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DUJOUR.COM SUMMER 2015 CHICAGO / DALLAS-FORT WORTH / HOUSTON / LAS VEGAS / LOS ANGELES / MIAMI / NEW YORK / ORANGE COUNTY / SAN FRANCISCO / WASHINGTON, D.C. DUJOUR.COM

SEVEN DOLLARS SUMMER 2015

DAZZLING DIAMONDS THE HOMES OF MUSTIQUE’S ELITE THE NEW TUXEDO DRESSING

Solving Hollywood’s Greatest Mystery

MODERN LOVE John Legend & Chrissy Teigen by BRUCE WEBER

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Contents SUMMER 2015

It's Great to Be Gronk

18

DUJOU R .COM

166

Style

39 SWEETEST THING Eve Hewson leaps from hoodies to haute couture

56 LEADING THE CHARGE Two CEOs team up to elevate African tourism

70 MAKING ALLOWANCES Subsidizing a “failure to launch” child can prove to be a very risky business

58 FUTURE IMPERFECT

Color coordinate from ear to ear with summer’s

A prominent Texas couple updated a “modern mas-

best sunglasses and complementary jewelry

terpiece” of the 1970s to meet their family’s needs

44 CASUAL BUSINESS How far can we go with the athleisure trend?

62 PALAZZO TRUDIE She has houses all over the world, but Trudie Styler feels most at home on her 900-acre Tuscan estate

46 FORMAL STUDIES The tuxedo is embraced by a stylish new generation

64 WAIT WATCHERS Fine dining is evolving and so is your server as a

Life

52 SET IN STONE

new guard replaces the old 68 SHAKE SHACKS

How did a wedding gift to John Huston end up in a

Classic Shaker furniture has a new place in the

plastic box outside Santa Barbara?

modern home

O N T H E C O V E R :

On Legend: Baja pullover, $2,155, THE ELDER STATESMAN, elder-statesman .com. On Teigen: Pisces Kimono robe, $3,844, LA PERLA, laperla.com. Photographed by Bruce Weber; styled by Deborah Watson.

BRUCE WEBER

42 PERFECT PAIRS


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Contents SUMMER 2015

Perfect Pairs

42

The Ballad of John and Chrissy

110

So Electric sunglasses, $ 5 05 , DIOR, dior.com. Earrings, $ 3 75 , AURÉ LIE BIDERMANN, 212-3 3 5 -06 04 .

The Magic of Mustique

124

Body

74 CEOS GONE WILD Top execs are swapping their suits for spandex to compete in the most challenging races on Earth 92 HIGH NOTE 76 MOVING THE NEEDLE It’s not great genes or even great Botox. The secret to aging well is human growth hormones

Designer Robert Majkut rethinks the classic piano

Work

Culture

102 MALCOLM’S MOMENT Eighty-four-year-old photo-realist master Malcolm Morley discusses the will that drives him

94 THE CRIMSON ELEPHANTS 80 HAIR RAISERS How faux locks became a status symbol

Young conservatives on Harvard’s campus find that life still revolves around a different kind of party

106 SCRIBES OF SUMMER Four debut novelists craft stories for the beach and beyond

82 BEAUTY 411: RIO The under-the-radar services locals love best

Play

84 MIX MASTER Science fiction becomes reality with BMW’s i8

96 TO SELL A MOCKINGBIRD Harper Lee’s first novel made her rich and famous. We take a look at the true price of literary genius 97 PREPPING FOR CLUB FED When going from life behind a desk to life behind

86 THE MANE EVENT 98 MORNING GLORY The sun isn’t the only thing expected to rise and 88 A CONFEDERACY OF PUNCHES

shine daily, as these newscasters know firsthand

Can we stomach the good-for-you-cocktail trend? 100 WINE MAVERICKS 90 SUMMER VACATION, BITCHES! Hotels that cater to the furriest member of the family

This summer’s busiest actor didn’t find a single great role to play—he found a bunch

bars, a good coach can make all the difference The women making horse racing the sport of queens

107 STOLL SURVIVOR

It’s time to raise a glass to the vino-industry innovators who are changing the grape landscape

Features

110 THE BALLAD OF JOHN AND CHRISSY She’s a supermodel who’s obsessed with junk food. He’s a pop star who reads The Economist. Together, Chrissy Teigen and John Legend have become America’s least conventional and most hilarious power couple. By Lindsay Silberman; photographed by Bruce Weber

CLOCK WISE F ROM TOP LEF T: DAV ID RINELLA. BRUCE WEBER. DOUG LAS F RIEDMAN.

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DUJOU R .COM

On Legend: The Commute tee, $55, AG JEANS, agjeans .com. Kane jeans, $185, J BRAND, jbrandjeans.com. On Teigen: Dress, $1,925, HERMÈS, hermes.com.


Rendez-Vous Night & Day watch Carmen Chaplin, Actor and Director

Open a whole new world


Contents SUMMER 2015

Sweater, $ 1,4 25 , EX EMPLAIRE, barneys.com. Tank MC watch in 18-karat yellow gold, $ 21,100, CARTIER, cartier.us.

Stoll Survivor

107

High Note

92 The Sins of the Father

124 THE MAGIC OF MUSTIQUE This Caribbean utopia is unpretentious and, better yet, under the radar. By Lindsay Silberman; photographed by Douglas Friedman

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160

Cities

180 CHICAGO

140 ARCTIC THRILL With jaw-dropping vistas and a spirit-awakening chill, northern Norway offers endless opportunities for adventure and reflection. By Alyssa Giacobbe; photographed by Christopher Churchill 148 A NIGHT ON THE EDGE OF THE WORLD Heating up the streets of Red Hook, Brooklyn, in the season’s sultriest looks. Photographed by Cedric Bouchet

The Windy City’s new innovators; a summer

200 TRI-STATE 182 DALLAS

Tyson Chandler’s new job; a stationery stand-off 184 HOUSTON

The best boots in Texas; summer’s must-have dress 185 LAS VEGAS

the story of the suspect who got away, the

The Far East on the Westside; the Emerson lands Downtown; Shiva Rose comes into bloom

hidden legacy of his daughter, the girl who knew

201 ORANGE COUNTY

The science of beauty; new culinary concepts 202 SAN FRANCISCO

Kiton’s latest outpost; Bay Area bags

The capitol’s top toques; the best in local liquor 206 PARTIES

Celebrating Shinola; a full house for Fendi Casa 190 MIAMI

Big fish at the Hard Rock; steakhouse smackdown 166 IT’S GREAT TO BE GRONK Football’s pop culture sensation is also one of

SoulCycle hits Westport

204 WASHINGTON, D.C. 187 LOS ANGELES

policeman son who proved his guilt and the too much. By Sheila Weller

Sharon Dorram’s guide to Greenwich;

lights up Sin City

The Black Dahlia murder horrified Hollywood and never lost its grip on our imagination. Here,

Upgrading the farmhouse; East End workouts

getaway in Saugatuck

Audra Baldwin’s Vegas; XS nightclub 160 THE SINS OF THE FATHER

198 HAMPTONS

193 NEW YORK

Back Page

208 FAMOUS LAST WORDS

the greatest tight ends in NFL history. By Lindsay

Max Mara’s Maria Giulia Maramotti; inside

For baseball great Jorge Posada, this motto has

Silberman; photographed by Bruce Weber

Manhattan’s latest overhauls

been a home run

CLOCK WISE F ROM LEF T: ALEX JOH N BECK . COURTESY. G ETTY IMAG ES.

132 HARDWEAR When laced with pearls, emeralds and diamonds, sculptural pieces shimmer. Photographed by Robin Broadbent


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All things come from the Earth XENOPHANES


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Jason Binn LET TER FROM THE CEO

With Chrissy Teigen and John Legend.

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t s finally s erti e in the city ter the past ew onths we re e cited or acation season and all the great social edia action that will co e with it. In arch we thoro ghly en oyed o r spring break escape at the a ed ra ilian o rt otel a al each instit tion that contin es to be as l rio s today as it was when it opened al ost a cent ry ago. In pril we hosted an inti ate dinner to celebrate one o today s ost talked abo t brands hinola at I a n S c hra ger’s p oo at the blic hicago. ack in ew ork we also hosted an e ent at endi asa with R a y on B l a c k and D a n iel L om ba rd i catered by An d rea C orrea l e at legant airs to te che M a rc M u rp hy s new book S ea son w ith A uthority. s pril t rned to ay we were delighted to celebrate society icon P a ris H il ton at J a s on S tra u s s and N oa h T ep p erberg s roo top lo nge at the rea otel. o ake s re yo don t iss any o o r other star st dded soirees thro gho t the year oin o r elect and gain ac cess the ost rele ant people places and e ents “o the day with I treat ent at D uJour s co er parties book la nches c linary tastings o ie pre ieres and other e cl si e e pe riences. isit o r elect.co to beco e a e ber. co rse to ake all o this possible there is plenty o work going on behind the scenes. r web tea is always working to ake o r.co yo r fi rst stop or l ry li estyle co erage and we were honored to be a fi nalist in the ditorial cellence category o M in ’ s B es t of the W eb & D igita l Aw a rd s a ong so e o the hottest titles in the ind s try. hat s ore at the 2 0 1 5 W ebby Aw a rd s D uJour was an honoree in three categories W ebs ite/ M a ga z in e S oc ia l / C u l tu re & L if es ty l e and Ap p / L if es ty l e, with co petitors incl ding Ha rper’ s B a z a a r V og ue The Hol l yw ood R eporter The F ina nc ia l Times ory rch and arget. n the co er o this iss e we are so happy to ha e y dear riends and today s ost charis atic ollywood co ple J ohn L egen d and C hris s y T eigen photographed by B ru c e W eber. hey are as inspiring in their grace and kindness as they are attracti e and talented and it s no wonder the world can t get eno gh o the . ot to ention they re so ch n and that s what akes the per ect or o r s er iss e. o get o t to the beach don t orget yo r s nscreen and drop e a line i yo re in the a ptons

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BEHIND THE VELVET ROPE

BINNSHOTS

F ol l ow on Tw itter a nd I nsta g ra m @ Ja sonB inn 8

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11 1. Amy Erbesfeld, Heather Vandenberghe, Tommy Hilfiger’s Eric Lichtmess 2. Southern Wine & Spirits’ Nicole Ruvo, Hermine Heller 3. Pal Zileri’s Paolo Torello-Viera 4. Restoration Hardware’s Gary Friedman, Bella Hunter 5. Kabbalah Centre co-founder Michael Berg 6. Steven Schnall 7. Lynda Schwartz, Corey G, Faye Resnick, Kris Jenner, Jonathan Cheban 8. White Street restaurant co-owner Dan Abrams, Richard Johnson, Frank Furlan, Gucci’s Florinka Pesenti 9. Fountainbleau’s Phil Goldfarb, Jeana Stone 10. Cornelia Guest, Project Gravitas founder and CEO Lisa Sun at Michael’s 11. MoMA’s Klaus Biesenbach, Dom Perignon’s Trent Fraser 12. Lauran Walk, Republic Records’ Charlie Walk. 13. John Legend sporting Invicta


F ol l ow on Tw itter a nd I nsta g ra m

@JASON BINN

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HANDPICKED

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14. Chase, Sage, Willis and Stillhouse’s Brad Beckerman 15. Sixty Hotels’ Jason Pomeranc 16. Jolene Engel, Mehdi Eftekari 17. Gayle King, Hollywood Foreign Press Association’s Munawar Hosain 18. Nile Rodgers, Page Six’s Stephanie Smith 19. Damon Dash, Nick Carter 20. WWD’s James Fallon 21. Isaac Belisha, Buffalo’s Gaby Bitton 22. Sarah Arison 23. Giuseppe Cipriani 24. Hayes Grier, Nash Grier in Master & Dynamics Headphones 25. Warner Music and Faena Miami’s Len Blavatnik 26. Vinny Guadagnino, restaurateur Scott Sartiano 27. Tiffany & Co.’s Melissa Pordy 28. William Lauder 29. Kane Katz, attorney Joel Katz 30. Revolt’s Andre Harrell, Kosher Soul’s O'Neal McKnight, DJ Cassidy 31. Hublot’s Marissa Brooks, Moet Hennessy’s Donae Burston 32. Warner Music COO and BLADE founder Rob Wiesenthal 33. Pepsi’s Frank Cooper, Nina Cooper 34. DVF’s Joel Horowitz 35. American Eagle’s Jay Schottenstein, Michael Jesselson

Katya Sorokko

Ally Kemper

Kristen Yraola

Andrea Kazanjian

Kristina Ratsy

Andrew Warren

Lindsay Wagner

Ari Hoffman

Lockhart Steele

Arnaud Cauchois

Margie Loeb

Arnaud Naintré

Marjorie Goldner

Aryeh Bourkoff

Mark Tevis

Ben Lerer

Marlene McDade

Bernadette Knight

Marti Crampshee

Bojan Kostic

Massimo Caronna

Brian Shaw

Matt Blank

Brownen Smith

Michael Farber

Bruce Weber

Michael Heller

Camille Douglas

Michael Irilli

Carl Cohen

Michael Warren

Christine Dias

Mike Daniels

Christopher Quincy

Nicole Berlyn

Dan Hill

Nicole Lapin

Dan Rothmann

Nicole Oge

Daniel Lombardi

Pamela Roland

Darcy Ahl

Paul Lubetsky

David Mitchell

Philippe Bonay

Dottie Mattison

Rayon Black

Doug Scott

Rebecca Tutilgerno

Ed Blumenfeld

Richard Beckman

Edward Cortese

Richard Burns

Eva Lorenzotti

Rob Berman

Eyal Lalo

Robin Schneiderman

Federica Boido

Rod Manley

Geoffrey Hess

Rodney Williams

Grace Chan

Sally Morrison

Greg D’Alba

Scott Flexman

Harvey Spevak

Shaul Nakash

Hunter Frick

Shauna Brook

Izvor Zivkovic

Shawn Sachs

James Maki

Sonya Menon

Jared Cohen

Stefani Greenfi eld

Jason Halpern

Stephanie Ogden

Jenna Lipkin

Stephen Budd

Jill Katz

Stephen Webster

Jim Berrien

Stewart Bain

Joe Cavalcante

Susan Holland

John Auerbach

Susan Silverstein

John Howard

Thomas Juul-Hansen

Jon Potter

Thomas Steinemann

Jon Steinberg

Toni Lubetsky

Jonas Tahlin

Tyler Gutowsky

Jonathan Levine

Valerie Zucker

Josh Herman

Valerio D’Ambrosio

Joshua Gaynor

Venanzio Ciampa

Kaitlin Derkach Kane Sarhan

Veronique Gabai-Pinsky

Kate Slavin

Wendy Velazquez

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Kathleen Ruiz

Alex Withers

DUJOU R .COM

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Al Sophianopoulos


A MOMENT WITH THE EDITOR

From top: Outside Tromsø, Norway; Bruce Weber’s dogs, Pipoca and Bonito; Gronk being Gronk.

he fi rst ti e I et hrissy eigen I was eight months pregnant and she kissed y belly. e had ne er e en spoken be ore. t it didn t eel in a si e or e en n a iliar. It elt nor al and e pected like of c ourse this was y greeting ro hrissy eigen. t the ti e she was st starting to beco e a o s basically or being hersel totally co pletely hilario sly hersel a s per odel t rned social edia orce. he giggled as she leaned in to plant a big wet one on the b p that was y son n o see below or proo . “ et e kiss that baby she said e citedly. wo years ago when eigen and si cian ohn egend arried they were plenty a o s. ow tho gh they re a ong pop c l t re s ost talked abo t both as a co ple and as individuals. Couples are supposed to bring o t the best in each other o co rse. t that doesn t always happen. heir secret oing by the gli pses we catch o the in the press and thro gh their ari o s social edia plat or s anyway it see s as i they re the best o riends who also ha e a a ing se which is ne er bad news or a relationship. In “ he allad o hrissy and ohn senior editor indsay ilber an fi nds o t that the perception is not so ar ro reality. hich is good beca se it t rns o t these two want a lot like a l ot a lot o babies. ohn and hrissy were the per ect co er stars or an iss e that set o t to e plore a n ber o ways to practice and celebrate indi id ality noncon or ity and the thrill o st being yo rsel . he ti ing see ed right here s st so ething so s er abo t gi ing p the resol tions and rein entions and gi ing in to who yo are to re sing to take yo rsel so se rio sly or at least a ew onths. ere at D uJour we always ha e a ondness or people and pets who don t take the sel es too serio sly. o know who ne er takes the sel es too seri

o sly r ce eber s dogs that s who. eanwhile I think the first ti e I nderstood the appeal o ob ronkowski the sa a ble and ery big tight end was when E S PN the Ma g a z ine ran a eat re o hi c ddling with a b nch o tiny kittens. It s easy to look at the atriots s perstar as a eat eating hard ass and he is that b t ronk has also transcended his sport and beco e belo ed or being a g y yo st want to hang aro nd with. o that s what we did which yo can read abo t in “It s reat to e ronk. e got gronked and had e en ore n than we co ld ha e i agined. In act yo ight say we gronked o r way through this entire issue as we set out to explore that eeling o breaking the r les and p shing the bo ndaries o e pectation st beca se yo can. e et the powerho se wo en o horse racing and nco ered the nlikely story o a ollywood legend s ost pri ed piece o art. e pit high ashion against the gritty backdrop o a rooklyn neighborhood went shoeless on sti e and snow obiled thro gh the wilds o northern orway. ltho gh I co ld not ha e been ore grate l to p t this ost recent winter behind s the appeal o a trans or ati e cold weather trip ca e to represent a the e and a re inder that bea ty regardless o sea son can be o nd in the ost ne pected places and nanticipated ways.

Nicole V ecchiarelli NV @ DuJour.com Instagram: editor_ nv

COUNTERCLOCK WISE F ROM TOP LEF T: CH RISTOPH ER CH URCH ILL. COURTESY OF LINDSAY SILBERMAN. BRUCE WEBER. COURTESY @ EDITOR_ NV INSTAG RAM. TH OMAS WH ITESIDE.

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Thoughts DuJour


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Editor in Chief Nicole Vecchiarelli

CEO/Publisher Jason Binn

Executive Editor Nancy Bilyeau

Executive Vice President, Global Sales Marc Berger

Managing Editor Natalia de Ory

FEATURES

FASHION + BEAUTY + HOME

Features Editor Adam Rathe

Market Director Sydney Wasserman

Senior Editor Lindsay Silberman

Fashion Market Editor Paul Frederick

Research Editor Ivy Pascual

Fashion Assistant Meaghan Hartland

Editorial Assistant Frances Dodds

DUJOUR CITIES Deputy Editor Natasha Wolff

ART + PHOTO

Regional Editors

Photo Editor Etta Meyer

Anna Blessing (Chicago), Holly Crawford (Houston),

Art Assistant Bryan Vargas

Holly Haber (Dallas), Scott Huver (Los Angeles and Orange County), Rebecca Kleinman (Miami), David Nash (San Francisco)

Creative Consultant David Sebbah for Spring Studios

Vice President, Business Development Isabelle McTwigan Executive Directors Phil Witt Michelle Koruda Senior Account Executives Gwen Beckham Adriana Martone Brett Zuckerman Advertising Sales Offices Janet Suber (Los Angeles) Sylvie Durlach, S&R Media (France) Susy Scott (Italy) Senior Executive Assistant Brianna Calabrese Administrative Assistant Maggie Miles Sales Assistant Stefanie LaGalia Assistant to Project Manager Sara Strumwasser Marketing Director Julia Light Marketing Manager Jen Goldenberg Marketing Associate Jennifer Lentol Designer Victoria Barna Chief Advisor Monty Shadow

DUJOUR.com Chief Digital Officer Jay Blades

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SALES

Editor at Large Alyssa Giacobbe

Digital Editor Eden Univer

Social Media Editor Alisha Prakash

Web Developer G. Leo Fulgencio

Senior Web Producer Julianne Mosoff

Web Assistant Jessica Khorsandi

PRODUCTION Mobile/Print & Operations, Director Shawn Lowe Senior Pre-Media Manager John Francesconi IT Manager Jacob Swimmer Production Manager Matt Reuschle Production Intern Adam Sareen

CONTRIBUTORS Patricia Bosworth, Dori Cooperman, Anne Christensen, Grant Cornett, Arthur Elgort, Douglas Friedman, Kyoko Hamada, Henry Hargreaves,

Print Consultant CALEV Print Media Paper Sourcing Aaron Paper

Alex John Beck, Ros Okusanya (Casting), Jeffrey Podolsky, Mickey Rapkin,

FINANCE

Rhonda Riche, Bruce Weber, Thomas Whiteside, Lynn Yaeger

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Paul Biedrzycki (Automotive), Lee Berresford (Art), Sandie Burke (Art), John Clark (Copy), Nick Earhart (Copy), Veronique Gabai-Pinsky (Beauty),

Finance Manager Michael Rose Assistant Controller Dahlia Nussbaum

Chloe Weiss Galkin (Art), Laura Henry (Fashion), Regan Hoffman (Research), Lauren Kill (Photo), Dacus Thompson (Research)

INTERNS Yukiko Fujii, Taylor Hakimi, Lucia Kyungyun Lim, Marilyn La Jeunesse, Alejandra Ott, Maggie Yang

Chief Financial Officer Stephanie Cabral-Choudri

Chairman Kevin Ryan

General Counsel John A. Golieb

Chief Advisors Dan Galpern Matt Witheiler

D uJour ( ISSN 23 28-886 8) is published four times a year by DuJour Media G roup, LLC., 2 Park Avenue, NYC 10016 , 212-6 83 -5 6 87. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission of the publisher is prohibited. The publishers and editors are not responsible for unsolicited material and it will be treated as unconditionally assigned for publication subject to D uJour magazine’s right to edit. Return postage must accompany all manuscripts, photographs and drawings. Copyright Š 2014 DuJour Media G roup, LLC. F or a subscription to D uJour magazine, go to subscribe.dujour.com, call 9 5 4 -6 5 3 -3 9 22 or e-mail duj@ themagstore.com.


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Contributors

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GET TING TO KNOW SOME OF THE TALENT

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5

BEHIND THE ISSUE— LUNCH ORDERS AND ALL W RI T T EN BY N ATA L I A D E O RY

1 ROBIN BROADBENT

2 LINDSAY SILBERMAN

3 BRUCE WEBER

4 ADRIENNE GAFFNEY

5 JULIE L. BELCOVE

Photographer, “Hardwear,” p. 132

Writer “The Ballad of John and Chrissy,” p. 110, and “It’s Great to Be Gronk,“ p. 166

Photographer, “The Ballad of John and Chrissy,” p. 110, and “It’s Great to Be Gronk,“ p. 166

Writer, “Prepping for Club Fed,” p. 97

Writer, “Malcolm's Moment,” p. 102

“I always try to make the jewelry the hero in every picture,” says photographer Robin Broadbent of the stunning gems he shot for the issue. Pinning them like butterflies made each one seem special and unique; Broadbent, whose work has appeared in Harper‘s Bazaar, Numero and The New York Times, admits that was the goal all along. ”The pieces were very sculptural, almost like works of art.”

Getting to spend time with celebrities is just another perk of the job for senior editor Lindsay Silberman, who chatted with cover stars Chrissy Teigen and John Legend as well as football star Rob Gronkowski. “He had me laughing my ass off,” reveals the Manhattan-based writer. “He's like a little kid trapped in the body of a giant, and he has absolutely no clue how funny he is.”

“Football and lovebirds seems like an odd combination,” concedes famed lensman Bruce Weber, who photographed Rob Gronkowski and John Legend and Chrissy Teigen at his home in Florida. The shoots included beachside dancing, a gladiator costume and even some adorable baby goats. “In this day and age, to find three people so open to adventure is very rare.” We couldn’t agree more.

When Adrienne Gaffney asked white-collar criminals to reflect on the prison experience, what surprised her most was their positive attitude. “They were upbeat,” reveals the Marie Claire and Nylon contributor. “The time in jail gave them a chance to reflect on their life and learn new things.” Gaffney learned a few things too. “I certainly found out more about prison than I ever thought I would.”

Julie Belcove, who has written for The Financial Times and The New Yorker, had followed Malcolm Morley’s work for years, and so she relished the opportunity to sit down with the artist during his recent visit to New York City. “He’s an incredibly fascinating man. Even into his eighties, he’s still pushing himself,” she says of Morley’s decision to forgo the artistic grid system. “He likes to break his own rules.”

Soup DuJour: Hot and Sour

Soup DuJour: Gazpacho

Soup DuJour: Split Pea

Soup DuJour: New England Clam Chowder

Soup DuJour: Tomato

WEBER: CH RISTOPH ER DOMURAT. ALL OTH ERS: COURTESY

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ORAL REPRESENTATIONS CANNOT BE RELIED UPON AS CORRECTLY STATING REPRESENTATIONS OF THE DEVELOPER. FOR CORRECT REPRESENTATIONS, MAKE REFERENCE TO THE DOCUMENTS REQUIRED BY SECTION 718.503, FLORIDA STATUTES, TO BE FURNISHED BY A DEVELOPER TO A BUYER OR LESSEE. All artist’s or architectural renderings, sketches, graphic materials and photos depicted or otherwise described herein are proposed and conceptual only, and are based upon preliminary development plans, which are subject to change. This is not an offering in any state in which registration is required but in which registration requirements have not yet been met. This advertisement is not an offering. It is a solicitation of interest in the advertised property. No offering of the advertised units can be made and no deposits can be accepted, or reservations, binding or non-binding, can be made in New York until an offering plan is filed with the New York State Department of Law.


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TAKING NOTES From left: Garrett Cuervo (Sax), Morgan Young (French Horn), Olivia Harrison (Drums), Tiger Harrison (Trumpet), Sofi Harrison (Guitar), Etienne Beauvillain (Guitar), Isabella Clarke (Violin), Scarlett Harrison (Violin) from the University of Miami-Frost School of Music.

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BEHIND THE SCENES

A Sense of Place

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1. THE RESIDENCE

2. THE NEIGHBORHOOD

3. THE RESTAURANT

There is something undeniably timeless about rising actress Eve H ewson, who stars in Cinemax’s The K nic k , a drama set in New York at the turn of the 20th century. That we shot her in Chanel only compounded the need for a classic setting, and there are few backdrops with more appeal than a prewar brownstone in one of New York City’s oldest neighborhoods. The duplex on G reenwich V illage’s Bank Street ( above) , represented by TOWN Residential, proved the perfect location for our photo shoot—because nothing quite spells glamour like a grand staircase and a wall o oor to ceiling windows.

To shoot this issue’s fashion feature, we went to—as declared by our photo editor’s cab driver—“the edge of the world,” or at least the edge of Brooklyn. Lensman Cedric Buchet’s photos from around Red H ook tell the story of a “wild night out on the town” with Swedish model Elsa H osk. In our favorite hot-off-therunway looks, she was certainly dressed for the occasion. Buchet chose two sites that represent the striking dichotomy of Red H ook: an abandoned factory that previously produced parts for the ships that dredged the Panama Canal, and a construction site for soon-to-be luxury condos.

ter reading the first ew paragraphs o “It s G reat to Be G ronk,” wherein the NF L superstar ravages a particularly hearty New York strip, you’ll be feeling either slight repulsion or mouth-watering envy. If your culinary tastes lean to the latter, you’ll want to know where to find that steak and the answer is o rbon Steak at Turnberry Isle Miami Resort. G iven the 800-plus wines on the list to choose from, it’s a place you can go and stay for a while. And believe it or not, G ronk didn’t even order the biggest piece of meat on the menu. If it’s on your bucket list to outeat a 26 5 -pound tight end, the 3 2-ounce is waiting. —FRANCES DODDS

CLOCK WISE F ROM TOP LEF T: BRUCE WEBER. COURTESY OF TURNBERRY ISLE. CEDRIC BUCH ET. COURTESY OF TOWN RESIDENTIAL.

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IWC PORTUGIESER. THE LEGEND AMONG ICONS.

Portugieser Annual Calendar. Ref. 5035: It took Portugal’s ocean-going heroes centuries to become legends; IWC’s Por tugieser took just 75 years. For it is that long since the appearance of the first IWC Portugieser with a pocket watch movement marked the beginning of a new legendary era. And that revolutionary step forward is still mirrored today in the IWC-manufactured 52850 calibre. The fact that innovative new technology no longer needs an eternity to achieve legendary

status can be seen in the annual calendar, where the month, date and day can be read of f at a glance. I WC . E N G I N E E R E D FO R M E N .

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Sweetest Thing

STARLET EVE HEWSON MAKES THE LEAP FROM HOODIES TO HAUTE COUTURE W RI T T EN BY E D E N U N I V E R PHOTO GR A PHED BY H I ROY U K I S E O S T YL ED BY PAU L F R E D E R I C K

CHANEL DESIGNER K ARL LAGERFELD HAS SAID OF HIS AUSTRIAN - INSPIRED COLLECTION ,

“GENERATIONS

COME AND GO , BUT LEDERHOSEN WILL ALWAYS STAY.”

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Dress, $ 12,4 00; Earring, $ 6 75 ; Bracelet, $ 1,775 , CH ANEL, 800-5 5 0-0005 .

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H

er father might be Bono, but Eve H ewson isn’t your typical celebrity progeny: She grew up far from H ollywood, wore a uniform to school every day and had to beg her parents for her very first Chanel bag—and she didn’t actually succeed until her 19 th birthday. Which was fine: G rowing up, H ewson— who stars as Nurse Lucy in Steven Soderbergh’s small-screen period drama, The K nic k —preferred Converse sneakers and hoodies to anything even remotely feminine. “I probably wasn’t the most fashionable girl, but I was a pretty cool boy,” she says. It wasn’t until she took an interest in what she calls her mother’s and sister’s “girly” clothing, in fact, that H ewson started to shed her tomboy skin. ( Of course, there’s no shame in playing dress-up in your mother’s closet if your mom is Ali H ewson, founder of environmentally conscious and perennially chic clothing line EDUN.) In the six years since she’s been in New York, where she attended NYU’s Tisch School o the rts the actress has refined her style even more, trading her hoodies and handme-downs for cropped leather jackets and the signature New Yorker look of black on black. “When you walk around New York, you just want to wear the cool jacket with a beanie,” she says, though she still carries the Chanel bag and has, in fact, supplemented it with a second one gifted by her mother. H er work


style

Coat, $ 10,5 5 0; Barrette, $ 1,275 , CH ANEL, 800-5 5 0-0005 . Photographed on location at 6 4 Bank Street, listed by Mark David F romm and Claudia Saez-F romm, TOWN Residential.

uniform, meanwhile, includes perhaps the one item of clothing you might expect a comfortloving former tomboy to despise—except she doesn’t. “I love wearing a corset! ” she says of Lucy’s wardrobe staple. “It’s like you get strapped into that thing, and you don’t even have to try to stand up. It just holds you there.” F ollowing her breakout role on the show— one particularly unforgettable scene had her injecting liquid cocaine into co-star Clive Owen’s penis—H ewson made the talk-show circuit, where she proceeded to charm every interviewer with her wit and beauty. These qualities also caught the attention of Chanel, where she has since become a “favorite.” At the fashion house’s presentation of the ParisSalzburg Mé tiers d’Art show this spring, K arl Lagerfeld’s first New York City showing in a decade, H ewson stood out among an audience that included Beyoncé and Julianne Moore. “There was something really tough about it, but sort of romantic,” she says of the collection, which showcased handiwork from partners like knitwear house Barrie and jeweler Desrues. “Usually you go to a fashion show and you don’t know how [ the clothes] would work every day, but I was saying to my friend, ‘ I want those pants, I want that jacket, I want to wear that.’ It was easy to incorporate into my life.” Acting accolades, impending muse status and rock-royalty pedigree notwithstanding, she’s still just 23 and not above being impressed. “Seeing Pharrell perform, I couldn’t believe it,” she says of the Chanel show. “I was in the front row, and all of a sudden he popped out, and it was amazing! ”

HEWSON ’S FIRST NAME COMES FROM THE MIDDLE OF THE WORD SEVEN , IN REFERENCE TO THE TIME AND DATE OF HER BIRTH , 7 A . M . ON JULY 7.

