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Corporate Flight Attendant News E-Letter Educating
the
community
one
news
issue
at
a
time. Volume
4,
Issue
6


OCTOBER
2009


ISSN
1932-4464


Scheduler or Dispatcher?

Our mission is to inform our loyal readers on today‘s issues that shape the corporate flight attendant. Customer satisfaction is our focus in our ongoing quest to exceed the goals for market, professional and personal growth. Each electronic publication is free to corporate flight attendants and aviation personnel throughout the world.

Article submitted by the NBAA Schedulers & Dispatchers Committee and S&D Advisory Council What is an FAA Licensed Dispatcher?

www.nbaa.org www.nbaa.org

An FAA Licensed Dispatcher is a ground-based operational extension of the flight crew. The Dispatcher shares flight operation joint authority and decision making – known as “operational control”. A plane never leaves the ground until both the Captain and the Dispatcher are in agreement. If a Dispatcher is concerned about visibility at the destination, or if the Captain does not want to proceed with a nonfunctioning component in the cockpit -- even though it is within legal limits -- the flight does not go. When the plane is in the air (following the flight plan that the Dispatcher has designed) the Dispatcher tracks it, keeping an eye on weather and traffic flow conditions in the region. Dispatchers also watch the conditions at both the destination airport and the alternate airports in case of an emergency. They can direct the Captain to divert or reroute the plane. If a Captain needs to alert someone that he or she has a sick Flight Attendant or an unruly passenger on board, the first person the Captain speaks to is the Dispatcher. Airline-Part 121 Dispatchers hold a valid FAA Aircraft Dispatch license, which is required by all major and regional airlines in the United States. Federal regulation created the certification in 1938. Six weeks of initial training at an FAA-certified school, passing a written test, and an eight hour oral exam are required to obtain a Dispatch license. Recurrent training is also required and consists of twenty hours of classroom instruction annually, and spending at least five hours observing an actual flight from the cockpit. In Part 91 and 135 Flight Operations a Licensed Dispatcher is not required. Everyone involved with the operation shares the safety responsibility. A Licensed Dispatcher assists the Flight crews in an elevated role of ensuring safe flights with expertise in: ✴ ✴ ✴ ✴ ✴ ✴

Federal Aviation Regulations Meteorology Navigation Air Traffic Control International Procedures Aircraft Performance

What is a Scheduler? The business aviation Scheduler is an integral part of the flight department and may also be referred to as Dispatcher or Flight Coordinator – but is typically not a Licensed Dispatcher.

Scheduler or Dispatcher?

I moved my cheese! Page 2

Explosive Decompression Page 10

Black Pepper Shrimp with 'ʻsun-dried" Pineapple Page 12

The primary purpose of a Scheduler is to take mutual ownership in the successful creation and completion of a trip, and provide the crew with a good foundation for each trip, including flight following and final documentation. They are often the first to receive the request for the trip and the first to hear of problems with the trip. Continue on page 6

Corporate Flight Attendant News E-Letter

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Volume 4, Issue 6


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www.cornersto nestrategiesllc. com

                     

      

    

   

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Corporate Flight Attendant News E-Letter

 Shari@cornerstonestrategiesllc.com 2

Volume 4, Issue 6


I moved my cheese!

HELP Wanted!

In my last newsletter I announced I was taking on a new venture and was heading back to school to become a dispatcher. While I did my research on the various dispatch schools, what to expect and how long the course would take, I was have to say I was not prepared for what was expected of me while in this class.

CorporateFAInsider.com is needing your support and looking for writers and web master help!

Here are the basics: 8 -5, M-F for full time students and 8 to noon, M-F for part time students. Full time students attend 6 weeks and part time students attend 12 weeks. You study one topic every two – three days in the morning and one to two topics in the afternoon for the week.

