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HOW TOMORROW HAPPENS VIRGINIA’S COMMUNITY COLLEGES


MILLS GODWIN1966


“In every community, there will be parents whose hearts are full with the knowledge that through these institutions, their sons and daughters enjoyed opportunities far greater than their own.� -Mills E. Godwin, Jr., Governor of Virginia


PROGRESS IS THE BYPRODUCT OF

VISION, COURAGE, & ACTION.


Shasta, teacher for Floyd County High School New River Community College

For more than 50 years, Virginia’s Community Colleges have embodied this fact, demonstrating that the promise of a better tomorrow is possible for students, communities, and the Commonwealth as a whole.


DRIVING VIRGINIA


2.6 MILLION STUDENTS ENROLLED SINCE 1966

FORWARD


WITH THE STROKE OF A PEN IN 1966,

VIRGINIA’S EDUCATIONAL LANDSCAPE SHIFTED.


60%

OF VIRGINIA UNDERGRADUATES ARE ENROLLED IN COMMUNITY COLLEGES. Danquail, culinary arts student J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College Tim, Director of Purchasing for Valley Proteins Tidewater Community College

When Virginia’s General Assembly established a community college system, it brought the promise of higher education to millions of Virginians. Fifty years later, the number of community colleges has grown to 23 and today every resident in the Commonwealth lives within 30 miles of a community college campus. The presence of community-based higher education has been transformational for the Commonwealth. Students from Farmville to Fairfax now fit college degree programs into busy schedules while staying close to home and family. They acquire valuable job skills and launch new careers. And they do it without excessive financial burdens. The benefits to Virginia’s economy are unmistakable. The marriage of general education with practical job preparation is a powerful formula. It expands

the Commonwealth’s workforce and enriches its communities. It drives the growth of local businesses and attracts new employers seeking a skilled workforce. It inspires innovation and raises household incomes. Over the past half century, these impacts have been felt from the urban centers of Richmond, Hampton Roads, and Northern Virginia, to rural counties reaching from the Eastern Shore, to Southside to the Blue Ridge.


CREATING


56% OF COMMUNITY COLLEGE GRADS

ARE IN TRANSFER PROGRAMS PLANNING TO PURSUE A BACHELOR’S DEGREE.

NEXT STEPS


OPPORTUNITIES START HERE. For all the twists and turns in life, Virginia’s Community Colleges provide critical transitions that propel Virginians toward brighter futures.

75% OF VCCS STUDENTS WHO

TRANSFERRED TO A 4-YEAR INSTITUTION SUBSEQUENTLY GRADUATED.


Ebonee, family therapist Piedmont Virginia Community College

Gateways to Higher Education

Launching a Career

Job Training and Transition

For many, community college is the starting point for a lifetime of learning. In 2016, more than 26,000 students earned graduation credentials from Virginia’s Community Colleges. Of these, a significant number move on to bachelor’s programs at one of the state’s four-year colleges or universities thanks to Guaranteed Admissions Agreements.

In a complex and demanding world, Virginia’s Community Colleges are uniquely positioned to help students find meaningful career paths. With hundreds of programs and majors, students gain the skills, experiences, connections and credentials to find jobs within their chosen professions in just weeks or months.

Across the Commonwealth, the demand for skilled professionals is soaring. Virginia’s Community Colleges help bridge this gap by delivering the state’s most comprehensive workforce training programs. From continuing education for professionals, to industry certifications, to 2-year degree tracks, people in all stages of life obtain the skills they need to keep their careers moving forward.


GROWING VIRGINIA’S


STUDENTS EARNED 37,000 INDUSTRY CREDENTIALS IN 2015.

ECONOMY


PREPARING A WORLD-CLASS WORKFORCE.


Daniel, truck driver for Valley Proteins Lord Fairfax Community College Sumbal, Sarah and Shariel, graduates Respiratory Therapy Program at Northern Virginia Community College

This is a pivotal moment for the Commonwealth. Our communities are changing as new technologies drive the growth of a new economy—one that requires different skills and new ways of working. According to a recent study, Virginia must fill an estimated 1.5 million jobs by the year 2022. While as many as two-thirds of those jobs will require postsecondary education, most will not require a bachelor’s degree. Instead, businesses will seek applicants who hold associate’s degrees and or industry-recognized certifications. Virginia’s Community Colleges are uniquely positioned to deliver on this need. Last year alone, more than 37,000 individuals received workforce credentials from Virginia’s Community Colleges.


