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Tourtellotte Memorial High School Student Handbook

2016- 2017


TOURTELLOTTE MEMORIAL HIGH SCHOOL Principal Ms. Megan E. Baker mbaker@thompsonpublicschools.org

Dear Students and Parents/Guardians;

Tourtellotte Memorial High School is an educational community dedicated to preserving a safe, supportive and responsive learning environment; wherein all students can discover, learn, develop, and realize their talents.

The student handbook is written for our students and their parents/guardians. The material covered within is intended as a method of communicating general district information regarding rules and procedures. Information in the handbook is shared/reviewed with students at the beginning of every school year. It is the family’s responsibility to read the handbook and familiarize themselves with all of the useful information it offers: academics, student services, student conduct expectations, activities, and much more.

Tourtellotte Memorial High School has wonderful resources and dedicated professionals, who are eager to assist students in achieving their educational goals. We welcome your questions and encourage you to visit our school website www.thompsonk12.org.

Sincerely,

Ms. Megan E. Baker Ms. Megan E. Baker Principal BOE Approval August 8, 2016 2


Table of Contents PART I: GENERAL INFORMATION ..................................................................................................... 6 FACULTY AND STAFF DIRECTORY ....................................................................................................................6 MISSION AND VISION STATEMENTS ................................................................................................................7 STRATEGIC GOALS.............................................................................................................................................7 CORE VALUES AND BELIEFS .............................................................................................................................7 GUIDING BELIEFS ..............................................................................................................................................8 COMMUNICATION: ONE CALL NOW - AUTOMATED SYSTEM .......................................................................8 AGE OF MAJORITY.............................................................................................................................................8

PART II: DISCIPLINARY CODE ........................................................................................................... 9 ATTENDANCE POLICY ................................................................................................................................9 PARENTAL VERIFICATION OF ABSENCES ........................................................................................................9 SCHOOL APPROVED ABSENCES .................................................................................................................... 10 SKIP DAY ......................................................................................................................................................... 11 HOMEWORK REQUESTS ................................................................................................................................ 11 MAKE-UP WORK ............................................................................................................................................. 11 TARDINESS TO SCHOOL ................................................................................................................................. 12 LEAVING SCHOOL GROUNDS/CLASSROOM WITHOUT PERMISSION ......................................................... 12 CLASS ATTENDANCE ...................................................................................................................................... 12 TARDINESS TO CLASS .................................................................................................................................... 12 DISCIPLINE CODE..................................................................................................................................... 13 SRBI ................................................................................................................................................................. 13 TIGER PASSES ................................................................................................................................................. 13 BEHAVIORAL EXPECTATIONS ........................................................................................................................... 14 DISCIPLINE CODE............................................................................................................................................ 15 DRESS CODE POLICY ...................................................................................................................................... 16 CONSEQUENCES OF DRESS CODE VIOLATION ............................................................................................. 16 LEVELS OF MISCONDUCT............................................................................................................................... 18 GENERAL REGULATIONS ............................................................................................................................... 18 DETENTION ..................................................................................................................................................... 19 OFF-CAMPUS MISCONDUCT .......................................................................................................................... 19 SAFETY CONCERNS ........................................................................................................................................ 20 DRINKING/EATING IN SCHOOL ...................................................................................................................... 20 PDA: RELATIONSHIPS .................................................................................................................................... 21 PLAGIARISM ................................................................................................................................................... 21 CHEATING ....................................................................................................................................................... 21 STRATEGIES TO AVOID PLAGIARISM AND CHEATING ................................................................................. 22 REPERCUSSIONS FOR PLAGIARISM AND CHEATING ................................................................................... 22

PART III: ACADEMIC RESPONSIBILITIES ......................................................................................... 23 ACADEMIC ETHICS .......................................................................................................................................... 23 ACADEMIC SCHOOLWIDE EXPECTATIONS ................................................................................................... 23 COURSE SELECTION PROCEDURE ................................................................................................................. 24 YEARLY REQUIREMENTS ............................................................................................................................... 24 SEMESTER COURSES ...................................................................................................................................... 24 CREDITS........................................................................................................................................................... 24 CREDIT REQUIREMENTS FOR CLASSES THROUGH THE CLASS OF 2020 .................................................... 24 PROMOTION REQUIREMENTS ...................................................................................................................... 25 EXAMS ............................................................................................................................................................. 25 3


REPORT CARDS............................................................................................................................................... 25 PROGRESS REPORTS ...................................................................................................................................... 25 GRADING ......................................................................................................................................................... 25 GRADE DETERMINATION ............................................................................................................................... 26 COURSE DESIGNATIONS FOR GRADE WEIGHTING ...................................................................................... 26 WEIGHTED GRADES........................................................................................................................................ 26 INCOMPLETES ................................................................................................................................................ 27 WEIGHT MODIFICATION WITHIN COURSES ................................................................................................. 27 HONORS AND ELIGIBILITY ............................................................................................................................. 27 HONORS .......................................................................................................................................................... 27 ELIGIBILITY...................................................................................................................................................... 27 RETENTION/SUMMER SCHOOL/CREDIT RECOVERY .................................................................................... 28 GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS ..................................................................................................................... 28 DIGITAL PORTFOLIO....................................................................................................................................... 28 GRADUATION CEREMONY ............................................................................................................................. 29 VALEDICTORIAN/SALUTATORIAN AND HONORS ESSAY SELECTION ......................................................... 29 DIPLOMAS....................................................................................................................................................... 31

PART IV: STUDENT RESPONSIBILITIES ........................................................................................... 32 TEXTBOOK POLICY ......................................................................................................................................... 32 CELL PHONES AND PERSONAL ELECTRONIC DEVICES ................................................................................ 32 ELEVATOR ....................................................................................................................................................... 32 IDENTIFICATION CARDS................................................................................................................................. 32 LAVATORIES.................................................................................................................................................... 32 LOCKERS ......................................................................................................................................................... 33 PARKING: RULES AND REGULATIONS ......................................................................................................... 33 OPEN CAMPUS: REQUIREMENTS AND REGULATIONS ............................................................................... 34

