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Monday, November 23, 2009 • Volume 11, Issue 45

2009 H1N1 Influenza Vaccination Clinic An additional supply of 2009 H1N1 vaccine has arrived at Duke University Medical Center, and a portion has been allocated for employee vaccination. A vaccination clinic will open as listed below for weekend staff with patient contact. There will be vaccine available until the supply is exhausted. Required Action: Please bring your Duke ID badge. Please also review the attached vaccine information sheet and print and complete the attached consent form. Date and Time: Saturday, November 21, 2009 from 7:30 a.m. to Noon

Comings and Goings in the Department We wish a fond farewell and good luck to Jin Yong Jung, MD, PhD who will be resigning from our department on November 25, 2009. Jin was a Visiting Research Scholar working in the Basic Sciences Division.

November 23-29 Birthday Wishes Eric Alford Dr. Matthew Atkins Leslie Cline Eugene Hobbs Dr. Andrew Meyer Priscilla Neighbours

Bradley Norden Flora O’Brien Nilam Patel Janeka Purnell Dr. Allison Ross Dr. Marcy Tucker

Note: If you do not want your name listed here, please send a removal notice to keith010@mc.duke.edu.

Location: In front of Duke North 2000 lecture halls (Directions: Take the visitor elevators to the second floor. Then, cross the footbridge in front of you, and you will see the lecture halls).

Department of Anesthesiology Research Conference

Monday’s from 5-6 pm in 5685-HAFS

Questions?: Please e-mail: EOHW@mc.duke.edu We will continue to provide vaccine to our patients, families and staff as we receive additional shipments. For vaccine updates, please visit our staff intranet site: http://intranet/H1N1/default.aspx For information about current vaccine locations for patients, please visit: http://dukehealth.org/flu

December 14, 2009

Holiday Special The Thanksgiving Story - Page 4

You and a guest are invited to attend the

Department of Anesthesiology

Annual Holiday Party Saturday, December 19, 2009 7 p.m. - 10 p.m. Durham Marriott Hotel 201 Foster Street

Please RSVP by December 5, 2009 to AnesEvts@notes.duke.edu http://anesthesiology.duke.edu

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This Month in the Department of Anesthesiology November 2009 MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

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7:15-8:00 a.m., RM203-Pain Clinic MRC Pain Conference

5-6 p.m., 5685-HAFS CT Conference: CANCELLED

6:15-7:15 a.m., 5685-HAFS CT Anesthesia Fellow/Faculty Preceptor Seminar: CANCELLED

THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY

2:30-3:30 p.m., VAMC VA Echocardiography Conference

5-6 p.m. 6686-HAFS GVTCCM Conference: “Faculty Nuts & Bolts” - Richard Moon, MD IRB Deadline: Submit 1 original and 3 copies to Dr. Gan’s office by 5 p.m.

6:30 a.m., 2001DN Resident Conference Lecture: “Postoperative Pain Management” Joshua Dooley, MD 7:15 a.m., 2001DN Grand Rounds: “Acupuncture” Grace McCarthy, MD 5 p.m., Chen Conference Room Neuroradiology Conference

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December 1, 2009

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7:15-8:00 a.m., RM203-Pain Clinic MRC Pain Conference

5-6 p.m., 5685-HAFS CT Conference

6:15-7:15 a.m., 5685-HAFS CT Anesthesia Fellow/Faculty Preceptor Seminar

7:15-8:00 a.m., RM203-Pain Clinic MRC Pain Journal Club

6:30 a.m., 2001DN Resident Conference Lecture

12:00-12:45 p.m., 2003DN Critical Care Grand Rounds: “Anti-fungals in the ICU” - Aimee Zaas, MD

2:30-3:30 p.m., VAMC VA Echocardiography Conference

5-6 p.m. 6686-HAFS GVTCCM Conference: “Anesthetic Implications of Heritable Diseases of Collagen: Osteogenesis Imperfecta & Ehlers-Danlos” - Nicole Guinn, MD

7:15 a.m., 2001DN Grand Rounds: “Intestinal Transplantation: Coming Soon to an OR Near You” - Stephanie McGuire, MD

4-5 p.m., 5680A-HAFS Pediatric Conference 5-6 p.m., 7863A-HAFS Resident Education Sessions: “Pacers & AICDs” - Kevin Thomas, MD

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7:15-8:00 a.m., RM203-Pain Clinic MRC Pain Conference

5-6 p.m., 5685-HAFS CT Conference

6:15-7:15 a.m., 5685-HAFS CT Anesthesia Fellow/Faculty Preceptor Seminar

7:15-8:00 a.m., RM203-Pain Clinic MRC Pain Journal Club

6:30 a.m., 2001DN Resident Conference Lecture

12:00-12:45 p.m., 2003DN Critical Care Conference: “NICU M&M”