Jeremy, Brownell Metal Studio Piedmont Virginia Community College

IN 2016, VIRGINIA CREATED A FIRST-IN-THE-NATION PROGRAM TO MAKE WORKFORCE CREDENTIALS MORE AFFORDABLE TO ASPIRING STUDENTS.


Angela, Networking Specialization IT Student J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College

VIRGINIA MUST FILL 1.5 MILLION JOBS BY 2022. A recent research report found that there were more than 175,000 job vacancies for so-called middle-skill occupations in Virginia in 2015. The jobs went unfilled for an average period of 26 days, which is longer than the national average. As a result, Virginia businesses lost 36.4 million hours of productivity, Virginia families lost more than $1 billion in potential wages, and Virginia’s General Fund lost more than $54.3 million in revenue. The New Economy Workforce Industry Credentials Grant program is designed to address these gaps. The program provides grants to students enrolling in one of 124 different community college training programs. Students enrolling in one of the workforce credential training programs covered by the new grants will pay only onethird of the normal cost.


EXPANDING


34,700 HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS IN VIRGINIA EARN COLLEGE CREDIT THROUGH DUAL ENROLLMENT IN COMMUNITY COLLEGES.

HORIZONS


ESSENTIAL CONNECTIONS WHEN THEY’RE NEEDED MOST. Virginia’s Community Colleges were founded to address the unmet need for accessible and affordable higher education and workforce training. That work continues today through innovative programs that expand access to our colleges and the countless benefits they provide.

$62 MILLION:

THE INCREASE IN LIFETIME INCOME FOR EVERY 100 RURAL STUDENTS WHO EARN A COMMUNITY COLLEGE DEGREE.


Coach Jayne and Haley, Mountain Empire Community College

COMMUNITY COLLEGE STUDENTS CAN GRADUATE WITH LITTLE OR NO STUDENT LOAN DEBT

MORE THAN 40,000 STUDENTS WITH MILITARY STATUS ENROLL IN COMMUNITY COLLEGE COURSES EACH YEAR.


Coach Sarah and Antoine Piedmont Virginia Community College

GREAT EXPECTATIONS FOR FOSTER YOUTH

25% OF GREAT EXPECTATIONS GRADUATES EARN ACADEMIC HONORS

Great Expectations is a nationally recognized program that helps Virginia’s foster youth earn the postsecondary credentials they need to achieve an independent and successful life. Great Expectations is currently available at 18 of Virginia’s Community Colleges. The Great Expectations approach is simple: connect foster youth with an adult coach who is committed to their success at the moment help is most needed. Coaches reach out to foster students in high school to begin talking about the future. Together, they explore the young person’s skills, values, and interests, and match them to higher education options. Coaches help with college applications and securing financial aid. Once a student is enrolled, coaches continue to provide the critical “wrap-around” support that teenagers need.


Helena, student New River Community College

REWRITING THE SCRIPT IN RURAL VIRGINIA If Virginia’s “rural horseshoe” were its own state, it would rank 50th in educational attainment. By comparison, the rest of the Commonwealth would rank second. To address this discrepancy, Virginia’s Community Colleges created the Rural Horseshoe Initiative to increase the number of rural students pursuing higher education. The program places career coaches in rural high schools to stand in where the student’s family and the school’s guidance staff cannot: planning for college and career, locating scholarships and financial aid opportunities, and solving the practical and personal issues that every young adult must face.


110,000

STUDENTS RECEIVED FINANCIAL AID TOTALING OVER $523 MILLION IN 2013-14. Brooke, nursing student Patrick Henry Community College

HELPING STUDENTS GRADUATE DEBT-FREE By virtually every measure, a college degree is a passport to a better life. For many prospective students, however, the doors to Virginia’s colleges and universities are blocked by rising tuition costs. The average tuition at Virginia’s four-year public universities is more than $10,000 per year, not including room and board. By comparison, a community college education represents one of the most valuable investments in the Commonwealth. Tuition at Virginia’s Community Colleges averages approximately $4,000 per year. When financial aid and scholarships are included, the out-of-pocket cost for a two-year associate’s degree drops well below $4,000 for many students.