PART V: SCHOOL SERVICES ........................................................................................................... 36 BUS TRANSPORTATION ................................................................................................................................. 36 GYMNASIUM................................................................................................................................................... 36 LIBRARY MEDIA CENTER ............................................................................................................................... 36 CAFETERIA ...................................................................................................................................................... 37 MY SCHOOLBUCKS PROGRAM...................................................................................................................... 37 NURSE’S OFFICE ............................................................................................................................................. 38 SCHOOL COUNSELORS’ DEPARTMENT/CAREER CENTER ........................................................................... 41 QVCC PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM.................................................................................................................... 42

PART VI: CO-CURRICULAR INFORMATION ..................................................................................... 43 ELIGIBILITY POLICY ........................................................................................................................................ 43 ACTIVITIES....................................................................................................................................................... 44 ATHLETICS....................................................................................................................................................... 44 CIAC: THE CONNECTICUT INTERSCHOLASTIC ATHLETIC CONFERENCE ..................................................... 44 DANCES ........................................................................................................................................................... 45 FIELD TRIPS ..................................................................................................................................................... 46 FUND RAISING ................................................................................................................................................ 47 STUDENT GOVERNMENT ............................................................................................................................... 47 STUDENT COUNCIL ........................................................................................................................................ 47 CLASS OFFICERS ............................................................................................................................................. 47 NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY.......................................................................................................................... 47

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PART VII: ASSOCIATED BOARD POLICIES ....................................................................................... 49 STUDENT ATTENDANCE, TRUANCY AND CHRONIC ABSENTEEISM ............................................................ 49 STUDENT DISCIPLINE - BOARD OF EDUCATION POLICY ............................................................................. 56 BULLYING PREVENTION AND INTERVENTION POLICY ................................................................................ 74 DRUG AND ALCOHOL USE BY STUDENTS..................................................................................................... 76 POSSESSION OF DEADLY WEAPONS OR FIREARMS POLICY ...................................................................... 84 POLICY REGARDING STUDENT USE OF THE DISTRICT'S COMPUTER SYSTEMS AND INTERNET SAFETY 85 CHARGE POLICY.............................................................................................................................................. 86 CONCUSSION PLAN........................................................................................................................................ 91

PART VIII: LEGAL NOTICES ............................................................................................................. 96 NON-DISCRIMINATION COMPLIANCE STATEMENT ..................................................................................... 96 HAZARDOUS MATERIAL IN SCHOOLS-PEST MANAGEMENT/PESTICIDE APPLICATION ............................ 96 ASBESTOS NOTIFICATION ............................................................................................................................. 98 NOTICE OF PARENT/STUDENT RIGHTS UNDER SECTION 504 OF THE REHABILITATION ACT OF 1973 .... 99 SAFE SCHOOL CLIMATE PLAN ..................................................................................................................... 100 COMPUTER AGREEMENT ............................................................................................................................. 109 “Non-Discrimination Statement” ................................................................................................................ 110 STUDENT RECORDS...................................................................................................................................... 110 TRANSCRIPTS ............................................................................................................................................... 110 FERPA NOTICE .............................................................................................................................................. 111 PPRA NOTICE ................................................................................................................................................ 112

The Student Handbook is designed to be in harmony with Board policy. It is not intended to either expand or diminish any Board policy, administrative regulation or negotiated agreement. Material contained herein may therefore be superseded by such Board policy, administrative regulation or negotiated agreement. Any information contained in this student handbook is subject to unilateral revision or elimination from time-to-time without notice. Please be aware that the handbook is updated yearly, while policy adoption and revision may occur throughout the year. A good faith effort will be made to notify students regarding substantive changes through newsletters, web pages, and other communications deemed appropriate by TMHS administration. A student’s failure to receive such information does not remove or reduce his/her responsibility to adhere to such changes.

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PART I: GENERAL INFORMATION FACULTY AND STAFF DIRECTORY ADMINISTRATION Ms. Megan E. Baker, Principal Mr. Ian L. Polun, Assistant Principal Mrs. Donna O’Connell, Administrative Assistant SCHOOL COUNSELORS Mrs. Janice Hanny, School Counselor Mrs. Lisa Canney, Career Counselor Mrs. Karen LeBlanc, Administrative Assistant FACULTY & STAFF ART Mrs. Bianca Picozzi

PHYSICAL EDUCATION Mrs. Debra Spinelli, Athletic Director Ms. Elizabeth Ten Eyck

BUSINESS Mrs. Patricia Tupaj

SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGIST Mrs. Kathleen Collins

ENGLISH Miss Katie Jambard Mr. Daniel Ten Eyck Ms. Donna Shaw Ms. Tracy Williams Ms. Jenna LaFlamme

SCIENCE Mr. Jason Bruce Mrs. Sarah Kiff Mr. Charles Poirier Ms. Theresa Schelhorn

FOODS AND NUTRITION Mrs. Diane Murray

SOCIAL STUDIES Mr. Michael Charron Mr. Jan Duprey Mr. Timothy O’Brien Mrs. Keri Procko

LIBRARY/MEDIA CENTER Mrs. Cindy Ouillette MATHEMATICS Ms. Sabrina Pereira Mr. Tony Perreault Mr. Scott Shelton Miss. Courtney Sobanski

SPECIAL EDUCATION Mrs. Paula Coderre Mrs. Lynn O’Brien Ms. Laurie Boire Mrs. Anne Kellner Mrs. Lori Rhodes