2:30-3:30 p.m., VAMC VA Echocardiography Conference

5-6 p.m. 6686-HAFS GVTCCM Conference: Professor Tim Short

7:15 a.m., 2001DN Grand Rounds: “Clinical Case Conference: The Failed Spinal Anesthetic” - Cheryl A. Jones, MD

4-5 p.m., 5685-HAFS Executive Team Meeting 5-6 p.m., 5685-HAFS Faculty Meeting

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4-5 p.m., 5680A-HAFS Pediatric Conference

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7:15-8:00 a.m., RM203-Pain Clinic MRC Pain Conference

5-6 p.m., 5685-HAFS CT Conference

6:15-7:15 a.m., 5685-HAFS CT Anesthesia Fellow/Faculty Preceptor Seminar

7:15-8:00 a.m., RM203-Pain Clinic MRC Pain Journal Club

6:30 a.m., 2001DN Resident Conference Lecture

12:00-12:45 p.m., 2003DN Critical Care Grand Rounds: “Ian Welsby - RV dysfunction and pulmonary hypertension” - Ian Welsby, MD

Don’t forget, the 2009 Department Holiday Party is tomorrow, Saturday, December 19, 2009 at the Durham Marriott Hotel, Downtown Durham from 7 to 10 p.m.

2:30-3:30 p.m., VAMC VA Echocardiography Conference

5-6 p.m. 6686-HAFS GVTCCM Conference: Aaron Sandle, MD

4:30-6 p.m., 6686-HAFS Resident Evaluation Committee Meeting 5-6 p.m., 5685-HAFS Department Research Conference

7:15 a.m., 2001DN Grand Rounds: “Analgesic Adjuncts” - Ashraf Habib, MD

4-5 p.m., 5680A-HAFS Pediatric Conference

5:30-6:30 p.m., 5680A-HAFS Perioperative Leadership Group Meeting

Upcoming Events: 2009 Department Holiday Party: December 19, 2009 | Durham Marriott Hotel | Durham, NC 2010 Academic Evening: Tuesday, May 18, 2010. Please mark your calendars. 2010 Resident Graduation Banquet: Saturday, June 12, 2010 | Hope Valley Country Club | Durham, NC

http://anesthesiology.duke.edu

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ANESTHESIOLOGY CME ACTIVITIES

Departmental CME Activities 4th Annual Winter Anesthesia and Critical Care Review February 28-March 5, 2010 | The Canyons Resort, Park City, UT For more information, contact Katherine Siler: siler006@mc.duke.edu.

Winter Conference special rate for all Duke faculty & CRNAs: $200 for CRNAs, $250 for faculty. Must register by December 31. See Katherine Siler for registration form. This five-day course will focus on reviewing concepts and new advances in pain management, regional anesthesia, critical care, cardiac anesthesia and pediatric anesthesia.

Carolina Cadaver Course

May 22-23, 2010 | The Duke School of Nursing, Durham, NC For more information, contact Kate Shaw: katerahere@gmail.com. This activity is designed to educate or refresh the knowledge of practicing anesthesiologists, critical care specialists, and certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNAs) in the anatomical requirements, techniques, and side effects of ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia and peripheral nerve blockade.

3rd Annual Emerging Technologies in the OR

June 6-9, 2010 | Disney’s Yacht and Beach Club Resort, Lake Buena Vista, FL For more information, contact Katherine Siler: siler006@mc.duke.edu.

13th Annual Duke Cardiothoracic Update and TEE Review Course August 5-8, 2010 | Sea Pines Resort, Hilton Head Island, SC For more information, contact Jaime Cooke: jca24@notes.duke.edu.

Mark your calendars for another year of cutting-edge research and updated information designed for medical personnel of all skill levels. NEW FOR THIS YEAR! Critical Care Track!

Ultrasound Guided Regional Anesthesia Preceptorship Course 2009-2010 Dates Available | Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC For more information, contact Katherine Siler: siler006@mc.duke.edu.

Participants in the Duke Preceptorship will spend three days in the regional block area, operating rooms and on the floor with post surgery patients observing ultrasound guided single shot nerve blocks and catheter techniques in a wide variety of clinical scenarios. They will learn how to set up the block area for maximum efficiency in the OR environment, improve their decision making ability and make choices in the performance of regional anesthesia. A one-on-one discussion with the Duke Faculty member reviewing cases, scanning techniques and the image library as well as covering handout materials will augment the preceptorship experience.

Visiting Preceptorship in Intraoperative Transesophageal Echocardiography 2009-2010 Dates Available | Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC For more information, contact Jaime C. Cooke: jca24@notes.duke.edu.