H AIR: MATTH EW MONZ ON F OR R+ CO. AT TRACEYMATTING LY.COM. MAK E UP: TRACY ALF AJORA F OR ANASTASIA BEV ERLY H ILLS. MANICURE: ROSEANN SING LETON F OR DIOR V ERNIS AT ART DEPARTMENT.

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“I love wearing a corset!” Hewson says of her character’s wardrobe staple.


Perfect Pairs COLOR COORDINATE FROM E AR TO E AR PHOTO GR A PHED BY DAV I D R I N E L L A

LACE ME UP, MON AMOUR

F rom top: Cher Dior Exquise earrings in yellow gold with sapphires, garnets and chrysoberyl, price upon request, DIOR F INE JEWELRY, 800-9 29 -3 4 6 7. Sunglasses, $ 5 6 0, MYK ITA + MAISON MARG IELA, mykita.com. Sylvy sunglasses, $ 6 5 0, F ENDI & TH IERRY LASRY, fendi.com. Electra hoops, $ 22,76 5 , V ENYX , net-a-porter.com. Crescent earrings in 18-karat gold and platinum with diamonds and azurmalachite, $ 3 7,5 00, DAV ID WEBB, davidwebb.com. Brooke sunglasses, $ 4 5 0, MORG ENTH AL F REDERICS, morgenthalfrederics.com. Serpenti Sauvage sunglasses, $ 3 5 0, BULG ARI, bulgari.com. Rock Candy earrings, $ 6 9 5 , IPPOLITA, ippolita.com.

There is no greater mecca of beach chic than the French Riviera, so it seems fitting that the Côte d’Azur inspired Club Monaco’s exclusive summer collaboration with Place Nationale. More than 500 different garments were handmade in Antibes, France, and sourced from vintage European fabrics—like antique French cotton and English lace. Place Nationale’s Dougy Butterworth says the pieces evoke “delicacy and ’70s bohemian British shapes.”

COURTESY

Club M onaco’s new handcrafted v intage collection is a study in nostalgi a

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“ WITH WHEELS UP, LESS TIME ON THE GROUND MEANS MORE TIME ON THE GREENS.� Name: Rickie Fowler Title: Professional Golfer Aircraft: Cessna Citation Excel/XLS

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As a professional athlete, travel is a huge part of my life. With tournaments, sponsor obligations, and training, I spend up 1- 8 5 5 - F LY- 8 76 0 WHEELSUP.COM to forty weeks a year on the road. Over the course of my golf career, that can add up significantly. The Cessna Citation Excel/ XLS is spacious enough to bring friends along for the ride, and the King Air 350i can access shorter runways, bringing me closer to more remote tournaments. I train hard to be the best professional golfer, and Wheels Up is the most efficient way to stick to my schedule and advance my career.

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CASUAL BUSINESS

How far can—or

should—w

e take the athleisure trend?

A

Pattern Theory

THE SUMMER’S HOT TEST SWIMWE A R LAUNCHES ARE SET TO MAKE WAVES PHOTO GR A PHED BY DAV I D R I N E L L A

F rom l eft: K nown for its men’s swimwear, V ILEBREQ UIN expands its women’s offerings this summer ( F eutre bikini top and bottom, $ 14 0 each, vilebrequin.com) ; MARYSIA tapped young designer Jonathan Cohen for a bold print on her signature styles ( Mott Maillot, $ 3 15 , marysiaswim.com) ; REBECCA TAYLOR embraced the mix-andmatch system of label G IEJO in her first swimwear collaboration ( Swimlette top, $ 125 ; Boy brief, $ 105 , rebeccataylor.com) .

In Gear

Ferragamo’s new MTO (Made to Order) Driver lets the customer play designer of the iconic men’s shoe, with more than 100 mixand-match options. Choose from a variety of luxury materials, interior and exterior colors and finishes and personalized lettering for a shoe that fits quite perfectly indeed.

Made to Order driving loafers, from $ 75 0, SALV ATORE F ERRAG AMO, ferragamo.com.

COURTESY

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A b ov e: A look from REBECCA MINK OF F ’S athleisure line, launching this summer. R ig ht: A look from new athleisure brand ADAY.

s someone who works from home most days, I’ve been at the forefront of the athleisure movement for quite some time. So I wasn’t disappointed when fashion gave me the official go-ahead to take my favorite compression tights and running shoes from CrossF it to brunch with my in-laws to a client meeting. What’s next: Weddings and funerals? Why not? H igh-fashion ( and high-price-tag) designer launches and collaborations—Adidas’ partnerships with Rick Owens and Raf Simons, NikeLab’s work with Sacai, and athletic lines from Theory, Stella McCartney and Cynthia Rowley, among many others—make a very good case for it. If you’re going to hand over a grand for a pair of Balmain sweatpants, you’re not actually going to sweat in them. This is what I told myself, anyway, one April afternoon when I pulled on a jersey jumpsuit with a drawstring waist and a pair of V ans to go to a christening, followed by Easter at a friend’s. Who needs an Easter dress when you have Easter leisure wear? My husband agreed as he laced up his “good” Chuck Taylors and held up two Under Armour performance hoodies: “G ray or navy? ” he asked, before slipping on the gray beneath his blazer. It wasn’t what my mother—and, judging by the judging looks, many of the churchgoers we encountered—would call our Sunday best, nor was it any cheaper than the more formal wear we might have donned just a year ago. But hey: H igh fashion’s not for everyone.— ALYSSA GIACOBBE


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Formal Studies

LONG A STUFF Y STAPLE, THE TUXEDO IS BEING EMBR ACED BY A ST YLISH NEW GENER ATION — IT’S NOT GROWING UP, IT’S GOING OUT S T YL ED BY PAU L F R E D E R I C K

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PHOTO GR A PHED BY A L E X J O H N B E C K

A b ov e: Bomber jacket, $ 5 ,5 00; Shirt, $ 770, DIOR H OMME, diorhomme.com. Bow tie, price upon request, TOM F ORD, tomford.com. O pposite, from l eft: Tuxedo, $ 5 ,9 70; V est, $ 1,5 70; Sweatshirt, $ 2,04 5 ; Shirt, $ 6 20, BRUNELLO CUCINELLI, brunellocucinelli.com. Boutonniere, price upon request, PUTNAM & PUTNAM, putnamflowers.com. Sneakers, $ 205 , AX EL ARIG ATO, axelarigato.com. Tuxedo, $ 3 ,5 80; Epi shirt, $ 6 3 0, LOUIS V UITTON, louisvuitton.com. Director’s cap, $ 4 8, G ENTS, gentsco.com. Evening shoes, $ 74 0, SALV ATORE F ERRAG AMO, 86 6 -3 3 7-724 2. Jacket, $ 3 ,15 0; Trousers, $ 9 78; Scarf, $ 272, BERLUTI, 212-4 3 9 -6 4 00. T-shirt, $ 178, JOH N V ARV ATOS, johnvarvatos.com. Classic F usion Classico ultrathin skeleton watch, $ 16 ,4 00, H UBLOT, hublot.com. Socks, $ 3 9 , F ALK E, saksfifthavenue .com. Shoes, price upon request, LANV IN, lanvin.com.


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G ROOMER: MARTIN-CH RISTOPH ER H ARPER AT PLATF ORM NY USING AV EDA. TALENT: AARON V ERNON, WILH ELMINA; K YLE MOBUS AND ERIN MOMMSEN, REQ UEST. STYLIST ASSISTANT: MEAG H AN H ARTLAND.

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O pposite, from l eft: Blazer, $ 9 9 5 ; Turtleneck, $ 4 5 5 ; Trousers, price upon request, PORSCH E DESIG N, porsche-design.com. Shirt, $ 24 5 , H AMILTON SH IRTS, hamiltonshirts.com. Box chain necklace, $ 3 4 0, DAV ID YURMAN, davidyurman.com. Portugieser Automatic watch, $ 12,4 00, IWC, iwc.com. Socks, $ 3 0, BRESCIANI, Bergdorf G oodman, 800-5 5 8-185 5 . Sneakers, $ 4 9 8, ANDROID H OMME, androidhomme.com. Tails, $ 2,79 5 ; Shirt, $ 3 9 5 ; Bow tie, $ 9 5 , CANALI, canali.com. Tyler pants, $ 1,25 0, J BRAND, jbrandjeans.com. Cufflinks, $ 10,9 25 , MONIQ UE PÉ AN, moniquepean. com. Slippers, price upon request, RALPH LAUREN, ralphlauren.com. Dinner jacket, $ 1,29 5 ; Trousers, $ 3 9 5 , H ICK EY F REEMAN, hickeyfreeman. com. Shirt, $ 9 9 0, SAINT LAURENT BY H EDI SLIMANE, 212-9 80-29 70. Shoes, price upon request, ALDEN F OR J.CREW, jcrew.com. A b ov e, from l eft: Jacket, $ 9 ,3 00; Shirt, $ 6 25 , BRIONI, brioni.com. Mick jeans, $ 286 , J BRAND. Bow tie, price upon request, DAV ID H ART, davidhartnyc.com. V intage bolo tie, $ 120, V ICK I TURBEV ILLE, vickiturbeville.com. Cufflinks, $ 4 9 5 , DAV ID YURMAN. Shoes, $ 23 5 , DR. MARTENS, drmartens.com. Tuxedo, $ 3 ,9 9 5 ; Shirt, $ 4 25 ; Bow tie, $ 15 5 , ISAIA, isaia.it. Lowell jacket, $ 285 , J BRAND. Chuck Taylor All Stars, $ 5 0, CONV ERSE, dsw.com. Bomber jacket, $ 5 ,5 00; Shirt, $ 770; Trousers, $ 800, DIOR H OMME, diorhomme.com. Shirt ( worn around waist) , $ 24 5 , H AMILTON SH IRTS. Bow tie, price upon request, TOM F ORD, tomford.com. Art School shoes, $ 285 , BROTH ER V ELLIES, brothervellies.com.


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OUR INSPIRATION HAS ALWAYS BEEN YOU.


life ROCKY ROAD Isamu Noguchi’s Magatama had a madcap journey before arriving in Montecito, California.

.

T

Set in Stone

HOW DID A WEDDING GIF T TO JOHN HUSTON SURVIVE ELIZ ABETH TAYLOR AND ARTIE SHAW ONLY TO END UP IN A PL ASTIC BOX OUTSIDE OF SANTA BARBAR A? W RI T T EN BY J E R E M Y K I N S E R

PHOTO GR A PHED BY DA N I E L T R E S E

owering green hedges ank an i posing wro ght iron gate which opens to re eal an acre o erdant anic red lawn s rro nding a white panish st cco str ct re with a rolling red tile roo . he scene co ld acc rately be described as the ery essence o o thern ali ornia architect re so it s fitting that nestled inside is the sanct ary o ab nter the s atinee idol once considered ollywood s intessential ll erican boy and llan laser a fil prod cer and nter s partner o nearly three decades. It s been ore than years since the co ple le t behind os ngeles or the only slightly less starry anta arbara s b rb o ontecito where both prah in rey and llen e eneres are neighbors. ere the en lead a si ple li e In the ornings they either take their two hippets attie and li ia or a r n on the nearby beach or nter will isit his belo ed horse arlow in a stable a short distance away. o e days the co ple will ha e l nch at a ca in town. ery nday nter aith lly attends ser ice at his local atholic ch rch. I nter still charis atic at e er eels nostalgic or his days in the spotlight he need only look aro nd the capacio s residence at an array o arti acts ro his career on display. “ he rnishings are things I e ac ired ro y tra els all o er the world nter says. “ hey re wonder l e ories o people and places I e known. nd what a gro p that s been. ring his career as one o arner rothers top stars nter co peted against a es ean and a l ew an or roles escorted atalie ood on st dio arranged dates and e en aintained a recording career releasing the hit “ o ng o e which e ent ally led to the or ation o arner ros. ecords. nter detailed his rise to a e incl ding ro ances with nthony erkins and dol reye in his best seller Ta b Hunter C onfid entia l and a doc entary o the sa e na e is c rrently on the esti al circ it. In ontecito there are e entos o nter s s ccess in e ery roo . pair o othic chairs in the oyer re ind hi o his late riend ock dson to who they once belonged. n anti e table in the ne t roo was a gi t ro the ritish banking heir elyn aring. here

WHEN TAB HUNTER WAS ASKED IN 2005 WHETHER HE WAS EVER ROMANTICALLY INVOLVED WITH HIS FRIEND ROCK HUDSON , HE REPLIED ,

“ROCK ?

NO . NOT MY TYPE .”


S A L E S | R E N TA L S | R E L O C AT I O N | N E W D E V E L O P M E N T S | C O M M E R C I A L | M O R T G A G E | P R O P E R T Y M A N A G E M E N T | T I T L E I N S U R A N C E

IN THE WORLD OF REAL ESTATE, WHO’S ALWAYS A STEP AHEAD?

575 MADISON AVENUE, NY, NY 10022. 212.891.7000 © 2015 DOUGLAS ELLIMAN REAL ESTATE. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY.


life

are also plenty of equestrian paintings throughout the home, a tribute to H unter’s lifelong love of horses. Yet perhaps the most extraordinary object in the house— and certainly the most valuable—is Ma g a ta ma , a sculpture designed by the late Isa og chi. t first glance it s a rather unassuming work: a comma-shaped piece of black onyx highlighted by pale green stripes across the center, less than six inches in length. It could be mistaken for a paperweight, as it sits in the middle of the living room on a coffee table not one o og chi s ne t to a bron e horse fig rine. nter refers to it as “the marble kidney,” while G laser jokes that it could easily pass for a knickknack from Mexico. Yet the sculpture was recently appraised at half a million dollars— and it comes with a surprising H ollywood pedigree. Ma g a ta ma came into H unter and G laser’s possession thanks to a coin toss. It began with the couple’s friend, the actress Evelyn K eyes, who was best known for playing Scarlett O’H ara’s younger sister in G one W ith the W ind . K eyes was by all accounts a spirited blonde and an avid art enthusiast. In 19 4 6 , following a whirlwind courtship, K eyes married movie director John H uston, renowned for his own impressive preColumbian collection, and while honeymooning on the East Coast the newlyweds visited the New York studio of Noguchi, who gifted them the heavy, twisting sculpture. After K eyes and H uston divorced in 19 5 0, they stayed friendly and split their entire art collection evenly. When both parties found themselves in Spain not long after the break-up, H uston was feeling sentimental about their amassed collection and proposed ipping a coin with the winner taking all the art. H uston lost the bet, and K eyes found herself the proud owner o pieces by icasso fino a ayo and a l lee as well as a massive assemblage of pre-Columbian art. ew years a ter when eyes beca e engaged to fil producer Mike Todd, she offered him the Noguchi as an engagement gift. Three weeks after that, Todd announced he’d fallen in love with Elizabeth Taylor and returned the

NOGUCHI HAS BEEN QUOTED AS SAYING ,

“EVERYTHING

“Only in California would someone store a Noguchi in Tupperware.” sculpture to the jilted K eyes. She went on to marry famed bandleader Artie Shaw, who would, after retiring, sell without K eyes’ consent her furs, jewels and art collection. Somehow the Noguchi escaped his notice and remained with the actress until her death in 2008, after which it was bequeathed to laser who d looked a ter eyes in her final years. Despite the sculpture’s value and provenance, the couple doesn’t keep it under lock and key. In fact, when an appraiser recently visited to examine the piece, she found it stowed inside a thick rubber container. “It made sense that if it fell, it would be cushioned,” G laser says with a laugh. “But she told me that only in California would someone store a Noguchi in Tupperware.” Its modest repository notwithstanding, the value of the sculpture came as no surprise to either man, since K eyes had described it as her treasure. “Evelyn told me it’s better than gold sitting in a bank,” G laser recalls. “She would have never sold it. Its sentimental value to her was priceless.” It s fitting then that while the piece has landed in the hands of yet another silver-screen luminary, it’s perhaps with the safest star of them all—one who walked away.

IS SCULPTURE . ANY MATERIAL , ANY IDEA WITHOUT HINDRANCE BORN INTO SPACE , I CONSIDER SCULPTURE .”

CLOCK WISE F ROM TOP LEF T: EV ERETT COLLECTION; G ETTY IMAG ES; DANIEL TRESE

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Clockwise from above: Gone With the Wind–era Keyes; vintage Hunter; Hunter and Glaser, at right, with Magatama.


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life TRAVEL TITANS: Calmeyer (left) and Mitchell in the Paley Center for Media.

THE BUCKET LIST

.

F iv e of M exi co City' s most exc lusiv e, life- altering offerings

Leading the Charge

T WO POWERFUL CEOS TE AM UP TO ELEVATE TR ADITIONAL AFRIC AN TOURISM W RI T T EN BY F R A N C E S D O D D S

P

PHOTO GR A PHED BY M I M I R I T Z E N C R AW F O R D

eople attach so ch i portance to what hotel they stay in or what acti ities to do when they tra el says eborah al eyer the o nder and o bo ti e l ry tra el fir oar rica. “ t i yo don t eet the right people yo st won t know the co ntry the way that yo co ld. al eyer or one knows all the right people. he th generation o th rican started oar rica in a ter relocating to anhattan where she noticed a serio s oid in knowledgeable rican to ris . o al eyer began enlisting her capacio s personal network to gi e clients nprecedented e periences

like umpiring a national cricket match, or meeting the Mandela family. Calmeyer’s approach to luxury travel has attracted in ential clientele thanks in no small part to Pat Mitchell, one of the media’s most legendary glass-ceilingbreakers. itchell the first wo an to prod ce and host her own nationally syndicated television program, the first e ale and president o and most recently the executive vice chairman of the Paley Center for Media was not looking or yo r a erage dai iris on the beach acation when she enlisted al eyer. he wanted a getaway that wo ld wake her p to the world ha e her breathing deeply and scribbling notes on napkins. Mitchell has since taken si trips with oar rica o ten bringing high profile riends including diplomats, journalists, heads o networks and e en obert edord who told her the o rney was one of the most transformative experiences he’d ever had. Mitchell’s most memorable trip marked the occasion of her 70th birthday which she celebrated with abo t riends ro aro nd the world. he o rney began with an dwardian era sleeper train ro ape own to retoria. er gro p incl ded hinese power co ple r no a edia og l and ang an a bi ito s personality known as the “ prah o hina. “ r no and an arri ed with three or o r phones and i ads. r no wo ld be like ang on I st b ying ackie han s ranchise al eyer recalls. “ t by the end o that trip all o the de ices were gone. an was on r no s lap and he was kissing her. It was like e eryone ell in lo e again. The success of these expeditions inspired Mitchell and Calmeyer to join forces: They’ve recently launched a series o trips called earning a aris or an ill strio s collective of their friends and acquaintances, though they re open to other g ests as well. he itineraries will be a i o fi e star l ry and less e pected e c rsions like wildli e tracking isiting the ho e o world a o s sc lptor ylan ewis and tra eling to the ollege or o ris which ann ally trains yo ng wo en ro poor r ral areas in the art o hospitality. “ e e had presidents o networks co e who ha e the in ence to tell a di erent story abo t rica says itchell “and that s part o what eb and I want to ake s re happens.

1. ATTEND A MOLECULAR DINNER PARTY Puj ol , Pol a nc o Chef Enrique Olvera’s worldrenowned restaurant boasts a private upstairs dining room with an open kitchen. Watch the chef make molecular magic: husked baby corn smoked inside a gourd with powdered chicatana ants, coffee and costeño chile mayonnaise. PUJOL.COM.MX

2. SOAR ABOVE RUINS IN A HOT-AIR BALLOON Teotihua c a n, Mex ic o Watch the sun rise above the astonishing archaeological remains of the Teotihuacan Pyramids, followed by a lavish champagne breakfast. ADVENTUREHUNTERSMEXICO.COM

3. TREAT YOURSELF TO A SHOPPING CONCIERGE S t. R eg is, Pa seo d e l a R eforma Stock up on the city’s toniest designer frocks without ever leaving your suite, thanks to a discerning personal shopper. After assessing the guest’s taste, stylist Marco Corral will return with a closetful of Louis Vuitton and Carolina Herrera.

FOR A STAR - STUDDED TRIP A LITTLE CLOSER TO HOME , THERE ’S ALWAYS TMZ ’S CELEBRITY SAFARI . IT HITS NEW YORK ’S HOTTEST SIGHTING SPOTS , LIKE SURI CRUISE ’S GYM .

STREGIS.COM/MEXICOCITY

4. INDULGE IN INDIGENOUS HEALING Los A l c ob a s, Pol a nc o The Aurora Spa at Los Alcobas hotel specializes in Mexican healing rituals and indigenous-inspired treatments. A Skin Soufflé Wrap incorporates Mexican tree bark, which is believed to stimulate collagen production. LASALCOBAS.COM

5. EXPLORE A BILLIONAIRE’S ART COLLECTION Museo S ouma ya , Pl a z a C a rso Business magnate Carlos Slim’s glittering Museo Soumaya holds invite-only events like dinner parties and private concerts. SOUMAYA.COM.MX

—ANNE RODERIQUE-JONES


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This page: The great room, anchored by a pair of Vladimir Kagan sofas covered in Brochier fabric, also features Baker-style chairs covered in Christian Liaigre velvet, bronze-copper Tom Dixon pendant light fixtures (hanging) and Christian Liaigre shelves. On the back wall is a Laura Wilson photograph above the fireplace and a Jason Miller for Roll & Hill's Superordinate Antler Chandelier. Opposite page: The facade is a contrast in textures, including natural landscaping, Massaranduba wood, limestone walls and a dark bronze pivot door that offers an unobstructed view of the dining room and back patio.


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Future Imperfect

HOW A PROMINENT TE X A S COU PLE U PDATED A “MO DERN M A STERPIECE” OF THE 1970S TO MEET THEIR FAMILY ’S NEEDS WHILE PRESERVING ITS UNIQUE DESIGN WRIT TEN BY HOLLY CR AWFORD PHOTOGR APHED BY MINTA MARIA

hen Dallas architect F rank Welch created this 8,000-square-foot house along H ouston’s Buffalo Bayou, the home was on the cutting edge of modernist design. F ortyfi e years later nder the watch l eyes o nati e e ans stela and a id ockrell what co ld ha e beco e o tdated has been o erha led and is enjoying a spectacular second act. he ockrells planning a o e ro spen to H ouston, stumbled onto the architectural ge and were at first ch ore taken with the sprawling, wooded landscape than the inside of the ho se. “ e really lo ed that it was nestled back says stela a or er litigation attorney

who now focuses her time on philanthropy and nonprofits. “ r a ily has to ha e that eeling of a connection to nature.” It seemed as if their goal was within reach li ing in a ho e with an spen ibe. “We wanted to make the outside come in to re create the olorado war th says a id president o an oil and gas ir . But then the couple turned full attention to the striking design o the ho se. ho gh it was a modern showcase in its heyday—and was featured in the December 19 78 issue of A rc hitec tura l R ev iew —the structure wasn’t witho t so e real irks. o e bark on the necessary tweaks and updates, the new owners consulted modernist architect Jesse H ager and

partner eather owell o ontent rchitecture. “It was a masterpiece in its day, and the essence of the house is pretty great, but it needed so e lo e ager e plains. “ ertain aspects, like its labyrinthian 19 70s geometry, didn’t suit a modern lifestyle.” pening p the oor plan to i pro e ow and help the family entertain large numbers o g ests dro e the reno ation plan. “ ro the beginning, this house was meant for hosting organizations, like the H ouston Ballet, that are near and dear to s stela says. It was also important to replace the dated steel and glass windows o erlooking the backyard—while still bringing in as much nature and light as possible.

ORIGINAL ARCHITECT FRANK WELCH , DESCRIBED AS THE FATHER OF TEX AS MODERNISM , ALSO DESIGNED THE DILLON HOUSE IN DALLAS ’ TURTLE CREEK AND THE LAMPLIGHTER SCHOOL IN DALLAS .


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Clockwise from top left: A 16-foot fire pit lights up outdoor entertaining space; the family room features limestone walls, a wood veneer Agatha Suspension Lamp by LZF and a Dellarobbia Maxx sectional sofa; gallery skylights and a glimpse of the great room; custom bronze dining tables and antique bronze starburst lights by Tony Duquette, Milo Baughman side chairs covered in Mokum Chatelet and a custom carved Sapele buffet.

After more than a year of construction—or “reconstruction,” as the Cockrells affectionately refer to it—the four-decades-old home radiates a new energy. “We took their requests and reorgani ed significantly b t the ones stayed the same,” H ager says of the renovation. ( Translation: The couple maintained the original footprint of the house.) Best of all, to satisfy the always uppermost nature quotient, the architects added glass and doors to a wraparound deck and oor to ceiling windows at the back of the house. Moreover, they raised the ceiling height from 8 to 10 feet to increase the feeling of spaciousness. The piè ce de ré sistance is the 28-foot peak in the great room—part of the original ra e b t stripped o tile and decked in assarand ba wood to “so ten it. In choosing the finishing touches, such as light fixtures ( a Luceplan H ope chandelier) and wallpaper by a id icks stela re eled in her b dding lo e o interior design. She pulled inspiration from a variety of

“It needed some tweaks, but we wanted to preserve its spirit. When you come into this place, you have to commit to modernism.” places ecorati e enter o ston arpet o e stdibs.co and ore . The house’s clean, modern lines provided a can as or conte porary art b t carried a challenge or two. “With such strong architectural statements in every room, we had to take scale, pop, medium and texture into consideration says stela. he co ple ade space for photographers like G ray Malin and a ra ilson as well as paintings by atthew H eller and Christopher Martin. “Selecting art has been e tre ely di ic lt b t e citing,” she says. “Still, at the end of the day, we b y the art we absol tely lo e.

H ager relished the Cockrells’ engaged attit de abo t creating their ho e. “It was a discussion the whole way, and a ton of fun working with them,” he says. The clients certainly return the compliment. “Without Jesse this project wouldn’t have come to fruition,” says a id in praise o the architect s ision. “ e wanted o r ho se to be a can as a display of our love of art, fashion, entertaining, and a place where all feel welcome,” explains stela. “ e ha e a ily parties charity e ents and dinners. F rom an intimate dinner to a late-night dance party, no one wants to leave afterward. We love that feeling.”

THE FINAL BATTLE FOR TEX AS ’ INDEPENDENCE , LED BY SAM HOUSTON IN 1836 , WAS FOUGHT ALONG THE BANKS OF WHAT IS NOW THE PEACEFUL BUFFALO BAYOU .


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Palazzo Trudie

SHE HAS GLORIOUS HOUSES ALL OVER THE WORLD, BUT TRUDIE ST YLER FEELS MOST AT HOME ON HER 90 0 -ACRE TUSC AN ESTATE PHOTO GR A PHED BY M A R TA P I A Z Z A

O

f all the rooms in which to spend one’s time at Il Palagio, where sumptuous sitting areas and fireplace-adjacent settees seem to appear around every corner, no place beats the kitchen. F rom before the first cup of morning espresso lands on the farmhouse table until the last bits of dessert are cleared away at night, none of the rooms in this 16 th-century villa, situated among the picturesque hills of Tuscany, seem more alive. While the buzz around the kitchen could easily be attributed to the staff—a house manager who was born on the property as well as a duo of cooks who seem intent on feeding anyone, hungry or not, who crosses their path— or the guests lounging by the fireplace, what really gives the room its energy is Il Palagio’s chatelaine, the actress, philanthropist and producer Trudie Styler. The villa comes to life when Styler—who’s often joined here by her husband, Sting, and their four children—is in residence. It’s no surprise, seeing how she brightens when talking about Il Palagio, the site of countless gatherings, family vacations and memorable moments. It was after Styler’s daughter Eliot was born in 19 9 0 in Pisa, Italy, that the family decided to set down roots in the area. F inding the perfect place, however, was no simple task. “We took a long time to find Il Palagio; it took a lot of searching,” Styler says, warming herself by that open fireplace. “The perception of Sting is that he’s a big star—that S ig nor S ting would want a g ra nd isimo pa l a z z o—and that’s not what he’s like at all.” Sting and Styler, it seems, were after something that had more charisma than curb appeal. The couple searched extensively for a home in Tuscany— “I’d imagined a house of our dreams, but I didn’t think it existed in real life,” Styler says—and had almost given up hope when their real estate agent informed them there was one place left to see. “I said, ‘ Let’s just forget it and go have a drink,’ ” Styler recalls, “but Sting said, ‘ Let’s do it.’ ” When they showed up at Il Palagio, which was built in the 15 00s as a hunting lodge for Italian aristocrats, Styler knew she’d found what she had been looking for. “We arrived at the house and suddenly it was like the sun came out,” she says. “It’s the closest thing to paradise that we

were going to get.” H owever, sometimes even paradise could use an upgrade. Since Sting and Styler purchased Il Palagio in 19 9 7, the house, the 9 00-acre grounds and the three guesthouses have been extensively renovated, and while there’s no lack of rustic charm on the property, there’s also no modern convenience that the estate does without. Upscale improvements were necessary since, beyond being just another exquisite hideaway for a world-famous family and its glittering parade of weekend guests, Il Palagio does something few other grand homes do: It earns a living. In addition to producing a portion of the food prepared by the kitchen, the grounds at Il Palagio are home to grapes, olive groves and a healthy population of bees. This means that the estate yields four varieties of wine, three types of honey and one very good cold-pressed extra-virgin olive oil—all under the Il Palagio name—that are enjoyed on the premises but are also available worldwide at gourmet purveyors including

TRIED AND TRUDIE Styler poses near Il Palagio’s oversize outdoor chess set. Gown, price upon request, ROBERTO CAVALLI, robertocavalli.com. Cardigan, Styler’s own.

STYLIST: JAYNE BLIG H T. H AIR AND MAK EUP: ALAIN PICH ON AT STREETERS LONDON.

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Clockwise from top: A well-appointed exercise nook; a dining room with a handpainted ceiling commissioned by Styler; one of the family’s favorite sitting rooms.