MUSIC Mrs. Kate Anderson

TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION Mr. Michael Joyce

NURSE Ms. Shannon Grauer

WORLD LANGUAGE Mrs. Wendy Fusco

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MISSION AND VISION STATEMENTS Mission Statement: The mission of the Thompson Public Schools, guided by the community’s strategic goals, is to “engage all students in a dynamic and effective education; thereby empowering them to challenge themselves as they become productive, responsible citizens.” Vision Statement: The vision of the Thompson Public School System, in collaboration with our community, is “to provide quality teaching and learning in a respectful, safe, healthy and supportive environment that links students, parents, schools and the community to achieve all students’ fullest potential.” STRATEGIC GOALS The strategic goals of an organization are responsive to and reflective of the institutional values, culture, and expectations of its stakeholders. In this instance, the community the school system serves, Thompson. These goals should not only inspire stakeholders, but result in a sense of joint ownership of achieving said goals. Certainly school leadership, teachers, and staff must strive for success, but so to must students, parents, community members, and elected leaders. Only through working together can a community achieve a community’s goals. Student Achievement: Ensure academic excellence, challenging standards and high expectations, while maximizing the potential for all learners. School Climate: Nurture a safe, creative learning environment in which respect for all promotes positive attitudes and shared pride in our schools and community. Partnerships: Ensure that there will be a shared responsibility between family, community and schools for a commitment to quality education and to enhance learning opportunities. Resources/Support: Provide equal access to quality materials, instruction, and facilities to enhance educational opportunities for sharing ideas and resources. Personal Growth: Prepare students to become productive, responsible citizens and encourage them to make positive contributions to the community. Communications: Provide important information and updates to community in a way that improves understanding of programs and projects and increases awareness of strengths and areas of improvement CORE VALUES AND BELIEFS The Tourtellotte Memorial High School community is committed to ensuring that all students are problem solvers who communicate and collaborate effectively. We believe that students are capable of working responsibly to become lifelong learners who contribute to their school and society.

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GUIDING BELIEFS We believe... Education is a life-long process. All students have the potential to learn and be successful. Education results from cooperation among school, home and community. A safe learning environment is essential to education. Students deserve a challenging and rigorous instructional program. Respect for others enhances learning. Education is necessary for effective participation in a democracy. Technology is a vital tool to support teaching and learning. Reviewed February, 2012 COMMUNICATION: ONE CALL NOW - AUTOMATED SYSTEM Two way communications between students, parents and the school is important to ensure success. TMHS utilizes the One Call Now automated message system to deliver important information to families. This system permits communication through telephone voice messages and email. In order to facilitate this communication, please be sure the office has accurate records. This phone calling system can make thousands of phone calls in a matter of moments notifying parents immediately of a school cancellation, school delay or an early release. All you have to do is provide the phone numbers that you would like to have called. AGE OF MAJORITY Students at or above the age of majority (18 years old) who live at home with their parents are under their parents’ control as far as the school administration is concerned. The school administration will not accept permissions and/or excuses whether verbal or written without parental involvement and parental signatures on notes or special requests.

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PART II: DISCIPLINARY CODE ATTENDANCE POLICY School attendance for students is a requirement in state statute. A major consideration contributing to the State Attendance Mandate is the fact that research clearly indicates there is a direct correlation between attendance and student achievement. With this in mind, we encourage you to plan family trips and medical appointments around the school’s schedule, and we appreciate your cooperation in making sure that your child gets to school on time. An absence will be recorded whenever a student is not in attendance for more than four hours in a school day. Students taking part in after-school activities (athletic, music, dance, etc.) must be in attendance a minimum of four (4) academic hours. Exceptions to this policy may be made by the administration only with advance notice. Students may not participate in after school activities if they are suspended. After-school detention must be served before a student can participate in any after-school function. Exceptions must be approved by the administration. PARENTAL VERIFICATION OF ABSENCES Connecticut law requires that you submit a written excuse or appear in person, on the day the student returns to class. Failure to provide this notice will result in the student’s absence being marked as “unexcused.” In the event that your child is absent, tardy, or being dismissed early: a) Please call the school at (860) 923-9303 as soon as possible. The office staff will be available for calls at 7:00 a.m. If you call at an earlier time, this (860) 923-9303 number has voice mail. b) Parent notes to request an early dismissal must be presented to the office before the student is released from school. When possible, we ask that notice of early dismissals be given to the office prior to the start of school. Please consider the instruction your child will not receive before requesting an early dismissal. c) If a student arrives late to school he/she must sign-in at the main office. If a student is dismissed early he/she must also sign-out in the main office. If the student returns to school, the student must sign-in to verify the time of his/her return. Failure to meet these expectations will cause any class absences to be considered unexcused and make-up privileges will be forfeited. Parent Notes must include the following information:  The student’s full name,  The date(s) of the absence(s),  The specific reason for the absence, lateness or dismissal  The signature of a parent  A daytime phone number where a parent can be reached to verify the note. 9


“Blanket” notes covering unspecified dates of absences, tardies, etc., are not acceptable; for example, “Please excuse my child from all absences in the months of April and May due to illness.” Anticipated Absences: Any anticipated excused absence, such as college visitations, which conflict with the school calendar must be arranged in advance or the absence will be considered unexcused and make-up privileges will be forfeited. Absences for planned family vacations are not considered excused and make-up privileges are at the teachers’ discretion. Connecticut state law provides that student absences may only be excused under the following conditions with the appropriate supporting documentation: A. School absences one through nine are considered excused when the student’s parent/guardian approves such absences and submits appropriate written documentation; B. For the tenth absence and all absences thereafter, a student’s absences from school are considered excused ONLY for the following reasons: 1. student illness (Note: all student illness absences must be verified by an appropriately licensed medical professional to be deemed excused, regardless of the length of absence); 2. student’s observance of a religious holiday 3. death in the student’s family or other emergency beyond the control of the student’s family; 4. mandated court appearances (documentation required); 5. the lack of transportation that is normally provided by a district other than the one the student attends (no parental documentation is required for this reason); or 6. extraordinary educational opportunities pre-approved by district administrators and in accordance with Connecticut State Department of Education guidance. SCHOOL APPROVED ABSENCES Absences which do not count toward the loss of credit include, but may not be limited to, the following:  School-related activities  Suspensions: in-school or out-of-school  Homebound instruction  Class meetings  Field trips  Sports or other school-approved extracurricular activities  Scheduled office and school counselor appointments  Religious observance  For Juniors and Seniors ONLY: 2 days for college visits. Students must make arrangements with teachers for any work missed during college visits. (Note: These absences will NOT be excused for the purposes of state truancy measures.)