For more details, please call 407-257-0857 or email Editor@CorporateFAInsider.com

Sounds easy so far, I am sure, well now let me tell you about what I was not prepared for. I received 6 tests during my first 4 weeks on all 20 subjects we covered. Some of the topics covered were: FAR’s 61, 65, 91, 121, 135, NTSB 8400, reading weather charts & wind charts, weight and balance calculations (loading an airplane with passengers, fuel, payloads and make sure it will fly at its optimum level), runway markings, able to read and tell the teacher what an arrival, departure, and airport plates are, as well as many more things. On top of those 6 tests, I needed to prepare for one of two FAA exams at the end of week 4 on all topics covered in the 4 weeks. This test was a 3 hour test with 80 questions. While this test was mostly multiple choices there were 7 questions that have 4 to 8 questions to answer before you can give your final answer. (PS…I took all three hours to take this test and I got a 79%)

http://www.flightsafety.org/aviationsafety-seminars/international-airsafety-seminar-registration? utm_source=MagnetMail&utm_medi um=email&utm_term=DSlapo %40CorporateFAInsider.com&utm_c ontent=There+is+Still+Time+to +Register+for+IASS +2009&utm_campaign=There+is +Still+Time+to+Register+for+IASS

So at this point we had two more weeks to learn one more thing that was flight planning. While the world outside of the FAA world is using computers to get this information, we had to learn this all the 1960s way and do it by scratch. Yes, my friends paper, pencils, calculators, charts, plates, weather charts and brains. At week 5 and 6 we were doing 6 flight plans with the first flight plan being taught in the morning and the rest were working with the instructor as he was teaching us. On week six we also needed to get ready for our end of course exam. This exam is broken down into 2 days with 3 hours for each part. Oh do not forget there is one more FAA test to get ready for along with two flight plans as part of the end of course exam. So are you tired yet just from reading all this? All I have to say I am exhausted! But just like those Master Card commercials, the training was PRICELESS at the end. I showed myself that I can push myself to the limits and pursing the next chapter in my life – I may be dispatching YOUR next flight! Daniel C Slapo Editor/Publisher

International Air Safety Seminar 2009 A Joint Meeting of Flight Safety Foundation, International Federation of Airworthiness and International Air Transport Association November 2-5, 2009 Kerry Centre Hotel, Beijing, China

C Y Lyn ong S n r Po tat Br ats lic e A un e vi o Yo de at u pt ion di d it! N

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Volume 4, Issue 6


LimoLink Donation to CAN Exceeds $25,000 in Service

White Plains, NY -- More than $25,000 worth of chauffeured limousine services, used for transporting cancer patients to and from airports and treatment centers, has been contributed to Corporate Angel Network by LimoLink International, a global supplier of chauffeured ground transportation to the aviation industry. The program began in April of last year with a patient transfer from Brooklyn, NY to a corporate flight originating at Teterboro airport in New Jersey. The original grant, for $12,000 in services, was exceeded this summer. Corporate Angel is the nonprofit organization that arranges free transportation to treatment for cancer patients using empty seats on corporate aircraft. Since its founding in 1981, the charity has scheduled more than 32,000 flights. www.corpangelnetwork.org Chris Wiese, Vice President of Sales at LimoLink, said the contribution fills a natural void with much-needed service. “The folks at Corporate Angel do a huge job for cancer patients, but their work centers around the actual flight,” Wiese said. “We can expand that service by providing vital ground transportation. This provides additional comfort and convenience for the patients and flexibility in scheduling flights for the staff and volunteers at CAN.” Peter Fleiss, Executive Director of Corporate Angel, said the free limousine service is a particularly welcome gift to those who live in rural or suburban areas. He said LimoLink is a significant supporter of business aviation and is the preferred provider of ground transportation for numerous corporate flight departments. LimoLink currently offers access to 4,500 chauffeured sedans, SUVs and vans throughout 650 locations in 570 cities. The company provides service at 700 commercial airports and 4,000 general aviation facilities in 90 countries. www.limolink.com About Corporate Angel Network Corporate Angel Network is a public charity that arranges free flights for cancer patients to treatment using empty seats on business aircraft. Since its founding in 1981, CAN has grown to include over 500 participating corporations, five paid staff, and a team of 50 part-time volunteers who work with patients, physicians, corporate flight departments, and leading treatment centers to coordinate medical travel needs of cancer patients with the scheduled flight activity of participating corporations. To date, CAN has arranged more than 32,000 flights and currently provides between 200 and 250 patient flights per month. CAN has received numerous awards in recognition of its service to cancer patients, including The Volunteer Action Award, the highest volunteer award from the President of the United States. For more information call (914) 328-1313 or visit www.CorpAngelNetwork.org.