Participants in the Duke Intraoperative TEE Preceptorship spend one three-day session in the cardiac operating suites, observing techniques of intraoperative TEE and interpretation of images. Preceptors will participate in active discussions with cardiothoracic anesthesia faculty and fellows, and learn the basic TEE exam. They will also learn how to troubleshoot difficult cases and enhance their decision-making skills in the operating room. Cases will be reviewed with fellows and faculty and images from pathology libraries will be used to augment the preceptorship experience.

http://anesthesiology.duke.edu

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THE BACK PAGE The Thanksgiving Story Copyright © 1997-2009 by Jerry Wilson

Most stories of Thanksgiving history start with the harvest celebration of the pilgrims and the indians that took place in the autumn of 1621. Although they did have a three-day feast in celebration of a good harvest, and the local indians did participate, this “first Thanksgiving” was not a holiday, simply a gathering. There is little evidence that this feast of thanks led directly to our modern Thanksgiving Day holiday. Thanksgiving can, however, be traced back to 1863 when Pres. Lincoln became the first president to proclaim Thanksgiving Day. The holiday has been a fixture of late November ever since. However, since most school children are taught that the first Thanksgiving was held in 1621 with the pilgrims and indians, let us take a closer look at just what took place leading up to that event, and then what happened in the centuries afterward that finally gave us our modern Thanksgiving. The Pilgrims who sailed to this country aboard the Mayflower were originally members of the English Separatist Church (a Puritan sect). They had earlier fled their home in England and sailed to Holland (The Netherlands) to escape religious persecution. There, they enjoyed more religious tolerance, but they eventually became disenchanted with the Dutch way of life, thinking it ungodly. Seeking a better life, the Separatists negotiated with a London stock company to finance a pilgrimage to America. Most of those making the trip aboard the Mayflower were non-Separatists, but were hired to protect the company’s interests. Only about one-third of the original colonists were Separatists. The Pilgrims set ground at Plymouth Rock on December 11, 1620. Their first winter was devastating. At the beginning of the following fall, they had lost 46 of the original 102 who sailed on the Mayflower. But the harvest of 1621 was a bountiful one. And the remaining colonists decided to celebrate with a feast -- including 91 Indians who had helped the Pilgrims survive their first year. It is believed that the Pilgrims would not have made it through the year without the help of the natives. The feast was more of a traditional English harvest festival than a true “thanksgiving” observance. It lasted three days. Governor William Bradford sent “four men fowling” after wild ducks and geese. It is not certain that wild turkey was part of their feast. However, it is certain that they had venison. The term “turkey” was used by the Pilgrims to mean any sort of wild fowl. Another modern staple at almost every Thanksgiving table is pumpkin pie. But it is unlikely that the first feast included that treat. The supply of flour had been long diminished, so there was no bread or pastries of any kind. However, they did eat boiled pumpkin, and they produced a type of fried bread from their corn crop. There was also no milk, cider, potatoes, or butter. There was no domestic cattle for dairy products, and the newly-discovered potato was still considered by many Europeans to be poisonous. But the feast did include fish, berries, watercress, lobster, dried fruit, clams, venison, and plums. This “thanksgiving” feast was not repeated the following year. Many years passed before the event was repeated. It wasn’t until June of 1676 that another Day of thanksgiving was proclaimed. On June 20 of

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that year the governing council of Charlestown, Massachusetts, held a meeting to determine how best to express thanks for the good fortune that had seen their community securely established. By unanimous vote they instructed Edward Rawson, the clerk, to proclaim June 29 as a day of thanksgiving. It is notable that this thanksgiving celebration probably did not include the Indians, as the celebration was meant partly to be in recognition of the colonists’ recent victory over the “heathen natives,” (see the proclamation). A hundred years later, in October of 1777 all 13 colonies joined in a thanksgiving celebration. It also commemorated the patriotic victory over the British at Saratoga. But it was a one-time affair. George Washington proclaimed a National Day of Thanksgiving in 1789, although some were opposed to it. There was discord among the colonies, many feeling the hardships of a few pilgrims did not warrant a national holiday. And later, President Thomas Jefferson opposed the idea of having a day of thanksgiving. It was Sarah Josepha Hale, a magazine editor, whose efforts eventually led to what we recognize as Thanksgiving. Hale wrote many editorials championing her cause in her Boston Ladies’ Magazine, and later, in Godey’s Lady’s Book. Finally, after a 40-year campaign of writing editorials and letters to governors and presidents, Hale’s obsession became a reality when, in 1863, President Lincoln proclaimed the last Thursday in November as a national day of Thanksgiving. Thanksgiving was proclaimed by every president after Lincoln. The date was changed a couple of times, most recently by Franklin Roosevelt, who set it up one week to the next-to-last Thursday in order to create a longer Christmas shopping season. Public uproar against this decision caused the president to move Thanksgiving back to its original date two years later. And in 1941, Thanksgiving was finally sanctioned by Congress as a legal holiday, as the fourth Thursday in November.

Classifieds Wanted Looking for an occasional dog-sitter. Mona is a spayed 45 lb. rescued shelter dog. Excellent health, house broken, no bad habits, doesn’t bark, and really enjoys a walk! A bit shy, but warms up quick and is a great companion. Gets along well with kids. Not trying to give her away but trying to avoid putting her in a kennel on vacations. First date is early December. Will pay kennel rates. Please contact David Warner at david.warner@duke.edu if interested.

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11-23-09