Page 1

Recess

University

RECESS REVIEWS MACHINAL PLAY

Q&A WITH GRADUATE STUDENT ON MEN’S FASHION STARTUP

RECESS PAGE 3

PAGE 2

The Chronicle T H E I N D E P E N D E N T D A I LY AT D U K E U N I V E R S I T Y

XXXXXDAY, APRIL THURSDAY, MMMM3,XX, 2014 2013

DUhatch showcases student ideas

WWW.DUKECHRONICLE.COM

ONE ONEHUNDRED HUNDREDAND ANDEIGHTH NINTH YEAR, YEAR, ISSUE ISSUE XXX 107

Small Town attracts big crowd

by Kirby Wilson THE CHRONICLE

One on-campus organization is getting into the business of student-run businesses. DUhatch, Duke’s student business incubator, held its biannual company showcase Wednesday in Teer Hall. Five student groups presented their business ideas to an audience of undergraduate students, graduate students and local entrepreneurs before meeting with the audience individually over Korean food. “We don’t make companies. We make entrepreneurs,” said Jim Mundell, director of DUhatch and adjunct associate professor of engineering, as he opened the meeting. Members of the student businesses each gave short presentations about their concepts. The companies included a mobile phone app designed to help men dress better, an online marketplace for selling luxury goods to Chinese consumers and a custom storage unit website. “There are a lot of students here who have a lot of ideas,” said Pranav Deshpande, communications manager for DUhatch and a first-year master’s student in engineering management. “DUhatch is here as a resource if they want it.” Mundell added DUhatch was useful in providing students with a physical space to creatively think and develop their ideas. Aditya Murthy, manager of DUhatch and a first-year master’s student in mechanical engineering, said the organization has given him exposure to businesses at every stage of development. “[DUhatch] provides office space and a good work space for the student, [which] is hard to find and almost impossible to find in the real world without proof of concept,” Murthy said. DUhatch currently has nine “teams,” See DUHATCH, page 10

auStin Peer/the ChroniCle

Smallpools, and five other artists, performed at the Duke Coffeehouse Wednesday evening as part of Small Town Records’ Feature Festival.

dsg senate considers ePrint allocation adjustment by Hayley Trainer THE CHRONICLE

Senators were divided on issues of environmental sustainability and ePrint affordability at the Duke Student Government meeting Wednesday. Representatives from Students for Sustainable Living—sophomore David Clancy and Fareed Khan, a master of management candidate at the Fuqua School of Business—presented a proposal to reduce

the current print quota for undergraduate students. Clancy noted that under the current system, students use more than 2,100 trees’ worth of paper each year. “We shouldn’t take lightly charging students money,” junior Ellie Schaack, vice president for facilities and the environment, said. “With that said, we saw that 2,100 trees are used by undergraduates each year, and that’s not insignificant.” She noted that the Senate should consider

the issue carefully before supporting the plan. Junior Tristan Ballard, senator for services, presented a resolution supporting the proposal to the senate following the presentation. The senate responded with mixed opinions, especially concerning policies that would allow students to apply for exclusions to the quota. See DSG, page 10

Profile for Duke Chronicle

April 3, 2014  

April 3, 2014  

Advertisement