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THE

DURHAM ISSUE

THE LOCAL

SPOTS TOBACCO

TOWN

REVAMP

AMERICAN

SPIRIT ON THE

FARM INKED

OUR VERY OWN

OLYMPIAN

BULL

FALL 2012 DUKEFASHION.ORG

CITY ENTREPRENEURS 1


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EDITOR-IN-CHIEF GENEVIEVE WERNER EXECUTIVE EDITOR / CREATIVE DIRECTOR LAUREN BUDORICK FASHION DIRECTOR ART DIRECTOR CHIEF WEB / CMS / GRAPHICS DESIGNER PR DIRECTOR BLOG DIRECTOR / MARKET EDITOR BEAUTY DIRECTOR

KATE YANG BLAIR MELOCIK AARON RALES EMMA TUCCI ELLEN MISHLER SHANNON KALSOW

FASHION ASSISTANTS LAUREN ALEF KATIE CHAPLIN MARKET ASSISTANTS ELISE LANG ALISSANDRA HOLZER LAYOUT ASSISTANTS NICOLE ANTOINE ARIEL WAINER CHELSIA YU EILEEN LU BROOKE ALTMAN PHOTOGRAPHERS DAVID HENRY NATASIA LEUNG MICHELLE STACKMANN PR ASSISTANTS NICOLE STANNERS SABRINA TAGER RAANAH AMJADI BLOG EDITOR JENNA GREENSPAN CONTRIBUTING WRITERS RACHEL APOSTOLES RONNIE WIMBERLEY

Printed by United Graphics, Inc. Funded by the Undergraduate Publications Board of Duke University DUKEFASHION.ORG

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So we’re finally seniors. Having put in our time on East and West Campuses, and taken various summers and semesters across the country and around the world, we find ourselves in the Bull City for the home stretch. It’s been easy to go about the past three years caught up in campus life without really having explored all that Durham has to offer. News flash: Durham has more restaurants than Sushi Love and more cool streets than just Ninth. There’s a reason the New York Times listed us as one of the “41 Places to Go in 2011.” Scratch that; there are a lot of reasons.

creators, the self-starters, the dreamers. If we’ve taken one thing away from our experiences in making this issue it’s that the people of Durham are incredibly approachable—they’d love to talk, and to share their passions with you. From Duke grads to recent imports, from the born-and-breds to the couldn’tstand-the-concrete-jungles, you’d be surprised to meet all the people who call themselves locals. Go introduce yourself, ask questions, and don’t hold back—you might just end up with some free veggies or an extra dose of caffeine.

We’ve spent the past few months living, working, and spending a lot of free time in and around Downtown Durham, taking advantage of some of the great things it has to offer. And as we’ve grown to love Durham more and more, we realized that’s what we wanted to share with you. Befriending a local farm hand at the Durham Farmers’ Market turned into an 11-page fashion editorial. A (semi-impulsive) decision to get a tattoo lent itself to a profile on one of the most interesting tattoo artists in the Triangle. Working and living in converted tobacco warehouses piqued an interest in the urban revitalization efforts that have made Durham what it is. Seeking free wifi turned us on to the myriad of coffee shops just steps away from East. We want to spread our love for the Bull City and encourage you to experience the urban renaissance happening in our own backyard. Take advantage of the atmosphere of innovation. Be inspired by the

We hope this issue will serve as something of a roadmap you can use to explore Durham. We’ve rounded up some of our favorite under-the-radar eateries for you to visit, profiled local entrepreneurs and learned a bit of history along the way. Take note of the dynamic scenery we found in our photo shoots. Discover the local culture and change up your routine.

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We always love to hear from our readers—talk to us @dukefashionmag and share your impressions, encounters, and latest finds. Enjoy the issue!


CONTENTSFALL2012 from the editors 4 letter on why the “durham issue” reports 6 trend you need to know this fall backpack 10 the stands alone the farm 13 on inspired by nature spirit 24 american taking cues from the past johnston 32 abby needs no introduction

36 inked talking tattoos with a true artist DRM 40 run like nano does reborn 50 athecity urban renaissance durham list 54 the the spots you haven’t tried everything nice 58 coffee…and a tale of two entrepreneurs

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CAPE

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MIH Jeans cape blouse $216, Rick Owens fleece cape $763, Raccoon fur cape $253


Pull and Bear $64, Mango jacket $99.99, All Saints coat $495

MILITARY

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P E A S A N T

FALL 2012 BAND OF OUTSIDERS RTW

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Sestra Moja Waterfall dress $298, Ellos dress $70, Dorothy Perkins dress $49


NAVAJO

FALL 2012 MULBERRY RTW

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Anna Sui top $294, Maison Scotch9poncho $460


ark industries

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fj채llr채ven k책nken, $75

cooperative, $69, urban outfitters


vintage coach

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everlane, $65, everlane.com

herschel supply co, $55, madewell

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follow FORM @dukefashionmag

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photographed by Lauren Budorick

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Dress, stylist’s own. Boots, Joseph.