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SKIP DAY The administration and staff at Tourtellotte Memorial High School and the Thompson Board of Education DO NOT IN ANY WAY approve of, or sanction, “skip days.” Students who take part in this activity will make up all time missed in after-school detentions. As this type of activity is never recognized as an excused absence, parents/guardians may not give permission for this absence. STUDENTS taking part in this type of absence will also forfeit privileges. HOMEWORK REQUESTS If a student is absent for a period of two days or longer with an excused absence, homework assignments may be requested by calling the school counselors’ office. Please allow 24 hours for work to be collected. Students are also encouraged to check class websites and contact teachers via email for assistance in gathering missed work. If a student knows in advance that he or she will be out of school for a period of time, it is his/her responsibility to get assignments from the teachers before the anticipated absence. If for medical reasons, a student will be out of school for a period longer than ten (10) days, s/he may be eligible for a home tutor. Parents should contact the school counselors’ office. MAKE-UP WORK Students are required to make up all work that is missed as a result of absence from school. Two days will be allowed for every day absent. However, the administration may grant an extension due to unusual circumstances. Students are to realize that the initiative and responsibility in making up work is theirs. Failure to comply will result in loss of credit for work not completed. The above make-up work policy does not apply to students returning from suspension. NOTE: Students suspended from school must complete the assignments provided while on suspension or else receive a zero for such assignments and missed class time. If students are tardy in the morning and miss any or all of a class period, they are responsible for obtaining and completing class work missed on that day. Work must be turned in on the following day. If students are dismissed early from school for personal, athletic, or other reasons, they are to contact those teachers whose classes they will miss before they depart and turn in work due, obtain class assignments, and get homework in preparation for class the next school day. During the course of the day, if students miss a class because they are at the nurse, in the office, or at school counselors’ office, etc., they are to contact that teacher whose class they missed and turn in homework, obtain the class assignment, and get the homework for the following day so they will be prepared for the following day’s classes. Students who are absent from school three or more consecutive days are responsible for making contact either with a student in each class or with the school directly to get their work. Friends can pick up assignments from teachers so that students do not get behind and so that teachers may pass back assignments to the rest of the class as soon as possible. Parents may contact the school counselors’ office for more assistance. If a student knows s/he will be absent due to a planned vacation, s/he should request the required work one to two weeks prior to departure and submit completed work by the third day of return. Failure to do so may result in zeros. 11


TARDINESS TO SCHOOL The administration and staff at Tourtellotte Memorial High School believe it is critical for students to start the day without the stress of arriving late to school. Tardiness to school will be tracked and parents will be notified each time a student arrives late without appropriate parent notification. Students that arrive late to school without appropriate parent notification will be marked as unexcused. Tardiness can only be excused with proper authorization as described earlier regarding excused absences. Additionally, parents may excuse a student’s tardiness up to ten times during the school year. Students who are tardy and unexcused will be subject to consequences. LEAVING SCHOOL GROUNDS/CLASSROOM WITHOUT PERMISSION A student’s safety during the school day is of primary concern. Therefore, it is imperative that students remain in the school building under proper supervision while school is in session. Any student who leaves school without permission given in advance and/or failing to sign out must return to school with a parent and will receive a 2-day in-school suspension. A student with a car who leaves school without permission additionally will lose parking privileges for five (5) school days and will also lose the open campus privilege for the same five (5) day period and may be subject to further disciplinary consequences. No student is allowed to go to the rear parking lot without the direct permission of the administration. Any student who skips any part of a class or leaves the classroom without permission is subject to discipline as identified in the Code of Conduct. CLASS ATTENDANCE Throughout the school year, it is the responsibility of the student and parent(s) to monitor closely the number of absences, which have been accumulated in each course. When a student anticipates an absence from school or from a particular class for any reason, it is very important that the student and the parent consider carefully the necessity of the absence, taking into consideration the current number of accumulated absences and their potential impact on loss of credit in the course. Students and parents should contact the administration about questions regarding the current number of accumulated absences in a specific class, or in reference to discrepancies in types of absences on attendance correspondence that is mailed home. Students and parents are reminded that the high school maintains a rotating schedule and therefore different classes may be impacted by tardiness or early dismissals. TARDINESS TO CLASS It is the responsibility of the student to get to class on time. If the student is delayed by a teacher, and the student is late for the next class, the student must get a pass from the teacher who is excusing the delay. If there is not a valid reason for being late for a class, the teacher may assign a detention for the tardiness. If a student is tardy ten or more minutes without a valid pass s/he will not only be considered absent for that period, but could also face further disciplinary action.

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DISCIPLINE CODE SRBI “Responsible, Respectful, and Safe,” positively state the expectations that focus on preferred behaviors in Thompson’s implementation of Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS). PBIS is based on principles of applied behavior analysis and a preventative approach that values positive behavior. District wide, Thompson is building a continuum of academic and behavioral interventions and supports that are rooted in positive discipline systems and pro-active educational interventions for all students. To learn more about this district initiative please contact the Director of Pupil Services for Thompson Public Schools, or visit the PBIS website at www.pbis.org.

TIGER PASSES Students must earn their Tiger Passes by demonstrating responsible, respectful, and safe behavior. Students may have their Tiger Pass revoked for various infractions in the school’s Code of Conduct.  any offense that warrants action from the office  by teacher petition based on the nature and amount of incidents in the classroom The status of revoked Tiger Passes will be reviewed throughout the year on the announced dates.  Status reviews will be done by a committee to include the administration and at least one teacher (non-certified staff may serve on this committee).  A student that remains clean of office referrals for one entire period between reviews will have his/her status renewed  Tiger Passes may also be renewed for other students based upon: o the nature of the student offense(s) o the date(s) of the offense(s) o the number of offenses from the year to date Tiger Passes entitle students to:  overall treatment like a respectful, responsible and safe adult  eat lunch outside  Open Campus (provided academic eligibility is met)  attendance at special events/assemblies o selected assemblies o pep rallies o Midnight Madness and other special after-school events such as the student-faculty basketball game etc. o dances o other announced and unannounced schoolwide activities  use of bathrooms and water fountains from the classroom without needing to ask permission o students still must follow classroom sign-out procedures o teachers may temporarily suspend this practice in their classrooms due to tests, quizzes, labs, and other unique situations where leaving the classroom may be detrimental to integrity of the instructional process

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BEHAVIORAL EXPECTATIONS Tourtellotte Memorial High School Behavioral Expectations Classroom

Respectful

 Honor personal space

 Be considerate of others’ learning

 Use appropriate

Cafeteria

 Honor personal space

 Use appropriate language

 Present yourself with dignity

Hallway

 Honor personal space

 Sit properly in your seat.