www.nbaa.org Corporate Flight Attendant News E-Letter

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Volume 4, Issue 6


www.flig htsafety. com Corporate Flight Attendant News E-Letter

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Continued from page 1 They serve as the direct link to management and customers and mitigate problems within their allowed scope. This also allows management to stay focused on the development of department resources and goals, rather than the development of individual trips. In addition, the Scheduler may offer many support functions to the manager/pilot, and is often elevated to the position of Supervisor or Manager. Unlike a Licensed Dispatcher, there is no federally mandated training program required for a Scheduler. However, on-going training is highly recommended and available during the annual NBAA Schedulers & Dispatchers Conference, the Schedulers Professional Development Program (SPDP), and throughout the year from various aviation training facilities. In addition, many S&Ds are involved with regional groups that meet regularly -providing educational presentations and valuable networking opportunities. A Scheduler or a Licensed Dispatcher (S&D) may be on call 24/7. A minimal amount of notice may be given to schedule a trip and handle all of the logistics. Schedulers and Dispatchers constantly monitor the weather, airport delays and airspace restrictions so that they can quickly react and reroute the aircraft if necessary. The goal is to safely deliver passengers to their destinations in time to attend their meetings -- all while making lastminute changes appear effortless.

already arranged – even if it’s 8:00 p.m. on a Saturday night and they’re trying to enjoy a romantic anniversary dinner with their spouse. Oh, how the spouses love that! S&Ds watch the news to see where the President is going to be traveling, because if they’re scheduled to travel to that same vicinity, airspace is going to be closed, and they’ll have to explain to the principal why they have to take him to an airport that is 50 miles out of his way. They are researching airport, ramp and landing fees, and negotiating fuel prices so they can advise the pilots where to buy the least expensive fuel. They are working with software vendors to make enhancements to scheduling software to increase efficiency. They’re creating and updating internal websites so customers can easily find out how to schedule a company plane and who must approve the flight. They’re generating and analyzing operational reports for accounting and making presentations to senior management. Many are also responsible for setting up new suppliers and ensuring that insurance requirements are met, payment of invoices and chargebacks, and may assist with the annual aviation insurance renewals.

get that call from a technician at 11:00 p.m. telling them that the plane scheduled to depart at 6:00 a.m. the next morning is now out of service, that all of the other aircraft are currently out of the country, and that they’d better figure out quickly how we’re going to get the principal to his very important meetings. As a result, S&Ds may be required to research options for supplemental lift. S&Ds are negotiating contracts with suppliers, coordinating with international handlers, reserving hangar space, and identifying and booking qualified flight attendants. Some also serve as flight attendants themselves and/or work very closely with flight attendants to ensure the best possible service for passengers. S&Ds depend a great deal on the professional flight attendants that provide for the safety of the passengers during the trip. For more information on the varied roles and responsibilities of Schedulers and Dispatchers, the S&D Committee, and the NBAA S&D Annual Conference and scholarship opportunities, go to http://nbaa.org/ ops/sched/.

S&Ds coordinate maintenance schedules and hope that they don’t

S&Ds ensure that crewmembers, including flight attendants, operate within their duty limits and get the required rest between flights. In addition, they are taking care of hotel reservations, ground transportation, catering, arrival and departure slots, landing permits, visas, Customs, sending the proper documentation to the TSA, and making frequent passenger changes. And - when they get the call directly from the principal that they now need to go to China rather than to Germany one day before the trip is scheduled to depart - they change everything that they’ve

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Volume 4, Issue 6


http:// www.executiveairc raftcatering.com/ Your catering source for Addison Airport (ADS) / Dallas Fort Worth (DFW), Dallas Love Field (DAL) / Dallas Executive Airport (RBD) and surrounding airports .