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Dress, FORM FALL 2012 14stylist’s own.


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Tank, Abercrombie & Fitch. Skirt, Kim15 chi & Blue. Necklaces, stylists’s own.


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Dress, Free People.

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Dress, Parker.19Necklace, stylist’s own.


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Shirt, stylists’s own.

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Cape, RD Style (Uniquities). Dress, Old Navy. FORM FALL 2012 24 Boots, Mossimo for Target. Necklace, stylist’s own.


photographed by Natasia Leung DUKEFASHION.ORG

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Sweater, Line (Uniquities). Skirt, Gap.

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Dress, Nasty Gal. Sweater, John Galt (Thread27 sence). Earrings, Maslo Jewelry (Uniquities).


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Jeans, Rag & Bone. Sweater, stylist’s own. 31 Bracelet, stylist’s own. Boots, Bonnibel.


OLYMPIC SILVER MEDALIST ABBY JOHNSTON ON DUKE AND DIVING. PHOTOGRAPHED BY GENEVIEVE WERNER 32

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I’m taking a year off before medical school. I haven’t decided if I’ll keep diving or not — part of me would love to continue, but I also want to pursue my career.

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Abby Johnston

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Life on campus is different because I am a fifth-year senior and don’t recognize a lot of underclassmen. It’s weird that the class I came to school with is gone and I feel a lot older than the freshmen. It’s also weird to pull up duke.edu and see my picture scroll by. Abby Johnston

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In London I loved watching other athletic competitions and cheering on my teammates. I spent most of my time in the village or going to sporting events because I figure I can always go back to London to sightsee! Abby Johnston

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BY LAUREN BUDORICK

It’s a slow, hot summer in the Bull City, and one that I could only describe as transformative— enlightening, even, and full of personal growth. There are things about it that beg to be remembered, that beg for some kind of mile marker. I’ve been thinking about a tattoo.

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A friend is in town visiting. She just wrapped up a cross-country road trip with a small lightning bolt tattoo she had done in LA. One of my roommates just got a tattoo. After over a year of careful consideration, he got a large elephant done on his upper back. She and I have a particularly life-affirming conversation that pushes my tattoo idea into the definitely-going-tohappen category. He’s got nothing but rave reviews for Dogstar Tattoo, the shop where he had his done: awesome space, great people, totally nonthreaten-


ing environment. Suddenly, I know it’s time. ◊ After receiving her BFA from Carnegie Mellon with a concentration in sculpture, Kathryn Moore went to flight school in Florida and then returned to the Triangle, where she had grown up. She found herself teaching out of a grass strip north of Durham and struggling to pay off her student loans while attempting to have time to create art. A friend suggested she try tattooing. She calls it a fluke, but she fell in love with it. “The industry was extremely different at the time,” Kathryn says. “Definitely not mainstream. There was one tattoo shop in Durham, and there are, I don’t know, twelve, at least, around now. And you just didn’t see it on everybody.” On top of that, Kathryn was different. A lot of the people in the industry at the time didn’t have a high school diploma, much less a BFA. And she was one of what she estimates were three women in the Triangle tattooing in the early nineties. Eventually she became fed up with being paid half of what male tattoo artists were paid, purely because she was a woman, and in 1997 she left and opened Dogstar Tattoo Company.

“One of the driving forces from the opening of the shop is I really wanted everyone to feel welcome when they came in here, where it was a much more nonthreatening environment. Women in particular—there was just a lot of weirdness that went into either getting a tattoo if you were a female or being a tattoo artist. So I wanted to change that. Also, the gay community was not necessarily welcome in shops; it was kind of homophobic. There was a lot of racism going on. And all of that just really bothered me. So Dogstar, it’s basically this safe place. That’s what I was after.”

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a friend suggested she try tattooing. she calls it a fluke, but she fell in love with it.

