the case may be, it’s important that the advisor and the students meet to discuss what the expectations are of each other. Liability Advisors do have potential liability exposure, and should understand their obligations to actively and effectively provide advice (“legal duty of care”) to the organization. Depending on the intended scope, comments could be as simple as “to the extent advisors become the subject of claims or other liabilities as a result of their role, they are covered by the University’s liability insurance programs so long as the alleged acts giving rise to the claims/liabilities fall within the scope of their official duties.” In addition to supporting student organizations, UCAE Student Involvement also does some support and provides resources for student organizations advisors. If advisors have any questions, they can email any of the team members of UCAE Student Involvement. 18


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Section 9: Risk Management

Types of Risk Physical Physical risks can include things such as food poisoning, injuries that may result in physical activities, injuries that may result from travel related accidents. It is important to ALWAYS take the appropriate precautions when your organization is selling/distributing food, hosting an athletic competition, or traveling for organization sponsored events. Duke Corporate Risk Management requires a participation agreement for all field trips or off-campus events to notify participants of potential risks in certain activities Reputation Reputational risks are those that may result in negative publicity for your organization, members of the organization, Duke, your advisor, or the venue where the event is held. Consult with your advisor if your organization has any question about the appropriateness of a flyer, an event name, or nature of an event. If you’re hesitant asking your advisor, it’s probably not appropriate. Emotional Emotional risks are those things that can cause a participant at your event or in your organization to feel alienated or cause emotional stress from the activity. Emotional stress (among other things) is a direct result of hazing and hazinglike activities. While an event or group activity may not be physically dangerous, emotional stress can have just a large an impact. Financial Financial risks are those things that negatively impact the fiscal stability of your organization and/or other organizations financially supporting your organization. It is imperative that the organization’s treasurer and rest of the executive board, including the advisor, stay informed and present about all aspects of the organization’s financial health. There are instances where unaccounted expenses may be charged to the organization’s account to put the organization in a deficit. An example of this would be when an organization uses a venue for free, but incurs a cleaning fee because the venue was left messy after the event. If the treasurer doesn’t regularly check the organization’s balance in the UCAE Business and Finance office, the organization runs the risk of an overdraft which incurs a monthly interest charge. Facilities Facility risks are those things that may prevent event from being held (weather, fire code, etc) or cause property damage. If your event or activity is held outside, it’s important to have a rain location or another date reserved in case of poor weather conditions. It is also important to pick an appropriate venue for the nature of your event as to prevent an damage to the facility and thus incur maintenance fees. Mitigating Risk There are several ways to mitigate risk but the basics of risk management come down to a cyclical process. Assess, Evaluate, Manage, and Measure. Managing risk is not an end product rather, it’s a constant process. First the organization needs to create a measurement of risk. Determine what is considered risky and what is not. If the organization has issues with this measurement, UCAE staff members will be happy to assist with this process. With any event or activity put on by the organization the organizers should always assess the risk involved. Next the evaluate how risky the different components of the event are. Finally determine how to manage and eliminate risks. 19


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Section 9: Hazing Policy

Hazing Policy Hazing is a serious infraction of university regulations. The potential for hazing typically arises as part of a student’s introduction to or initiation in an organization (fraternity, sorority, athletic team, or other group) in which there is often a perceived or real power differential between members of the organization and those newly joining it. Hazing defined. Hazing is defined as any action taken or situation created, whether on or off university premises, that is harmful or potentially harmful to an individual’s physical, emotional, or psychological well-being, regardless of an individual’s willingness to participate or its bearing on his/her membership status. Such activities and situations include, but are not limited to: Level I Violations • marching in line • road trips • wearing apparel which is conspicuous and not normally in good taste, and/or inappropriate for the time of year • calisthenics • line-ups • pledge/signature books • periods of silence • standing for a length of time • personal servitude • activities that would not normally construe hazing but because of time, place, or manner make them inappropriate Level II Violations • sleep deprivation or interruption of consecutive sleep hours • expected or forced consumption of food, drink (including alcohol), or other substance • acts of humiliation or degradation (including streaking or wearing degrading or humiliating apparel) • restrictions on eating or bathing • acts that disrupt academic instruction or learning of others • interruption or interference of academic commitments Level III Violations • branding • paddling in any form • compromising (sexual) situations Any individual or group found responsible for hazing will be subject to sanctions outlined in the disciplinary process, including, but not limited to: disciplinary probation, social suspension, suspension of charter, restrictions on member recruitment and/or group activity, removal of the individual from the group, loss of housing privileges, suspension, and/or expulsion. Sanctioning will increase with the level of violation and any previous hazing violations. (Levels of violation listed above are guidelines only and may change given particular circumstances of a violation.) Students should also be aware that hazing is a misdemeanor under North Carolina state law. Acts or potential acts of hazing may be reported to the Office of Student Conduct (919-684-6938) or Duke Police (911 or 919-684-2444 from non-campus phones). In addition, concerns may be reported confidentially via voicemail to the university’s Hazing Hotline at 919-684-5766.