 Use appropriate displays of affection

 Be considerate of others’ learning

language

Assembly

 Be attentive to presentation

 Silence and

Study

 Honor personal space

 Be considerate of others’ learning

Athletic Events, Pep Rallies

 Use appropriate language

 Be courteous to all

 Present yourself with dignity

store personal devices

 Use appropriate language Responsible

 Be on time  Be prepared  Use electronic devices at designated times

 Use time productively

 Maintain a clean environment

 Be courteous to others to and from the cafeteria, while in line, and at your table

 Be punctual to class

 Sit with your class.

 Go directly to your destination

 Use restrooms prior to entry.

 Secure locker

 Be prepared  Take ownership of your actions.

 Represent the school with pride

 Be a role model

 Use study time productively

 Use electronic devices for educational purposes

 Challenge

 Take care of

yourself

 Take care of

school property

school property Safe

 Follow staff

 Follow staff

directions

directions

 Follow class routines

 Use materials for designed purposes

 Follow routines

 Keep an appropriate pace

 Follow staff directions

 Listen for announcements

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 Follow staff

 Follow staff

directions

directions

 Use caution on the stairs

 Use materials for designed purposes

 Follow staff directions

 Use caution on bleachers


DISCIPLINE CODE The purposes of implementing a prescriptive student code of conduct is to accomplish the following:  Effectively communicate a clear set of expected student behaviors, infractions, and consequences to TMHS students  Preserve the optimum educational environment in which to deliver instructional services  Respond to disruptive influences with corrective measures in a firm, consistent, and predictable resolution of behavioral infractions  Remove, as a last resort, the disrupters from the educational environment so that the majority may pursue their educational goals It is the responsibility of the total school community to create and maintain an environment that is safe and orderly and an atmosphere that is conducive to teaching and learning. Students at Tourtellotte Memorial High School are expected to conduct themselves in a responsible manner so that they do not interfere with the orderly process of education. Appropriate disciplinary action will be taken against any student who acts in a manner prohibited by this Handbook, school rules, the Board of Education Student Discipline Policy or administrative regulations or in violation of any other Board of Education Policy or regulations. Within the scope of this policy, it is recognized that traditional consequences have not always brought significant changes in behavior for all students. Within the confines of this policy, it is recognized that on occasion, latitude and discretion may be necessary in effecting change with certain students. While it is impossible to categorize all behaviors that are disruptive of the educational process, the Tourtellotte Memorial Discipline Code stipulates the most common behavioral infractions and establishes consequences for each infraction consistent with Board of Education Policy. Students who are accused of committing an infraction leading to potential suspension have the right to be informed of the reasons for the potential disciplinary action, and to be given an opportunity to explain the situation prior to the imposition of discipline. In the event of an emergency, the informal hearing will be held as soon after the suspension begins as possible. Parents will be notified of the suspension and cause as soon as possible. Disciplinary procedures used at Tourtellotte Memorial High School range from an informal conferencing to expulsion from school. The procedure used depends on the seriousness of the violation, the specific circumstances of the situation, and the individual’s overall pattern of behavior. A series of minor infractions committed by the same student can also constitute a major infraction because, over time, it has a demoralizing effect on the general student body and staff. In addition to the usual school procedures, criminal conduct may be reported to police.

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DRESS CODE POLICY  Head coverings of any kind, including but not limited to scarves, bandannas, masks, headbands, visors, kerchiefs, hats, caps, or hoods shall not be worn, carried, hung on belts or around the neck or kept in the classroom during regular school hours. Sunglasses, whether worn or carried are not permitted during regular school hours. Approved coverings worn as part of a student’s religious practice shall not be prohibited by this policy.  Footwear standards are maintained for the prevention of accidents and injury. o Shoes appropriate for school activities must be worn at all times. o Students should avoid high-heeled shoes or sandal styles that make walking, running, or other activities less safe for students. o Footwear which mars floors or is a safety hazard is not permitted.  Clothing and jewelry will be safe and free of writing, pictures or any other insignia which: o are considered crude, vulgar, profane, or sexually suggestive o advocate violence o advocate racial ethnic or religious prejudice o advocate the use of tobacco, drugs or alcohol  Clothing or jewelry which is distracting or disruptive to the educational program or which is gang-related or which poses a threat to the physical well-being and safety of the student or others will not be worn on campus or at school activities.  No clothing, article of clothing or manner of wearing clothes that inappropriately reveals the abdomen, chest/cleavage, back, buttocks, or undergarments/boxers when standing and sitting is permitted. o A minimum of 2” wide straps on shirts is required. o No spaghetti straps, strapless and low side cut tanks are permitted. o No shorts, miniskirts, or pants which reveal the upper thigh or undergarments are permitted. o Spandex garments are allowed only if they are covered by shorts or skirts. o No see-through clothing/fabric is permitted unless it is covering other acceptable clothing.  Attire should be clean, and students should bathe regularly. Any student who becomes offensive and disturbing to others because of poor hygiene will be dealt with individually by the administration or other appropriate personnel. CONSEQUENCES OF DRESS CODE VIOLATION The administration/designee will ask the student to change/adjust inappropriate attire. At the discretion of the administration, a student may phone home for appropriate attire to be brought into school. If the student continues to violate the dress code, inappropriate attire will be confiscated and proper attire will be provided. Confiscated materials will only be returned to a parent. Students that refuse requests to comply with the dress code will be subject to discipline following the school code of conduct for disrespectful behavior.