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S DOGTA ◊

It’s a Tuesday evening in early August and I’ve made a sameday appointment. I sent an image as a rough idea of what I want my tattoo to look like, and Kohen, who is one of Dogstar’s four tattoo artists and will be doing my tattoo today, adjusts the edges and the size to exactly how I envision it. Before too long the machine is running, and I’m being inked. For life. Many of Kathryn’s clientele, though, come in for more complex pieces. Having been established in the area for so long, she’s known for a particular style of artwork. She

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likes to do big, more conceptual work, which she attributes to her background in three-dimensional art. I ask her about the longest tattoo she’s ever done. It was eleven hours, on a friend—she wouldn’t do that on a customer. “It was brutal.” She prefers to work for two hours at a time, although she’ll do up to five and a half if someone is traveling and absolutely needs to get something done. The weirdest she’s done? “I did a self-portrait on someone once, which I find to be just a little peculiar … But you know, if that’s what she wanted, then

the machine is running, and i’m being inked. for life.

I was happy to do it for her.”

Kathryn uses art nouveau a lot as a reference; she likes the flowing, curvy lines. She likes work that relates to the body as a whole, and a person’s anatomy, their changing muscle structure, carries considerable weight in her designs. With a laugh, she calls her design pro-


A TATT T O R O cess “glacially slow;” it often takes her a couple of months to get through a whole tattoo, because she’s got so much large work going on, but it can stretch out up to two and a half years. ◊ The first thing that strikes me about Dogstar when I walk in is how interesting the interior looks—nothing like the tattoo shops I’ve ever pictured. It fills a prime corner space in the recently renovated Golden Belt, off of Main Street on the eastern edge of the downtown area. It’s spacious, bright, and strangely peace-

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ful, I think, for a tattoo shop.

is flooded with natural light.

Two years ago, when Dogstar moved into this space, Kathryn chose it over the other warehouse renovations in Durham primarily for costeffectiveness. She also liked that the entire complex is Gold LEED-certified, and one of the buildings is filled with artists’ studios. In designing the space, Kathryn was going for “Asian industrial”—modern but not too cold or hard, softened with an Asian influence, utilizing a lot of wood and natural materials, “so it doesn’t feel impersonal.” All of the interior walls stand a foot off the ground, so the space

Dogstar, according to Kathryn, gets all types of people. In fact, she sees many corporate types—“they have enormous work done, but they’re wearing a suit and tie, so you would never know it to look at them”—and all ages, up to 65 or 70. She says there’s definitely been an increase in acceptance of tattoos since she’s been in business; it’s much more mainstream now. “When I got into [tattooing] it was a lot more rough and tumble, kind of that street culture, underground—very, very dif-

ferent. It’s an industry that’s cleaned up its act quite a bit.”

Kathryn says she sees people come in for all kinds of reasons: spiritual, self-affirmative, grieving, reclaiming one’s body. Mine, I would say, is a highly personal self-affirmation and a visible reminder of many of my values and experiences. It’s a mark of reclamation after some changes and events, and it’s a symbol of all that I am and all that I strive to be. Oh, and it looks pretty cool. So, hey—I’ll show you mine if you show me yours.

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photographed by David Henry FORM FALL 2012


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Jumpsuit, Zara. Shoes, 41 Comme des Garรงons


Dress, BCBGeneration. FORM FALL 2012 42 Shoes, Nike.


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Shirt, stylist’s own. Shorts, C9 by Champion. Headphones, Beyerdynamic. 43 Shoes, Nike.


Shoes, Nike.

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THE STORY OF DURHAM, FROM TOBACCO TOWN TO A MODERN CITY OF INNOVATION. STORY, Ronnie Wimberley PHOTOGRAPHS, Michelle Stackmann

West Village, Brightleaf Square, American Tobacco, Durham. A hustling and bustling city, Durham, has brought new life to itself within the past three decades creatively employing old tobacco factory warehouses to host businesses and residents. And housekeeping has certainly had its effects: Durham is responding. Revitalization continues with several multi-million dollar investments underway and in the making. This new growth spurt has brought with it a recharged citizenry along with the capability to accommodate youth and visitors, and to enliven upscale life in Durham. The city is on track for a bright future, while also remaining firmly rooted in the tobacco foundations of its past. Capitalizing on underused factory resources to build prospects for a fresh and dynamic city scene, architects have maintained strong ties to Durham’s formative history. The architectural