http:// www.ag schools .com/ Corporate Flight Attendant News E-Letter

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Volume 4, Issue 6


• Emergency Crewmember Training • Initial/Recurrent Flight Attendant Training • Operations Specifications Training www.InflightTrainingSolutions.com Randall Wood • 201-982-3453 or Cheryl Chestnut • 609-828-4015

www.silverlininginflightcatering.com Corporate Flight Attendant News E-Letter

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Volume 4, Issue 6


www.med aire.com Corporate Flight Attendant News E-Letter

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Volume 4, Issue 6


“Explosive Decompression; What Do I Do NOW?” Randall Wood has a vast amount of experience in the education field relating to the aviation industry. He has over 27 years of teaching aviation subjects ranging from the most basic of pilot skills to Part 135 Operations. In the latter, he has been the Director of Operations and/or the Chief Pilot for several Part 135 companies and has enjoyed teaching all aspects of 135 operations from both a pilot and flight attendant standpoint. He specializes in 135 Operations Specifications and Emergency Training using current computer technology in all presentations and "hands-on" for emergency drills. Arguably the scariest moment on board an airplane, at least at high altitude, is an explosive decompression. Hard to imagine and although there is not a lot of data available to learn from, we do know that it can be deadly! What will I feel? Are there any other clues as to what just happened? What will the pilots do? What are my duties as a Flight Attendant or Cabin Manager? Let’s explore these and more. It would certainly be important to create some knowledge foundation first. Thankfully, our industry does not have explosive, or even rapid, decompressions very often. There are no current volunteers to expose themselves to this phenomena so what we gain comes primarily from the ‘experts’…people who have lived through it and a few crazy military volunteers a long time ago. Most of us know that we cannot survive but for just a few moments at high altitude….say 40,000 feet and up. What is detrimental to our health as humans is the rapid change to this raw environment as it relates to one primary consideration: the time of useful consciousness. Depending on the size of the hole causing the decompression; the extreme cold will quickly take an overwhelming charge of your life. What kind of cold….how’s almost MINUES 70 degrees Fahrenheit? If that doesn’t take care of you, the lack of immediate oxygen will give you a useful consciousness of just a few seconds. Our bodies can handle 40,000 feet ok, (providing the right environment), what we can’t handle is getting to that altitude quickly. Here’s just some of what our bodies go through with an explosive decompression:

Trapped Gases. Boyle's Law, for all you college grads, states that the volume of any gas is directly proportional to the pressure exerted on that gas. In other words, as the pressure drops, the gas expands. Any gas trapped in the human body will expand with a drop in the pressure surrounding the body. This can occur in various places in the body causing varying degrees of discomfort or pain. Ear Blocks. The trapped gas disorder almost everyone who has ever flown is familiar with is one affecting the ears -actually the middle ear. Usually, trapped gas in this area is a problem on

Honolulu Advertiser Aloha Airlines Flight 243 descents, but discomfort and pain can be present during rapid decompressions due to the Eustachian tube attempting to channel that pressure change to and from your ear cavity. Sinus Block. Sinus block can be more severe than blockage of the Eustachian tube leading to the middle ear outlined above because the passages between the sinuses and the nasal cavity are much smaller than the Eustachian tube. With a rapid decompression and any with inflammation of the sinus passages at all, severe, almost incapacitating pain may be felt. Some have described this pain as feeling as though a nail was being driven into the cheekbone. Dental Problems. Although dental problems associated with rapid decompression are not as common as

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ear and sinus blocks, they can occur. Any abscess or infection in the gums or around the roots of teeth will cause pain upon ascent but a rapid decompression can cause disabling pain. Teeth that have been improperly filled cause problems with altitude or rapid decompressions. The higher pressure under the filling will cause excruciating pain and in rare instances can cause the tooth to explode. An exploding tooth would be distracting, not to mention the pain associated with the failure. Intestinal Problems. Intestinal problems associated with rapid decompression range from merely embarrassing to totally incapacitating. There is normally about one quart of free air in the intestinal tract. This is air that is swallowed and gases that are produced by digestive processes and fermentation. This air, too, will obey Boyle's Law and increase in volume with the decreasing ambient air pressure. That quart of air, at sea level, will expand to more than nine quarts at 43,000 feet! That greatly expanded volume of air can cause severe intestinal cramping and pain or it can be simply a discomfort. The expanding gases will attempt to escape through both ends of the gastrointestinal tract. No need to elaborate any more here! That along with a couple other phenomenon gives us just a small insight as to what your body will go through should you be the unlucky one with the explosive decompression. So, what will the pilots do? How does that affect me should this all actually happen? The pilots are trained to immediately go on oxygen. The oxygen masks that they use are quite different than the ‘dixie cup’ masks that are available in the cabin. These masks actually force oxygen into the pilot’s lungs. Continue on page 14