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“I’d imagined a house of our dreams, but I didn’t think it existed in real life.” Eataly in New York. According to Styler, working with the land isn’t as foreign to her as it might seem. “I am a farmer’s daughter, so the idea of growing things isn’t alien to me,” she says. “It’s actually something I have in my blood.” If taking in Il Palagio by the glass isn’t quite enough, the entire estate—which can accommodate up to 4 9 guests—is also available for private rentals; Styler herself has used the grounds to host retreats for the likes of Sean Parker and Sir Bob G eldof. But Styler’s not counting on a career as an innkeeper to occupy her time. In addition to maintaining homes in New York and London, she’s becoming something of a movie mogul. As a partner in the production company Maven Pictures, she’s worked as a producer on films including S til l A l ic e and Ten Thousa nd S a ints and is currently trying to bring K haled H osseini’s best seller

A Thousa nd S pl end id S uns to the big screen. ( On-camera work hasn’t been frequent, but Styler has appeared onstage in London and New York in recent years and doesn’t rule out the possibility of making it a more regular gig.) More than anything else—more than movies or wine or her work in South American rain forests—Styler says what really drives her is family. She currently logs only a few weeks a year in Tuscany, but claims she’s hoping to change that, to get her entire clan there for a whole month each summer. The idea is so appealing that Styler says it’s the closest thing she can imagine to heaven. “When I die,” she says, “I want to spend eternity at Il Palagio, sitting around a table with my closest friends and family, eating amazing food, drinking our wines and laughing.” Sitting by the fireplace in Styler’s kitchen, that doesn’t sound like such a bad plan at all.

IN 1999 , STYLER AND HER CHEF, JOSEPH SPONZO , PUBLISHED THE LAKE HOUSE COOKBOOK , WHICH INCLUDED RECIPES FOR LAMB WITH MOLE SAUCE AND A

“RUSTIC”

PEACH PIE .


life

Wait Watchers FINE DINING IS EVOLVING,

AND SO IS YOUR SERVER. AS A NEW GUARD REPL ACES THE OLD, A GUIDE TO CHARTING THE COURSE

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rom Michelin-starred chefs’ counters hidden inside pizza parlors to the latest 18-course “vegetablefocused” gastronomic fantasy/ yoga studio, haute cuisine isn’t about white tablecloths anymore. And as New York restaurant critic Ryan Sutton says, “The waiters are the diplomats of the restaurant”—no matter how absurd the latest regime. “They are super well-informed now, and they’re passionate about more than just the food.” G one are the days of the tuxedoed F rench snob; say hello to the Z ac Posen– suited, Ph.D.-holding food scientist. F or your next restaurant expedition, we present a map to the world of waiters.

THE STEPFORD WIFE

THE NAVIGATOR

Like a butler or a geisha, a waiter once had the uncanny ability to predict our every need and silently meet it. Empty glass? More wine is here within 60 seconds, tops. Long day? The foie gras is just the thing to soothe your shattered nerves. Nature calling? He’s there to direct us to the restroom, hold the door and dry our hands on the way out. Sure, we were paying for the attention, but as relationships go, this one was damn satisfying.

Menus have become uncharted territory, and waiters know it. Sections like “land,” “fire” and “etc.” have replaced boring (read: practical) terms like “appetizer” and “entree,” and the only guarantee of a coherent meal is a 10-minute conversation with someone who knows the lay of the land. As Washington Post critic Tom Sietsema says, “If you have to explain how the menu works, perhaps it isn’t working.” Until this trend passes, the waiter is as indispensable a guide as Sacagawea.

THE GREASED PALM

TH E M ONK

TH E IM POSSIBLE HOST

THE IMPOSSIBLE HOST

THE STRUGGLING ACTOR

THE STRUGGLING FARMER

Once, it was ill-advised to show up without a pocketful of bills to pass out like Santa Claus: tips for the host, bartender, captain, coat check—not to mention the waiter. How much to tip was a headache. But the only way to ensure personal attention at a decent restaurant was to make it rain.

Restaurants from NYC’s Dirt Candy to San Francisco’s Atelier Crenn are moving to a service-included model that adds a flat fee to the check and makes waiters’ wages more predictable. “I suspect that 10 years from now, no one will know what a tip is,” says Craft empire builder Tom Colicchio.

Scoring a good table has never been easy. The sacred Book of Reservations would open 30 days in advance, and seatseekers would dial frantically and pray. Those who didn’t make it were forced to try their luck as a walk-in, only to be judged by a host as immovable as Gibraltar.

With the VIP caste system and no-shows putting a hit on bottom lines, restaurateurs eighty-sixed the Book. They’ve opted for an aggressively democratic no-reservations route. Not willing to eat at 5:30, when doors open? The host takes a name and texts when a table opens. Say, next Tuesday?

For actors, writers and the creatively unemployed, waiting tables was the ideal survival gig. A brain-free workday left them time to craft their masterpieces, and laissez-faire HR policies made it easy to bolt the minute a big break came. As they say: “Every waiter, like every prisoner, has a dream.”

These days, instead of scrambling to auditions, servers work the fields or wax rhapsodic about country life. Blame Thomas Keller: His French Laundry, in the Napa Valley, started serving Vermont butter that could be traced to original herds. We’ve been living with the Old MacDonald routine ever since.

G ETTY IMAG ES

W RI T T EN BY R E G A N H O F M A N N


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TOP LEF T: A PAG E F ROM S HA K E R : F U N C TI O N - PU R I TY - PE R F E C TI O N , BY DAV ID STOCK S, JERRY G RANT AND SIR TERENCE CONRAN, ASSOULINE. CLOCK WISE F ROM TOP RIG H T: MATTH EW K ROENING ; MARIE CLERIN; MATTH EW K ROENING ( 2) ; PIETER ESTERSOH N; JAMES IRV ING , COURTESY TH E SH AK ER MUSEUM | MOUNT LEBANON

C l oc k w ise from top rig ht: Dining chair from Enfield, NH , circa 183 0– 4 0s; the G alerie Downtown booth from the European F ine Art F air; case of drawers from Watervliet, NY, pre-186 0; rocking settee from South F amily, Mount Lebanon, NY, circa 189 0s; a modern interior designed by James H uniford featuring craftsman furniture; Shakers gathered in Mount Lebanon, circa 1870.

Shake Shacks CL ASSIC SHAKER FURNITURE E ARNS A SPOT IN THE MODERN HOME

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ED I T ED BY K E I T H P O L LO C K

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ention the Shakers and mod ern probably isn t the fi rst word that springs to mind, but if ever there was evidence that trends are cyclical, it’s in the revival of the 19 th-century furniture style. This spring, in a booth at the European F ine Art F air, F ranç ois Laffanour— director of the Paris-based Laffanour-G alerie Downtown—re-created a series of Shaker interiors to showcase the “origins of modern design.” As Los Angeles design expert Oliver M. F urth says, “This type of furniture has been decidedly out of fashion for so long that when we see it now, it feels ‘ new’ again. . . . Its guiding principles are simplicity, utility and honesty. It’s a precursor to the minimalism of the 19 6 0s and the resurgence of the craft movement of recent years.” Indeed, from a double-rocking settee to an original meetinghouse bench, the Shaker aesthetic is comfortable in a room with contemporary counterparts. But more than that, there’s something tactile and communal about the designs. “We spend our waking hours typing or holding a device,” F urth says. “H umans are thirsty for furniture made by someone’s two hands.”

R estorat ion Har dw Minimalism needn’t be relegated to interiors. Not, at least, according to Danish designer Søren Rose, who collaborated with RH on the brand’s new Maldives Collection of sleek outdoor furniture. “In this digital age, people are spend-

TEAK PARTY

ar e de signe r Sør en R ose say s al l the ac tion' s in the bac

ing too much time inside. They should go outside more,” says Rose, whose line of low-slung teak lounges, tables and chairs provides indoor comfort while keeping the focus on nature. When planning an outdoor living space, Rose

suggests taking cues from the landscape, like a stone walkway or a pool. Decide “if it’s rustic or minimalistic, whether it’s clean or textured,” he says. Get creative with the palette, but don’t go overboard. A good outdoor space

k ( yar d) should enhance the exterior rather than overwhelm it. Pieces in the Maldives Collection, for example, have ultra-deep seats to make the most of your terrace. So go on and enjoy the view. It’s never been clearer. —JULI MOSOFF


46 BRANDS. 25 UNIQUE TO MARKET. | THESHOPSATCRYSTALS.COM


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TROUBLED SON Thomas Gilbert Jr.’s money crisis was worsened by mental illness, reports say.

Making Allowances SUBSIDIZING A “FAILURE TO L AUNCH” CHILD C AN PROVE THE RISKIEST OF BUSINESSES W RI T T EN BY J U D I T H N E W M A N

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isa Smith ( not her real name) had to pull over to the side of the road because she couldn’t see through the tears while thinking about Thomas G ilbert Jr. “When I heard the story about the adult son who killed his father over his allowance, I had a sick feeling,” the mother of two from Pennsyl ania writes. isa is re erring to the horrific case of the 3 0-year-old, Princeton-educated son of a hedge-fund manager who in January allegedly murdered his father, Thomas G ilbert

IL LUS T R AT IO N BY C H A R I S T S E V I S

Sr., because he had reduced his son’s allowance. Like the G ilberts’, Lisa’s family’s wealth is relatively new; perhaps unlike the G ilberts, she has a stronger sense of her son’s instability. “My son Jake works for the family business, and whatever we give him isn’t enough,” Lisa says. She loves her son but fears his violent temper and has had to confront some harsh truths. “H e lives at home, we pay for a new car every two years, and he says his father underpays him. But he won’t go and work for someone else.” Jake had just broken into

his mother’s trust fund and taken $ 11,000 for incidentals; he refused to pay it back, saying he didn’t “owe” them anything. That was at the heart o their recent blow p. “ he fights with his father are unbearable. I know he should be on his own, but I’m so frightened of what will happen if we cut him off.” According to a recent Pew Research study of more than 2,000 adults, nearly 1 in 5 between the ages of 18 and 3 4 are getting financial help from their parents—sometimes a lot of help. And 3 out of 10 between the ages of 24 and 3 5 are living at home, the highest number since the 19 5 0s. The kids call it “being on the payroll.” And the grim joke among parents goes something like this: “What does your son do? “H e’s a waiter.” “A waiter? ” “Yes, he’s waiting for me to die.” The subject, say therapists, is becoming increasingly fraught. Jane G reer, Ph.D., a Manhattan psychologist, says her clientele, generally the wealthy and the super-wealthy, are preoccupied with their offsprings’ failure to launch. “Parents who perceive themselves as excellent nurturers—far better than their own parents —don’t want to see that the logical extension of nurturing is dependency,” she notes. Some observers detect a decided difference between parents with old money and those with new. A tradition exists among many of those with inherited wealth to help their kids, but the money is much more conditional. It pays for tuition and camps, bestowed on the children or grandchildren; perhaps they provide grander real estate than their kids could otherwise afford. But there is more of a sense that the children are custodians of their parents’ wealth, not owners of it. New money is much more open-ended, G reer says. “It’s more like, ‘ H ere’s your allowance, have fun in St. Bart’s.’ ” Sally K oslow, the author of S l ouc hing Tow a rd s A d ul thood : How to Let G o S o Y our K id s C a n G row U p, tends to agree about the lack of preset conditions, particularly among those whose aff luence is first or maybe second generation. “People are so deeply invested in their kids, they admire their kids’ champagne taste,” she says. The problem is, they have Bud Light budgets. Of course, over the past few years the economy has been brutal to new graduates, and it’s common for kids of means to work at post-college internships that pay nothing or

SOME CELEBRITIES DON ’T BELIEVE IN BIG ALLOWANCES FOR THEIR KIDS . SINGER TONI BRA XTON ’S TWO SONS GET $10 AND $15

...

A MONTH .


style they have grown up in, they are in some way failures—which may account for studies saying the rate of depression and anxiety is higher among the children of the aff luent. “The saddest thing to me,” says Lieber, “is that Tommy G ilbert Jr. was going around telling people he was starting a hedge fund. H ere was this person who, despite his Princeton education, would have been better off working as a music teacher or a carpenter somewhere. But this was the life he knew, and if the stories are correct, he lived with a sense that he disappointed everyone. There are lots of one percent kids who are not violent, who don’t have what is probably his underlying mental illness, who nevertheless live like that.” There is, I think, something else going on among this generation of well-off parents. The children feel guilty ( whether they admit it or not) , but they’re not the only ones. If our career focus has made us stint on time with our own

SOCIAL DISGRACES The Rich Kids of Instagram document their every lavish expenditure online, much of which comes courtesy of family money.

children, at least we can continue to cough up money. This, at least, is my thought every time my 13 -year-old son says things like, “Would you let me be a 4 0-year-old living at home, playing Civilization and eating nachos in bed? ” H is main goal in life is to torment me, of course. But I always read something else into his question: “Will you love me no matter what? ” Why does he doubt it? And what can I do to reassure him at this point? G iven my own predilection or p tting work first I ha e missed more than my share of soccer games— am I sure of my ability to say no to him if he took longer than I’d like to launch? Perhaps it is that sense of doubt in her own parenting ( she came from a childhood of poverty and abuse, and she has stayed in a turbulent marriage largely for the money) that keeps Lisa shelling out the dough. Certainly her son feels both his mother’s guilt and his father’s disappointment. She says, “Every day my son is reminded that he didn’t make it on his own, and his father lets him know he’s not the man he expected him to be.”

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“I worry that my husband and I live in a townhouse, but without our help, our son could end up living out of his car.”

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next to nothing. As a certain mother, whose husband is one of the best-selling authors of our time, put it to me, “My son chose a career in the arts, and I suppose I think of supporting him as a kind of sponsorship.” I point out that her own husband made a good living, and then a great living, as a writer—rare, G od knows, but it happens. “We would never have dreamed of asking our parents for money,” she admits. “But it’s a different time. I worry that my husband and I live in a townhouse, but without our help, our son could end up living out of his car.” Another parent of a son “in the arts” told me she has tried repeatedly to cut him off. “But then, there will always be some dire emergency,” she says. “It’s just hard not to put more money in his account when the balance is low.” H e is in his late twenties. “Maybe in a few more years . . . ” she adds wistfully. Those who take allowances often seem not so much guilty as resentful, notes Richard K irshenbaum, a N ew Y ork O b serv er columnist whose new book, I sn’ t Tha t R ic h? Life A mong the 1 Perc ent, is out in June. “I hear these wealthy adult children complaining about how they have no freedom, how their family controls them through money,” he says. “I’m always asking things like, ‘ Why don’t you take your own vacation? ’ and the answer is, ‘ Well, F ather would be really upset.’ ” Adults I talked to who received parental largess had many interesting justifications, from “I’ve helped my parents out when they’re sick” to “My parents wouldn’t want me to work at something I didn’t enjoy” to “Don’t my kids deserve the same kind of private-school education I had? ” ( To which the answer might actually be: No.) But what comes through in all these discussions is the inescapable sense of doubt about their own competence. When you’re 3 5 years old, nothing says “I am a fraud” like a Birkin bought with Daddy’s stipend. And therein lies one of the consequences of parents and adult children being enmeshed by money, says Ron Lieber, the “Your Money” columnist for The N ew Y ork Times. It’s not that there’s anything intrinsically wrong with the fact that so many parents help out a little. ( According to Lieber, approximately 20 percent of checks to private schools are written either by trust funds or people who are not the parents of the kids.) The problem, Lieber says, is the message to those in “the Lucky Sperm Club” is that if they do not live in the


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SOME OF THE COUNTRY’S TOP EXECS ARE SWAPPING THEIR SUITS FOR SPANDEX TO COMPETE IN THE MOST CHALLENGING R ACES ON E ARTH W RI T T EN BY E D E N U N I V E R

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CEOs Gone Wild

magine running through the wilderness for days, diving ( on purpose) under solid blocks of ice or rowing a tiny boat across the Atlantic Ocean—then suiting up and heading into the o fice or a day o delegating. It so nds like the tra ectory o a Bond movie, but this sort of double life—extraordinary feats o athleticis on one hand yo r e eryday nine to fi e on the other—is becoming more and more popular among a certain set o b siness titans. It s ally starts o t har lessly eno gh. orty se en year old Nashville business mogul Phil Theodore says it occurred to him to do an Iron an when considering what he wanted to acco plish before his looming 4 0th birthday—beyond owning a variety of companies in the healthcare, print-management and consultingser ices ind stries that is. espite his wi e s practical protests pointing o t a n ber o obstacles he d ace here wo ld he


C om p an ies f rom W al l S treet to S il ic on V al l ey a re taking fitness as s eriou s l y as the n ext I P O

If you’ve been down on Wall Street lately, you may have spotted some suits getting a bit snug in the backside. Shout out “Ass to grass!” and you could see some fearsome squats right there on the sidewalk. For this you can thank CrossFit, the highintensity workout that’s “kipping” its way into the tech and corporate cultures in the name of team-building— and a little gritty competition. JP Morgan, Goldman Sachs and Deutsche Bank have all hosted competitions at CrossFit Wall Street, while Silicon Valley is in a full-on burpee frenzy. This past January, Google, Twitter and HGST battled each other in a CrossFit Corporate Challenge at CrossFit Norcal in San Jose, owned by CrossFit Games winner Jason Khalipa. As far as Khalipa’s concerned, the trend makes perfect sense. “We see a direct correlation between salesmen who perform best in their companies and in these events,” he says. “These guys are willing to work hard because they want to win.” So long, softball.

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MARGINS TO MUSCLES

Sanderson says he has used in business from the start of his career, and which he has since extended to his athletic endeavors. “If I get home from work or out of a work dinner and it’s late—nine or ten o’clock at night—and raining, I’ll go out and run because I have to hit my 70 miles a week,” he says. “If I don’t run today, I have to hit 20 miles the next day, and I don’t have time to run 20 miles the next day, so it’s not even an option.” There’s also, of course, the undeniable appeal of winning. These guys aren’t Olympic athletes, but they know how good it can feel to best the competition, especially if the competition happens to be someone in their circle of business acquaintances. With races like these, says Weiner, the animalistic desire certain CEO types have to constantly outdo themselves, and each other, is fulfilled. Chris Solarz, a managing director at New York City consulting firm Cliffwater, holds five G uinness World Records, including one for climbing stairs ( going up 3 3 ,000 feet in less than 12 hours) and another for treadmill running ( achieving the greatest distance in 12 hours by logging 77.07 miles) . “I truly have not found my limit,” says Solarz. “I think my limit is when I’m curled up on the side of the road and I say, ‘ I cannot take one more step,’ and have to be dragged off in an ambulance.”

DUJOU R .COM

find the time? H e didn’t even own a bike! And so on—Theodore was determined. F ive months later, he was in Brazil at a starting line. It was there that he met tech entrepreneur Daley Ervin, who has since become Theodore’s racing partner-in-crime. “Then it kind of escalated,” says Theodore, in what could be called the understatement of the century. The two went on to run hundreds of miles at a time, at extreme altitudes and through myriad terrain, eventually taking on the aptly named Death Race, a biannual elimination-format competition in which athletes co plete i ensely di fic lt mental and physical challenges over the course of many days, from scaling mountains while wearing backpacks fi lled with rocks to chopping wood for hours on end. Only 15 percent make it through. “You don’t get to sleep,” says Theodore, somewhat boastfully. This coming December, he and Ervin will row a boat 3 ,000 nautical miles across the Atlantic Ocean from San Sebastiá n de la G omera to Antigua to raise money for Team Beyond, a charity they created along with Manhattan philanthropy consultant ( and fellow extreme racer) Jeff Smith to help se their races to benefit ca ses like h nger clean water and cancer. Team Beyond is anticipating raising $ 5 million this year alone. Buttoned-up workaholics worth millions of dollars might not seem the most natural thrill seekers, but in a world that’s ever work harder, play harder, the combination is an ideal marriage. “As people take on more challenges at work, they also seek greater challenge in their personal lives,” says Dr. William Weiner, a New York City sports psychologist, noting that the interest among hard-charging business types in extreme sports—or extreme anything—has been growing steadily over the last decade. And although it may also seem counterintuitive for those who already experience extreme levels of stress at work to willingly seek out extreme pressures in their personal lives, Weiner also says the athletic ventures may have a positive impact on office performance. “In a certain way,” he says, “those challenges, particularly athletic challenges, sometimes embolden [ executives] to take more risks in the workplace, too.” Many who’ve reached the top of their game professionally no longer face the same sort of hurdles that they did when they were younger and just coming up. And they miss it. The extreme work/ extreme play connection is clear to venture capitalist Philip Sanderson of IDG V entures, an ultramarathoner who created a TED Talk titled “H ow I H acked an Ultramarathon by Thinking like an Entrepreneur,” which encourages the idea of committing strongly to each and every goal—no excuses allowed. It’s a philosophy

From top: Skulls given as medals to Death Race winners; Theodore, left, and Ervin.

—FRANCES DODDS

MARLINS POSE A BIGGER DANGER TO SMALL BOATS IN AN OCEANIC CROSSING THAN SHARKS DO BECAUSE THEIR LONG BILLS CAN POKE A HOLE THROUGH THE VESSEL .


body

MOVING THE NEEDLE

It’s not great genes or even great Botox. The secret to aging well—really well? H uman growth hormones

ive years ago, at age 4 7, Manhattan Pilates instructor Rebecca Collins ( not her real name) felt the body she had spent years fine-tuning was starting to decline. “I was a little sluggish, unmotivated to work out and noticing my skin start to sag,” she says. She wanted an anti-aging boost that went beyond the effects of green juice and downward dog, and sought the help of New York City internist Joseph Raffaele, an age-management specialist. H is prescription: .5 milligrams of synthetic human growth hormone ( H G H ) administered daily intravenously, along with a once-in-a-while estrogen cream to tamp down any perimenopausal symptoms, like hot f lashes. Today, at 5 2, Collins says she feels more energetic than she did decades ago. The fat around her midsection melted off, her muscles became more defined and the skin on her face continues to feel taut. “My sisters and I are close in age, and it’s all the same genes, but my face is plumper than theirs, and I don’t have the creases they have,” she says. “People are amazed when they find out how old I am, though I’m certainly not going to tell them I’m taking H G H , because I work hard, too.” H G H , a protein naturally produced by the pituitary gland, stimulates growth throughout the body ( including cells, muscles and bones) . The F DA has approved synthetic injections for those who don’t make enough of it, including kids with growth disorders or adults with degenerative muscle disease. But H G H has also become a tool among athletes and actors trying squeeze better results ( or a few more years) out of their bodies: Lance Armstrong, Suzanne Somers and Sylvester Stallone have all reported using H G H , and countless others in H ollywood are rumored to partake. F ortyseven-year-old PayPal cofounder Peter Thiel

recently said he’s hoping the hormone will help him live to be 120. Raffaele started using the hormone himself at 3 7 and 18 years later looks nothing like other baby-boomer M.D.’s. H e’s lean, with shiny hair and skin that’s completely smooth—no jowls, wrinkles or under-eye bags in sight. At his practice, PhysioAge Medical G roup, roughly 20 percent of patients take H G H injections, usually in combination with other hormones. Among the benefits he touts: more lean body mass, changes in skin texture and moisture, fastergrowing hair and nails, improved cognitive function and even greater bone density. Aside from anecdotal evidence, however, there isn’t a lot of raw data to confirm that H G H is indeed a miracle elixir. ( Which may be why most of the marketing happens at the grass-roots level. “I get all these calls from musicians and actors because they’ve heard about it at a party or at the gym,” says Dr. Andre Berger, founder of the Rejuvalife V itality Institute in Beverly H ills.) There are two other issues that keep the hormone from exploding full-throttle. Cost is one—a year’s supply can run around $ 15 ,000, since insurance doesn’t cover it. Safety is another. Since hitting the market, H G H has been linked to a host of side effects, including carpal tunnel, diabetes and, most critically, cancer. “There’s a reason our H G H levels go down naturally as we age,” says K evin Yuen, an endocrinologist at the Oregon H ealth & Science University H ospital. ( The fear is that in large doses, human growth hormone could act like fertilizer on malignant tumors or damaged cells.) Still, for patients like Collins, who simply feel better on the stuff, that’s a gamble they’re willing to take. “I’m not just sitting around pumping this stuff up,” she says. “But diet, exercise, H G H . . . these days, it has to be a combination of everything.”

ATHLETES KNOWN TO TAKE HGH CLAIM IT SPEEDS UP HEALING OF INJURIES AND IMPROVES THEIR ENDURANCE AND STRENGTH .

SHOT IN THE DARK Can HGH really stop the clock?

ROBIN BROADBENT/ TRUNK ARCH IV E

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WRIT TEN BY KRISTEN DOLD


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Hair Raisers

HAVING A HE AD FULL OF FAUX LOCKS WAS ONCE CONSIDERED HOLLY WOOD’S LIT TLE SECRET. NOW IT’S A STATUS SYMBOL— FOR EVERYONE

Cher’s tour rider requests a special backstage room with one large table and three chairs to store her wigs.

Beverly Hills extensionist to the stars Piny Benzaken charges $4,500 for a custom locks appointment.

Britney Spears suffered a hair malfunction in front of 4,500 fans during a Las Vegas concert when a clump of blond extensions fell from her head and became attached to her black bodysuit.

Julianna Margulies’ Good Wife wig cost the show $10,000.

Eight days after debuting a dramatic pixie cut on Instagram, Beyoncé’s hair morphed into a long bob.

In her 2010 autobiography, millionaire wig mogul (and actress) Raquel Welch wrote, “With the aid of a wig, I have more versatility in my life, and so can you!”

Kylie Jenner just launched her own line of teal ombré premium clip-ins that are 24 inches long and sell for $270.

Downtown destination: 27 West 20th Street in Manhattan is home to RPZL, the city’s first hair-extension bar.

Haute-couture fashion house Balmain makes a 3D “Hair Dress” that sits atop the head like a crown. It comes with a child-size hanger and garment bag for storage.

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W RI T T EN BY L I N D SAY S I L B E R M A N


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Beauty 411: Rio

THE UNDER-THE-R ADAR PRODUC TS, SERVICES AND E XPERTS LOC ALS LOVE BEST PRO DUCED BY V E RO N I Q U E G A B A I - P I N S K Y

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ia d a d e, the Portuguese word for vanity, has no negative connotations in Brazil. On the contrary, it’s considered part of a citizen’s duty to keep up appearances. hese fi e io de aneiro experiences will help you capture a bit of that local bombshell glow on your next visit to South America’s C id a d e Ma ra v il hosa .

• BOOK A B R A ZILIAN blowout from either Crystal H air or C. K amura, the city’s most renowned salons for turning unruly curls into sleek, shiny waves—the signature of Brazilian women.

treatment by Dr. Ariel H aus, who says, “Beauty in Brazil is characteri ed by healthy c r aceo s tanned fig res. One of his most requested procedures is the Brazilian Bottom Lift, which tones, sculpts and reduces the appearance of cellulite.

• B ROWSE TH E AISLES of G ranado, the city’s famous pharmacy, which specializes in bath, body and home goods. Beautiful packaging and high-quality ingredients put these products on par with department store brands.

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Mix Master SCIENCE FIC TION BECOMES RE ALIT Y WITH BMW ’S i8

W RI T T EN BY PAU L B I E D R Z YC K I

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hen BMW design honcho Benoit Jacob says that the i8, the brand’s new plug-in hybrid sports car, was designed “by the wind,” he means it both literally and fig rati ely. “ e don t belie e we can con ince people to go or s stainable i it s not se y he says. “I it s not con incing or e otional. he i s layered aerodyna ic d cting that r ns ro end to end o its carbon fiber body a c l ination o e tensi e wind t nnel

PHOTO GR A PHED BY C H R I STO P H E R G R I F F I T H

testing—is meant to reduce drag and maximize stability. In ore poetic ter s howe er the owing or o the “s stainability oc sed sports car is, like a sailboat, about harmony and the ability to esh with its en iron ent. What makes the i8 remarkable, though, is that it represents a nuanced answer to the ongoing dile a o eco e ficiency ers s per or ance. ro nd town the car can rely on its regenerati e braking powered electric dri e

but when it’s time to hit the open road, the gas-powered hybrid system takes the worry out o staying within reach o the nearest charging station. nd while the i handles with trademark BMW precision, it does so in near silence, although—with an MSRP starting at $ 13 5 ,700 and optional matching Louis V uitton luggage— certainly not without making a statement, as the first wa e o do gooders taking deli ery o their i s this s er ndo btedly already know.


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play From left: Jill Zarin, Sheila Rosenblum, Linda Rice, Iris Smith and Dottie Herman.

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The Mane Event THE WOMEN BEHIND L ADY SHEIL A STABLE T WO ARE TURNING HORSE R ACING INTO THE SPORT OF QUEENS W RI T T EN BY B I L L K E I T H PHOTO GR A PHED BY S E A N D O N N O L A

heila Rosenblum doesn’t like to take no for an answer. “It may be the death of me in the end,” the Manhattan social fixture says. “Life should be about calculated risks, and not all of mine have come with calculation.” As the founder of Lady Sheila Stable Two, an all-female horse-racing group based on Long Island, she’s had to not only embrace but also learn to revel in the reality of risk. It’s something the former ballet dancer and F ord model has taken to wholeheartedly. osenbl had irted with the er dite equestrian pastimes of jumping and dressage for years, but in 2010, when her then husband, Daniel, offered to buy her a world-class dressage horse, she decided she’d take a racehorse instead. d ittedly her first ew years in the horse-racing business were a string of missteps—“I’ve made mistakes, some really expensive mistakes,” she says—and industry types seemed to think she was a deep-pocketed, ash in the pan in estor who wo ld lea e the field as ickly as she entered it. In one early snafu, she was sold a horse that wasn’t technically for sale, an ordeal that ultimately required the involvement of the F BI and H illary Clinton. Rosenblum’s luck changed, however, when she met Linda Rice, a horse trainer based on Long Island. “I didn’t seek out a female trainer, but she just blew me away,” says Rosenblum. “I wanted a New York trainer because I wanted to touch my horses and feed them, to watch them train in zero degrees and 100 degrees. I wanted a trainer who would take the time to answer questions because I wanted to learn. I didn’t just want to write a check and say, ‘ H ey, go do what you want.’ ” Still, it is a business, and that’s why Rosenblum has rounded up a cabal of eager investors—what’s known as a syndicate in the equestrian world—to co-own a literal stable of horses. “I surrounded myself with an incredible team,” she says. Some were old friends, some she knew only socially, but they each had a zeal for investing their money in a new endeavor. “We were all looking for something just a little different, something outside of our sense of security,” she says. F irst to sign on was Rosenblum’s longtime friend Jill Z arin, best known for her stint on The R ea l Housew iv es of N ew Y ork C ity, who in turn brought in Dottie H erman, the CEO of Douglas


A FRIEND IN STEED: Rosenblum, at left, La Verdad and Zarin, below.