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achievements are directly attributed to the impressive integration of the old and new, and the surprising success of the old to new. Mr. Howard Wood, a volunteer tour guide who employs his expertise about the city to keep its rich history alive, retells the story of the Duke family’s monopoly on tobacco in the late 19th and 20th centuries. The Sherman Anti-Trust Act broke the monopoly apart, spawning the proliferation of a number of smaller tobacco companies that gave rise to the great number of warehouses still sprawled throughout the city today. Tobacco prominence fell and warehouses were abandoned, full of latent potential that would later allow the city of Durham to seize the strategic opportunity. Warehouse renovations date back to November of 1981 when the new Brightleaf Square officially opened to the public, propelling the remodeling trend in full swing today. “In July 2008, the [Golden Belt] complex opened for business with 35 artist studios and 37 apartments, along with office space for the city of Durham,” says Gary Kueber of OpenDurham.org, a personal initiative to protect Durham’s history and provide easy access to information about its past. The American Tobacco District, Erwin Mills, West Village, and Diamond View III, among other renovations, not only encourage visitors and tourism, but also create spaces, residences, and resources for a dynamic Durham community. Durham’s rapid growth and development during its tobacco monopoly signified the potential of its future, laying the grounds for important research institutions DUKEFASHION.ORG

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like Duke University as well as the city’s attraction as the “Foodiest Small Town in America.” Such a future included a burst of

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population growth and economic activity in the following years. After a decade-long population stagnancy in the ’70s, Durham’s population expanded nearly 30 percent

over the course of the ’80s, the same decade Brightleaf was remodeled. Since then, the population has continued growth at roughly the same rate decade after decade. Hopes are


high for Durham and its track record so far hasn’t been bad, but new projects like the Chesterfield Building predict even more success. Once touted as the “world’s most modern cigarette factory” in the ’40s and ’50s, the Chesterfield Building is now next

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in line for a major renovation. Durham’s future is intimately tied to its past. And as Durham opens its arms wide to a wave of developments, citizens and students alike stand poised as the city’s population

to inform the metropolitan reorganization effort, and to act as fundamental to the formation, growth, and establishment of a new and improved Durham, North Carolina.

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coffee BEYU CAFFE 335 w. main street @beyucaffe

Don’t miss live jazz music on Fridays and Saturdays, 9pm-midnight Catch their Monday night study halls for $1 coffee, $2 lattés & cappuccinos (6pm-close) Try a pumpkin spice latté

BLEND 807 e. main street @blendgoldenbelt

Pick your own flavors and they’ll blend you custom froyo on the spot Look for their food truck (find it by following them on Twitter) Choose one of their 8-9 teas and 5-6 coffee flavors

RESPITE 115 n. duke street @respitecoffee

Don’t miss their weekly Wednesday delivery from Crumb bakery Reserve their study room for group projects Try a Mayan mocha

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pastries CUPCAKE BAR 101 e. chapel hill st. @thecupcakebar

Don’t miss their mojito-flavored cupcake Won’t find a traditional bar menu, but will find alcohol in the frosting Try a frosting shot

DAISY CAKES 401 foster street @daisycakesNC

Don’t miss their extended Saturday menu (8 am-3 pm) Order birthday cakes 48 hours in advance Try cake in a cup

NINTH ST BAKERY

136 e. chapel hill st @ninthstbakery Don’t miss falafel Fridays Catch their weekly Friday “After Hours” for live music Try the kombucha

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eats OLD HAVANA 310 e. main street @oldhavanaeats

Don’t miss the hot sauce, an original Haitian family recipe This Cuban sandwich shop is the real deal: the owners met in Old Havana, Cuba Try the bestselling Havana or El Caney

PIZZERIA TORO 105 e. chapel hill st. @pizzeriatoro

Don’t miss the backroom bar Come back often for their daily menu Try a wood-fired pizza

THE REFECTORY 2726 chapel hill blvd @refectory

Don’t miss: all of your old favorites! Catch their new food truck, Curbside Kitchen, at the Farmer’s Market Try the outdoor seating, made of wood from the collection of J.D. Poe

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coffee chocolate tea spice

everything nice

How Areli Barrera de Grodski and Leon Grodski de Barrera turned an epicurean and intellectual love for coffee and chocolate into bikeCOFFEE and now Cocoa Cinnamon—that is, into their way of life.