Linwood, Executive Director at Open Door Resource Center J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College

WORKING WITH VETERANS For veterans, community colleges play a vital role in the transition to civilian life. With a wide range of certifications and programs that fall under the GI Bill, as well as dedicated Veterans Affairs Offices on many campuses, service members find the opportunities and support they need to move into the next phase of their lives.


UNLOCKING


MORE THAN 10,000 FACULTY TEACH AT VIRGINIA’S COMMUNITY COLLEGES.

POTENTIAL


CREATING COMMUNITIES OF LEARNING. “The quality of our institution is measured by our faculty. And our faculty is second to none.” -Glenn DuBois, Chancellor

REWARDING EXCELLENCE IN TEACHING A fund supporting the Susan S. Wood Professorship for Teaching Excellence honors Dr. Susan S. Wood’s 40 years of service to Virginia’s Community Colleges. The Susan S. Wood Professorship for Teaching Excellence recognizes a VCCS faculty member who demonstrates faculty excellence, dedication to students, and academic leadership like that reflected throughout Dr. Wood’s extensive career.


John Tyler Community College

Students connect with course material, other students, and the world at large. Most important, perhaps, are the connections with faculty. At the heart of the community college experience is the relationship between a student and teacher. Our faculty members are here for one reason above all others: to teach. While many professors also publish, research, and practice professionally, their campus roles are singularly focused on working with students. This work often takes the form of transformative relationships that spark new passions, reveal hidden talents, and instill new skills and habits.


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VIRGINIA’S COMMUNITY COLLEGES

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WHEREVER YOU ARE IN VIRGINIA, YOU ARE NEVER MORE THAN 30 MILES FROM A COMMUNITY COLLEGE CAMPUS.

1 BLUE RIDGE Dr. John A. Downey, President

9 LORD FAIRFAX 17 SOUTHSIDE VIRGINIA Dr. Cheryl Thompson-Stacy, President Dr. Alfred A. Roberts, President

2 CENTRAL VIRGINIA Dr. John S. Capps, President

10 MOUNTAIN EMPIRE Dr. Scott Hamilton, President

18 SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA Dr. J. Mark Estepp, President

3 DABNEY S. LANCASTER Dr. John J. Rainone, President

11 NEW RIVER Dr. Jack M. Lewis, President

19 THOMAS NELSON Dr. John T. Dever, President

4 DANVILLE Dr. Bruce R. Scism, President

12 NORTHERN VIRGINIA Dr. Scott Ralls, President

20 TIDEWATER Dr. Edna V. Baehre-Kolovani, President

5 EASTERN SHORE Dr. Linda Thomas-Glover, President

13 PATRICK HENRY Dr. Angeline D. Godwin, President

21 VIRGINIA HIGHLANDS Dr. Gene C. Couch Jr., President

6 GERMANNA Dr. David A. Sam, President

14 PAUL D. CAMP Dr. Daniel Lufkin, President

22 VIRGINIA WESTERN Dr. Robert H. Sandel, President

7 J. SARGEANT REYNOLDS Dr. Gary L. Rhodes, President

15 PIEDMONT VIRGINIA Dr. Frank Friedman, President

23 WYTHEVILLE Dr. Dean Sprinkle, President

8 JOHN TYLER Dr. Edward “Ted” Raspiller, President

16 RAPPAHANNOCK Dr. Elizabeth H. Crowther, President


Progress is nothing new to Virginia’s Community Colleges. Since 1966, our colleges have helped to transform millions of lives while being a driving force behind the state’s constant evolution. Today, as we face the challenges of a changing economy requiring different skills and new ways of working,

VIRGINIA’S COMMUNITY COLLEGES ARE ONCE AGAIN LEADING THE WAY.


JOIN US IN CELEBRATING AND SUPPORTING THE COUNTLESS TOMORROWS THAT ARE HAPPENING AT OUR COMMUNITY COLLEGES.


VIRGINIA’S COMMUNITY COLLEGES 300 ARBORETUM PLACE, SUITE 200, RICHMOND, VA 23236 WWW.VCCS.EDU | INFO@VCCS.EDU

How tomorrow happens - Virginia's Community Colleges 2016  
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