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“It’s not an area to go into if one can’t lose the money she’s investing.” Elliman. Donna Bernstein, the celebrated horse painter, also asked to meet with Rosenblum— “I thought she was trying to sell me art,” Rosenblum says—and philanthropist Iris Smith soon joined the group as well. “It’s all bright, hardworking women. We weren’t necessarily friends from the start, but we’ve become that,” Rosenblum says. “I have a lot of girlfriends who want to be involved and I say, you can’t. It’s very expensive, it’s very slow, it’s not for the weak of heart, and it’s not an area to go into if one can’t lose the money she’s investing.” So, what gives Rosenblum the moxie to carry out such a risky endeavor? H aving spent her adolescence training at the strict Royal Ballet School in London and later the School of American Ballet, Rosenblum grew up avoiding any and all hazardous behavior. With

her dancing days behind her, however, she’s now able to dabble in more daring affairs. “I’ve been making up for everything since my twenties! ” she says with a hearty laugh. But racing is anything but a heartless undertaking. Of her star sprinter, La V erdad, who is a favorite to win this year’s New York– Bred Divisional Championship, Rosenblum says, “I’m emotionally involved. I was advised by two vets not to buy this horse, and yet I did.” Though the eight investors—also included are Diane Davis and Jessie Laiken—are rarely in the same city at the same time, they all came together this April to root on La V erdad at a race in Saratoga, where they also had an official shareholders dinner and celebration at the Saratoga National G olf Club. Rosenblum might have once been known for her Upper

East Side soiré es, but these are the sorts of places she’s logging time in now. Indeed, if you find yourself at Belmont or at Saratoga, Lady Sheila Stable Two horses— there are three in total—aren’t hard to spot. “I chose the tackiest combination of colors that I could humanly find, which is bubblegum pink and neon blue,” Rosenblum says. “I wanted to pick something that I could see from really far away when I get older.” And just like that Rosenblum demonstrates that even from the beginning, when everyone doubted her longevity, she was always thinking long-term. “My kids told me that I promised everyone I’d quit if my second trainer didn’t work out,” she remembers. ( Rice is her third.) “But I have the luxury of changing my mind.”

SIX FEMALE JOCKEYS HAVE RIDDEN IN THE KENTUCKY DERBY SINCE 1970 . THE HIGHEST PLACEMENT FOR A WOMAN SO FAR WAS FIFTH , BY ROSIE NAPRAVNIK IN 2013 .


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A Confederacy of Punches C AN WE STOMACH THE GOOD -FOR-YOU COCK TAIL TREND?

PHOTO GR A PHED BY H E N RY H A RG R E AV E S

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lthough the idea of drinking for health—drinking alcohol, anyway—is about as sane as going on a mayonnaise cleanse, bars these days are serving cocktails that are nearly indistinguishable from those fancy pressed juices everyone’s downing in the name of better living. At Alembic in San F rancisco, the menu description for the Southern Exposure calls out the antioxidants in the shot of celery juice it lists among other ingredients that include gin, mint and lime. At Percy & Co. in Seattle, the Mother’s H elper pairs gin with kombucha, while bargoers can add healthenhancing “tinctures”—for “brain power,” “complexion” or “female balance”—to any drink. Tanya’s Cafe in London has even gone full juicery-for-party-people, offering a line of “Superfood Cocktails” that includes the Maple Maori, with gin, kiwi, pomegranate, apple, calendula, carob and chlorella. H ow did we get here? A theory is that once bartenders made the switch from neon green sour mix to fresh mixers, cocktails were already halfway down the road to smoothiedom. H ouse-squeezed fruits and vegetables are far more palatable than bottled juices; matcha, bone broth, shiso and coconut water add une pected twists to traditional a or profi les and kombucha tastes much like the vinegary shrubs that have taken the mixology world by storm. Add the massive popularity of clean eating and you’ve got a trend, no matter how silly it might sound. “ hen I fi rst got hired I tho ght h y G od, how am I gonna make healthy cocktails when alcohol is bad for you? ’ ” says Johnny Swet, a bar consultant who developed the

drinks menu for health-conscious bistro Cafe Clover in NYC. Swet visited juice bars and vitamin shops, then worked with a nutritionist to build cocktails like the What' s Up Doc? — which contains Linie aquavit, carrot, pineapple and parsley, but certainly tastes like nothing your doctor has ever prescribed. “I mean, I

always think a cocktail is going to be a little unhealthy,” Swet says. “But you can make it better, and cleaner. And you can have less of a hangover the next day.” F or anyone who made a habit of another recent cocktail trend— four-shot Manhattans made with overproof rye—that’s pretty unassailable reasoning.

KOMBUCHA IS A FERMENTED DRINK MADE FROM BLACK , WHITE OR GREEN TEA THAT NATURALLY CONTAINS A VERY LOW AMOUNT OF ALCOHOL .

STYLED BY CAITLIN LEV IN

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W RI T T EN BY JACQ U E L I N E D E T W I L E R


play DOGGY STYLE The classic kennel is for the birds.

Summer Vacation, Bitches! ENGL AND’S L ATEST PET PROJECT: HOTELS THAT C ATER TO THE FURRIEST MEMBER OF THE FAMILY W RI T T EN BY A LYSSA G I ACO B B E

LEONA HELMSLEY ’S MALTESE , TROUBLE , WAS NO STRANGER TO LUXURY ACCOMMODATIONS — THE PAMPERED POOCH TRAVELED BY PRIVATE JET AND

“RETIRED”

TO A BEACHFRONT RESORT IN FLORIDA .

BJORN IOOSS/ TRUNK ARCH IV E

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o many posh hotels these days make a big deal of all the ways in which they cater to pets—the in-room “Best F riends” menu featuring burgers and bone-shaped biscuits at L’Ermitage in Beverly H ills, the poolside pet massage at Las V entanas al Paraí so in Cabo among them. But make no bones about it: These are still hotels for humans. You know that. The hotels know that. And your cat, that so rp ss she definitely knows it too. Now a new breed of European hotelier is p tting pets first with l ry ani als only accommodations that rival your own. Nick sel it his ob in to r n the ayfields ry og otel in ortha ptonshire two hours north of London, which offers 11 private rooms and, soon, a doggy swimming pool. Ninety minutes west, on 12 acres of postcardperfect Cotswolds farmland, Jenny Marriott and her partner i o er “l ry breaks or dogs” at their inn, The Paw Seasons. All overnighters sleep inside—they’re not a nima l s— and, says Marriott, between “invigorating runs and walks along some of the 112-mile Cotswolds Way trail,” they can wander around the farmhouse and choose where to curl up, which, unsurprisingly, is often by the kitchen ( Tim is a b dding baker . c rsions ight incl de a trip to Westonbirt Arboretum or Brean Sands for a midmorning swim. And while the resort sees a n ber o high profile owners arriott says “the dogs are blissfully unaware of their importance, so there are no airs here! ” Where there are undoubtedly plenty of airs, howe er is at he Ings ry at otel in Yorkshire, where even the fussiest felines— and show e a eline who isn t can find comfort in one of 12 woodland animal-themed suites that feature four-poster beds with down pillows radiant oors bespoke cli bing trees and a room-service menu including such treats as sea bass and prawns ( with a catnip garnish, naturally) and house-made “Meowgaritas.” Private balconies overlook acres of rolling hills b t with inch at screens that play wildlife scenes all day long, who can be bothered with actual wildlife? “Busy” days wind down with aromatherapy massages, warm towels and bedtime stories. “There is never a dull moment,” says innkeeper Jo Ounsley. “They never get bored.” And if they do, that’s what the in-room iPads are for.


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PARTY ANIMALS: Harvard’s young Republicans, clockwise from left, Emily Hall, Will Long, Emma Wheeler, Bella Gomez and Chanel Rion.

The Crimson Elephants

WHILE REPUBLIC AN HARVARD GR ADS SEEM TO BE STACKING THE U.S. SENATE, YOUNG CONSERVATIVES ON C AMPUS FIND THAT LIFE STILL REVOLVES AROUND A DIFFERENT T YPE OF PART Y WRIT TEN BY JOHN WOLFSON

O

PHOTOGR APHED BY ADAM DETOUR

n a frigid mid-F ebruary evening, a meeting of the H arvard College Anscombe Society is late getting started. Outside, the snow in Cambridge rises depressingly high, and the sidewalks are streaked with salty slush. The gloom extends inside room 107 of Robinson H all, where the Anscombe Society’s e ec ti e o ficers all three o the are holding o calling the meeting to order. It’s a lonely business being a conservative on what is often described as one of America’s most liberal campuses, and the Anscombe Society—motto: “Where traditional values meet H arvard”— hoped a recent recruitment effort involving V alentine’s candy distributed in dorms would draw potential members to tonight’s meeting. But now it’s past 7 P .m., and so far copresidents Bella G omez and Thayer Wade and treasurer Bryan Poellot are the only ones who’ve showed up. Still, the group isn’t ready to accept defeat.

H arvard’s Anscombe Society is one of several on campuses across the country named for G .E.M. Anscombe, the British academic who advocated for chastity, family and the right to li e. he ar ard society has abo t o ficial members, but only a handful are active. That put the society in a precarious position when its last president graduated in 2014 . “[ Because] the club is so small and not that many people are active, we didn’t have an election,” G omez recalls. “And then, when our president graduated, we were left without leadership.” G omez eventually agreed to take over, but given her commitments as a member of varsity crew, she asked Wade to serve as co-president. All things considered, a few new members would be a godsend. Wade glances at the time. “We’ll just give it a few more minutes,” he says. It s not hard to fig re o t why the nsco be ociety has trouble attracting new members. The society is concerned with social issues, like “sexual integrity,” which includes a


call to abstinence; the sanctity of traditional marriage, which is to say the institution involving one man and one woman; and “true feminism,” which means, according to the society’s website, “equal rights and freedoms… that can co-exist with motherhood and the unique responsibilities it entails.” Sure, there are millions of people who share those beliefs, but they’re not typically college students. The society knows all this. G omez, who calls herself “extremely socially conservative,” says she has no illusions about how her belie s fit in at a place like ar ard. “ e are a ery small group on campus,” says the 20-year-old sophomore from e ington ent cky. “ e re trying to grow. nd in airness the gro p has had s ccesses lect re it hosted in ebr ary by the conser ati e writer onna reitas drew abo t people. Still, the society’s message can be a tough sell. President Richard Nixon referred to the university as “the K remlin on the Charles,” and Texas senator Ted Cruz has clai ed that while he was at ar ard aw in the s there were a dozen Marxist members of the faculty who “believed in the o erthrow o the . . go ern ent. ar ard in other words, has the reputation of being very liberal. hat s not to say the nsco be ociety e bers are the only conser ati es on the ca p s. here s the pop lar arard ep blican l b pl s the ohn da s ociety ar ard Right to Life, the Ha rv a rd S a l ient student newspaper and a number of other conservative groups and clubs. But there is a belief in right-wing circles that the institution remains i per io s to conser ati e in ence. o e says when she discusses politics with her more liberal classmates, “they’re letting me talk mostly so they can tell me that I’m wrong.”

ar ard and think hy on arth did these people go there re they gl ttons or p nish ent t the tr th is the idea o ar ard as so e sort o liberal bastion is largely a yth. radley says at its core ar ard is a b siness whose prod ct is ed cation. “ ar ard is abo t power he says “and whether you’re liberal or a little right, it doesn’t matter.” ar ard is less concerned with acti is than with in ence as we saw in pril when st dents ac lty and al ni staged sit-ins to demand the school divest from fossil fuels. Bradley says the students who choose the school, regardless of their politics, do so because of the opportunities that come with it. “There are a lot of people here,” one student tells me, “who are convinced they’re going to be president.” ith the in tes contin ing to tick away it is clear that no new e bers are going to show p at the nsco be ociety eeting in obinson all. ade takes one ore look at the time and at last calls the meeting to order.

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ot all conser ati es at ar ard eel arginali ed. he ca pus has proved fertile for Republican political talent. Last year three ar ard ed cated ep blicans o otton o rkansas en asse o ebraska and an lli an o laska were elected to the . . enate. hat cha ber now has ore e bers with ar ard ties than e ocratic ones. eanwhile ar ard grad lise te anik a ep blican ro ew ork was elected to the o se last year. G avin Sullivan, a 20-year-old sophomore, is a vicepresident o social e ents or the ar ard ep blican l b and says the dominant liberal sentiment at the school actually works to build solidarity on the right. “I think it invigorates our discussions a bit,” Sullivan says. But in general, he adds, “people are respectful of political diversity.” Sullivan says it’s easier on campuses for conservatives like hi who are oti ated pri arily by fiscal policy noting “Students can react strongly to social conservatism.” t st how strongly ro what I e seen it wasn t the scorn o liberal st dents e ing gro ps like the nsco be Society as much as the lack of awareness that such groups existed at all. Indeed, when I asked Jacob Carrel, the president o the ar ard ollege e ocrats what he ade o the nsco be ociety he said it was his sense that they weren t especially well known. ow co ld all the co nists at ar ard iss the social conser ati es in their idst I put that question to Richard Bradley, author of Ha rv a rd R ul es: The S trug g l e for the S oul of the W orl d ’ s Most Pow erful U niv ersity, who says, “You hear about conservatives at

It s hard not to eel or o e ade and oellot three dri en yo ng people willing to sacrifice or their belie s. Their recent recruitment push was a lot of effort with no discernible payoff. So was it better to be feared or ignored? y ind ashed to the alentine s ay packages the gro p delivered to all freshmen. The bags, packed with candy, were placed in baskets on dorm-room doors. This kind of “door dropping” is so common that many students eventually stop bothering to sort thro gh the . s acob arrel the College Democrats president, told me, “There’s a good chance the people who got the bags didn’t even notice.”

IN 2012 , MITT ROMNEY, WHO HOLDS A JOINT J . D . AND M . B . A . DEGREE FROM THE UNIVERSITY, LAMBASTED PRESIDENT OBAMA FOR HAVING SPENT

“TOO

From left, Hall, Long, Cameron Khansarinia, Rion, Gomez and Wheeler.

MUCH TIME AT HARVARD .”


work

To Sell a Mockingbird THE PUBLIC ATION IN 1960 OF HARPER LEE’S FIRST NOVEL MADE THE AUTHOR VERY FAMOUS —AND VERY RICH. NOW, WITH HER SECOND BOOK , GO SET A WATCHMAN , DUE THIS SUMMER , WE TAKE A LOOK AT THE TRUE PRICE OF LITER ARY GENIUS W RI T T EN BY F R A N C E S D O D D S

Millions of copies of To Kill a Mockingbird that have sold worldwide to date.

PA G E S O F N O T E S T H AT L E E W R O T E F O R

How old Lee will be when Go Set a Watchman is published.

Number of years Lee studied law at the University of Alabama before leaving to pursue writing.

C A P OT E’S T RU E - C R I M E MASTERPIECE, IN COLD BLO OD.

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H E R F R I E N D T RUM A N

How many days it took after Go Set a Watchman was announced for the book to hit the number one spot on Amazon.

The highest price ever paid for a signed first edition of To Kill a Mockingbird.

$25,000

2013 The year To Kill a Mockingbird was banned in schools by Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana.

To Kill a Mockingbird’s ranking on a recent list of Top 100 Banned Books.

Royalties Lee was reportedly paid per day in 2009.

$9,249

40

#21 Number of languages into which To Kill a Mockingbird has been translated.

H ARPER LEE, MAP OF LOUISIANA: G ETTY IMAG ES. CAK E: ISTOCK .

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150 : N U M B E R O F


Prepping for Club Fed

IT’S NO E ASY TASK TO GO FROM LIFE BEHIND A DESK TO LIFE BEHIND BARS. BUT A GOOD COACH C AN MAKE ALL THE DIFFERENCE W RI T T EN BY A D R I E N N E G A F F N E Y IL LUS T R AT IO N BY S É B A ST I E N T H I B AU LT

F

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or plenty o s ite e ec ti es ha ing a consig liere—whether to assist in greasing wheels in Washington or counsel on the intricacies of international e pansion is a necessity. o when asters o the ni erse find the sel es acing ti e behind bars, many of them hire a prison coach. os ngeles based cons ltant arry e ine who has been doing the ob or eight years says the skills he learned d ring a year sentence or dr g trafficking, securities fraud and racketeering are what ake hi a s ccess l coach. “I helped o t so any people while I was inside with edical assistance early release trans ers I tho ght I co ld t rn this into a b siness he says. H e wasn’t the only one. he field which has blosso ed in recent years incl des coaches coming out of careers within the prison system as well as e con icts who can o er critical insight. nd while so e coaches speciali e in shortening sentences consultant H erb H oelter cited community service to help eanie aby billionaire y arner a oid ail ti e in a ta e asion case—others help prepare clients for life on the inside. r ce a eron a allas based co nselor ad ises clients on what they can bring to ail options or anaging finances from behind bars and which fellow inmates to sociali e with. ther ad isers oc s on helping relati es cope with the change. “People watch The S ha w sha nk R ed emption, and they’ve got a perception of prison,” says Levine, “but it’s not necessarily like that.” F or criminals at minimum-security camps, life isn’t ch like a prison o ie. “It s people st like the who made some poor decisions and ended up convicted,” Levine says. “The important thing is everybody there is getting o t one day and they don t want to get into tro ble. In act H oelter claims the atmosphere can be downright friendly. “It s al ost like a raternity he says. F or some of the better-connected prisoners, there’s even a buddy system. The breadth of H oelter’s practice allows hi to o er a “big brother progra or new clients. “I somebody’s going to Schuylkill in Pennsylvania, we’ll call another guy’s wife and say, ‘ H ey, we’ve got this rookie coming in. an yo r h sband st look a ter hi he e plains. That sort of connection can be a lifesaver, since what tr ly ends p plag ing in ates is the boredo . “ o re

going from an environment where you had control over thousands of people to an environment where they say, ‘ H ey, this is when we have breakfast,’ ” says H oelter. So, how does the deposed head of a F ortune 5 00 company make the best of his powerless life? “The question we pose to guys is, ‘ What are the things you’ve always wanted to do? ’ ” H oelter says. H e encourages reading a book a week, learning a lang age or finding a prison ob that tili es the in ate s skills. Leg a l skills, that is. H e mentions a client doing time or ta ra d who o ered a co rse in personal finance “I never wanted to know what he taught them,” he says. ne thing that can ake a prison stay ore di fic lt high profile. oelter who worked with ernie ado artha tewart and ichael ick tells a o s clients the ost i portant thing to do is blend in. “We tell them to act like everybody else,” he says. Some inmates do this better than others. “Leona H elmsley, rest her soul, was a tough case,” H oelter ad its. “ he tho ght she sho ld be treated as a een. It didn’t work out.” Easier to acclimate was Stewart, who was photographed upon her release wearing a poncho crocheted for her by an inmate pal with yarn from the commissary. oelter also spoke with ado be ore he entered a tner orth arolina prison in to ser e a year sentence. “We knew he was going to go in for the rest of his li e he recalls. “ e asked e hat can I do with ysel nd I said o can ake li e better or all the people aro nd yo in there. I think that was good ad ice.

SINCE SMOKING WAS BANNED IN FEDERAL PRISONS , CIGARETTES ARE SAID TO HAVE BEEN REPLACED AS INMATES ’ BARTERING ITEM OF CHOICE BY INSTANT COFFEE AND POUCHES OF MACKEREL .


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Clockwise from left: O’Donnell at her desk; King in her office; Rose preparing for a broadcast.

MORNING GLORY

The sun isn’t the only thing expected to rise and shine early every day. This trifecta of CBS newscasters knows firsthand WRIT TEN BY ADAM R ATHE PHOTOGR APHED BY SEAN DONNOL A

E

ach weekday between 7 a.m. and 9 a.m., more than 3 .5 million viewers welcome a triumvirate of C B S This Morning anchors into their homes. But for Charlie Rose, G ayle K ing and Norah O’Donnell—the news veterans who host the Tiffany Network’s morning show—the day starts long before they arrive at their Midtown Manhattan studio. Rose rises at around 3 :5 0 a.m.—“I have multiple alarm clocks, though I generally wake up on my own,” he says—and the N ew Y ork Times lands on his doorstep at about four. By the time he reaches the o fice he has already de o red the morning paper and scoured the web in order to stay on top of the important stories. But Rose isn’t the only one keeping these hours. “My alarm goes off at 3 :3 0,” K ing says, recounting her own routine. “The car picks me

up, and I get out of it looking like I couldn’t actually work on TV . Then I go into hair and makeup and it’s like, abracadabra! ” Of course, there’s more to getting ready for one of America’s most-watched morning shows than just a little bit of cosmetic magic. Each day they’re on the air, the anchors come in as prepared as possible—news being news, there’s always some catching up on world events to do—and meet with producers and talk among themselves. “It’s go, go, go, go, go for the first few hours of our morning,” O’Donnell says, noting that while each anchor has an office, it’s not where the majority of a day’s work gets done. “Our office, in many ways, is the set,” O’Donnell continues. “That’s really where we work.” And it’s paying off. The show, which has been on the air for just three years, has found success by bringing more serious stories to the traditionally y orning show or at li -

ing up to its oft-repeated tag line, “The news is back in morning news.” ( G uests have included weighty newsmakers like Syrian leader Bashar al-Assad, presidential hopeful Ted Cruz and the Dalai Lama.) And while C B S This Morning is still an up-and-comer in comparison with industry juggernauts Tod a y and G ood Morning A meric a , it has seen consistent ratings growth: In early 2015 , the program was reportedly up nine percent in viewers from the year before. This kind of success is no small feat, especially considering the show’s hosts do some high-profile moonlighting—Rose on his eponymous PBS series, K ing at O magazine and O’Donnell as a contributor to 6 0 Minutes. Still, this trio seems to thrive in the highintensity environment. “It’s a pleasure coming to work every day,” Rose says. “G ayle and Norah make me better at what I do, because we share a journey and we share a mission.”

THE CBS BROADCAST CENTER , WHERE CBS THIS MORNING FILMS , WAS A DAIRY DEPOT BEFORE THE NETWORK TOOK OVER THE MANHATTAN SPACE IN THE 1950 S .


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The former classics professor is one of the wine industry’s most respected risk-takers. He’s known for The Scholium Project, a winery that takes an unconventional approach: His three-member team forgoes fancy machines and stomps on nearly every batch of grapes themselves. (The wines are served at Michelin-starred restaurants like Per Se.) Schoener’s latest passion project involves raising $2 million to build an “urban winery”—and eventually a vineyard—in Central Los Angeles.

Michael Evans had recently completed a stint as a consultant on John Kerry’s presidential campaign when he visited Argentina for the first time. He planned for a short respite—and never left. Evans purchased land in Mendoza, started making wine and soon enough his vino-loving friends wanted in. His company, the Vines of Mendoza, has since facilitated the winemaking dream for 150 clients. He recently opened a $16 million resort on the property to host owners and guests.

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The Pinot N oir prod uc er w ho sna g s w ine l ov ers a spot a t the top of the l ist

The b il l iona ire on a c rusa d e to fig ht w ine fra ud

Michelle Reeves’ passion for Pinot Noir inspired her to quit a coveted gig in the entertainment world and buy a winery in Napa—all at the age of 27. Now, after nine years at the helm of boutique Pinot Noir producer David Family Wines, Reeves is splitting her time with another entrepreneurial venture: I Know The Winemaker, an exclusive membership club that lets oenophiles skip decade-long winery wait lists and instantly purchase current releases of rare wines.

After growing suspicious that he’d been duped by a counterfeit-wine scam, businessman Bill Koch opened his prized cellar to a team of authenticators who determined that $2 million worth of his rare vintages were fakes. To prevent others from sharing his fate, Koch has spent an estimated $25 million on private investigators to expose offending auction houses. His most recent victory came in July 2014: After a sixyear lawsuit, a prominent wine auctioneer agreed to amend its policies to better protect consumers.

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AB E SC HO EN E R


culture

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The artist working at his Brookhaven, New York, studio

Malcolm’s Moment

RIDING A NEW WAVE OF APPRECIATION, 84-YE AR- OLD PHOTO -RE ALIST MASTER MALCOLM MORLEY DISCUSSES THE CHILDHOOD MEMORY HE’S NEVER GOT TEN OVER AND THE WILL THAT KEEPS DRIVING HIM W RI T T EN BY J U L I E L . B E LCOV E

H

e may be the only world-class artist who can boast of learning to paint via a correspondence course—in prison. F ortunately, Malcolm Morley was a better artist than a thief. As colorful as his cinematic, action-packed paintings, Morley is sipping a cappuccino at the Carlyle hotel in New York and reminiscing about how he came to be a pioneer of photo-realism, the hyper-detailed style of painting that he prefers to call “super-realism” and that would help earn hi the ery first rner ri e in and the F rancis J. G reenburger Award, which he received this spring. H is latest batch of canvases, on view at Sperone Westwater G allery in New York, makes references to numerous historical periods with depictions, in both two

PHOTO GR A PHED BY K YO KO H A M A DA

and three dimensions, of the Alamo, Napoleon and a cannon ro the attle o ra algar or a different take on his longtime subject of war. Morley’s psyche was marked by war from his earliest memories, when he was shipped off to boarding school in the . . at age in . H is mother had not told him he was going until she said good-bye at the train station, leaving him with a lifetime of separation anxiety. But one night off the coast of Devon, where he’d been sent, a freighter was torpedoed, and the next day the schoolchildren were allowed to see the wreck co plete with oating loa es o bread. “ hat sinking reighter has been a rec rring theme, so in a sense, it was a blessing,” he says. H e loved war movies and was fascinated by the see ing ad ent re o pitfire essersch itt dogfights o er ondon d ring the lit .

hen back with his other orley s r i ed a er an “doodleb g destroying their at and along with it, a model ship he’d built. “It was abo t three in the orning he recalls. “ here was a huge bang—I felt it from my toenails to my head. We were refugees overnight.” In a ter stints in prison and art school, Morley immigrated to New York, not because it was the home base of the Abstract Expressionists but because he was following a woman, the first of his five wives. “I never had girlfriends,” he says. “Just got married.” One day he tried to paint a ship in the harbor. hen he reali ed he co ldn t see the bow and the stern simultaneously, he bought a postcard of it, which he then faithfully re-created five feet long in oil paint, ushering in photorealism. “It required an enormous amount of


ARTWORK COURTESY OF SPERONE WESTWATER

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MORLEY ’S PAINTINGS HAVE BEEN KNOWN TO DRAW FROM SCENES IN MOVIES , INCLUDING BATTLESHIP POTEMKIN AND SUDDENLY.

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concentration and willpower,” says Morley, who relied on a trick from art school: using a grid to size up the image from source material to canvas. Painting square by square with a fine brush, Morley perceived his creations as a series of tiny abstractions; only the results were representational. H e painted ships almost obsessively. “It took a while to realize I was trying to paint the ship that got blown up, that could never be painted,” he says. ( Morley underwent 25 years of psychoanalysis. “F inally the shrink threw me out.”) H is loosened-up images of the 19 70s were the precursors to the Neo-Expressionism that fueled the 19 80s art boom, and his subject matter broadened to airplane crashes, animals ( harkening to the great British painter G eorge Stubbs) and athletes, our modern-day heroes. At 84 , he is still innovating. “I’ve come off the grid,” he says, somewhat triumphantly. Rather than working meticulously from a photo or a watercolor, Morley is improvising, composing the canvas one object at a time from models he has built—though with the same dedication to precision. Robert Storr, dean of the Yale School of Art, calls Morley both “smart” and “unruly.” “H e’s continued to make really interesting, eccentric, richly layered stuff, and he’s no kid,” says Storr. “H e’s not housebroken, and his painting does not sit quietly on people’s walls.” Brookhaven, Long Island, is now Morley’s home with his wife of 26 years, Lida. H e misses the energy of the city but says, “I live in the light. G oethe’s last words were, ‘ More light.’ I love the last words of dying people.” G oethe’s may be apocryphal, but asked to predict his own, Morley quips, “More recognition! ” H e laughs. “I’m pretty much insecure enough and secure enough to go on.”

Clockwise from top left: Morley’s paint tubes and models; Trafalgar Cannon (2013). Cargo Freighter Lida (2013); YM60 (2014).


PR O M OTI O N

SYLVESTER STALLONE

NICOLE RICHIE

TONY ROBBINS

PAUL PIERCE AND JAMIE FOXX

EMILY BLUNT AND MICHAEL DAY

JASON BINN AND LENNY KRAVITZ KENDALL AND KYLIE JENNER, GIGI HADID, AND DR. RUTH WESTHEIMER

GOLDIE HAWN

COCO ROCHA AND HILARY RHODA

OSCAR WINNER LUPITA NYONG'O

KATIE HOLMES

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culture

THE ROYAL BLUES

Q u een L at if ah reveal s the ris k s s he took to p l ay the s in ger B es s ie S m ith

Scribes of Summer

IS IT TRUE THIS MOVIE TOOK DECADES TO MAKE? The project came to me 22 years ago and didn’t come together at the time, but it’s a project I’ve always loved. I wanted to make it happen.

FOR THE BE ACH AND BEYOND

WHY PLAY HER NOW? I could relate. To the vulnerability, the loneliness, the power, having something and losing it. This story needed to be told, and I didn’t want to get to a point where I couldn’t tell it.

FOUR DEBUT NOVELISTS CR AF T STORIES

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IL LUS T R AT ED BY K AT R I N F U N C K E

E RIK A SW YLE R

J U LIA PIE R PONT

The B ook of S pec ul a tion

A mong the Ten Thousa nd Thing s

Protagonist Simon might be a librarian by trade, but no training could prepare him for the book this novel’s named for, one that unravels the story of the remarkable women in his family—all circus performers who’ve mysteriously drowned on the same date. Part sideshow and part thriller, the smart story follows Simon as he races to discover the secret behind his family’s curse with only days before his troubled, beloved sister could become its next victim.

It isn’t long after Jack’s mistress shares an anthology of his love letters with his blindsided wife that his life—the comfortable existence of a middle-aged, Manhattan-based artist—changes drastically for the worse. What comes next in this nimbly written tale aren’t more endings but instead beginnings—and moving ones—for Jack, his wife, Deb, and their two children. Pierpont’s debut artfully charts how a family is undone and then carefully patched back together.

LESLIE PAR RY

J ESSIC A KNOLL

C hurc h of Ma rv el s

Luc k iest G irl A l iv e

The New York City of 189 5 , a brutal yet poignant place with its Coney Island attractions, Lower East Side tenements, underground opium dens and island lunatic asylums, comes vividly alive in Parry’s novel. With adeptly shifting viewpoints, the storyline follows the fate of four outsiders— Belle, Odile, Alphie and Sylvan—all of them strangers whose fates weave together in a resolution that is both satisfying and deeply affecting.

This darkly twisted spin on having it all comes from a former C osmopol ita n editor and fittingly its ambitious protagonist is an editor at a glossy magaine with an old oney fianc a ribeca lo t and a 25 -inch waist. But shocking traumas from her past threaten to destroy her carefully constructed facade. A gesture to K noll’s own experiences in the vicious world of women’s magazines, her debut novel is a sharp, cattily funny, self-aware and captivating read.