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School Code of Conduct Be Responsible Be Respectful Be Safe Classroom Managed Office Managed (tardy to class, minor (behaviors that (inappropriate comments, (fighting, verbal assault, noise, mild rough-housing, prevent teacher from gestures, language directed harassment, bullying, etc.) teaching or other towards teacher/staff; drugs, alcohol, students from defiant/inappropriate attitude paraphernalia, etc.) learning, leaving class directed towards teacher/staff; without notice, property damage etc.) skipping (any part of) class, etc.) Teacher Managed (office managed in the cases of Immediate removal to the office and loss of eligibility for after-school and special activities (duration TBD). Students will also lose privileged status until the next full review period. dress code and substitute teachers) If, at any time in the FIRST OFFENSE - Detention FIRST OFFENSE - Detention FIRST OFFENSE - The teacher's discretion, the with the teacher is with the teacher is assigned. student could be sent issue becomes too assigned. Student may be The student will be sent home and a 1-5 day disruptive or repetitive, permitted to return to the home immediately, unless, in suspension (ISS/OSS) is move to the next next class at the the administrator's assigned. A parent column... administrator's discretion. discretion, the meeting is scheduled prior circumstances warrant a to the student's return to probationary return to the classes. next class. ADDITIONAL OFFENSES ADDITIONAL OFFENSES ADDITIONAL OFFENSES Detentions with the office Detention(s) with the office The student is immediately will be assigned. At the will be assigned. The sent home and a 5 day administrator's discretion, student may be also be sent minimum suspension the student may return to home or assigned to ISS. At (ISS/OSS) is assigned. A the next class. Otherwise, the administrator's parent meeting is the student will be sent discretion, an ISS/OSS of 1-5 scheduled prior to the home. A parent meeting days may be assigned. The student's return to classes. may be called. student may also be referred The student is referred for to additional services (pupil services (pupil services, services, DCF, JRB, etc.). DCF, JRB, etc.). If, at any time in the If, at any time in the In cases of assault, drugs teacher's or administrator's administrator's discretion, (non-tobacco), or discretion, the issue the disrespectful behavior weapons, the police may becomes disrespectful or becomes dangerous, move to be called for consultation repetitive, move to the next the next column... and possible action. column... Expulsion may be recommended at any time in accordance with district policies and state statutes. All suspensions are minimum assignments. A suspension is not concluded until a meeting with the student, parent, and administrator is held. At this meeting, the student must accept responsibility for his/her actions and agree to steps to remedy the problem and ensure future success. Teachers may be included in the meeting as appropriate. NOTES If any of the above conflicts with Board of Education Policy or regulations, the Board of Education Policy and/or regulations shall control. Offenses listed above are examples. A more extensive list is available in the main office. Detentions will be used as a reflective opportunity. If the detention is not served, students will be assigned ISS until a parent meeting is held. Students/families are expected to pay restitution for damage to school property.

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LEVELS OF MISCONDUCT The Tourtellotte Memorial High School discipline code is divided into three levels of conduct Responsible, Respectful, and Safe. The levels represent a continuum of behavior based on the nature and seriousness of the act or the frequency of the occurrence. The following shall act as a guide for students, parents, teachers and administrators. However, the administration reserves the right to escalate consequences, when in their judgment, the frequency of the act or seriousness of the act warrants it. GENERAL REGULATIONS  Students may receive a detention for a minor incident not listed in the standards of behavior. 

Students referred to the office during a class will not return to class that period.

Students who consistently disrupt the educational environment and accumulate excessive detentions may be assigned to in-school suspension.

Board policy will be followed for those students who receive numerous suspensions.

A parent conference with a school administrator is expected prior to the student’s return to the classroom from suspension.

All suspensions shall be in-school suspensions unless the administration determines that an out-of-school suspension is required because the student poses a danger to persons or property or provides such a disruption of the educational process. Additionally, the administration may determine that an out-of-school suspension is appropriate for the student based on evidence of previous disciplinary problems that have led to suspensions or expulsion, where efforts by the administration to address those disciplinary problems through means other than out-of-school suspension or expulsion, including positive behavioral support strategies, have failed.

A student who receives multiple suspensions may be referred to the special education team (PPT) depending upon the nature of the infractions.

A petition may be filed with Juvenile Court when a student receives multiple suspensions from school depending upon the nature of the infractions.

Consequences for violations of smoking, drug, or weapon standards are administered in accordance with current Student Handbook and Board of Education Policy.

During periods of suspension, students are not eligible to participate in, or attend, any school activity.

Periods of in-school suspension missed due to school cancellation or student illness will be made up on the first day a student returns to school.

During periods of out-of-school suspension, students are not allowed on school grounds. If necessary, law enforcement will enforce this rule.

No student shall be placed in in-school suspension more than fifteen times or a total of fifty days in one school year, whichever results in fewer days of exclusion. 18


DETENTION Detention is a period of up to two hours where a student remains at school under supervision after the conclusion of the school day. The location of the detention will be determined by the teacher or administrator. If for a valid reason a student cannot attend the assigned detention, the student should talk to the teacher involved, or a school administrator, before missing the detention. o Detention will begin at 2:10 p.m. on designated days. o Any student arriving after 2:15 p.m. may not be admitted and will report to the administration on the following day. o Failure to report to a scheduled detention will result in additional consequences including additional detentions or in-school suspension. o Students will be given 24 hours’ notice of a detention in order to arrange for transportation home. o Students are responsible for their own transportation from detention. o The following are not allowed in detention:  Eating or drinking  Use of any type of electronic device  Talking  Sleeping o Any type of inappropriate behavior may result in dismissal from detention.  Any student who is dismissed from detention is to report to the administration on the following day.  Any student dismissed from detention is subject to further consequences including additional detentions or suspension. o Students may not participate in or attend extra-curricular activities on the day that they are serving this detention until the detention is satisfied. o Work, team practices and games, club meetings and activities, among other commitments are not valid reasons for missing detention. o Detentions may not be rescheduled unless a valid emergency arises accepted by the teacher or administration. o Students not in school on the day they are to serve a detention will be automatically scheduled for the day they return. OFF-CAMPUS MISCONDUCT Students may face disciplinary actions for off-campus conduct that both violates a publicized Board of Education Policy and is seriously disruptive of the educational process.