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Section 9: Hazing Facts, Myths, Alternatives

Facts 1. 82% of deaths from hazing involve alcohol, according to noted hazing expert Hank Nuwer 2. Hazing is often about power and control. Hazers have a need to feel powerful and in control 3. Hazing is not just associated with athletes and Greek–letter organizations. It occurs across a wide spectrum of organizations. 4. You can never be sure you know the physical or mental background of an individual and what the effects of hazing for that person might be Myths 1. Hazing builds unity. Hazing builds animosity between people and does nothing to foster trust, unity or respect. It simply makes better hazers 2. The new members want to be hazed. Really? Then why don’t you advertise it in your Rush? 3. I went through it, so they should too! One class can break the “tradition” of hazing- it just takes some courage and integrity to do what is right. 4. I’ll never get caught or turned in! If you haze, there will be a time when even your friends will have to choose between you and their integrity and wellbeing. It is in their best interest to report the hazing, no matter who is involved. Also, someone may decide to come forward even after college and you can still be held accountable. 5. If they agree, then we’re not hazing. WRONG! Since peer pressure leads students to consent, the focus is on what you do, not whether they said you could. 6. Hazing motivates new members to be better. Hazing motivates no one. It hinders academic achievement, destroys self-esteem and causes emotional strain and physical harm. Alternatives to Hazing In general, groups should design new member activities that focus on the mission, purpose and function of the organization. If an activity doesn’t reflect favorably on the reason the group exists then another activity should be used. Commitment and dedication to the group’s values and purposes will come from actually engaging in activities that promote those values and purposes. • • • • • • • • • • •

Ropes/Challenge Course Outdoor Adventures through Campus Recreation Attend Duke sporting events in addition to basketball Do a hands-on service project for the elderly, children, etc. Attend campus special events (plays, concerts, lectures) as a group Invite alumni to campus for Homecoming activities Educational programming regarding the history of the group and/or the University Movie Night Group Dinners Community, campus or facility beautification projects Participate in a mentoring program *Facts, Myths, and Alternatives are adapted from the University of Michigan “See through the Haze” 21


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Section 10: Leadership Officer Responsibilities Officer Responsibilities

Officer responsibilities will vary depending on the size and culture of the organization. A president of a 100-member organization will have different duties of a president of a 10-member organization. It is important to have a constitution that clearly outlines officer responsibilities and to revisit these responsibilities semi-annually. Below are some general responsibilities each position may have. President • Oversee executive board meeting • Meet and communicate regularly with Advisor • Delegate tasks when appropriate • Assist in budgeting process • Represent organization in “big picture” meetings • Re-register organization yearly on DukeGroups.com • Taking advantage of collaborative opportunities Vice President • Assist president when needed • Oversee general body meeting • Manage day-to-day responsibilities of organization • Act as liaison to general body members • Assist in budgeting process • Responsible for building camaraderie within executive board and general membership Secretary • Maintain DukeGroups.com profile • Communicate updates to advisor and UCAE • Take and distribute minutes from the meetings • Record attendance at meetings and events • Send out emails from the organization • Maintain a membership roster on DukeGroups.com Treasurer • Check monthly balance with UCAE Business and Finance team. • Maintain financial records • Submit request for funding forms to SOFC and represent organization at hearings • Give balance updates at meetings • Oversee fundraising efforts Other positions to consider • Event Planning - becomes an expert on knowing how to plan events at Duke and the policies associated with event planning • Philanthropy - if the organization is philanthropic, this board member will charge those efforts • Advocacy - a board member that advocates on behalf of the student organization • Recruitment - charged with recruiting and organization activities fairs and general recruitment efforts • Publicity - does general advertising for organization and specific advertising for events held by the organization 22


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Section 11: Inclusivity Duke University Commitment

“We live, learn, and work in a world that is increasingly diverse, and it’s our diversity that adds depth, richness and excitement to the experience of being a part of the Duke community. As the demographic landscape continues to shift and expand on both a national and global level, so too the opportunities to expand our individual and collective knowledge, understanding and skills for working effectively with people who may have different world views, perspectives, backgrounds, values and experiences than our own. Creating a climate where everyone feels valued, respected and included is more important than ever.” – Office for Institutional Equity, Duke University “Faculty and students benefit most by interacting creatively and productively with the widest possible range of individuals, ideas and peoples. We seek to model and teach that the range of human differences in the classroom, in the hospital, and in our laboratories matters at Duke and in the world.” Making a Difference – Duke’s Strategic Plan Non-discrimination and Harassment Policy Duke University prohibits discrimination and harassment, and provides equal [membership] opportunity without regard to race, color, religion, national origin, disability, veteran status, sexual orientation, gender identity, sex, genetic information, or age. Campus Resources Center for LGBT Life The Center for LGBT Life provides education, advocacy, support, mentoring, academic engagement, and space for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, transsexual, questioning, and straight-allied students, staff, and faculty at Duke. Center for Multicultural Affairs The Center for Multicultural Affairs offers educationally based cross-cultural programs and providing technical support on multicultural issues for the university community. International House The International House provides educational services, advocacy, and outreach to the international population and the Duke/Durham community. Jewish Life at Duke Jewish Life at Duke works to foster and enrich Jewish life through social, educational, religious and cultural activities. Mary Lou Williams Center for Black Culture The Mary Lou Williams Center for Black Culture strives to promote racial understanding, build community, and foster an appreciation for and increase knowledge of Black people, Black history, Black culture, and the vast contributions of people of the African Diaspora. Muslim Life at Duke Muslim Life at Duke is committed to enriching the lives of Muslim students and the whole campus through organizing events and activities that cater to the spiritual, social and intellectual needs of Duke students.