THERE’S ALSO NUDITY, VIOLENCE AND STEAMY LOVE SCENES. DID ANY OF THAT SCARE YOU? If you take a role like this, you’ve got to have the balls to pull it off. There’s an underlying classist, sexist, racist tone to what she experienced, because that’s what life was like. It made me respect Bessie and the people who helped her even more.

AFTER A DOZEN PUBLISHERS REJECTED HER , DARCIE CHAN SELF - PUBLISHED HER FIRST NOVEL , THE MILL RIVER RECLUSE , AS AN E - BOOK . IT WENT ON TO SELL MORE THAN 413,000 COPIES .

F RANK MASI/ H BO

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Bessie Smith made her name in the 1920s by singing and living the blues. In a new HBO biopic, Bessie, star and executive producer Queen Latifah tackles Smith’s tumultuous life with an impressively confi dent performance. Here, the Emmy- and Oscarnominated actress discusses her most daring role yet.


Stoll Survivor

THIS SUMMER’S BUSIEST AC TOR DIDN’T FIND A SINGLE GRE AT ROLE TO PL AY— HE FOUND A BUNCH W RI T T EN BY A DA M R AT H E PHOTO GR A PHED BY A L E X J O H N B E C K S T YL ED BY PAU L F R E D E R I C K

1988 BEETLEJUICE

1990 EDWARD SCISSORHANDS Elfman created the score for this dark classic using a 79-piece orchestra.

V ersatility is also what he’s best at. “Corey is my favorite kind of actor: smart, emotional, brave and level-headed,” says A nt- Ma n director Peyton Reed. “H e’s incredibly exciting to watch on camera.” Stoll’s co-stars seem to feel similarly—even the ones who’ve been famous longer than he’s been alive. “I remember shooting a crucial scene between Corey and Michael Douglas and feeling like Corey was so intimidating,” Reed recalls. “When we finished the scene, Michael came up and whispered to me, ‘ H oly shit, this guy’s good.’ ”

HE SHOOTS, HE SCORES

This summer, Lincoln Center will celebrate composer Danny Elfman’s work with Tim Burton. Here, we look at the duo’s most memorable collaborations

1999 SLEEPY HOLLOW

2003 BIG FISH This fantastical film earned Elfman his third Academy Award nomination.

2005 CHARLIE AND THE CHOCOLATE FACTORY

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2012 DARK SHADOWS For the score, Elfman referenced music from the 1970s, when the original TV series ran. 2010 ALICE IN WONDERLAND Elfman has said he wrote the film’s theme while stuck in a London airport.

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1989 BATMAN “Nobody wanted me on the film,” Elfman has said, though his work on the movie became iconic.

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G ROOMER: JOANNA PENSING ER AT EX CLUSIV E ARTISTS. BATMAN: G ETTY IMAG ES. ALL OTH ERS: EV ERETT COLLECTION.

C

orey Stoll could have slipped into any number of supervillain-appropriate costumes on his first day as the bad guy Yellowjacket in A nt- Ma n, the big-screen adaptation of the Marvel comic. Instead, he ended up hanging from the ceiling, wearing a skintight polka-dot one-piece. “We did motion capture on my very first day,” the 3 9 -year-old actor explains with a laugh, “and I was in this big room in a unitard with dots all over it. I was going over all of my character’s different motions, being strung up on wires and working through each little piece of stunt work.” F or the lifelong comics fan, kicking off filming with a taste of high-end special effects was a thrill—but soon enough, he’d have to learn to play it cool. “I had to stop myself from getting so excited by all the toys,” Stoll says. “I had to force myself to pay attention to my script.” Luckily, focusing on scripts is something the New York native—who got his big break, and a G olden G lobe nomination, care of the first season of House of C a rd s—has had plenty of experience doing lately. In the coming months, in addition to his role as Yellowjacket, Stoll will play a man jailed for murdering his family in D a rk Pl a c es, a policeman investigating Whitey Bulger in B l a c k Ma ss and a vampire hunter on the second season of his F X series The S tra in. It’s a disparate group of characters, but Stoll says it’s the range of these roles that appeals to him. “V ariety excites me, and I’ve been lucky so far in that I don’t feel that typecast,” Stoll explains. “I’m being invited to go from something that feels naturalistic and close to myself to playing this supervillain who requires such theatricality, and that’s been really fun and challenging.”


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BRUCE WEBER

PHOTOGRAPHED BY

WRITTEN BY LINDSAY SILBERMAN STYLED BY DEBORAH WATSON

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SHE’S A SUPERMODEL WHO’S OBSESSED WITH JUNK FOOD. HE’S A POP STAR WHO READS THE ECONOMIST. TOGETHER, CHRISSY TEIGEN AND JOHN LEGEND HAVE BECOME AMERICA’S LEAST CONVENTIONAL—AND MOST HILARIOUS— POWER COUPLE, PROVING THAT LOVE, HUMOR AND INSTAGRAM CAN CONQUER ALL

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THE BALLAD OF JOHN AND CHRISSY


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ESTERDAY JOH N AND I were looking at couples therapy and stuff,” announces supermodel Chrissy Teigen, popping an oily Italian olive into her mouth. She clarifies: “Not for us, I mean.” Teigen and her husband, the musician John Legend, are cuddled up at il Buco in downtown Manhattan. Over a tapas-style feast of roasted Spanish octopus, poached eggs with wild mushrooms, H awaiian K ing prawns and milky burrata, we’re discussing the intricacies of marriage—in particular, what makes theirs work, given the pressures of being in a “H ollywood” relationship. “We were watching a [ reality] show about the first year of marriage, and we couldn’t understand why things change so much when people get married,” says Legend, in the familiar smooth-as-silk tone that, for 10 years, has translated into hit record after hit record. Teigen deadpans, “H onestly, you would have to cheat. That’s the only reason I could foresee us needing couples therapy.” They


“WE DON’T DISCUSS

EVERYTHING IN PUBLIC, BUT I FEEL LIKE IT’S OK TO SHOW PEOPLE THAT WE LOVE EACH OTHER.”

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sensation. She was in on the joke before the show had even ended. “Sorry I don’t practice my cry face, okay,” she tweeted, ollowed by a snap o her and egend i itating the e pression. “ ohn and hrissy co pletely re o e any e pectation we ha e about celebrity couples. Everything you see is authentic, and people respond to that,” says Joe Z ee, the editor in chief of Yahoo! Style and Teigen’s cohost on the upcoming daytime talk show The F A B Life. “ e li e in an age where e erything is so hea ily contrived. Even Instagram posts can be produced and strategized. But they’re just being themselves.” “Strategy” is something that Legend hasn’t even considered. H is and Teigen’s social media interactions range from snarky ( @ chrissyteigen: “John just called the hunger games ‘ the thunder games.’ I married my dad”) to sweet ( @ johnlegend: “@ chrissyteigen I wonder if our 16 year old selves would date each other,” accompanied by a nerdy childhood photo of Legend in oversize, owlish glasses) . They are almost always revealing in some way. “I never understood the purpose of being secretive and coy and trying to disguise the fact that you’re together,” says Legend. “It’s odd to shut off a major section o yo r li e and say ell that’s off-limits.’ ” Teigen leans over, as if to give him a peck on the cheek. Instead, she digs her perfectly manicured talons into his scalp and proclaims, like a proud parent, that she’s discovered a gray hair. H e shrugs and contin es. “ e don t disc ss everything in public, but I feel like it’s OK to show people that we love each other.” Legend did just that in 2013 with the release of his hit single “All of Me,” a romantic ode to Teigen that declares, “All of me/ Loves all of you/ Love your curves and all your edges/ All your perfect imperfections.” The ballad earned two G rammy nominations, while the song’s intimate black-and-white music video—which the couple filmed two days before their wedding—became, in a way, their coming out as a celebrity duo. Teigen, true to form, couldn’t let the moment remain sappy forever. She took to Twitter: “2 grammy noms for @ johnlegend no one has congratulated me for being the inspiration behind ‘ all of me.’ without me there is no all of me,” warranting an equally quick-witted response from Legend:

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laugh—as if to say, “Could there b e a more ridiculous suggestion? ”—and reach for more prawns. Legend and Teigen may scoff at the label, but they are pop culture’s undeniable Couple of the Moment. In the year and a half since their September 2013 nuptials, their respective careers have skyrocketed—he went on a world tour, won an Oscar and performed at the Super Bowl; she landed the cover of S ports I l l ustra ted , inked a book deal and is preparing to cohost her fourth TV show. And while their success as individuals has been remarkable, the real appeal—the reason why fans are as enamored of them as they are of each other—lies in their dynamic as a couple. They are goofy, self-deprecating, unpretentious and totally, believably, in love. Their social media personas, which reach a collective 19 million followers, chronicle life as a normal couple doing normal couple things: taking selfies, cooking dinner in their bathrobes, playing with their dogs and going on vacation, with only occasional dispatches from the more glamorous aspect of their lives. It’s this willingness to offer such ordinary-seeming, noholds-barred access that, in fact, makes these two such a rewarding celebrity fi ation. e know that Teigen’s mother is ostensibly their third roommate, and that Legend makes a killer mac and cheese. Unlike more frustratingly elusive celebrities, they give us what we want—or at least do a very good job making us think they do. Consider this in contrast to Jay-Z and Beyoncé , who spent years denying they were an item, or Ashton K utcher and Mila K unis, who hid their marriage from the press for several months. ( Only after K unis appeared on a talk show wearing a wedding ring did she a big o sly confir that she and tcher were “ aybe arried.) That brand of orchestrated behavior is no longer satisfying to fans—we now favor celebrities who are relatable, imperfect and honest over those who are rehearsed and perfectly posed. Teigen, though a supermodel, is rarely perfectly posed. At this year’s G olden G lobes, the most viral moment was not Legend’s poignant acceptance speech after his Best Original Song win for S el ma ’s “G lory,” but the reaction of his tearyeyed wife, whose awkward “ugly cry face” became an Internet


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“CHRISSY LAUGHS AT JOHN BECAUSE HE’S SO SQUARE, AND HE LAUGHS AT HER BECAUSE SHE’S SO IRREVERENT.”

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“@ chrissyteigen who told you this song was about you? ” But when you give people an inch, they’ll take a mile. Legend and Teigen were recently on a f light together when Teigen, who says she reads 9 9 percent of everything tweeted at her, saw that she’d been tagged in a photo. A passenger behind them had snapped a picture of the couple kissing through the gap between the seats. “I rarely lose it, but I confronted him,” says Teigen. “I held my phone up and I was like, ‘ Are you f--king serious? ’ ” Legend told the guy not to be a douche bag.

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T G OES WITH OUT SAYING that Teigen and Legend are extraordinarily attractive individuals, but they are somehow more beautiful together than they are apart. When we meet, Teigen is wearing a sleeveless white T-shirt sans bra, like only a 29 -year-old supermodel can, her sculpted, candy-apple cheeks peeking out ro beneath the bri o a oppy beige hat. egend in a black beanie and black peacoat, could easily be mistaken for any dapper downtown hipster. We’re seated at a table at the front of the restaurant, exposed to New York’s cobblestoned Bond Street, when a photographer appears on the other side of the window. I become o erwhel ed with second hand paranoia ow did he find them? Did a waiter tip him off? But before I can bring it to their attention, the door swings open and in walks a young woman, her face partially concealed by a birdcage-style wedding veil. H er father, the “paparazzi” and her new husband trail behind. They’ve just tied the knot at City H all. eigen and egend who say they still eel and definitely still act—very much like newlyweds, grow nostalgic about their own City H all nuptials, a last-minute affair that cracks them up two years later. They didn’t realize they would need to bring a marriage license to their wedding in Lake Como, so they squeezed in a quick ceremony four days before walking down the “o ficial aisle. “I didn t know that we wo ld ha e to do the traditional vows. I was ready to just sign a piece of paper,” says Teigen, who wore black leather pants and a black V ictoria Beckham cape for the occasion. “But when it actually happened and I was up there, I started crying, of course.” Not long after the couple met in 2006 on the set of the music video for Legend’s single “Stereo”—seven years and one day before their wedding—Legend knew there was something

different about Teigen. She was stunning, sure. But that was only part of her appeal. “The more I got to know her, I started to realize how funny and cool she was,” he says. “You meet all kinds of good-looking people, but she was so vibrant and engaging. Even when we’d text, she was always saying something clever.” H is eyes literally twinkle when he talks about his wife. “They’re an intriguing couple,” says Sybil Dessau, a TV producer and one of Teigen and Legend’s closest friends. Legend, who at 3 6 still describes himself as shy, started college at the University of Pennsylvania at 16 . As a 4 ’11”, 12-year-old high school freshman, he had been nicknamed Doogie H owser. Teigen has lovingly morphed the moniker into “G oogie Browser,” a reference to her husband’s fondness for G oogle. H is dream is to one day be a contestant on Jeopa rd y! “John’s the guy who is always reading The E c onomist backstage. H e’s an intellectual—he’s not funny, outgoing or crazy,” says Seth F riedman, Legend’s friend and former manager. “Chrissy laughs at him because he’s so square, and he laughs at her because she’s so irreverent.” Teigen, meanwhile, has the sharp tongue of a comedian and an obsession with Taco Bell. She loves Nintendo and performing magic tricks. “Chrissy contradicts what you’d expect a model to be. She likes to eat, she likes to speak and she likes to be contro ersial says essa . “ he s not a wall ower and she’s unapologetic about it.” H er no-bullshit attitude toward fame has also struck a chord with women. In the spring, she Instagrammed an intimate photo of her inner thighs, and visible stretch marks, with the caption “Bruises from bumping kitchen drawer handles for a week. Stretchies say hi! ” The post drew an onslaught of media coverage, including an article on Time’s website that hailed her as a bastion of body positivity. If that sounds like an overstatement—the idea that a swimsuit model might inspire self-acceptance among young women—just take a look at the comments. “Thank you for showing it’s OK to not be perfect . . . ” wrote one. “That a good personality and a sense of humor will take you a long way. We need more role models like you in the world.” And another: “Wow, I’ve always made an effort to keep mine hidden. So many women can relate to this. Thanks to you, I don’t have to feel ashamed anymore.” Legend is a needle-mover in his own right, using his fame as a platform to create awareness for social change, occasionally with a sense of humor likely inf luenced by his wife. In his “All of Me” video spoof that recently went viral, Legend hosted a wedding for his two bulldogs, Puddy and Pippa, serenading the

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“WE WANT A LOT OF KIDS. JOHN LOVES PREGNANT WOMEN.”

animals as they walked down the aisle. The video concluded with a tout from Legend promoting a fundraiser for his Show Me Campaign, a nonprofit that focuses on ending poverty through education. The following week, he launched a multiyear initiative to end mass incarceration.

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ATER TH IS SUMMER, Teigen will begin cohosting The F A B Life, a roundtable-style daytime talk show on ABC. “It’s going to be very weird for me to go to work at the same time every day five days a week,” she says, sipping a glass of rosé . “H ow does this work? Can you call in sick? I’ve never had a job where it mattered if you were sick. With modeling, as long as you’re not barfing in the photo, no one cares if you’re sick.” Although they’ve long called New York home, Teigen will soon spend most of her time in Los Angeles, filming the show. When I ask Legend if he, too, plans on living in L.A. full-time, he looks confused, as if the thought of being apart had never even crossed his mind. “I’ll just be wherever she is,” he says. While Teigen is on set, Legend will head to the studio to work on his next album, which he’s hoping to release in mid-2016 . And then? “H ave some babies,” he says with a boyish grin. Teigen chimes in, “We want a lot of kids. I would love to have three or four of my own, and then adopt a few. So basically I’ll be pregnant the rest of my life.” Imagining pregnancy is, to some extent, what inspired her to go nude for the D uJour photo shoot. “You look at K im [ K ardashian] and see how women’s bodies just become so beautiful,” she says. “[ The thought] of getting boobs thrills me. And John looooves pregnant women, so— ” H e doesn’t argue. “I’m attracted to the heightened femininity,” he admits. Teigen confesses that she’s partial to having girls. “She thinks I’m not athletic enough to have a boy,” he says. “I’m a musician, I’m good with women and I’m a feminist, so I think I ll be a good girl daddy. lready he s planning or the financial strain of parenthood. “Part of my goal in making money is so that o r kids won t ha e to y on reg lar planes and e barrass s he says. “I sa ing p so they can y pri ate. Private air travel notwithstanding, Teigen insists the couple won’t let parenthood change who they are. “I feel like sometimes when people give birth, they give birth to a tiny part of their brain. Whatever they thought they would be goes out the window and they kind of lose their minds,” she says. She doesn’t think she’s going to be that person. Still, while she’s at it, she’d like to make something else clear: “I am 1,000 percent not going to have an Instagram account for my baby. It will not have a hashtag. If I have a hashtag for my baby, just kill me.”


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F rangipani’s wraparound veranda offers hilltop views of L’Ansecoy Bay. O pposite page : The 13- acre Rosa dei V enti—Italian for “wind rose”—has private tennis courts and two swimming pools.


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DESPITE ITS SPRAWLING COMPOUNDS AND CELEBRITY HOMEOWNERS, THE THREE-MILE-LONG CARIBBEAN UTOPIA IS STARTLINGLY UNPRETENTIOUS AND, BETTER YET, UNDER THE RADAR W RIT TEN BY LI N DSAY S I LB E R M A N

PHOTOGR A PHED BY D O U G L A S F R I E D M A N


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you listen close enough—never mind the clinking glasses of rosé and ubiquitous steel-drum soundtrack—you can make out the sound of waves rolling lazily against the dock. It’s after dusk in Mustique, and the entire island has converged on The Cotton H ouse for the hotel’s Tuesday-night cocktail party, the paradisaical equivalent of a weekly town-hall meeting. Two elderly gentlemen are wrapped in a warm embrace beneath a thatched-roof tiki bar outside of the hotel—they’d attended uniersity together and st crossed paths or the first ti e in years. boistero s gro p o rits is swilling artinis beside a fire pit in the sand; dinner-party invitations and double-cheek air kisses are being handed out faster than highballs of rum punch. It’s a decidedly swanky crowd—there are business titans, architects, fashion industry executives—and yet there are no dinner jackets, no lavish gowns and, perhaps most surprising of all, not many shoes. Welcome to Mustique, a locale that burnished a reputation as the epicenter of barefoot luxury in the ’70s and hasn’t changed since. On the three-mile-long private island in St. V incent and the G renadines yo won t find a single tra fic light street sign or . There’s just one quaint hotel ( the aforementioned Cotton H ouse) and a tiny bed-and-breakfast. Most visitors prefer to take advantage o sti e s illa c lt re and right lly so. the homes on the island, 81 are available for rent on a weekly basis. They come fully staffed ( think chefs, butlers, gardeners, property managers and housekeeping) and represent a portfolio as eclectic as their owners. Toucan H ill, for instance, is a sprawling four-bedroom home designed to look like a Moroccan palace, with domed pavilions, lush gardens and 3 6 0-degree views. It’s a stark contrast to Palm Beach, the six-acre British Colonial– style oceanfront estate owned by o y ilfiger. The fashion mogul recalls being enamored with the island when he first isited years ago. “ here s so ething so e otic and pri iti e abo t sti e he says. “It s tr ly the ost beautiful, relaxing place on earth.” The American designer spent se eral years as a renter be ore p rchasing a fi er pper beach house in 19 9 0. A contractor advised that the property couldn’t withstand reno ations so ilfiger concei ed o a new design that stayed tr e to the aesthetic o the island. “I wanted an li er Messel British Colonial home made of coral stone,” he says, citing the nglish designer who de eloped sti e s first illas. ilfiger is st one o the island s any list ho eowners—a group that also includes Shania Twain, Bryan Adams and Mick Jagger. The list of renters ( Bill G ates, Jennifer Lopez,

Denzel Washington and Prince William and K ate Middleton) is arg ably e en ore i pressi e. or high profile isitors the allure of Mustique goes beyond its pristine beaches and watercolor sunsets: The island is virtually impenetrable to paparazzi. Its coastline is monitored by on- and off-shore security, and each guest arriving by air must be preapproved by The Mustique Company, an enterprise that functions like a co-op, managing all facets of life on the island. Things have more or less operated that way since the company was formed in 19 6 8 by Scottish aristocrat Colin Tennant, who’d p rchased sti e or so e years earlier. ennant a man-about-town known for throwing extravagant society parties, decided to transform the undeveloped island into an exclusive destination. H e gifted a plot of land to his friend Princess Margaret after she married; she went on to build one of the island’s first ho es es olies a . he reno ated acre illa is still available for rent.)


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O pposite page : Inside the famed Basil’s Bar. Its owner, Basil Charles, opened the eponymous establishment 39 years ago. This page , from top: In 1971, Princess Margaret appointed English artist Oliver Messel to design Les Jolies Eaux, which occupies a 10-acre private peninsula; a bamboo-laden living room inside The Beach H ouse.


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“THERE ARE NOT THAT MANY PEOPLE HERE NOW,” SAYS TOMMY HILFIGER. Mustique soon became recognized as a celeb-studded refuge, and a building boom ensued. Jagger’s Japanese-inspired mansion Stargroves was completed in 19 83 , followed by David Bowie’s whimsical Indonesian pavilion six years later, and so on. In an effort to curb overdevelopment, The Mustique Company capped the total number of homes on the island at 13 0—a decision that remains unchanged, making ownership opportunities on Mustique scarce. Just a handful of villas are on the market ( through Douglas Elliman F ine H omes and K night F rank Residential) , and of the two empty plots left for the taking, one has a $ 9 million price tag. “ here weren t any people here when I first bo ght y ho e says ilfiger. “ nd there s not really ery any now. It’s true. Mustique is the kind of place where everyone knows e eryone yo d be hard pressed to find a si ilarly inti ate acation destination anywhere else in the world. t its b siest—the week between Christmas and New Year’s—the entire island’s population amounts to fewer than 1,3 00 people. “Even if you’ve only been here once, you feel like you belong,” says Jeannette Cadet, who is hailed by homeowners as The Q ueen of the Island. F or the past 28 years, Cadet has ser ed as anager o he sti e o pany b t no ficially, she is Mustique’s social chair and welcoming committee. She greets nearly every arriving passenger at the island’s 2,000-square-foot bamboo airport terminal, introducing newcomers to regulars and homeowners to hotel guests. Cadet, a native of nearby St. V incent, says that the island’s warm, laissez-faire nature is simply the “V incentian” way.

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1. The Moroccan palace–i nspired Toucan H ill. 2. F rangipani’s library, accented with nautical decor. 3. Rope and wrought-iron swings. 4. The Beach H ouse boasts a waterfront bungalow for guests. 5. A walkway surrounded by koi ponds. 6. o y ilfiger s al each gets its na e ro the pal trees scattered throughout the estate. 7. Outdoor seating at a villa that takes architectural cues from F rank Lloyd Wright. 8. Toucan H ill’s master suite.


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F rom top: eekly rentals or the editerranean in enced ienna start at the property is also or sale a seating area en eloped by e otic botanicals.


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or all of Mustique’s utopian charm, it’s admittedly not for everyone. There are no resorts, no shopping malls, no casinos and no Arnold Palmer– designed golf courses ( or any golf courses, for that matter) . There are only three restaurants—no-frills joints that serve burgers and fries—and beyond the Tuesday night cocktail party, the only out-of-home evening entertainment is sunset jazz at Basil’s, a beloved watering hole on the beach that appears as though it hasn’t been updated since opening in 19 76 . There’s an oft-shared tale about a real estate tycoon who, isiting or the first ti e rented the priciest ho e on the island for two weeks but was so bored he left after two days. Still, those who appreciate the luxury of villa life—and the simplicity outside of it—never fail to return. “The ones that fall in love fall hard,” says Patricia Medford, Toucan H ill’s property manager, who left a job in the fashion industry and moved to Mustique from New York City about 15 years ago. Medford acts as a liaison between the guests and staff, executing special requests no matter how outlandish or complex. “We’ve hosted a 200-person Moroccan feast with belly dancers, fire breathers and en on stilts she says. “ e e en ew in exotic pastries. I always say that with a little bit of money and a little bit of time, anything is possible.” It’s not unusual for guests to spend an entire week without leaving the property, she says. And why bother? Especially when an affable in-house chef is at your disposal, preparing chilled carrot and passion r it so p resh grilled fish with aribbean spices and homemade ginger sorbet. “Our butler moves guests throughout the whole property. One day they’ll dine in the Mirador, and the next they’ll be in the dining pavilion,” says Medford. “Between the location, the tablecloths, the napkins, the glassware and the cuisine, it’s a new table-scape for every meal. We have 21 different sets of dishes.” When visitors do leave their homes, be it for a gourmet picnic at Lagoon Beach or a game of backgammon at Basil’s, they travel via “mule”—a jerky golf cart– ATV hybrid. Even the most uptight New Yorkers quickly adopt the tradition of waving to passersby, or stopping to offer a lift to a stranger on foot. “Nobody locks their doors on this island—nobody. I keep my car keys in my car. I’m not supposed to say that, but that’s the way it is,” says Cadet. “I guess we live in LaLa Land here. I hope it never changes.”

A bov e: Model Lizzy Jagger and a friend lounge on the lawn of Pelican Beach, one of the villas owned by her father, Mick Jagger. B el ow : Mustique Airport consists of a single unlit runway that shuts down at sunset.


HARDWEAR WHEN LACED WITH PEARLS, EMERALDS AND DIAMONDS, SCULPTURAL PIECES SHIMMER

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PHOTO GR A PHED BY R O B I N B ROA D B E N T

S T YL ED BY K AT E S E B B A H


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A b ov e: Blue Book Collection bracelet in 18-karat white and yellow gold with diamonds and South Sea pearls, $ 85 ,000, TIF F ANY & CO., 800-84 3 -3 26 9 . O pposite: H igh Jewelry Collection bracelet in 18-karat white gold with diamonds, price upon request, CH OPARD, chopard.com.


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Pois Moi cuff in 18-karat white gold with diamonds, $ 12,6 00, ROBERTO COIN, robertocoin.com.


Bombe ring in 18-karat white gold with diamonds and emeralds, price upon request, G RAF F DIAMONDS, 212-3 5 5 -9 29 2.

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H eritage bracelet in 18-karat yellow gold with diamonds, price upon request, V AN CLEEF & ARPELS, vancleefarpels.com.


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H igh ring in 18-karat white gold with diamonds, price upon request, BULG ARI, 212-3 15 -9 000.


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Onde ring in 18-karat white gold with diamonds and emeralds, $ 82,3 00, DE G RISOG ONO, 212-4 3 9 -4 220.


Ultra Blanche manchette in 18-karat white gold with diamonds and ceramic, $ 114 ,000, CH ANEL F INE JEWELRY, 800-5 5 0-0005 .

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N WITH JAW-DROPPING VISTAS AND A SPIRITAWAKENING CHILL, NORTHERN NORWAY OFFERS ENDLESS OPPORTUNITIES FOR ADVENTURE AND REFLECTION W RIT TEN BY A LYSSA G I ACO B B E PHOTOGR A PHED BY C H R I STO PH E R C H U RC H I LL


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Left: A road less traveled between Tromsø and Olderdalen; O pening spread: Longyearbyen, about 600 miles from the North Pole, at night.

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The drive from Tromsø to Olderdalen, in a U-shaped valley in northern Norway’s Lyngen Alps, is long, winding and not a little disconcerting, especially given the only rental car available to us is a Yeti, a misleadingly rugged name for a tiny, tinny vehicle not entirely up to the task of handling Arctic roads, even paved ones. When we set off before dawn, the hotel clerk warns us to beware of avalanches, and he isn’t just having fun with the Americans: Only yesterday, he reports, a G erman was killed by falling snow on the very roads we plan to travel. Then, amiably, i a little weakly “ o ll be fine. o r re e es are good As far as scenic drives go, though, this one—5 6 miles for which we are told to budget three hours—is hard to top, even without snow tires or guardrails. Although it is postcardbeautiful, this particular stretch of Norwegian coast, about 1,800 miles north of Oslo, remains almost entirely untouched by tourism. F or one thing, Norway—the world’s 11th largest e porter o oil doesn t e actly need the cash. nd so there are views without houses, or hotels, hoarding them; miles of glassy fjords and looming glaciers; no meaningful sign of human life beyond the occasional boat or wooden rack of cod laid out to dry. It’s frame after frame of nature at its most arresting as confir ed by a passenger seat photographer who insists on cli bing o t o the eti e ery yards. It s fine There is no real rush; no one here to answer to. We’ve come to Norway to see the Northern Lights, those mythical curtains of color that streak the coldest, darkest night skies, caused by the collision of gas particles between Earth and the s n. ery decade or so to rists ood a rora iewing hot spots for a glimpse of the lights at their brightest and most frequent; peaks like the one happening now last for a few years. One night, as we sit on a cliff 9 0 minutes from Tromsø staring e pectantly tho gh not i patiently o t at the orwegian Sea, H alvar Ludvigsen, whose family has owned this land for nearly two centuries, tells me this year’s lights have been bright eno gh to wake hi ashes o red and green thro gh his bedroo window. “ o ne er gi e p he says o the waiting. “Just when you think it won’t happen, two minutes go by and yo get the show o yo r li e. al an ho r later nat re makes good on his promise, with a 20-minute display of gray and green waves dancing through the clear midnight sky. With an airport offering daily f lights from Oslo, Tromsø is Norway’s most popular destination for Northern Lights chasers, and it’s full of packaged-tour buses and the selfie-stick-wielding tourists who ride them. There are some very good guides here, many of whom will take you as far as F inland in pursuit of the evening’s best lights, but you could also choose to head directly to one of those more thinly populated areas and let the lights come to you. Which brings us back to the Yeti: Our destination in Olderdalen is Lyngen Lodge, an eight-room fjordside hotel with a back deck built for staring at the sky. Owner G raham Austick was leading


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C l oc k w ise from top l eft: Longyearbyen’s Svalbard K irke, the world’s northernmost church; glacier-spotting in Svalbard; snowy Svalbard from above; the sled-pulling huskies of G reen Dog Svalbard, eager to get running.