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SAFETY CONCERNS Some acts are so serious that they may require administrative action, which may result in the immediate removal of the student from school (up to 10 days) and the potential intervention of law enforcement authorities:  Possession of weapons (including but not limited to firearms, knives, clubs, explosives.)  Possession, consumption, influence, or sale of alcohol and/or drugs  Arson  Bomb threat  False Fire Alarm  Physical Assault to a school employee or another student  Hazing - To initiate or discipline students by forcing them to do humiliating or painful things. (Up to 10 day out-of-school suspension, suspension from the athletic team.)  Threats of Violence - The Connecticut Association of Boards of Education formally defines a threat as words or actions which deliver threatening or violent messages. o Threats can range from boastful taunts, to harassment, to bullying behavior, to the intent to commit deadly acts. o All threats should be taken seriously and assessed to determine the level of risk and danger involved. o All threats should be reported to a teacher or an administrator.  “Bullying” behavior and/or harassing behavior by any student in Tourtellotte Memorial High School is strictly prohibited, and such conduct may result in disciplinary action, including suspension and/or expulsion from school. See the district’s Bullying Policy and Safe School Climate Plan for more information. o ”Bullying” means any overt acts by a student or group of students with the intent to ridicule, humiliate, or intimidate the other student while on school grounds or at a school-sponsored activity which are repeated against the same student over a period of time. o Students or parents may file oral or written complaints concerning suspected bullying behavior, and students shall be permitted to anonymously report acts of bullying to teachers and school administrators. However, discipline will not be based on only an anonymous bullying report. o Any report of suspected bullying behavior will be promptly investigated. If acts of bullying are verified, prompt disciplinary action may be taken against the perpetrator, consistent with his/her rights of due process. Please note: Administrative discretion may be used to modify any behavior consequence when deemed appropriate and suspensions are not appealable. DRINKING/EATING IN SCHOOL There will be no open bottles, cans or containers allowed to enter the building. The water machines will be available during lunch, before and after school. Water is available from the water fountains in each of the hallways. Plain water (no vitamin water, Gatorade, juices, etc.) will be allowed in the classroom provided it is in a sealed, clear bottle when entering the building. No thermos containers, travel mugs, or convenience store cups will be permitted in the building at any time. 20


PDA: RELATIONSHIPS While we recognize the normalcy of relationships and romances, we wish to remind students that certain types of physical contact and behavior are improper in corridors and elsewhere at school. Self-respect and the respect of your companions should always be of prime concern. Proper conduct of all students at all times is expected. Failure to do so will be responded to with disciplinary action. PLAGIARISM Plagiarism demonstrates a lack of integrity and character that is inconsistent with the goals and values of Tourtellotte Memorial High School. Plagiarism interferes with the assessment and feedback process that is necessary in order to promote academic growth. Plagiarism includes but is not limited to the following:  taking someone else’s assignment or portion of an assignment and submitting it as your own  submitting material written by someone else or rephrasing the ideas of another without giving the author’s name or source  presenting the work of tutors, parents, siblings, or friends as your own  submitting purchased papers as your own work  submitting papers from the Internet written by someone else as your own  supporting plagiarism by providing your work to others, whether you believe it will be copied or not CHEATING Cheating demonstrates a lack of integrity and character that is inconsistent with the goals and values of Tourtellotte Memorial High School. Cheating robs students of their opportunity to become competent. Students are expected to produce their own work except on projects designated by the teacher as cooperative efforts. Teachers will indicate which assignments are to be cooperative efforts and will establish guidelines for the use of such aids as calculators, computers, word processors, and published study guides. If a student is in doubt about the ethical standards applicable to a particular situation, the student is responsible for clarifying the matter with the teacher. Cheating includes but is not limited to the following:  copying, faxing, e-mailing, or in any way duplicating assignments that are turned in, wholly or in part, as original work  exchanging assignments with other students, either handwritten or computer generated, whether you believe they will be copied or not using a computer or other electronic device to obtain answers in a testing situation  giving or receiving answers during tests or quizzes or the appearance of giving or receiving answers (talking, passing notes, texting, etc.)  taking credit for group work when you have not contributed an equal or appropriate share toward the final result  accessing a test or quiz for the purpose of determining the questions in advance of its administration using summaries/commentaries (Cliff Notes, Spark Notes, etc.) in lieu of reading assigned materials using cell phones in any manner during a quiz or a test 21


STRATEGIES TO AVOID PLAGIARISM AND CHEATING  Be prepared and keep to a realistic schedule.  Make certain that you understand the assignment and the grading assessment that will be used. Do not read or scan someone else’s paper before writing your own.  Do not work with others unless the instructor gives you permission to do so.  Be organized.  Keep current with assignments. REPERCUSSIONS FOR PLAGIARISM AND CHEATING Any student who is caught plagiarizing or cheating will receive a grade of zero for the academic work involved. The administration will notify the parents of the student or students involved. When work is shared by another student, both students will be penalized with a grade of zero. Grades which are the result of academic dishonesty in any form are irrevocable. Further disciplinary action may be taken.

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PART III: ACADEMIC RESPONSIBILITIES ACADEMIC ETHICS Tourtellotte Memorial High School expects its students to maintain the highest degree of academic ethics. This means putting the utmost effort into all class work and assignments. ACADEMIC SCHOOLWIDE EXPECTATIONS The TMHS Schoolwide Expectations are the academic, civic, and social outcomes in which all students should be proficient. They are statements about what students should know and be able to do upon graduation. The TMHS community has identified and adopted five core learner expectations and performance indicators which support the accomplishment of the school’s mission. They are supported by the school’s statement of academic expectations established by all departments of the school. The Tourtellotte Memorial High School graduate will demonstrate proficiency in: Expectation 1: Problem Solving  the process of effectively applying the analysis, synthesis, and evaluative processes in both independent and group settings to enable productive problem solving Expectation 2: Communication: A. Interactive Communication  the process of understanding, organizing/developing, speaking, listening/responding, and collaborating Expectation 2: Communication: B. Reading  the process of understanding, interpreting, connecting to, and forming a critical stance on textual material Expectation 2: Communication: C. Writing  the process of expressing ideas through writing in a variety of forms, using standard language conventions and considering various audiences Expectation 3: Information, Media, and Technology Skills  the process of ethically utilizing a variety of 21st century tools to acquire and disseminate information, solve authentic problems, and increase productivity Expectation 4: Innovative Thinking  the process of demonstrating originality, creativity, flexibility, and adaptability in thinking patterns, work process, and working/learning conditions Expectation 5: Cultural/Civic Awareness and Personal Responsibility: A. Cultural Awareness  the process of understanding diverse cultures, recognizing global relationships, and responding independently to changing conditions Expectation 5: Cultural/Civic Awareness and Personal Responsibility: B. Civic Awareness  the process of understanding social responsibility in relation to community Expectation 5: Cultural/Civic Awareness and Personal Responsibility: C. Personal Responsibility  the process of understanding personal accountability and its effects on quality of life