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Section 11: Inclusivity

Women’s Center The Duke University Women’s Center is dedicated to helping every woman at Duke become self-assured with a kind of streetwise savvy that comes from actively engaging with the world. We welcome men and women alike who are committed to gender equity and social change.

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Section 12: General Resources

Duke Innovative Design Agency (DiDA) The Duke Innovative Design Agency (DiDA, pronounced dye-dah), sponsored by UCAE Student Activities, is a student-staffed marketing and design center founded as a resource for recognized student organizations at Duke. Visit dida.dukegroups.duke.edu for more information about services, sample works, or to submit a request. LAUNCH The mission of LAUNCH, a student-led program supported by UCAE Student Activities, is to enhance student involvement and leadership development at Duke University. The LAUNCH team provides web-based resources, individual and executive board appointments, retreat planning assistance and workshops to facilitate peer to peer development for the purpose of enhancing individuals and groups in the Duke community. Services Provided by LAUNCH • Individual Appointments: Assist students with finding involvement opportunities on campus. • Executive Board Appointments: Assist student organization executive boards with identifying areas for improvement and developing/implementing solutions. • Workshops: Provide advanced education and training on specific topics relevant to students and organizations. • Retreats: Help student organizations effectively plan retreats to maximize benefit for individuals attending and the organization as a whole. • Online Resources: Provide increased resources and make information available to students 24/7 via the LAUNCH website. Topic Areas LAUNCH Specializes In • Budgeting/Finance: How to create and manage a budget, fundraising tips, maximizing your organization’s money. • Transitioning: How to retain valuable information about an organization, effectively pass along that information to new leaders, and train and develop future leaders. • Public Relations: How to craft an image for your organization, repair a damaged image, and recruit new members. • Teambuilding/Retention: How to keep members engaged, build group cohesion, and facilitate team building activities. • Involvement: How to match interests with involvement opportunities and apply co-curricular involvement to post graduation goals. To learn more about the LAUNCH team, or to request one of our services, visit www.dukelaunch.org. Corporate Risk Management Corporate Risk Management works to ensure the safety of the people and assets of Duke University, guarding them from risk of injury or financial loss. The Corporate Risk Management Office manages the various insurance programs for the University, including property insurance, general liability insurance, and automobile insurance. As part of the overall goal to safeguard the resources of the University, Corporate Risk Management also works in partnership with Campus Police, the Occupational and Environmental Safety Office and the University Counsels’ Office to evaluate potential hazards. Visit http://finance.duke.edu/insurance/ to download participation agreements or request a certificate of insurance.

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Section 12: General Resources

Office of Trademark Licensing The mission of the Office of Trademark Licensing is to protect and promote the name(s), images, symbols, logos, and trademarks that are associated with Duke University’s name and its reputation as one of the finest universities in the country. To that end, the Office of Trademark Licensing provides information, guidelines, and procedures related to the use of Duke’s trademarks, in a manner that protects the integrity of the institution’s trademarks and ensures such trademarks are used in an appropriate manner. Duke’s Trademark Licensing Program is administered by Duke’s Office of Trademark Licensing and overseen by the Director of Trademark Licensing. Visit http://trademarklicensing.duke.edu/TrademarkLicensingPolicySO.html for a comprehensive list of all trademark licensing policies related to student organizations. University Archives Did you know that the documents, videos, photographs, posters, scrapbooks, and social media content produced by your student organization are part of Duke University’s history? The Duke University Archives wants to partner with you to make sure your organization’s legacy is documented for the future! The Duke University Archives, part of the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, preserves the official records of Duke University—everything from the school’s original constitution and the records of Duke’s presidents to the records that your student organization is going to produce this year. Before you take your organization’s records home for break, or file them away for next year’s organizational leadership, get in touch with the Duke University Archives and talk with us about transferring your paper or digital records to us, where they’ll be available for study by future group members and archival researchers alike. Or, check in with us to see what historical documentation on your organization we might already have. To get the conversation started, visit http://library.duke.edu/ uarchives/about/student-org-records.html.

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Duke Student Organization Handbook  

2012-2013 Student Organization Handbook