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chartered off-piste ski tours through the Lyngen Alps when he happened upon the land; he built the lodge to offer guests access to the unadulterated Norwegian wilderness, with the comfort of returning to high-thread-count sheets, outdoor jacuzzis and a refined food and wine program ( currently under the direction of a F renchman named V incent) . Most who visit the lodge for Northern Lights spend their days adventuring lite: dogsledding, whale watching, snowshoeing, fishing. By mid-March, when the lights begin to taper, the lodge opens up to more hardcore thrill seekers who come to ski untracked snow right down to the beach. There’s a chancy social aspect to any small lodge setting, of course, and here the potential pitfalls are rendered even more apparent by the over-the-top peacefulness of the surroundings. By the end of dinner, the English are arguing with the F rench, the Austrians have stopped speaking entirely, and the Americans have been reminded of our status as such so many times we’ve lost count. The Swiss: not always neutral. Communal dining with people you’ve just met is fun, unless it isn’t, and it’s easy to fantasize about returning when all eight rooms could be filled with people of your choosing ( which is possible; the lodge does private and small-group bookings) . The setting and the Thai-inspired dinner of Arctic cod pulled from the fjord that morning—and a few glasses of wine—help diffuse most of the tension, but we’re glad when we’re able to bid the Europeans so long and head to our comfortable fjord-front hut down the road, where we’re treated to hours of lights and zero political commentary. Olderdalen seemed plenty remote. But the next morning, as our plane descends into Longyearbyen, about 6 00 miles from the North Pole, we understand we hardly knew the meaning of the word. Settled in the early 19 00s by a coal-seeking American, Longyearbyen is the main town of the Svalbard archipelago, whose year-round population of about 2,5 00 is sustained by mining, tourism and science and otherwise attracts, in the words of one local, “writers, explorers, photographers and alcoholics.” Svalbard is also home to the G lobal Seed V ault, which safe harbors seeds from more than 4 ,000 plants from around the world, including all the essential food crops. The cold isn’t as shocking as you might expect—the temperature on Svalbard averages about 25 degrees F ahrenheit. The bigger issue is the polar darkness, which lasts almost four full months. By early March, the light is a pretty predawn blue that grows brighter each day, but the sun remains hidden below the horizon. Timon Brü ggemann, a 23 -year-old G erman who leads us dogsledding and ice-caving, tells us the fear of isolation encourages people to be especially social during the darkness, but that it still results in a community of transients. Those who do stick around, meanwhile, seem to like to foster a Lost vibe. V iggo, a retired ar y o ficer who has been leading ta icab to rs here since 2005 , tells us that Svalbard “is a place where you don’t die of age, you die of tragedy,” which is only slight hyperbole. Many residents sleep with their guns, in case a polar bear barges in during the night. Still, says V iggo, Longyearbyen is a “perfect place to raise children,” because there is plenty of money, plenty of nature and, polar bear breaking and entering notwithstanding, no crime. V isitors come to Svalbard for the nature, as well as for rugged


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A view of the Aurora Borealis and the Norwegian Sea, as seen outside Tromsø.

but manageable outdoor adventure—polar bear safaris, glacier walks, dogsled trips and other explorations of the Arctic wilderness and o tfitters like the one we sed pic oad can c sto ize itineraries according to interests and ability. Most residents get aro nd by snow obile or “snow scooter and on o r first day four of us get a brief tutorial before gearing up in giant snowsuits and embarking on a 120-mile journey to the island’s east coast and back in search of polar bears and other wildlife: reindeer, o es and birds. s I cr ise o er at per a rost and thro gh barren valleys of ice, I smugly think I must have a natural talent for snowmobiling: It’s easier than I thought. H alf an hour later, I less smugly tip my scooter while maneuvering some “terrain.” But we are Arctic explorers! And, without any verifiably broken ribs, I’m not given the option of turning back anyway, which is sort of like when I fell off a horse in Patagonia. The next 100 miles are thrilling and terrifying, an emotional and physical love-hate roller coaster, as we travel up and over glaciers, through a blizzard, past giant holes in the earth ( “I knew that was there,” assures our guide, V egard, half-convincingly) and across ice that in warmer months is the Arctic Ocean. V egard rides with a rif le on his back, because although the goal is to see polar bears, the goal is to see them at a distance. The bears don’t necessarily share those goals, however, and they can run very fast. While the outing is probably more intense than I would have signed up for had I fully paid attention to what would be expected of me ( i.e., some experience riding a snowmobile) , that’s also what made it so rewarding. K icking back on your scooter to stare into the Arctic Ocean from atop a glacier, a pouch of rehydrated potato stew in hand, isn’t an experience or a feeling you’re likely to ever forget. That night, dinner is not powdery potato stew but multiple co rses at set the island s fi e star by any eas re resta rant in a building that has served, over its many years standing, as a post o fice a school a hospital and a ch rch. he wine cellar i probably one o northern rope s largest with abo t bottles and best, with a “two wine glass” rating from W ine S pec ta tor—was once a choir practice room. Although Svalbard has no arable land, most of H uset’s menu comes from local sources: Arctic char and snow crab, greenhouse-grown produce, sea vegetables and, of course, reindeer, which depending on who you ask, tastes like lamb or beef or the feeling you had when you found out Santa wasn’t real. The dinner and the restaurant do a very good job of emphasizing a point that by now is obvious: Svalbard is a place of extremes, and far warmer than its icy exterior might have yo belie e. en within the refined setting o set there is a cabaret performance going on upstairs, where after dinner we run into V egard, who greets us as if we’re old friends. Two days later, the sun returns to Longyearbyen, just like that. F or c onta c t informa tion a nd more rec ommend a tions on hotel s, resta ura nts a nd a c tiv ities in northern N orw a y, v isit d uj our. c om.


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HEATING UP THE STREETS OF RED HOOK, BROOKLYN, IN THE SEASON’S SULTRIEST LOOKS

PHOTOGRAPHED BY CEDRIC BUCHET STYLED BY ANNE CHRISTENSEN

A NIGHT ON THE EDGE OF THE WORLD

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Jumpsuit, $ 3 ,5 9 5 , JASON WU, Saks F ifth Avenue, 877-5 5 1-725 7. Labyrinth cuff, $ 11,5 00, DAV ID YURMAN, davidyurman.com. Clutch, $ 1,9 9 5 , JUDITH LEIBER, Bergdorf G oodman, 800-5 5 8-185 5 . Sling backs, $ 1,73 0, RENÉ CAOV ILLA, renecaovilla.com.

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Jumpsuit, $ 3 ,5 9 5 ; Stole, $ 6 ,3 9 5 , JASON WU, Saks F ifth Avenue, 877-5 5 1-725 7. Labyrinth cuff, $ 11,5 00, DAV ID YURMAN, davidyurman. com. Clutch, $ 1,9 9 5 , JUDITH LEIBER, Bergdorf G oodman, 800-5 5 8-185 5 . Sling backs, $ 1,73 0, RENÉ CAOV ILLA, renecaovilla.com.

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Coat, $ 8,9 00; Skirt, $ 2,6 00; Belt, price upon request, MARC JACOBS, marcjacobs.com. Boule cuff in 18-karat white and black gold with diamonds, $ 25 ,5 80, AS29 , Jeffrey New York, 212-206 -1272. Ava pumps, $ 4 6 5 , CH ELSEA PARIS, chelseaparis.com.

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Jacket, $ 12,5 00, F ENDI, 212-89 7-224 4 . G own, price upon request, EMILIO PUCCI, 212-75 2-4 777. F atal pumps, $ 79 5 , BRIAN ATWOOD, saksďŹ tha en e.co . ollipop onstellation ring in karat gold with sapphires right hand I I ippolita.co . atras ring in karat yellow gold with dia onds and oonstone le t hand I I i ankatr pcollection.co .

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Celia Birtwell dress, $ 15 ,9 00, V ALENTINO, 212-772-6 9 6 9 . Opera clutch, $ 3 28, F URLA, furla.com. On hair: Beach Blonde Sea Waves Salt Spray, $ 10, JOH N F REIDA, johnfreida.com. On eyes: F luid Eye Tint in Senso, $ 3 8, G IORG IO ARMANI BEAUTY, armanibeauty.com. On lips: Lip Color Sheer in Rose Soleil, $ 5 0, TOM F ORD, tomford.com. On nails: Le V ernis in Atmosphè re, $ 27, CH ANEL, chanel.com.

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Theresa gown, $ 5 ,29 5 , ALTUZ ARRA, Bergdorf G oodman, 800-5 5 8-185 5 . Choker, price upon request, ALTUZ ARRA, altuzarra.com. Lou compact, price upon request, EDDIE BORG O, eddieborgo.com. Sandals, $ 6 5 0, G IUSEPPE Z ANOTTI DESIG N, 212-6 5 0-04 5 5 .

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Cape, $ 9 ,29 5 , DOLCE & G ABBANA, dolcegabbana.it. Seduction romper, $ 5 4 8, DIANE V ON F URSTENBERG , dvf.com. Boule cuff in 18-karat white and black gold with diamonds, $ 25 ,5 80, AS29 , Jeffrey New York, 212-206 -1272. Lady Jane pumps, $ 6 5 0, SERG IO ROSSI, 702-73 4 -09 9 1. Tights, $ 6 5 , WOLF ORD, wolfordshop.com.

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Coat, $ 10,000, BURBERRY PRORSUM, burberry.com. G own, $ 10,000, DONNA K ARAN NEW YORK , donnakaran.com. Earrings, price upon request, ALEX IS BITTAR, alexisbittar.com. Ava pumps, $ 4 6 5 , CH ELSEA PARIS, chelseaparis.com. H air: Ward at The Wall G roup. Makeup: Stevie H uynh at D+ V Management. Talent: Elsa, IMG . Manicure: G eraldine H olford using CH ANEL Le V ernis at The Wall G roup. Stylist Assistant: Rachel Pincus. Photographed on location at 202 Coffee Street and 16 0 Imlay Street, Est4 te F our Properties in Red H ook.

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A ob v e: Dr. G eorge H odel bought the Mayan temple–s tyled house on F ranklin Avenue in 1940. It was the scene of infamous parties, and, claims his son Steve H odel, the place where the Black Dahlia was murdered. O pposite: Tamar H odel, the doctor’s daughter, in her twenties.


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THE SINS OF THE FATHER

THE BLACK DAHLIA MURDER HORRIFIED HOLLYWOOD AND NEVER LOST ITS GRIP ON OUR IMAGINATION. HERE, THE STORY OF THE SUSPECT WHO GOT AWAY, THE POLICEMAN SON WHO PROVED HIS GUILT AND THE HIDDEN LEGACY OF HIS DAUGHTER, THE GIRL WHO KNEW TOO MUCH W RI T T EN BY S H E I L A W E L L E R


he entered the California Institute of Technology at 14 and soon had an affair with a professor’s wife, who bore his baby. ( H odel would ultimately father 11 children by five women.) H odel’s teenage best friend was another rare bird, the talented and charismatic John H uston, son of Walter. H uston and H odel sparred over a classmate, the delicate-faced and witty Dorothy eanne ar ey. he eloped with ston beco ing the first o his fi e wi es and they ran o to reenwich illage in . Meanwhile, H odel—forced out of Caltech because of the impregnation of his professor’s wife—started a literary magazine, became a photographer, attended the University of California Berkeley and went on to medical school. H e began working for the Los Angeles Board of H ealth in 19 3 8, pursuing his specialties—venereal disease and secret abortions. Desperate women

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“SUPPOSIN’ I DID KILL THE BLACK DAHLIA? THEY CAN’T PROVE IT NOW,” SAID HODEL IN ONE OF THE SECRET TAPE RECORDINGS.

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Born in 1907 to wealthy Russian Jewish parents, G eorge H odel was raised in Pasadena as an indulged prodigy. At nine, he played major piano concerts. H andsome in a brooding, romantic way,

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amar Nais H odel, the girl on the witness stand at H ollywood’s criminal court, was 14 years old in December 19 4 9 , but she seemed older. Involuntarily worldly. A photo taken soon after reveals a kind of Beat G eneration Marilyn Monroe: unsmiling, lush-featured, with a platinum blond beehive, big, red lips and a snug white cardigan. She was a smart girl, private school– educated, with rarefied tastes. But Tamar was, without a doubt, tormented. And the person who did the tormenting was her father. G eorge H odel stared at his daughter from the defendant’s table. H e was charged with incest. A doctor with a genius IQ who specialized in venereal disease, H odel was an admirer of the Marquis de Sade and a friend of movie, literary and art world libertines like John H uston, Man Ray, John F arrow and H enry Miller. H odel hosted bacchanalian parties in his Mayan temple– styled home, built by Lloyd Wright on F ranklin and Normandie, in the L.A. neighborhood now called Los F eliz. It was in that house, prosecutors said, he raped his daughter. One of the lawyers for the defense, Robert Neeb, grilled Tamar on the stand that day. The defense team’s strategy was to make the girl come across as unstable, a pathological liar. Neeb’s effort to do just that would have unintended consequences that would reverberate for decades. Two years before the H odel trial, a savage murder shocked H ollywood. The mutilated body of 22-year-old Elizabeth Short, soon to be dubbed the “Black Dahlia,” was found in a vacant lot. No arrest had ever been made. To show the H odel jury how “crazy” Tamar was, Neeb asked the girl: “Isn’t it a fact that you told a roomer in your mother’s home in San F rancisco that you knew your father had killed the Black Dahlia? ” “No,” Tamar said. But the terrified girl wasn’t telling the truth. Tamar d id believe it—and with reason. She lived in her father’s house and heard the whispers, including his veiled warnings. “It’s an evil place,” said the art photographer Edmund Teske. “Women were tortured for sport there. Murders happened there.” Now, at the age of 80, Tamar is in a hospice in H awaii. In fragile health, she wants the truth to come out. Not the bits and pieces glimpsed by the world up to now, but her whole harrowing story. I’m the only journalist who has ever interviewed her. Tamar describes an existence of abuse and violence, fear and guilt, all wrapped up in bohemian glamour. She was a stubborn idealist who lived a life following the principles of racial integration when you could be killed for doing so—and a desperate

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optimist who named her last three children ( sons) Peace, Love and Joy. “She wanted so badly to be good,” her older daughter, F auna H odel, says. “Wanted” is the sad key word. H er daughters, F auna ( a gallerist and motivational speaker) and F auna-Elizabeth ( né e Deborah) Simon ( a photo editor) , are true survivors, each from a different bad B movie. Also safely emerged from the mayhem is Tamar’s half-brother Steve, who grew up in an astonishingly licentious household to become, of all things, a cop. Steve H odel drew on all of his skills and training during a 15 -year-long investigation to discover whether his own father murdered Elizabeth Short. H e could not have done it without Tamar. At critical junctures, Tamar, and then one of her daughters, connected the dots. Dr. G eorge H odel as the Black Dahlia killer is a theory that more and more people support. But the victimization of Tamar H odel is not theory. It is fact. And the details of her abuse—compounded by the tragic patterns created—defy belief. H ollywood has presented, on screen and in real life, many stories of decadence, melodrama and crime, some of the best originating in the glamorous noir 19 4 0s. Most of these stories were invented or exaggerated. This one isn’t.


H is domination was extreme. “My father used to stand at the mantel and read poetry to everyone and inform us this was G od speaking,” she said. She was sexualized. “Man Ray took nude pictures of me,” Tamar said. “I knew he was a great artist, but I didn’t feel comfortable. H e felt like a dirty old man.” She was pressured to sunbathe nude. H er father gave her erotic books to read, determined “to make me a sex goddess.” When Tamar was 11, H odel forced her to perform fellatio on him. “I gagged! I was scared! I was embarrassed! ” The year before, in May 19 4 5 , Ruth Spaulding, the secretary at H odel’s venereal-disease clinic ( and thus the keeper of many secrets) , was found dead of an overdose. Police suspected it was forced but couldn’t prove it. H er death was ruled “suicide.” Among the women who passed in and out of H odel’s clinic was Elizabeth Short, a brunette from Massachusetts. Short possessed an arrest record for underage drinking, a habit of talking to men in hotel bars and the usual naive dreams that brought pretty girls with Depression-era childhoods to Los Angeles. During the last six months of 19 4 6 , Short lived in five different apartments in H ollywood. She was vulnerable. Eight people, including one who would later become a police detective, asserted that they knew, firsthand, that H odel had some kind of relationship with Short. The last time friends saw her was on the evening of January 9 , in the Biltmore H otel. On the morning of January 15 , the severely mutilated body of a young woman was found in L.A.’s Leimert Park. The woman who first sighted the body thought it was a mannequin—it had been bisected expertly at the waist; there were signs of torture. The presentation of the corpse indicated that the murder occurred at another location; she was moved to the field to be viewed. These were the remains of Elizabeth Short. Some who’ve studied the crime see clues in certain photos and

“MY FATHER TOOK AVANT-GARDE TO THE HILT, AND THE WOMEN WENT ALONG WITH ALL OF THIS , BUT IT WAS HIDDEN,” SAID TAMAR.

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sought him out, providing him with all sorts of ammunition. “H e had a dossier on the cops and their prostitutes—he had something on the police department,” Tamar told me. When John and Dorothy H uston, now back in Los Angeles, divorced, H odel romanced Dorothy and renamed her “Dorero,” a combination of Dorothy and Eros. They married in 19 4 0, and H odel bought the F ranklin house, designed by the son of F rank Lloyd Wright. The doctor began to indulge his fascination with Surrealist art. It was a passion with dark underpinnings. Surrealism was started in Paris as an outgrowth of Dadaism. According to art historians Mark Nelson and Sarah H udson Bayliss, in their book E x q uisite C orpse: S urrea l ism a nd the B l a c k D a hl ia Murd er, “an interplay of irrationality, eroticism and violence was at the heart of Surrealism.” Man Ray, a noted Surrealist painter and photographer, had become entranced with sadomasochism while living in Paris. When he moved to Los Angeles in 19 4 0, the artist struck up a friendship with H odel. The two became very close. Los Angeles was, in the ’4 0s and early ’5 0s, a simmering stew of sophistication, desperation and veiled danger. Brilliantly talented people of urbane temperament commingled with Dustbowl beauties whose ambitions often stalled at the hatcheck-girl or diner-waitress stage; hardboiled cops braved police and city hall scandals, such as the one captured in the James Ellroy novel and subsequent film L. A . C onfid entia l . At war’s end, the cheerleading sunniness of the Big Band musicals was replaced by the dark themes of noir—lovers had a sexy avarice, a delicious untrustworthiness. The subtle violence and perversity of this L.A. moment were captured in classics such as The B ig S l eep and O ut of the Pa st. In the house on F ranklin Avenue, the lifestyle veered from the hedonistic to the G rand G uignol. And here is where a child made her unfortunate entrance. In 19 3 5 , another Dorothy— Dorothy Anthony, a San F rancisco model—had given birth to H odel’s daughter. H odel insisted on naming her Tamar for the protagonist of a poem by his friend, Big Sur poet Robinson Jeffers. “Tamar” was a tormented woman who had sex with her brother, reinterpreting a biblical story. “G eorge brought my mother and me into his home,” Tamar told me. It was like a harem: Dorothy, Dorero and, for a while, H odel’s common-law wife, Emilia—all with H odel’s children. “My father took avant-garde to the hilt, and the women went along with this,” Tamar said. “But it was hidden.” Tamar and her mother moved out and back to San F rancisco, but when Tamar approached pubescence, H odel sent for her.

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LEF T TO RIG H T: COURTESY OF F AUNA H ODEL. G ETTY IMAG ES. COURTESY OF F AUNA H ODEL ( 2) . G ETTY IMAG ES.

F rom l eft: a na odel the child a ar was orced to gi e away with the ather o her da ghter the s original case e idence file including Elizabeth Short’s address book; teenage Tamar H odel, third from right; Dr. G eorge H odel, at age 38.


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paintings. The art historians Nelson and Bayliss note ( and photographs show) how strikingly Short’s posed upper body resembled one of Man Ray’s photos of his wife, Juliet. The body’s pronounced bisection ( the top half was placed a foot away from the bottom) could be seen as a nod to a Man Ray painting, Le B ea u Temps. In addition, a man calling himself “The Black Dahlia Avenger” wrote letters to the LAPD and newspapers claiming responsibility, in one letter drawing a picture of a face in a stocking mask, like one of Ray’s of Juliet. Most stunningly, L.A. artist William Copley did a painting in 19 6 1, showing a doctor with tort re in icting tools and a dead n de wo an on the oor. A hard-to-escape conclusion: The Surrealists were winking at the murder of the Black Dahlia. H undreds of police officers investigated Short’s death; more than 5 0 people “confessed” but were cleared. During the months and then years of fruitless investigation, Tamar’s young life was unraveling on F ranklin Avenue. She worshipped her father and she feared him. “The pharaohs had sex with their daughters,” he’d rave. She f led to her mother, who made her feel as if she, not H odel, was the “bad one.” She returned and became pregnant by H odel after he raped her in the summer of 19 4 9 , and she had an abortion. Afterward, her father, jealous of boys she knew in school, “hit me with a gun and screamed and yelled and went insane.” H er stepmother, Dorero, urged her to “ ‘ run away right now,’ ” Tamar said. “She told me my father had committed a murder [ of his secretary] .” Tamar went into hiding with a friend’s family. When the police tracked her down, “the officers said, ‘ We know all about your father.’ ” But on December 23 , 19 4 9 , despite two eyewitnesses who testified that they d seen odel orcing se on a ar he was ac itted. ( It was later found that other witnesses were given payoffs of $ 10,000 to $ 15 ,000 to commit perjury.) Tamar—publicly branded a slut and a liar at 14 —was remanded to a juvenile detention home. The trial set something else in motion: The LAPD was now hot on H odel’s trail for the Black Dahlia murder. When lawyer Neeb made his bombshell accusation, he had no idea that his client ever knew Elizabeth Short. Nor did he realize that G eorge H odel w a s an early suspect, because of a drunken, guilty-sounding muttering of H odel’s at a nightclub ( reported to the district attorney, though the lead went nowhere) . Now detectives planted recording devices inside the walls of the F ranklin house, and 18 officers listened in around the clock. They heard H odel tell a friend, “Supposin’ I did kill the Black

AFTER THE POLICE FOUND THE TERRIFIED GIRL HIDING WITH FRIENDS, THEY SAID, “WE KNOW ALL ABOUT YOUR FATHER.”

Dahlia? They can’t prove it now, because my secretary is dead,” and remark that his plan was “Never confess.” If the police planned to arrest H odel, it never happened. In March 19 5 0, H odel f led Los Angeles, settling in the Philippines and marrying an aristocratic F ilipino. After they divorced, he took yet another wife in San F rancisco, lived in a penthouse and died at age 9 1 in 19 9 9 . H odel managed to elude arrest for any crime. The police tapes containing his conversations about Short and Spaulding were “lost.” But they were not gone.

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or much of her life Tamar H odel struggled to recover from abuse and condemnation. Released from juvenile detention to her mother’s house, she got pregnant again after a boy in the neighborhood raped her. Tamar had the baby girl at a hospital in San F rancisco. Even though the infant’s father was white, she told her family and hospital staff he was black because “I was shocked by the way whites treated blacks in the juvenile hall. I was embarrassed to be white.” H er heroes were Marian Anderson, Langston H ughes, Paul Robeson and Josh White. She watched a nun take the baby, at her parents’ orders. G eorge H odel was never not in control of Tamar’s life. H e named the baby F auna, for another incest-tinged poem by Jeffers. But he didn’t want her raised by the H odels. H e ordered Tamar’s mother to drive to Reno to find a black woman willing to be given a baby under his terms: She would not be officially adopted and she must keep her name, F auna H odel. A ladies’ room attendant at a casino, a woman named Jimmie Lee, agreed. When, at the hospital, Jimmie Lee balked—this baby was white! —H odel assured her, “One day she’ll darken.” F or the next 15 years, F auna lived with Jimmie Lee, who became an alcoholic prostitute. F auna experienced the full discrimination of being in a black family, but, since she never did “darken,” she was also made to feel like an alien in her community. A saving grace for F auna was Jimmie Lee’s live-in boyfriend, a shoeshine man who, F auna says, “instilled kindness in me.” Another saving grace: staring at her birth certificate and dreaming of meeting her birth mother. As for Tamar, she remained artistic, precocious—and wounded. At 16 , she married a black artist in Mexico, then left him after he beat her so badly she attempted suicide. In San F rancisco, she married a second time. H e was Stan Wilson, a black folksinger and activist. She became a people-connecting socialite in the interracial avant-garde, spending evenings at the H ungry i with H arry Belafonte, Maya Angelou, Lenny Bruce and Bruce’s stripper wife, H oney. She had a daughter with Wilson and named her Deborah. Though Tamar was, this now-adult daughter says, “very brave” in confronting the hate of being married to a black man in the early 19 5 0s, her parenting almost helplessly followed the sick route etched by her sadistic father and her own enabling mother: She introduced Deborah to sex at age 10—the girl’s eve-


R ig ht: Alfre Woodard was the star of the unreleased fil Pretty Hat tie’ s B aby , based on F auna H odel’s memoir, O ne D ay She ’ l l D ar k en.

COURTESY OF F AUNA H ODEL

ing the case that his father was the killer. It was a best seller, but he still didn’t have the whispered-about secret-evidence file containing the bugging of the F ranklin house. A chance meeting changed everything. In 2002, F auna H odel introduced herself to an elderly man at her L.A. gallery who said, “H odel? That’s an unusual name. I bugged a home on F ranklin Avenue of a Dr. G eorge H odel. Murder case of Elizabeth Short.” e was retired cop alter organ and his confir ation o the tapes’ existence gave the search new life. In 2003 , L. A . Times reporter Steve Lopez located the transcripts of the tapes, which had been hidden by the case’s 19 5 0 DA investigator. Steve H odel wrote three follow-up books, all with new evidence. The latest one was published in 2014 . The results of Steve H odel’s investigation have been deemed conclusive by four LAPD officials. While the public position of the LAPD is that Short’s murder is unsolved, a former head of detectives, James McMurray, has said, “G o ahead and clear the Black Dahlia case.” F or Tamar and her children, closure hasn’t been as clear cut, but in the last few years, F auna-Elizabeth Simon says triumphantly, “We broke the chain.” Tamar is finally able to understand the cruelty done to her at every level. At the end of her life, she has four grandchildren, all emotionally healthy and enjoying careers. “I love and forgive my mother,” says F auna-Elizabeth, the daughter she raised. The other F auna, the one given away, says, “Tamar is the most fascinating woman I know—and the most troubled—but did she want to save the world? Yes, she did.” By shattering the H odel curse, her daughters helped save her.

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“Steve, the paramedics are here,” said the voice on the phone in the middle of the night. “They just pronounced your father dead.” The fourth wife of H odel had reached out to his favorite child te e by then a retired police o ficer. te e ade his way to San F rancisco and, while going through his father’s effects, found a curious thing: a photo of Lucie Arnaz as the Black ahlia in a o ie. hort s horrific nsol ed rder still held people in thrall, the subject of books and movies. When he made a call to his half-sister Tamar, she said, “You know our father was a suspect in the Black Dahlia murder.” H orrified, Steve moved to L.A. and “followed the evidence” piece by piece. H e compared his father’s letters to the handwriting in the anonymous ones written to newspapers ( “That was my father’s handwriting, no doubt”) and interviewed dozens of people he knew from childhood. H e found a receipt for his father’s purchase of cement bags the day after Short disappeared; identical empty bags were found near the corpse. Steve H odel published a book, B l a c k D a hl ia A v eng er, mak-

“ I ALMOST DIED WHEN I FOUND OUT I WASN’T PART BLACK,” SAID FAUNA HODEL. “BEING BLACK WAS SO IMPORTANT TO ME.”

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nings with men paid the rent after Tamar’s divorce. And Tamar did not protect her from the family’s psychopath patriarch. When Deborah was 12, H odel took the girl to a fancy lunch, slipped a drug in her drink “and I woke up hours later spread-eagled and undressed” in her half-clad grandfather’s presence. While raising Deborah, Tamar became a big-sister figure to her beautiful 12-year-old neighbor, Michelle G illiam. She was later to become the singer Michelle Phillips. “Tamar was so exotic, she was instantly my idol,” Phillips says today. But “she didn’t have a friend in the world.” And, even as a tween, Phillips knew there was something wrong with Tamar’s insisting, as if to rationalize her life, that it was a good thing to have sex with your father. Years later, when Michelle dated Jack Nicholson, she told him the tales she’d learned of Tamar, and they ended up in the screenplay for C hina tow n. Of all people, John H uston, H odel’s former best friend, played the powerful father who raped his daughter and forced her to have the baby. Tamar moved with Deborah to H awaii. H earing the beautiful name of the sister she never expected to meet, Deborah legally changed her name to F auna-Elizabeth. Tamar had three sons and was often stoned on psychedelics as a way to blunt her pain. Deborah-turned-F auna-Elizabeth tended her little brothers. In 19 72, the family dynamic changed dramatically. The original F auna had tracked Tamar down. “I almost died when I found out I wasn’t part black,” F auna says. “Being black was so important to me.” Meeting the decadent sophisticate took F auna aback. “I thought she would be like Doris Day! ” But mother and daughter forged a bond, as did the half-sisters. They shared something with their mother: F auna and F auna-Elizabeth had had babies at 15 . But they were determined to make something of their lives. F auna wrote a memoir, O ne D a y S he’ l l D a rk en. In 19 9 1, it was made into a movie, Pretty Ha ttie’ s B a b y, starring and produced by Alfre Woodard. It was scrapped just after the rough cut was screened, leading to suspicions that H odel, still alive, used what power he still had to get it shelved. But eight years later, his inf luence was gone, and some of his darkest secrets emerged.


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IT’S GREAT TO BE GRONK NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS SUPERSTAR ROB GRONKOWSKI IS A NONSTOP-PARTYING, FOOTBALL-SPIKING, NIGHTCLUB-FREQUENTING POP-CULTURE SENSATION. HE ALSO HAPPENS TO BE ONE OF THE GREATEST TIGHT ENDS IN NFL HISTORY. LIFE IS PRETTY DAMN GREAT FOR GRONK RIGHT NOW— AND IT’S BOUND TO GET EVEN BETTER

BRUCE WEBER

PHOTOGRAPHED BY

WRITTEN BY LINDSAY SILBERMAN STYLED BY DEBORAH WATSON


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O n G ronk ow sk i: Shorts, worn throughout, $ 4 5 , NIK E, similar styles available at nike.com. O n the g irl s throug hout, from l eft: Louise top, $ 13 0; Emily top, $ 14 0, SEILENNA, seilenna.com. Bikini top, $ 120; Bikini top, $ 120, G IEJO, giejo.com. Blakely top, $ 4 0, AERIE, ae.com. Meryll top, $ 14 0, SEILENNA. Bikini top, $ 6 5 , DIESEL, diesel.com. V oyou top, $ 200, ERES, net-a-porter.com. G et G ronk’d shorts, $ 19 , G RONK NATION, gronknation.com.


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“I FEEL LIKE IT HAPPENED TO ME FOR A REASON.”


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“PEOPLE THINK I’M IN TROUBLE 24/7, BUT WHAT HAVE I EVER DONE BESIDES DANCE?”