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www.ru dysinflig ht.com Corporate Flight Attendant News E-Letter

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Black Pepper Shrimp with 'Ęťsun-dried" Pineapple Chef de Cuisine Ian Winslade, Spice Market, Atlanta Yield: 1 serving Menu price: $12.50; food cost/serving: 28% This recipe came from Plate Online

Pineapple, peeled, cored, cut into 1 inch pieces, 1 /2 each

Sweet soy sauce, 3 TBS Soy sauce 1 TBS

Grapeseed or corn oil, 3 TBS Lime juice, fresh, 1 TBS Scallions, trimmed, sliced 3 each Sugar, 1 1/2 TBS Ginger, fresh, minced 1 TBS Salt, 1/2 tsp Garlic, minced 1 TBS Black peppercorn. Crushed, 1 3/4 tsp Black beans, fermented, rinsed, squeezed dry, chopped, 1 3/4 tsp

Shrimp, large, peeled, deveined and halved crosswise 4 each Jicama, diced 1/2 cup Baby pea shoots, thinly sliced l/2 Cup

1. Preheat oven to 200 degrees F. Put a rack on top of a rimmed baking sheet and line rack with a silicone baking mat. 2. Put pineapple pieces on mat in a single, even layer. Bake pineapple until it is dried, shriveled and chewy, about 2 hours. Remove pineapple from silicone mat and cool completely on a rack. 3. Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a large saucepan over medium-high heat. Add scallions, ginger and garlic to pan and cook, stirring until softened and golden. Add crushed pepper and cook until fragrant, then add black beans, soy sauces, lime juice, sugar and salt and bring mixture to a boil, stirring occasionallly. Reduce heat to medium and simmer 2 minutes. Transfer mixture to a blender and puree until coarsely blended. Reserve. 4. Heat remaining oil in a wok or large skillet over high heat. When oil is almost smoking, add shrimp to wok and cook, turning pieces once, until crisp and browned. Remove oil from the wok, then add black pepper sauce and 2 tablespoons water to wok. Stir in dried pineapple and remove wok from heat. Decoratively arrange shrimp and pineapple on serving plate, garnish with jicama and pea shoots, and serve.

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www.jetfinit y.com www.jetfinit y.com Corporate Flight Attendant News E-Letter

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Explosive article --Continued from page 10

Dispatcher Quiz! Answers pg 18 What are the following signs or statements

TPA RWY 18L/36R CLSD 1200-2000 DLY

A

B

EIK OBST DRILLING RIG UNKN (108 AGL) 1500 FT NW AER RWY 15 LGTD

C

D

The only way that force can be overcome is to exhale over that pressure. This takes a couple of minutes to get use to. I highly suggest that you get this training as well since many third crewmember ‘jump’ seats have these as their oxygen masks. Make sure that demonstration happens at your next Emergency Training event! Once the pilot is on oxygen, they are taught to perform an Emergency Descent. They push the aircraft to its design limits and hurry it to a safer altitude. During that process you must sit down. This instruction is not to sit on the nearest available seat…I mean the nearest seat; whether it is occupied or not. This is survival of the fittest. You are not worth anything for your passengers if you collapse. The reason for this is that you most likely will pass out and in doing so you will fall to the floor. Oxygen mask hoses are not long enough to allow you continued oxygen flow while you are on the floor and therefore potential brain function loss can result. Sit down, now! Since the decompression has caused a zero visibility in the cabin (we essentially created a cloud in the cabin due to the warmth and moisture level inside), wave your arm out in a horizontal fashion hoping to catch an oxygen mask/ hose that has been automatically, or by pilot input, deployed from the ceiling. Put the mask on and strap into the seat. I know what you are thinking….what about that person under you? I can’t say much here other than YOU must survive in order to help him or her later! Now hang on. That pilot up front is under the same conditions that you are but with a better mask and you are hoping and praying that he gets this airplane to a lower and safer altitude quickly. If done correctly, you all will survive with effects lasting from a few hours to a few days. Once at a lower altitude, assess the situation and make sure that all occupants continue using their masks until professional help has arrived. Here are some very basic instructions regarding air noises or potential leaks in the cabin while enroute: Don’t attempt to cover a leak - Exception some door seals with pilot instruction; Don’t push on a leak;