STORY, Rachel Apostoles PHOTOGRAPHS, Genevieve Werner

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Getting around the rustic brick building at 420 W. Geer St. requires a certain degree of dexterity and athleticism. Luckily for me, I am led by Areli Barrera de Grodski, a petite, pixie-like woman, who has memorized every inch of the building and moves nimbly about the space, sidestepping cinderblocks and bounding over plywood boards. As she gives me a tour of what will become Cocoa Cinnamon, a coffee, chocolate, tea and spice lounge (the word café does not suffice), Areli’s face lights up. It is clear that she sees something entirely different in the space than I do. Where I see a curved metal cabinet, Areli sees a functional piece of art designed in the style of Austrian architect Friedensreich Hundertwasser—a statement on the boundaries of time and space. Where I see primed white walls, Areli sees a rich golden color, which will embody the warmth and iridescence of a mustard seed. For Areli and her husband Leon Grodski de Barrera, this space is the physical incarnation of their dreams, and they have carefully considered every detail in making that dream a reality. Leon and Areli met eight years ago in Cherokee, North Carolina while working at a café. The two connected over their love for coffee and chocolate, not only on an epicurean level but also on an intellectual level— intoxicated by their intricate histories and narratives. Six years later, their friendship developed into a romantic relationship, and the two got married. They decided to leave Cherokee in search of their own beginning together, and they found that beginning in Durham. After making their home in Durham’s vibrant Central Park District, Leon and Areli began considering how to establish themselves in the local food scene and engage with the Durham community. They could not get into the competitive Durham farmers’ markets, and they did not have the financial capital to open their own brick and mortar shop. Serendipitously, the answer came to Leon in a dream. “It was funny because we were visiting back home at my sister’s house,” said Areli. “And Leon just woke up and said ‘I got it, I know how

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we are going to start in Durham: bikeCOFFEE.’” They had the concept: bring coffee to the people, quite literally, on a bicycle. Now, it was time to figure out the logistics of the operation. Taking inspiration from Espressomanden (or “Espresso Man”), a one-man coffee bike operation from Copenhagen, the couple purchased an industrial bike frame from a retailer in Queens, NY and began tinkering with the bike’s design to minimize weight and maximize space. The couple found unexpected help from many of Durham’s artists and craftsmen while working in sculptor Al Frega’s cooperative workspace. Craftsmen generously gave their time and expertise to help Leon and Areli complete the bike.

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“That’s when we knew that Durham was the right place,” Areli said. “We felt this warm sense of community already.” With the bike complete, Leon and Areli soon realized that they would have to revise their initial plan to serve espresso drinks, given the bike’s already substantial weight. They decided to focus on sourcing organic, fair trade that they hand brew for customers on the bike. Apart from their rotating selection of coffees, Leon and Areli also created a robust menu of specialty drinks, all of which pay homage to the history of coffee in a deliberately playful way. Instead of relying on processed syrups and sweeteners to flavor their drinks, Leon and Areli turn to more intense


spices like ginger and cracked black pepper. “It’s interesting because spices really aren’t new at all,” muses Leon. “If you go to the Middle East where some of the first coffee cultures started, putting spices and rose water into your coffee is some of the most normal thing in the world. So we have kind of awakened these traditions in our recipes. Some of them come from stories we have read, some come out of cacao stories.” The Durham community has embraced both bikeCOFFEE and Areli and Leon’s intellectual approach to coffee, chocolate and tea, which has given them the footing they need to begin work on their brick and mortar shop, Cocoa Cinnamon. They have become accidental carpenters, electricians, and painters, laboring to create a space that is equal parts community house, indulgence room and home away from home. The couple has once again felt the support of the Durham community in constructing Cocoa Cinnamon, relying on their talented lot of friends to actualize their dreams. Friend and design consultant David Solow has helped them cultivate the space’s aesthetic. Another friend, artist Heather Gordon, has offered to paint a conceptual mural on the shop’s floor, transforming binary code into an imaginative discussion piece. They envision a space that inspires conversation and engagement with different people and ideas, but at the same time has lightness about it. Explaining his vision, Leon says “it’s like Shakespeare— you can laugh at the dirty jokes, but at the same time, you are getting your mind blown.” Chatting with the couple in what will soon become the main seating area, I, too, can see it and believe it.

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special thanks MODELS

celine esgin nano anderson shibani das aharon walker ryan murphy

FRIENDS OF FORM

abby mathieson adrienne castro allison rhyne audrey melville elizabeth chaplin louisa ballhaus meredith birely morgan wiley rachel bowley

…and a huge thanks to UNIQUITIES, which has been an invaluable partner since our beginnings. Visit their location on Main Street to purchase many of the clothes featured in this issue.

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FORM Fall 2012 – The Durham Issue