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T-shirt, $ 29 , TOMMY H ILF IG ER, 212-223 -1824 .


clubs, twerking courtside during a Clippers game or being showered with champagne on a college coed– packed yacht. H is antics have, unsurprisingly, spawned critics—people who question his dedication to playing football. And that drives G ronk crazy. H e’s living every 26 -year-old guy’s dream right now, and he’ll be damned if anyone tries to take that away from him. “There’s definitely a time to party and a time to focus on work, but you need to let loose a little bit so that you can go back on Monday feeling refreshed and motivated to work hard again,” he says. “People act like dancing is breaking the law and partying is a crime. Everyone thinks I’m in trouble 24 / 7, but what have I really done besides dance? ”

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It would be impossible to wholly understand the essence of G ronk witho t first considering his childhood. H e was the second yo ngest in a a ily o fi e brothers, which meant that life at the G ronkowski residence in Buffalo, New York, was akin to A nima l House, but with more bulk and less booze. Rob’s father, G ordy, played college football, and his sons, as luck would have it, inherited his golden ticket in the genetic lottery. ( Today, the average weight among them is around 25 0, and all are over six feet tall.) The G ronk household was a breeding ground for athletic talent—the basement boasted a full-size gym, and the backyard was decked out with a tennis court, a baseball field basketball hoops and a hockey net. While Diane, the family matriarch, provided the fuel—she’d spend the entire day in the kitchen whipping up enough chicken par esan to eed an ar y ordy pro ided the fire. In the backyard, he would run tennis drills, baseball drills, football drills; consistently pushing his boys to be stronger, better, faster. Sibling rivalry engendered a spirit of healthy competition, and ultimately, three o t o the fi e brothers ade it to the . one wo ld be as successful as Rob, though. G ronkowski landed at the University of Arizona, a Division I school that would serve as the perfect platform to showcase his talent. But a back injury sidelined him for the duration of his junior year, and the promise of being an early draft pick dissipated. H e was selected by the Patriots in the second round of the 2010 draft, 4 2nd o erall. “It was definitely a blessing in disg ise he says. “ o e players peak at 20 years old, so if you pick them in the top 10 just because they dominate in college, it doesn’t mean that they’re going

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A massacre has just occurred at a ritzy restaurant in northern Miami. The assassin—a man beast of 26 5 pounds with a treetrunk-thick neck—is sawing mercilessly into the pile of bloody f lesh. “I usually don’t cut it before I eat it,” he admits. A speaker trembles with the heavy bass of a Whitney H ouston dance remix. H is voice rises an octave as he tears a particularly large chunk free and says: “Sorry! That was intense.” Watching a 6 ’6 ” professional football player have his way with a 14 -ounce New York strip is a brutal experience, but New England Patriots tight end Rob G ronkowski has a hard time dialing back his intensity, even when he’s not playing football. Still, the herculean force he brings to the dinner table—evocative of his take-no-prisoners approach on the field is isleading. In reality, he is the gentlest of giants, with kind eyes, a dopey grin and the ambiguous sort o accent that so nds at first midwestern, but is really the product of upstate New York. At the age of 26 , G ronkowski, a newly minted Super Bowl champion, has already locked in a six-year, $ 5 4 million contract—the most lucrative deal for a tight end in NF L history. H e’s set several all-time records for his position, cementing a reputation as the best tight end in the league, if not the best tight end to ever play pro football. That’s no small feat, considering he’s suffered ( and bounced back from) two major injuries that threatened to ruin his career. But as much as he’s been lauded for his remarkable talent on the field ronkowski s e trac rric lar beha ior has garnered even more attention. If quarterback Tom Brady is the Patriots’ demure sophisticate, well, G ronkowski is his fratty, fun-loving foil. And fans can’t get enough of him. H e has become something of a pop-culture phenomenon: G ronkowski’s post-touchdown tradition of football spiking ( and spiking other things, like bouquets, hockey p cks and cakes o the field has inspired a iral ideo trend called “gronking whereby ans fil the sel es spiking inani ate obects. e is the s b ect o an erotic an fiction no el that was an azon K indle best seller. H e travels around town on “The Sinners Bus,” his very own partymobile; it has nearly 11,000 followers on Twitter. A sports website, BarstoolSports.com, perhaps put it best: “H e is the most uncomplicated, endearing meathead in the history of the NF L.” On any given day, G ronkowski—who usually goes by “G ronk”—might be found offering lap dances to women at night-


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Top: Robe, $ 79 , LANDS’ END, landsend.com. A b ov e: Blazer, $ 3 9 9 ; Shirt, $ 9 9 , TOMMY H ILF IG ER, 212-223 -1824 . H air: Thom Priano at G arren New York for R+ Co. Makeup: Regine Thorre. Prop stylist: Dimitri Levas. Casting: Little Bear Productions. Production: Dawn Boller. Photographed on location in G olden Beach, F lorida. Extras: Andrea Thomas, F ront. Briley H ale, Elite MIA. Julianna Sharkey, Wilhelmina. Dounica Aleksic and K ayla Prince, F ord MIA. Joy Corrigan, Lilly Sanders, Camille Neviere, Next. Alexandra Lorens and Alexandra Buman, MC2.


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to keep on improving. The way things ended up for me . . . I feel like it just happened for a reason.” The Miami meat massacre has ended, and being that we’re in a steakhouse with an encyclopedia-size wine list, I suggest we do a tasting. A sommelier arranges 15 wineglasses on the table in front of me, G ronkowski and his childhood friend, John Ticco. “H e’s humble because he had three older brothers, so there was always someone bigger and better than him,” says Ticco, a baby-faced real-estate broker who still resides in their hometown. “H e’s just an average dude who grew up in Buffalo. I don’t think he’s ever forgotten that.” The sommelier begins gingerly pouring. “This is 6 0 percent Malbec and 4 0 percent Cabernet,” he says filling three glasses with an opa e red li id. “You can tell by the color that it’s full-bodied, but the tannins give it a super-velvety feel, and . . . ” G ronk’s eyes have glazed over. H e smiles politely, but his disinterest is palpable. “It would have been cooler to do a beer tasting,” says Ticco. G ronk nods in agreement. “My drink is usually vodka with water because it gets you hydrated and drunk at the same time,” he explains after the sommelier has departed. “I never drink wine. There’s only one wine I like, but I forget what it’s called. It tastes like Sprite.”

“HE’S JUST AN AVERAGE DUDE WHO GREW UP IN BUFFALO,” SAYS A CHILDHOOD PAL.


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TRAVEL

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CHICAGO DALLAS/FORT WORTH HOUSTON LAS VEGAS LOS ANGELES MIAMI NEW YORK ORANGE COUNTY SAN FRANCISCO WASHINGTON, D.C.

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Pool Rules

In Montauk you can enjoy the ocean—without even going outside. Year-round visitors to Gurney’s Resort and Sea Water Spa luxuriate in the serene, sand-filtered, ocean-fed heated indoor seawater pool (the only one of its kind in North America) and indulge in Thalassotherapy, spa treatments that make use of saltwater and seaweed to deliver pure, therapeutic benefits. Five new restaurants (like Scarpetta Beach and The Regent Cocktail Club), in partnership with LDV Hospitality, offer up local seafood and craft cocktails. “Beyond the rooms, it’s important that we cater to our community with our food and drinks,” says Gurney’s president George Filopoulos. 290 OLD MONTAUK HIGHWAY, MONTAUK; GURNEYSMONTAUK.COM

Edited by NATASHA WOLFF


CHICAGO

D A L L A S/ F O R T W O R T H

HOUSTON

LAS VEGAS

LOS ANGELES

MIAMI

NEW YORK

ORANGE COUNTY

SAN FRANCISCO

WA S H I N G T O N , D . C .

CHICAGO

INNOVATORS & ENTREPRENEURS WITH A HOST OF COLLABORATIVE SPACES AND PIONEERING PROGRAMS, THE CITY OF BIG SHOULDERS IS QUICKLY BECOMING THE CITY OF BIG IDEAS

Technology 1871

Named for the year of the Great Chicago Fire, whose aftermath triggered historic and defining changes in the city’s urban planning and architecture, 1871 is a hub for tech entrepreneurs. Businesses select memberships based on their space and time needs; successful alumni include kCura, an e-discovery software company, and PrettyQuick, an innovative beautybooking service. CEO Howard Tullman regularly hosts notable guests, including Mayor Rahm Emanuel, British Prime Minister David Cameron and Governor Pat Quinn. 1871.COM

MATTER

The health-tech incubator Matter opened its Gensler-designed co-working space in the Merchandise Mart this spring. The 25,000-square-foot office creates an environment of collaboration and mentorship—member companies have access to local universities, health-care partners and potential investors—meant to inspire experimentation and drive the future of health care. The first 10 members include a pharmaceuticals company, a robotics firm and a handful of health-software developers. Memberships are offered at three monthly rates: Reserved ($450), Shared ($300) and Night and Weekend ($150), with varying degrees of access to work spaces and labs. To facilitate successful startups, Matter is launching regular workshops that address common challenges and pitfalls of building a business. MATTERCHICAGO.COM

Food INTRO CHICAGO

Clockwise from top: The dining room at Intro Chicago; fluke, avocado, radish and Douglas fir; oxtail tea, rutabaga “ramen” and aronia berries.

The latest from Lettuce Entertain You Group is a stage for up-and-coming chefs across the country and a school for culinary entrepreneurs, with LEYE founder Rich Melman and chef Matthew Kirkley as “teachers.” Housed in the former L20 space in Lincoln Park, the restaurant brings in a new chef every few months to collaborate with Melman and Kirkley and transform the place into the visiting chef’s vision. The restaurant started with Los Angeles–based Top Chef star C.J. Jacobson and a five-course prix fixe menu highlighting local purveyors, followed by Erik Anderson, a Food & Wine best new chef. 2300 NORTH LINCOLN PARK WEST; INTROCHICAGO.COM

Thought CHICAGO IDEAS

What began as a single week a few years ago grew into a year-round program of multidisciplinary events, speakers and panels, leading up to the weeklong festival and innovation platform in October that brings together global thought leaders and hosts hands-on labs throughout the city. Co-founded by serial entrepreneur and Groupon co-founder Brad Keywell, Chicago Ideas is an accessible, all-inclusive forum joining luminaries across disciplines. Politicians talk to inventors, poets talk to scientists, business leaders talk to artists, all with the intention to connect and catalyze action across the city. The majority of talks and labs (behind-the-scenes explorations formerly unavailable to general audiences) are open to the public at an affordable $15 per event. This year’s conference takes place October 12 through 18. Speakers include such industry heavyweights as George Lucas and former GE CEO Jack Welch. CHICAGOIDEAS.COM

ALL IMAG ES COURTESY

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Health Care


CHICAGO

D A L L A S/ F O R T W O R T H

HOUSTON

Lululemon marketing director Brooke Johnson shares her fitness faves around town.

The new 20-acre Maggie Daley Park within Grant Park in the Loop offers an extensive playground, an outdoor climbing wall and sprawling picnic-perfect lawns with a city skyline as backdrop.

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TUCK INTO SAUGATUCK

QUAINT AND CLASSIC WITH ITS SUMMER-AT-THE-LAKE FEEL, THIS MICHIGAN TOWN DRAWS URBANITES WHO LOVE GOOD FOOD WITH THEIR GETAWAY. A MUST-STAY: THE WICKWOOD INN, A FOOD LOVER’S B&B

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EQUINOX

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“I love the bright, airy vibe at the Equinox in Lincoln Park. They have three floors of weights, fitness rooms, yoga and boxing studios, for any activity I want to take on. I’m excited about Equinox’s new studio cycling program, The Pursuit, too. And the Kiehl’s products are the best way to cool down and freshen up after a workout.”

Clockwise from top: The Wickwood Inn; whimsical Hugo Guinness prints line the walls; cold brew coffee from Uncommon Coffee Roasters.

1750 NORTH CLARK STREET; EQUINOX.COM

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WHERE TO SWEAT THIS SUMMER

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SHRED 415

FLYWHEEL SPORTS

“Interval training sim-

“Flywheel in Old Town

ply works, and the mix

is known as a killer

of treadmill/cardio and

spin studio, and I just

weight work at Shred

discovered its barre

415 in Lincoln Park

classes. I stop by Real

is a great combination.

Good Juice next door

It’s pushed me to

afterward for a Fly

my limit.”

Girl Smoothie.”

2156 NORTH CLYBOURN AVENUE; SHRED415.COM

1653 NORTH WELLS STREET FLYWHEELSPORTS.COM

A two-and-a-half hour drive from Chicago, Saugatuck, Michigan, is a culinary destination centering on the Wickwood Inn, a beautifully manicured 11-unit cottage helmed by chef and author of the famed S il v er Pa l a te C ook b ook Julee Rosso ( who ran a restaurant in New York for years) . F ill yourself up on Rosso’s delicious frittatas, popovers and sticky buns for breakfast and charcuterie platters in the evening. Also consider an excursion beyond the B& B. 510 BUTLER STREET; WICKWOODINN.COM

WHERE TO EAT AND DRINK:

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Sip an Oval Beach Blonde or a Michigan Wheat at Saugatuck Brewing Company ( sa ug a tuc k b rew ing . c om) . Lucy’s Little K itchen ( 26 9 -85 7-205 3 ) offers seafood al fresco, along with a sugarcane juice bar. Locally roasted single-origin coffee is the draw at Uncommon Coffee Roasters ( unc ommonc offeeroa sters. c om) .

WHAT TO DO:

Pack a picnic and watch the majestic Lake Michigan sunset from Oval Beach. Or take a Star of Saugatuck paddle-wheel boat ride down K alamazoo River and out onto the lake. F or a quicker trip, the hand-propelled Chain F erry, in use since 183 8, takes you across the river to the foot of Mount Baldhead. Climb 3 00 steps up the mountain for a stunning view.


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Tyson and Kimberly Chandler with sunglasses from their Chandler x Selima Optique line.

The Vow Factor Nardos Imam launched her namesake bridal and eveningwear collection in 2013 after seven years at Dallas retailer Stanley Korshak, where she began as a seamstress and later became an in-house designer for the store, working with brides to create their dream wedding gowns. There, the Eritrea, Africa, born-and-raised designer was introduced to bride-to-be Mackenzie Brittingham Sumrall, who was having trouble finding the dream dress for her upcoming Aspen nuptials. The two hit it off and decided to go into business together, with Brittingham Sumrall in charge of the business side. “Mackenzie understood my designs and passion for making women feel beautiful,” says Imam. Hard at work on her second bridal collection, Imam is enjoying her newfound freedom. And in a state where bigger is better, Imam isn’t swayed by tall orders: “I actually designed and created around 30 gowns for one wedding. There were 17 bridesmaids!” 6170 SHERRY LANE; NARDOSIMAM.COM

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SPECS APPEAL

WHEN IT CAME TO COLLBORATING WITH SELIMA OPTIQUE ON A LINE OF FASHION SUNGLASSES, TYSON AND KIMBERLY CHANDLER KEPT IT IN THE FAMILY

Dallas Mavericks center Tyson Chandler, his wife, Kimberly, and her brother, Browne Andrews, are embarking on some shady business. The trio has teamed up with Selima Salaun, the brains behind eyewear brand

Selima Optique, to launch a line of unisex sunglasses. Dubbed “Our Secret,” the collection comprises head-turning, handmade shades like the Jane and O (second from top), named for Jane Birkin and Jackie

Onassis, respectively. “This collection has been inspired by tastemakers who have left their trademark on fashion,” says Kimberly. As for the name, “Our Secret represents the creative experiences we’ve had around the world,”

says Tyson. Andrews and the Chandlers were involved in the process from start to finish. “We got to chatting about what inspires all of us, and the rest is history,” says Andrews. AVAILABLE AT FORTYFIVETEN, 4510 MCKINNEY AVENUE FORTYFIVETEN.COM

SOUTHERN COMFORT No matter what ails you, Remedy will have the cure, thanks to chef Danyele McPherson’s gourmet spin on comfort-food classics. “I wanted to re-create staples of American cuisine and make them modern,” she says. That means childhood favorites that feel grown-up—like confit-fried chicken with chive mashed potatoes—and sweets like Orange Dreamsicle and coconutcream pies. McPherson admits a soft spot for the Kobe beef cheeseburger. “It’s the type of burger you marry, not date.” 2010 B GREENVILLE AVENUE; REMEDYDALLAS.COM

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STATION AGENTS

TWO STATIONERY DESIGNERS ARE MAKING QUITE A PAPER TRAIL IN TEXAS. HERE, WE COMPARE AND CONTRAST THEIR THANK-YOU-NOTE STYLES

Visitors to NorthPark Center can learn more about the shopping destination’s world-class art collection (think Andy Warhol, Henry Moore and Roy Lichtenstein) via its new interactive art app. NORTHPARKCENTER

BELL’INVITO

Margretta Hill Wikert and Kerri Ellis Davis are living proof that print isn’t dead. The duo is behind Ellis Hill, a custom stationer and monogram shop (jewelry boxes, linens and ceramic trays) in Highland Park Village that creates bespoke invitations, place cards and envelopes using techniques like engraving, thermography and letterpress. Whether you’re seeking a clean design or a quirky, colorful theme, you’ll look good on paper no matter what the occasion.

Founder and former Neiman Marcus art director Heather Wiese-Alexander used her love for Italy and quality craftsmanship as the inspiration for Bell’Invito, Italian for “beautiful invitation.” The brand delivers that and more—elegantly crafted calling cards, save-the-dates and thank-you notes— designed using presses from the late 1800s. “Stationery has become a fashion statement instead of something you simply reach for your in your desk drawer,” Wiese-Alexander says.

25 HIGHLAND PARK VILLAGE ; ELLIS- HILL .COM

147 PIT TSBURG STREET ; BELLINVITO . COM

THANK-YOU NOTES—HANDWRITTEN OR E-MAILED? Always handwritten. It’s a gift in itself to receive a handwritten note in the mail.

An e-mail is not a thank-you note. Use a cocktail napkin if that’s all you have, but don’t miss the opportunity to write and give back.

CURSIVE OR PRINT? We like mixed fonts on an invite!

I’m rarely at a loss for an opinion, but in this case, I say just write.

Cursive on a note.

TIMELINE? It’s best to send a thank-you note within a week of receiving a gift.

I always say: Better late than never.

NOTE CARD OR PAPER?

Above: Installation view of Barlow’s GIG (2014) at Hauser & Wirth in Somerset. Below: Installation view of the artist’s dock (2014) at the Tate Britain in London.

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A note card. Short, sweet and to the point!

Both. If you need to say a little more, you need writing sheets and note cards.

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ELLIS HILL

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PH YLLIDA BARLOW ( 2) ; NORTH PARK CENTER: JOH N BURG OYNE; ALL OTH ER IMAG ES COURTESY

.COM

BARLOW: ALEX DELF ANNE ©

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PHYLLIDA BARLOW: “TRYST” This summer, the Nasher welcomes British sculptor Phyllida Barlow and her large-scale installations made of wood, concrete and cardboard. Through August 30.

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BOOT FOR THE HOME TEAM

There are more than 100 steps that go into making a custom-designed pair of cchese s boots b t the first step to act ally owning a pair is aking yo r way to the e as based brand s new ighland illage store. esigned by cchese co owner yn se also o yn se Interiors in allas the shop has war western to ches like a ceiling ade o hand hewn white oak bea s reclai ed ro barns b ilt in the s and atching hardwood oors and display fi t res. It s chock ll o erchan dise incl ding a ootwear collection and e estrian inspired bags the store also stocks yle o ett or a ilton hirts dson eans and the largest selection o lint r s il ers iths one o a kind hand engra ed belt b ckles ade in Ingra e as. “ here are so any st ha es it s di fic lt to choose st one says retail director ay a by. oot prices range ro to or a en s erican alligator style.

More heart surgeries take place at the Texas Medical Center than anywhere else in the world. The hospital group even performed the first successful heart transplant in the country in 1968.

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4051 WESTHEIMER ROAD; LUCCHESE.COM

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ecchiello ini bag ape bag deni espadrille TOD’S, tods.com.

THE LITTLE WHITE DRESS

Houston marks the spot for Tod’s 10th U.S. boutique. The store, at the Galleria, showcases men’s and women’s collections and features walls made of mixed materials, like saddle-stitched leather boiseries, bright wood-coated panels and gray stone. “The idea was to make our clients feel at home,” says CEO Diego Della Valle. “A house built in a classic Italian style with thousands of fine details is always rare to find.” 5085 WESTHEIMER ROAD; TODS.COM

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Leather Heads

Designer and Houston native Andrea G. Phillips might live in London, but she knows what Texans need to look (and feel) cool in high humidity. Fittingly, the founder of AG Phillips—sold at Neiman Marcus, Tootsies and Elizabeth Anthony—has introduced a collection of little white frocks. “Incorporating white into your wardrobe makes you look chic when it’s 100 degrees,” Phillips says. She recommends completing the look with bold accessories in blue, like turquoise Jimmy Choo sandals. AGPHILLIPS.COM


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Talk about fun in the sun: Mandalay Bay’s Beach Concert Series takes place on an 11-acre “beach” with more than 2,700 tons of real California sand, imported for the occasion. This summer’s lineup includes The Script and Ziggy Marley. MANDALAYBAY.COM

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The Wynn Las Vegas’s XS Nightclub might just be the brightest—and most technically advanced—establishment on the Strip, thanks to the recent installation of 14,000 LEDs throughout the space. This attention to detail isn’t unusual for managing partner Jesse Waits, who says, “The aesthetics of our club always set the bar high, and with the new lighting, ; . it’s enhanced even more.”

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3131 LAS VEGAS BOULEVARD SOUTH XSLASVEGAS COM

AN (UN) SHEEPISH DISPLAY Hermès rang in the Year of the Sheep this past February with a series of events held at each of its three Las Vegas stores. The boutique at the Bellagio offered custom fragrance-engraving services, while the Encore Las Vegas

H ERMES: DELPH INE CH ANET; MANDALAY BAY: JOH N BURG OYNE.

hosted a Leandro Erlich–designed watch exhibit. Nearby at The Shops at Crystals, the French mega-brand threw a reception feting the Saint-Louis Paperweight Exhibition, a special display of exceptionally crafted spherical crystal paperweights created by France’s premiere glassmaker since 1586, Saint-Louis, using the traditional Roman millefiori technique. “Saint-Louis paperweights exemplify the company’s unique ability to master a specific crystal technique and develop it further using the workshop’s own skills,” says brand director Celine Sanchez. “The paperweight has continued to be reinvented, re-mastered and collected for centuries.” HERMES.COM

A pink rose is first crafted separately with a blowtorch and then encased in the clear crystal.

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AUDRA BALDWIN’S VEGAS THE ARTS PATRON, MOTHER AND WIFE OF CITYCENTER CEO BOBBY BALDWIN CALLS SOUTHERN HIGHLANDS HOME. HERE’S A LOOK INSIDE HER LAS VEGAS

CULTURE

“Las Vegas is a very philanthropic community. I am the vice president of the executive board and special-events chair for the NEVADA BALLET THEATRE and vice president of field operations for the MISS NEVADA

SCHOLARSHIP ORGANIZATION.”

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DIET & WELLNESS

FASHION & SHOPPING

“In the morning, I enjoy two cups of Bulletproof Coffee and Greek yogurt while reading the paper. For lunch, it’s an organic Chinese chicken salad at home or lunch with my husband (every Wednesday!). We do family dinners at home four nights a week, but otherwise I love MICHAEL MINA and LE CIRQUE at the BELLAGIO and SAGE and BARMASA at ARIA. I take antigravity yoga classes at SHINE ALTERNATIVE FITNESS [below] and Megaformer classes at REMIXX, and I do cardio with trainers in my home gym daily.”

IN THE BAG The new design of Longchamp’s boutique at the Forum Shops at Caesars Palace is taking cues from the art of origami, featuring wall panels that bring the folded fabric of the brand’s popular Le Pliage tote to life. (Miley Cyrus carries the new Zodiac style, designed by Jeremy Scott.) It’s fitting, according to Scott, a frequent collaborator, who tells us that, “Le Pliage bags have become a French icon—like the croissant or the Eiffel Tower.” 3500 LAS VEGAS BOULEVARD SOUTH; US.LONGCHAMP.COM

Bag, $ 3 85 , LONG CH AMP, us.longchamp. com.

“I like to check out THE SHOPS AT CRYSTALS and other designer boutiques. Some days I wear runway CHANEL and other days it’s LULULEMON. My daily uniform is RAG & BONE dark skinny jeans, a JAMES PERSE T-shirt and a BALMAIN blazer. I carry a HERMÈS Jige clutch or a TOM FORD Natalia bag [$4,190, tomford.com]. For shoes, it’s SAINT LAURENT heels [price upon request, ysl.com]. I love my vintage Cartier panther ring and my FRED JOAILLIER engagement ring and wedding band.”

Miley Cyrus

BALDWIN: JERRY METELLUS; ALL OTH ER IMAG ES COURTESY.

BEAUTY & GROOMING

“I use a custom skin-care regimen from LANCER and The Method: Body Cleanse [$30, lancerskincare.com] and SK-II’s Signs Eye Mask [$115, sk-ii.com]. For makeup, it’s TOM FORD Illuminating Primer and Traceless Foundation, HOURGLASS Ambient Lighting Powder, GIORGIO ARMANI Eyes to Kill black eyeliner, GUCCI lipstick in Iconic Red [$39, saks.com] and TOM FORD Jasmine Rouge and JO MALONE Wild Bluebell cologne. Oscar at the ROBERT CROMEANS SALON cuts and colors my hair. I use ORIBE shampoo and conditioner and SHOW BEAUTY Pure Treatment Oil.”

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LEGENDARY SUSHI SPOT HAMASAKU EVOLVES WITH THE TIMES AND REMAINS ON A ROLL

THE CHIRASHI BOWL One of the restaurant’s new offerings

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Los Feliz-itations

4626 HOLLYWOOD BOULEVARD; HOTELCOVELL.COM

TWILIGHT ROLL Spicy tuna, crab, avocado, seared albacore and ponzu

11043 SANTA MONICA BOULEVARD; HAMASAKULA .COM

NO TROUBLE WITH THE CURVE After Beverly Hills plastic surgeon Suzanne Trott noticed patients bypassing ALL IMAG ES COURTESY

bulky postsurgical compression garments in favor of sleeker store-bought shapewear, she designed the Vixen by Lipo Queen shapewear to comfortably compress under form-fitting clothes. Soon “they were coming back after the six-week mark still wearing it,” says Dr. Trott, whose design emphasizes comfort and support. “When a woman feels more confident about her body, her entire demeanor changes.” LIPOQUEEN.COM

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CHARLIZE TACOS Spicy tuna, avocado, fried wonton skin, rice, creamy wasabi and sweet soy

Long a fixture for high-end sushi-lovers on L.A.’s Westside ( and tucked away in a nondescript strip mall) , H amasaku has certainly changed since it opened in 19 9 8. F or years, the restaurant was known for creative menu items inspired by a celebrity clientele—the Charlize tacos, the Twilight Roll and other dishes named for Julie Andrews and Candy Spelling. But after more than a decade of serving fame-inspired fish, it was time for an update. These days, the menu has turned toward more refined Japanese fare, thanks to the leadership of executive sushi chef Yoya Takahashi and executive chef Wonny Lee, and the decor has been overhauled by architect Marwan Al-Sayed ( of Utah’s Amangiri resort) , who brought in a new “bento box” aesthetic, with blond wood and felt and fabrics in a wide variety of colors and textures. Offsetting the new design is an impressive selection of Japanese art from the collection of the restaurant’s owner, H ollywood power player Michael Ovitz. “The quality of food and warmth of hospitality has never changed, and as all things need to evolve, it was important to not interrupt the overall ethos we originally created,” says Ovitz, a famed aficionado of Eastern influences. “Marwan Al-Sayed’s interpretation of what we had to offer breathed a new life into the space and mirrors the simplicity that I’ve always admired in Japanese design and culture.” And that’s change we can live with.

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When Dustin Lancaster decided to transform the apartments above his Bar Covell drinking hole into the new Hotel Covell, he teamed with designer Sally Breer to devise themes for each suite. The result? Rooms modeled on everything from 1950s NYC to 1970s Paris.

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FAR EAST MEETS WESTSIDE

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Summer time, Cipriani Style. BODRUM

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MONTE CARLO

VENICE

MEXICO CITY

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VENICE

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www.cipriani.com NEW YORK

@cipriani

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Below: Shiva Rose in her test kitchen. At right: The line’s new Rose Face Oil and bath salts.

A RISING RENAISSANCE The new 20-story apartment complex The Emerson stands like an exclamation point alongside Grand Park and the forthcoming Broad Museum, heralding the comeback of Downtown L.A. Related California tapped Arquitectonica to design the sophisticated structure, which retains a warm sense of home. Or, as Related VP Gino Canori says, “It’s like living in Downtown’s ultimate work of art.”

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Having extolled the virtues of natural beauty products, blogger and tastemaker Shiva Rose was inspired to launch her own namesake skin-care line. “It just doesn’t make sense to eat organically but then to soak our pores in chemicals,” she says. “I began to make my own Rose Face Serum, using roses from my garden. The serum was powerful, and I started the line to share nontoxic beauty with my community.” The line will continue to blossom this summer with new products, including Glowing Face Balm, Nectar Body Oil and Radiant Rose Water. THELOCALROSE.COM

LOS ANGELES

In Full Bloom

For its 50th anniversary, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art is digging deep into its 120,000-object collection to display “50 for 50” with its most significant acquisitions, including works by Warhol, Degas, ToulouseLautrec and Lichtenstein. LACMA.ORG

225 SOUTH GRAND AVENUE; THEEMERSONLA.COM

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It seems like Miamians only have eyes for Pritzker Prize– winning architects these days. At last count, which changes daily, there were at least nine design whizzes with pending projects in the city.

THE EMBASSY

DR’s Orders

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Come summer, Miamians—and a recent guest, former Spanish king Juan Carlos—cool down at Casa de Campo in the Dominican Republic. Visitors can reserve one of the all-inclusive resort’s 185 rooms or a private villa to soak up perks like a Pete Dye–designed golf course and take a catamaran cruise to nearby Catalina Island.

THE BAZAAR PROJECT

HIP STRIP

Just north of the Miami Design District, the historic Buena Vista neighborhood has become a bohemian hub for independently owned shops and restaurants. They’re easily located in a string along Northeast Second Avenue—the only hard part is parking!

CASADECAMPO.COM.DO

THE BAZAAR PROJECT Decorating and gifting are a breeze thanks to the globe-trotting proprietor Yeliz Titiz, who re-creates the eclectic markets of her native Istanbul with classic wares.

BV CHOCOLATE & WINE Descendants of a royal chocolatier and champagne maker partnered in this decadent venture, where Chateau Margaux bordeaux meets saffron bonbons. 4512 NE SECOND AVENUE; BUENAVISTACHOCOLATE.COM

THE EMBASSY Neighborhood pioneer Alan Hughes whips up sunflower-seed-crusted salmon and pintxo specials to live music.

MAIER & MILAN

DSQUARED2

In its third Miami location, TOMAS MAIER‘s namesake lifestyle store has settled into the Bal Harbour Shops. “We went for a less industrial look this time,” says Maier, who decorated the beachy boutique with vintage Scandinavian chairs and unfinished oak floors. “It’s more organic.” 9700 COLLINS AVENUE; TOMASMAIER.COM DSQUARED2‘s DSQUARED2 fun, colorful clothing—say, a pink and green camouflage dress shirt and necktie in a matching print—feels right at home in Florida. Men and women will be tempted by the Milan-based brand’s new Bal Harbour boutique, part of its 20th-anniversary festivities. 9700 COLLINS AVENUE; DSQUARED2.COM

4600 NE SECOND AVENUE; THEEMBASSYMIAMI.COM

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LEMONI CAFÉ The original café, known for garlicky chicken, avocado paninis and green-tealime cupcakes, has sprouted a sister pizzeria of the same name. 4600 NE SECOND AVENUE; MYLEMONICAFE.COM

PRITZ K ER PRIZ E: JOH N BURG OYNE; ALL OTH ER IMAG ES COURTESY

4308 NE SECOND AVENUE; THEBAZAARPROJECTSHOP.COM


# KUROH ARDROCK H O L LY WO O D, F L 路 S EMIN OLEH A RD ROCKH OLLY WOOD.COM 路 95 4 - 585-5333


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EVEN THE OFF-SEASON BRINGS A FLURRY OF TASTY NEW RESTAURANTS TO TRY

Casino Cooking

Clockwise from top left: Chef’s nigiri box; chef Alex Becker; Hokkaido scallops; whitefish carpaccio.