JFK TWY Y CLSD BTN RWY 13L/ 31R AND TWY F

E

Reseat passengers away from leaks; that includes you! Remember, report any hissing or air noises to the cockpit immediately since having notice might allow the pilots to change their altitude and/or the pressurization schedule to reduce the potential of a decompression.

F

Corporate Flight Attendant News E-Letter

Given the above, one would wonder why we fly at all. The truth is that this event takes place so rarely that you might win the lottery first. Partial decompressions and rapid, not explosive, decompressions are more likely and the physical damage to the body is quite less. The effects of rapid and slow decompressions vary from minor ear discomfort to embarrassing gastrointestinal tract issues. Thankfully, our industry makes great airplanes and with normal maintenance schedules met, we don’t see explosive decompressions very often.

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www.absolutetaste.com http:// www.corporateflightattendanttraini

June 29th, 2009 – July 2nd, 200 New Orleans, Louisiana

Space is limited to maximize the student's learning experience. (Location To Be Announced)

One must be prepared and have a thorough understanding and real knowledge of what this industry is all about a the language of Part 91, “corporate aviation”. You must understand the job / role of being a business aviation fli attendant. It is for this reason that we are conducting our annual four day training class the Monday after the NB Attendant conference which will be held on Friday, June 27th and Saturday 28th. Sunday the 27th will allow yo after the hectic conference schedule! Our training will commence Monday morning June 29th thru Thursday Jul 2nd. You will now have the opportunity to attend our “Corporate Flight Attendant Training” program directly af conference and go home as an empowered and educated possible flight attendant candidate allowing you to get resumes out in a professional fashion! Ninety one per cent of the people that we trained in the past 10 years are flying either contract or have secured full time positions.

www.aviationfoodsafetytraining.com

If you have recently completed "corporate specific" emergency training, this is an opportunity for you to attend training and get the rest of the education that will facilitate you in your goal of getting a full time or contract pos empower you to do everything right on that first trip assignment! Egress training is just that, evacuating the airc Julie Allen formerly with FlightSafety stated, “Susan’s training is a totally comprehensive training, and is actua Nuts & Bolts/Meat & Potatoes of corporate flight attendant training within business aviation.” We will educate films andCorporate the following: Flight Attendant News E-Letter 15 Volume 4, Issue 6 ! Defining The Corporate Aviation Flight

! Catering Communication Skills


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www.beprin cess.com

Phone: (Toll-Free) 1.800.489.0609

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www.deluxe -uk.com

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Dispatcher Quiz! Answers

Tampa Airport-Runway-18L/36RClosed from Noon to 8 pm daily

What are the following signs or statements

TPA RWY 18L/36R CLSD 1200-2000 DLY

A

B

EIK OBST DRILLING RIG UNKN (108 AGL) 1500 FT NW AER RWY 15 LGTD

JFK TWY Y CLSD BTN RWY 13L/ 31R AND TWY F

C

Erie Municipal Airport-Obstacle-Drilling RigUnknown-108 Above Ground Level-1500 Feet-North West-Area-Runway-15-Lighted

D

Runway Holding Position Sign. This sign is located at the holding position on taxiways that intersect a runway or on runways that intersect other runways. The inscription on the sign contains the designation of the intersecting runway as shown. The runway numbers on the sign are arranged to correspond to the respective runway threshold. For example, "16-34" indicates that the threshold for Runway 16 is to the left and the threshold for Runway 34 is to the right.

E

JF Kenndy Airport-Taxiway-ClosedBetween-Runway-13L/31R and Taxiway-F

Taxiway Location Sign. This sign has a black background with a yellow inscription and yellow border as shown below.

F

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Corporate Flight Attendant News E-Letter Oct 09