Big fish at the Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino aren’t only at the card tables. Kuro, the venue’s new Japanese restaurant, features serious seafood (think wildcaught gulf pink shrimp from purveyor Trigger Fish Seafood). “Though the menu is fundamentally Japanese, we combine locally sourced ingredients as well as items imported from Japan for our contemporary ‘new style’ Japanese cuisine,” explains executive chef Alex Becker. 1 SEMINOLE WAY, HOLLYWOOD; SEMINOLEHARDROCKHOLLYWOOD.COM

WHAT’S AT STEAK?

The heat is on in Miami’s steakhouse scene. Here’s how newcomer Quality Meats compares to a veteran like The Forge.

THE CONTENDERS

THE FORGE Since the 1990s, Shareef Malnik has played the consummate host at this institution, founded by his father in 1969. 432 WEST 41ST STREET; THEFORGE.COM

Family-owned butchers such as Halperns, Bush Brothers and Pat LaFrieda provide cuts like a 10-oz bavette and a 64-oz aged tomahawk.

SIZE MATTERS

8-oz filet mignons and 40-oz dry-aged tomahawk chops from Pat LaFrieda and Creekstone Farms and Wagyu from Japan.

Enjoy Sine Qua Non’s 2005 Atlantis (a grenache-syrah blend) and the Piña Clara, a crisp, clear take on the piña colada from a tap.

SIPS

Savor 1961 Château Latour 1er Grand Cru Classé Pauillac and the Sicilian Smoke–tequila, mezcal and pink-grapefruit-juice cocktail.

President Bill Clinton, Ryan Gosling, Angelina Jolie, Lady Gaga, Jessica Simpson and Derek Jeter have dined at the New York location.

STAR WATTAGE

Madonna, Bono, Jennifer Lopez, Al Pacino, Michael Jackson, Martha Stewart and Matthew McConaughey.

Note AvroKO’s enhanced art-deco details, as well as multiple private rooms and al fresco nooks surrounded by thick foliage.

SETTING & SURPRISES

On weekends, there’s live entertainment and private parties can reserve the wine cellar to dine at a mirrored table amid rare vintages.

MADE IN THE SHADE

Miami and Bal Harbour shopping destination The Webster’s stylish owner, Laure Heriard Dubreuil, has parterned with the St. Regis Bal Harbour resort to create a luxurious seaside cabana. The 600-squarefoot poolside retreat features the brand’s signature wallpaper, sisal rugs, antique mirrors and floral-print furniture by Paul Frankl. There’s butler service, a flatscreen TV, a shower and a wet bar as well as plush robes and slippers for lounging. Outside the cabana, two pom-pom-trimmed loungers await when you seek some sun, and a fresh-fruit platter and bubbly are included in the $550-per-day price. “The wallpaper and furniture respresent the brand’s DNA and my interpretation of Miami chic,” says Dubreuil. “I wanted to re-create Webster heaven in a cabana.” 9703 COLLINS AVENUE; STREGISBALHARBOUR.COM

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QUALITY MEATS Fourth Wall Restaurants’ Michael Stillman and chef Craig Koketsu have imported their New York hit. 1501 COLLINS AVENUE; QUALITYMEATSMIAMI.COM

BECK ER &

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SAVOR THIS SUMMER

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A NEW GENERATION TAKES THE HELM AT MAX MARA PHOTOGRAPHED BY WESTON WELLS

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Small Whitney Bag, $ 1,15 0, MAX MARA, 212-879 -6 100.

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emlines may rise and fall, but there’s more changing in fashion than just the garments—and Max Mara is a prime example. “We are a company that’s not about revolutions but about evolution,” Maria G iulia Maramotti, the company’s U.S. retail director, explains. “Today’s woman is different than when my grandfather started: She wants to be comfortable, beautiful and impeccable.” And while it’s certainly true that times have changed since Achille Maramotti, Maria G iulia’s grandfather, founded the fashion house, there are some things about the Maramotti family that have always stayed the same. The most prominent example being their unwavering devotion to the arts, something most recently apparent in their sponsorship of April’s opening party for the Renzo Piano–de signed Whitney Museum of American Art on the H igh Line. That partnership is organic for the family, which owns the Collezione Maramotti, a private contemporary-art collection outside Milan, and has sponsored the Whitney Art Party for the past two years. “The Maramotti family has dedicated themselves to making modern and contemporary art available to the public,” says museum director Adam D. Weinberg, “and has demonstrated outstanding support for the arts internationally.” F or Maria G iulia, the Whitney isn’t international; it’s just her neighbor. She’s called Manhattan’s Chelsea neighborhood home for the past three years, and New ork has been a h ge in ence on the brand. That’s most obvious in its pre-fall collection, which features a leather Whitney Bag, available in three sizes and four colors and the result of a collaboration with the Renzo Piano Building Workshop. “What’s happening in the city’s art and music scenes is very contemporary,” Maramotti says. “This lifestyle is really in line with our brand’s DNA.” —N at as ha W ol ff

With 111 locations globally, fast-casual eatery Sushi Shop is expanding its NYC presence with six new restaurants, including ones on the Upper West Side and in the Flatiron. Check out the brand’s signature sushi boxes, perfect for grab-and-go lunches. MYSUSHISHOP.COM

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AMAZING SPACES

TWO EXCITING NEW OVERHAULS ARE HEATING UP THE DOWNTOWN SOCIAL SCENE

THE BIG SIX-OH

LA NUOVA BELLA NOTTE

After a major makeover, a SoHo stalwart is reborn

A venue for Cipriani is truly a worthwhile event

The hotel at 60 Thompson Street has been a downtown destination—for dining, drinking and countless swanky soirees—since it opened in 2001. And while the address hasn’t changed, thanks to a recent overhaul the hotel now known as Sixty SoHo feels entirely new. In addition to a renovation by interior designer Tara Bernerd that tackled the hot spot’s public spaces and all 97 guest rooms, other upgrades include a new bar and coastal Italian restaurant from hospitality guru John McDonald and the reopening of the famous rooftop lounge. “It’s reflective of how SoHo’s grown up,” explains co-owner Jason Pomeranc. “There’s a great past but also a refined present and future. It speaks to the idea of how hospitality has evolved.” The result is decidedly modern, with high-end furnishings, art by Ryan McGinley and Harland Miller and an upscale atmosphere that places it among the city’s most alluring spaces—if you’re the right kind of guest. “It’s not meant to appeal to everyone,” Pomeranc says. “It takes a specific point of view.”

Cipriani’s worldwide Italian restaurant empire is expanding yet again—and to one of its grandest locations yet. The celebrated culinary dynasty has opened a second event space in lower Manhattan, in the Great Hall of the landmark Cunard Building at 25 Broadway. The venue, completed in 1921, features 69-foot arched ceilings decorated by a vast Ezra Winter mural, and will be a fitting home for the Italian brand. “Twenty years ago my father [Giuseppe] recognized the potential of these beautiful landmarked buildings and the opportunity of giving them a new life with great events and celebrations,” says Maggio Cipriani. “We thought that it was a unique space with spectacular decoration and a perfect addition to our collection.” The former Cunard Steamship Line ticketing office and U.S. Postal Service building, which can house up to 1,000 guests, has already played host to Victoria Beckham’s fall runway show. “It reminds me of a time when New York was probably the busiest port in the world,” says Cipriani.

60 THOMPSON STREET; SIXTYHOTELS.COM

The Gordon Bar at Sixty SoHo.

25 BROADWAY; CIPRIANI.COM

The library at Cipriani 25 Broadway.

FROM ITALY WITH LOVE

A classic Italian jeweler is making New York its home

Above: Andrea and Lucrezia Buccellati. At right: White gold and diamond bracelet, price upon request, BUCCELLATI, buccellati.com.

At almost 100 years old, the Buccellati brand is known for its timeless elegance, something that’s apparent in the luxury jeweler’s new flagship in New York. The walls of the five-story Madison Avenue boutique are lined with damask fabric panels, the furniture is Giorgetti and the floors are dark oak wood set in a classic Versailles pattern. According to creative director Andrea Buccellati, “The boutique encompasses the company’s new visual identity as the brand ; . evolves further into the 21st century.” 714 MADISON AVENUE BUCCELLATI COM

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A ROOM FOR ALL SEASONS

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DISTINCTIVE PRIVATE EVENT ROOMS FOR 10 - 150 P A R K

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FACE FORWARD TWO NEW BEAUTY DESTINATIONS OFFER CUTTING-EDGE TREATMENTS IN 30 MINUTES

HEY THERE, GORGEOUS New NoMad facial spot Heyday hopes to do for skin care what DryBar did for on-the-go hair care. And at either $60 for 30 minutes or $95 for 50 minutes, customers can enjoy facial treatments using products from Tata Harper, Naturopathica and Grown Alchemist. “I was doing a lot of work for beauty companies who focus on pushing products rather than helping consumers do what’s right for their skin,” CEO Adam Ross says. “And personally, looking after my skin was becoming increasingly confusing, expensive and time-consuming. In speaking with my friends, everyone was equally frustrated, so I became convinced there had to be a better way.”

Heyday’s booking app

DO YOUR LAUNDRY Skin Laundry promises to improve smoothness and tone while diminishing the appearance of acne and pores with a 10-minute medical-grade noninvasive YAG laser treatment and IPL light therapy, which vaporize the dirt and toxins in the skin. The concept came to Yen Reis while living in Singapore and suffering from acne following the birth of her third child. Upon returning to Los Angeles, she founded the first of many clinics in 2013, but the Flatiron outpost marks the company’s East Coast debut. “Even though we are a medical facility, we wanted to remove any clinical feeling and enhance the overall experience,” Reis explains.

1130 BROADWAY; THINKHEYDAY.COM

Skin Laundry

3 WEST 16TH STREET; SKINLAUNDRY.COM

Ryan Harwood, founder and CEO of the women’s lifestyle site PureWow, worked at Goldman Sachs for five years before realizing there was a big digital space that needed filling. Here, we pick his brain. WHY DID YOU LAUNCH PUREWOW? Many of the sites meant for women weren’t appealing to them. Women were looking for a voice that didn’t silo them into buckets as a mom, career woman, divorcee, etc. Sure, they wanted a Kardashian moment or two, but they also want financial advice, or a tip on what book to read next. HOW DID YOU COME UP WITH THE NAME? WOW is an acronym for “Women on the Web.” We also implemented a “wow factor” into the discoveries we cover editorially, and the name PureWow fit. WHAT MAKES FOR A SUCCESSFUL WEB STARTUP? It’s always about the people. You will face a ton of obstacles along the way, so leaders need to be thick-skinned and resilient. It also takes an understanding that you’re going to have to do a lot without a lot of money. WHAT HAVE YOU LEARNED FROM WORKING IN A MOSTLY FEMALE OFFICE SPACE? That sometimes things are simply out of my control. PUREWOW.COM

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From left: Liden’s Everything, at Maccarone Gallery, which inspired the new public installation; the handcarved, structural foam bagels are fabricated in Greenpoint, Brooklyn.

WHAT WOMEN WANT

The NYC–based creator of PureWow has it all figured out

TK TK TK TK TK PH OTO CREDITS STYLE?

Art Production Fund and Kiehl’s have partnered to present artist Hanna Liden’s two-part public art installation Everything this July. The work takes on a very New York item— the bagel—by placing large-scale, foam-carved versions of the carb downtown. “It’s a playful nod to the surprising beauty of everyday urban spaces,” says APF cofounder Yvonne Force Villareal. Chris Salgardo, Kiehl’s U.S. president, concurs: “It’s so exciting to bring this remarkable installation to life.”

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Bagel Bites


RIFLESSI LUXURY EUROPEAN BRANDS AT NEW YORK‘S LOWEST PRICES

WEST 57 STREET (BETWEEN 5TH & 6TH AVE) NEW YORK, NY 212 935 4747 RIFLESSI.US

PHOTOGRAPHY RUPRECHTSTUDIOS.COM CREATIVE DIRECTION MAALIKOBASI.COM


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BARN LIVING

Always in Motion

Photographer Ben Watts is unlocking his iPhone in honor of Montauk. Watts’new book, Montauk Dreaming, features stunning phone-generated photos of his beloved beach town.

The classic H amptons farmhouse is getting an upgrade. Black Barn, the brainchild of architect and interior designer Mark Z eff, offers custom-built homes “inspired by the barns and farmhouses of the East End, with a bespoke modern sensibility,” according to developer Robert Dankner of Prime Manhattan Residential. Selling for about $ 4 million, each custom home features touches like industrial staircases, matte-black exteriors and wide-plank wooden oors along with pools and tennis co rts. “ lack arn is a depart re ro the c ansion style houses that have become so typical; an exciting new alternative.” BLACKBARNS.COM

AKT in Motion, a dance-based cardio workout, is already a favorite of New York City’s exercising elite, and now devotees can get their fit fix while in the Hamptons. Anna Kaiser, the method’s founder, is opening a permanent location in East Hampton to help clients like Sarah Jessica Parker and Kelly Ripa stay in shape when they’re at their summer homes. “East Hampton is very central to many of my clients,” says the high-energy Kaiser, “and we need a home that we can use yearround that creates the true AKT vibe and offers all the props and tricks you get at our other studios.” The location’s lineup will include a roster of group classes—including Happy Hour, S&M, 4Play, S(wet) Dream and AKTease—for clients looking to get in an intense yet fun workout in what Kaiser describes as a positive and encouraging community. “You get your cardio, strength and flexibility in just one hour while sweating every toxin out of your body without wasting a single moment.” 3 RAILROAD AVENUE, EAST HAMPTON AKTINMOTION.COM

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Epic bodysuit, $ 3 5 0; Bionic bra, $ 103 , MICH I, bandier.com.

OUTFITTED FOR FITNESS Workout-apparel destination Bandier is expanding its offerings with a new Southampton outpost. This summer, the store will offer an updated selection of swim and activewear, including over 50 brands, such as Stella McCartney by Adidas, Michi and Norma Kamali. 44 B MAIN STREET, SOUTHAMPTON; BANDIER.COM

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[PROMOTION]

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The Back Room at One57 offers a premiere, contemporary restaurant to Midtown Manhattan where you will savor our culinary masterpieces in American cuisine style crafted by our culinary experts. The Back Room at One57 offers a sophisticated, intimate atmosphere with views of Carnegie H all and close steps away from midtown destinations like Columbus Circle, Lincoln Center, and Central Park.

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SHARON DORRAM’S GREENWICH

THE COLORIST, WHO TENDS TO THE TRESSES OF LINDA EVANGELISTA AND ANNA KENDRICK OUT OF HER EPONYMOUS UPPER EAST SIDE SALON, CALLS CONNECTICUT HOME

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Knockout Workout The boxing-based method at Punch Fitness Center, founded by champion kickboxer Adelino Da Costa, gets clients into fighting shape fast. At its Greenwich, Connecticut, facility, both private and semiprivate training—through a series of intense moves—are on offer. “Our trainers listen and look for the things that clients

LOCAL HAUNTS

need to do to reach their physical peak,” says Da Costa. “The greater talent, however, is

“I shop on Mondays at Mario Batali’s TARRY MARKET.. I love the THOMAS HENKELMANN restaurant at the Homestead Inn, L’ESCALE,, on the water (we have a standing reservation on Friday nights), LE PENGUIN bistro and REBECCAS for special occasions (their catering is the best). On weekends, we like to visit THE INN AT POUND RIDGE by Jean-Georges [below] and Michael White’s cozy CAMPAGNA at the Bedford Post Inn.”

reading a client’s energy and being able to connect mentally with that person.” And devotees (from fashion editors to titans of business) can’t get enough. “I love Punch—if I survive,” says Dylan Lauren, who, along with her husband, trains at the Upper East Side location. “It’s got a great vibe because of the unique personalities and backgrounds of the trainers. I leave there with more energy and spring in my step than when I enter.” 321 GREENWICH AVENUE, GREENWICH

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FASHION & SHOPPING

MORE SOUL More than 10,000 riders take SoulCycle spin classes every single day. That’s a lot of pedaling. To meet the ever-increasing demand, the fitness empire is opening in Westport, its second studio in Connecticut. “Westport has been asking for SoulCycle for quite some time now,” says cofounder Julie Rice. “We can’t wait to finally open and start building our community there.” 374 POST ROAD E, WESTPORT; SOUL-CYCLE.COM

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BEAUTY & WELLNESS

“I alternate KÉRASTASE Cristalliste with LEONOR GREYL for shampoo and conditioner. For volume, I use SALLY HERSHBERGER Supreme Lift and LIVING PROOF Perfect Hair Day [$26, livingproof.com]. I love LA MER Moisturizing Soft Cream [$160, lamer.com], and at night I apply CHRISTIE BRINKLEY Recapture cream. I use TOM FORD blush and Skinny Dip lipstick, and I cannot live without CLÉ DE PEAU concealer.”

“For summer, I’ll pair a BRUNELLO CUCINELLI suede and tulle layered top [$4,495, 212-627-9202] with J BRAND white jeans [$178]. I live in CHLOÉ flats and ROGER VIVIER pumps [$775, 212-861-5371] during the day and MANOLO BLAHNIK or CHANEL heels at night. I love CHROME HEARTS eyewear, ETRO scarves and TOM FORD, CÉLINE and HERMÈS bags.”


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Upscale Beverly Hills candymaker Sugarfina just opened one of its sweet spots at South Coast Plaza in Costa Mesa. SUGARFINA.COM

Loco for SOCO

With more than 70 showrooms and culinary outposts, Costa Mesa’s South Coast Collection (SOCO) has become a destination for both high-end home furnishings and artisanal eateries. PUEBLO At the tapas restaurant Pueblo, old world Spanish flavors are presented with novel twists and crafted with locally sourced ingredients by chef Michael Campbell (San Francisco’s RN74). There’s also a traditional Spanish jamón carving station.

ST PÂTISSERIE CHOCOLAT Master pastry chef Stephane Treand provides the initials for this sweets shop, and he also offers aspiring pâtissiers the chance to enroll in The Pastry School next door for courses in creating their own exceptional sweets. STEPHANETREAND

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Espadrilles, $ 75 , SOLUDOS X JEF F DIV INE, soludos.com

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A SHORE THING Surf photographer Jeff Divine is bringing his visions of ocean scenes to dry land via a collaboration with Soludos beach shoes. “Soludos remind me of the ‘70s, when surfers were traveling the world and would bring new fashion back to California,” says the SoCal native. Soludos founder Nick Brown is a longtime fan of Divine’s: “His images capture surfing in a really authentic way,” says the shoemaker. “The vivid colors and exotic locales made Jeff’s photos perfect for our shoes.”

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ROCHE BOBOIS In the spring, the brand moved its Costa Mesa headquarters into a new 8,200-squarefoot showroom, offering an even larger selection of its creatively conceived and designed home furnishings and one-of-a-kind pieces.

With its first-ever berth at Fashion Island, the luxurious ZO Skin Centre’s cutting-edge services and treatments provide a unique way to pamper your outermost layer. “Unlike others selling skin-care products in the mall, it is physician-owned and offers state-of-the-art equipment, personalized protocols and highly proven exclusive products to restore skin to its most healthy and vibrant condition,” says dermatologist and founder Dr. Zein Obagi.

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TIMOTHY OULTON Timothy Oulton gallery recently touched down at SOCO’s HD Buttercup outpost, which is ideal for the British brand’s sophisticated, relaxed aesthetic and furnishings that combine antique sensibilities with modern interpretations.

THE SCIENCE OF BEAUTYJUST GOT PERSONAL

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SKIN DEEP


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KITON’S POINT BREAK

The Naples-based bespoke clothing company and suitmaker K iton is making wa es with its first an rancisco o tpost. H oused in the historic Shreve Building, the boutique offers clothes and accessories for men and women, as well as an exclusive, limited-edition line of custom-built surfboards with K iton fabric inlays, to o tfit yo at the o fice and in the ocean. “Our surfboards, like our suits, are made in the artisanal way, by hand,” explains the brand s . . president ntonio aone. “And this city has a large population of creative, counterculture people who understand and s pport artisanal ndertakings.

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The San Francisco Jewish Film Festival, the first and largest Jewish film festival in the world, kicks off its three-week summer run on July 24 with dynamic cinema from around the world. SFJFF.ORG

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Grab Bags Claire Borel’s toy box was her mother’s closet. The Bay Area native has since turned her passion into a career with the launch of her line of exotic skin purses, House of Borel. Her mantra with the accessories is to “make it better, make it richer, make it timeless.” Working with Italian tanneries, Borel creates a finished product to “achieve a new modern idea of California-style luxury.” rocodile orsalina conda e

anaconda erona ana ho seo borel.co .

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A PALATABLE DUO

One SF firm approaches hospitality design from the inside out. The job of upgrading the interiors of not one but two Four Seasons properties on the Hawaiian island of Lanai did not faze Paletteur’s David Lasker and Gino Castaña, though it had its daunting aspects. “We were challenged to complete a lobby renovation in eight weeks for the hotel at Manele Bay,” explains Lasker. “Normally, that will take a year or more.” Transforming the hotels (all told, five restaurants, two lobbies, a spa and 13 penthouse suites) for Larry Ellison, who owns the island, in record time solidified their reputation. With Castaña concentrating on the color palette and materials and Lasker on the space plan and architecture, the duo’s local work includes the Mark Hopkins’s Nob Hill Club (seen below). “Our mantra is to create a sense of place and tell a story that is inspired by the history, art and culture unique to a locale,” says Lasker.

207 GRANT AVENUE; KITONUS.COM

re ra ity wool s it b rnished coloring shoes

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[ P R OMOT ION ]

SPECIAL ISSUE

GAME CHANGERS Join us as we unveil a special issue celebrating the forward thinkers, innovators and brand stewards that will shape 2016.

BE A PART OF THE FUTURE Commitment Date: 08/17/15 Available in Homes and on Newsstands: 10/27/15 FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT YOUR DUJOUR SALES REPRESENTATIVE


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TOP TOQUES

TWO MICHELIN-STARRED CHEFS FROM NEW YORK CITY VENTURE SOUTH TO SHOWCASE THEIR CULINARY CAPABILITIES

OSTERIA MORINI Chef Michael White has opened Osteria Morini at the Lumber Shed in the Navy Yard, and already it‘s catered events at the White House. Under the direction of executive chef Matt Adler, the restaurant serves homey Italian dishes and is beloved for pasta, like the crab, sea urchin, basil and Calabrian-chili bucatini and the baked ricotta gnocchi with duck ragu and escarole. Adriatic-style seafood soup, roast chicken and braised short ribs round out the entrees at this loft-like waterfront space. “The food movement has expanded recently, and we wanted to be part of it,” says White. “It feels like D.C. waited for this type of venue for a long time.” 301 WATER STREET SE; OSTERIAMORINI.COM

DBGB Located at CityCenterDC in Penn Quarter, DBGB is a lively neighborhood boîte from chef Daniel Boulud and executive chef Ed Scarpone. Designed by Boulud collaborator Thomas Schlesser and his firm, Design Bureaux, the decor features mirrored walls, brown leather booths and wooden bistro tables. “I’ve always thought about opening a restaurant in D.C., being that it was the first place I lived and worked in the U.S.,” says Boulud. “This space gave us the chance to be part of a new wave in the downtown neighborhood.” So far, the most popular dishes have been classics like coq au vin, trout and house-made boudin blanc sausages. 931 H STREET NW; DBGB.COM

No city does July 4 quite like America’s capital. With a parade down Constitution Avenue, a starstudded free concert on the National Mall and an over-the-top fireworks display, there’s no better place to celebrate the nation’s independence.

HAUTE HOTEL HAPPENING

Dupont Circle’s Embassy Row H otel boasts 23 1 guest rooms, but the property— recently renovated to the tune of $ 15 million—isn’t just for tourists. In-the-know locals can drop by this summer to partake of the rooftop bar and saltwater pool, and there’s plenty to do inside the building as well. “Our lobby is meant to be a social playground,” says general manager Shawn Jervis. “It’s a place where you can start your day and end your night.” 2015 MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE NW; EMBASSYROWHOTEL.COM

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Creek-Tastic

To enjoy Loudoun County, Virginia’s thriving wine and liquor scene, look no further than Purcellville distillery Catoctin Creek, founded by chemical engineer Becky Harris and her project-manager husband, Scott Harris. “Scott likes to say that 20 years of government contracting taught him a great love of drinking,” jokes Becky. The first Loudoun distillery to open legally since Prohibition now produces best-sellers like the smooth Roundstone Rye and Watershed Gin and draws 10,000 visitors annually to its tasting room. This fall, the brand will release its first straight rye whisky, as well as an apple brandy. 120 WEST MAIN STREET, PURCELLVILLE; CATOCTINCREEK.COM

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THE IN CROWD

Shine On Chicago WHO: Shinola’s Jacques Panis, JKLS PR’s Lara Shiffman and JIll Katz WHAT: A dinner at the Pump Room restaurant to celebrate Shinola’s new Wicker Park store WHERE: The Public hotel Chicago

DJ BROOKLYN DAWN

SHINOLA PRESIDENT JACQUES PANIS, THE CHICAGO TRIBUNE’S DAVID SYREK AND DAVID CSICSKO CAROLINE FITZGIBBONS AND SOTHEBY’S CEO TAD SMITH

THE PUBLIC’S DAVID MISKIT AND JASON BINN

RICH ALAPACK AND APRIL FRANCIS

JASON ERKES SHINOLA’S KIRK BLACK AND JILL KATZ

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GUGGENHEIM PARTNERS’ DOTTIE MATTISON

CADE MLODINOFF, LARA SHIFFMAN AND BRADLEY JAROL

DAVID HOFFMAN AND PAIGE NOVICK

NICOLE AND STEVE BIRKHOLD

KATHARINA PLATH AND KATHLEEN WALSH

BETSY KNAB AND JENA GAMBACCINI

JULIA MOSHY AND REYA BENITEZ SCOTT FELDMAN, CHEF MARC MURPHY AND HERB KARLITZ

Mi Casa es Fendi Casa WHO: Tad Smith, Chef Mark Murphy and Daniel Lombardi WHAT: Cocktails and bites by Elegant Affairs’ Andrea Correale to celebrate Fendi Casa’s newest furniture line WHERE: Fendi Casa’s Luxury Living showroom in NYC

OLA KOSKA AND FOUR HUNDRED’S TONY ABRAMS

ANDREW WARREN AND CHARLIE ZAKKOUR

SH INOLA: TASOS K ATOPODIS/ G ETTY IMAG ES; F ENDI CASA: ASTRID STAWIARZ / G ETTY IMAG ES

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NICK LOEB, FENDI CASA MARKETING DIRECTOR DANIEL LOMBARDI AND RAYON BLACK


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THE IN CROWD

Binn Around Town

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From a DuJour cover party for Paris Hilton at PH-D Lounge at the Dream Downtown to the White House Correspondents’ Association dinner and the Thomson Reuters party, our CEO is on the scene—with his iPhone

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1. Antoine Doublet, Amaury Dazin, Alexandre Doublet and IWC Schaffhausen’s North American president Edouard d’Arbaumont 2. Brunello Cucinelli’s Gianluca Farinazzo and Thomas Ricotta 3. Kiton’s Giuditta Zecchin 4. Bill Bratton and Rikki Klieman 5. Lea Black and Yossi Dina 6. Amore Leighton Black, Peter Rauche and Nespresso’s Laura Hagege 7. Jordan Duffy 8. Wheels Up CEO Kenny Dichter and wife Shoshana 9. Observer Media CEO Joseph Meyer 10. Frank Kaminsky and Russell Wilson 11. Le Cirque’s Mauro Maccioni 12. Donald Trump and NYSE’s Tom Farley 13. DuJour’s Marc Berger, Lindsay Hockenberry and David Newlove 14. Ally Mataj 15. Jon Tasker and Mulberry marketing director Johanan Merino 16. Flybridge Capital Partners’ Matt Witheiler and Amanda Witheiler 17. Ali Wentworth and ABC News’ George Stephanopoulos 18. RYLI 19. Paris and Nicky Hilton 20. Chrissy Teigen wearing Etro and a TW Steel watch 21. HFPA’s Munawar Hosain and Kayla Peterson 22. Thomson Reuters’ Steven Schwartz and Gilt’s Kathy Leo 23. Absolut Elyx CEO Jonas Tahlin 24. Alexis McDermott and Debbie Gough 25. Eric Thomassian and Severin Carlson 26. Burberry’s George Kolasa and Armani’s Rod Manley 27. Arianna Huffington and Nash Grier 28. John Legend wearing a Philip Stein Sleep Bracelet


Famous Last Words FOR YANKEES GRE AT JORGE POSADA ,

THIS MOT TO HAS PROVEN TO BE A HOME RUN W RI T T EN BY F R A N C E S D O D D S

Capitals in the middle of words are a sign of defiance and rebellion.

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He doesn’t dot his i’s. This shows that he’s at one moment extremely detailed but at another decides it’s his prerogative not to be.

We see deliberate positioning of words and letters. He’s careful about self-expression.

W

hen Jorge Posada was a boy growing up in Puerto Rico, he could only imagine one future for himself: “It was always baseball,” says the legendary slugger. The son of a Cuban refugee, Posada never took the attainment of his dream for granted. “At the old Yankee stadium, we had a sign with this DiMaggio quote over the passage from the clubhouse to the dugout,” he remembers. “We all used to touch it before a game, and I would say it in my head every time I played there. It was true—we were lucky to be wearing pinstripes.”

There is a tightness in his signature. The letters are compressed. He’s intense about what he does.

The Yankees were glad to have him, too. This summer the team is commemorating Posada’s 17-season career by retiring his number, 20, making him the last Yankee to ever wear it, a fact he calls “unbelievable.” Of course, a career like his owes just as much to hard work as it does to luck. According to graphologist Annette Poizner, Posada’s handwriting suggests he still holds the belief that he’s been extraordinarily fortunate, and is thus avidly aware of his self-presentation. “Look at the clear and careful spacing,” she says. “Every letter is carefully articulated. Someone else might write more naturalisti-

cally, understanding that the whole point is to get a handwriting sample. But for him, he’s aware that this is a showcase. There will always be a self-consciousness.” What Posada’s handwriting doesn’t reveal, the man himself does in his forthcoming memoir, The Journey Home: My Life in Pinstripes. And what an odyssey it’s been. “I keep going back to that fi rst day I got to put on the uniform and sit in the dugout,” Posada recalls. “Nobody was in the stands; nobody was on the field. I was there by myself, sitting in the dugout crying because I had accomplished my childhood dream.”


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