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COURSE SELECTION PROCEDURE In selecting courses for the following school year, students are required to list the subjects requested on a course of study form. A parent or guardian must sign this form. These forms are completed in the early spring with the assistance of the school counselors. Students are advised to select their subjects carefully and to seek assistance from the school counselors. YEARLY REQUIREMENTS Our school day consists of seven class periods. Ninth and tenth grade students are required to take six credits plus a physical education (PE) class. Eleventh and twelfth grade students are not required to take physical education classes once they have earned one full PE credit. SEMESTER COURSES A semester course is a class that meets five days a week for one half of the year. Each semester course is given a final grade and, if passed, will be assigned a half credit independent of any other half-credit course. Semester courses will be computed into a student’s grade point average (weighted and non-weighted). CREDITS A credit is earned by passing a subject that meets five days a week throughout the year. One half credit is given for physical education courses, semester courses, or other classes that meet two or three times a week for a full year. Students must earn 24 credits to be eligible for graduation. CREDIT REQUIREMENTS FOR CLASSES THROUGH THE CLASS OF 2020 Four credits of English: 1 English credit must be taken each school year. Three credits of Social Studies: 1 Government 1 U.S. History or Early American History Three credits of Mathematics Three credits of Science: 1 Freshmen Science 1 Biology One credit of Arts; Art and/or Music One credit of Technology based work: Business, Technology Education, and/or computer based Mathematics One credit of Physical Education Eight elective credits In addition to the course credits required, all students must meet the “proficiency” level for the Science Connecticut Academic Performance Test (CAPT) in their sophomore and/or junior year, and meet a set of performance standards as juniors and/or seniors as measured by State Assessments or the district’s basic skills assessment in order to qualify for a diploma.

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PROMOTION REQUIREMENTS Students at Tourtellotte Memorial High School must meet rigid credit requirements to be promoted from grade level to grade level. Additionally, they must conform to Connecticut State Law in order to graduate. To be promoted, students must complete credits as follows in accordance with Board of Education Graduation Requirements: From Grade 9 to 10 5 Credits From Grade 10 to 11 11 Credits accumulated From Grade 11 to 12 17 Credits accumulated Graduation 24 Credits accumulated EXAMS All students take exams at the conclusion of each semester. Announcements about exam schedules and regulations will be made prior to mid-year and final exams. Exam grades will equal 20% of the course grade. Seniors with an average of 90% or higher may be exempt from that exam at the teacher’s discretion. REPORT CARDS Report cards will be distributed four times during the school year. The approximate dates fall accordingly: Quarter 1 (October) Quarter 2 (January)

Quarter 3 (March) Quarter 4 (June)

PROGRESS REPORTS The school issues progress reports midway through each quarter. It is the student’s responsibility to make sure the parent/guardian is aware of the report. The administration will keep the parents informed as to when the parents may expect the reports home. The approximate dates fall accordingly: Quarter 1 (September) Quarter 2 (December)

Quarter 3 (February) Quarter 4 (May)

A second type of progress report may be initiated by the parent. The parent must call the school counselors’ office in order to request progress reports. The school counselors’ office will arrange for two biweekly progress reports to be mailed home. After that, a student may pick up report forms in the school counselors’ office, bring them to teachers for completion, and hand-carry them home. GRADING Tourtellotte Memorial High School’s grading system for all students will be numerical. 100 - 97 = Superior quality 79 - 77 = Above average 96 - 94 = Very high quality 76 - 74 = Average 93 - 90 = High quality 73 - 70 = Below average 89 - 87 = Extremely good 69 - 67 = High pass 86 - 84 = Very good 66 - 64 = Pass 83 - 80 = Good 63 - 60 = Low pass 59 and below = Failing 25


GRADE DETERMINATION Grades for each quarter will be interpreted and determined by each teacher. Grades are based upon the successful completion of assignments and class participation with regard to the teacher’s goals and objectives for each student. COURSE DESIGNATIONS FOR GRADE WEIGHTING LEVEL I (Advanced Placement) Advanced Placement is a program offered by the Educational Testing Service of the College Board. An exam provided by the College Board is given in May. Successful students may receive college credit to the course. This program requires very high motivation and outstanding academic ability. The academic standard for these courses will be most demanding. Courses taught in conjunction with the University of Connecticut are weighted as Advanced Placement. LEVEL II (Honors) Courses are designed to meet the needs of students who are planning to attend four-year colleges and universities. The work will be very demanding, as students will be developing skills of analytical and critical thinking and acquiring the work habits necessary for success in college. This will require research, laboratory experience, and extensive requirements for verbal and written expression. LEVEL III (Academic) Courses are designed to meet the needs of students who would like to go on to college but may have some difficulties in particular subject areas. Standards and work requirements will be high, and thinking, research, laboratory, and communication skills will be developed. WEIGHTED GRADES The Thompson Board of Education has approved the G.P.A. Weighted Grades Policy previously approved by the faculty at Tourtellotte Memorial High School. This policy evolved after a very thorough and challenging process that has concluded with the acceptance of the following system for determining G.P.A. for our students starting with the Class of 1993. The purposes of the Weighted Grade G.P.A. system are the following: 1. Recommendation to a four-year college 2. Placement at four-year college 3. Scholarship awards based on academic scholarship 4. The ranking of our students for awards based on academic scholarship In order to determine G.P.A. course offerings are listed according to four levels: 1. Advanced Placement 2. Advance College Preparation 3. College Preparation 4. Standard The following numerical differentials will be used to determine class rank: Advanced Placement 1.113 Honors 1.057 Academic 1.000 26


INCOMPLETES Occasionally a student may be assigned a grade of incomplete when documented extenuating circumstances have prevented the student from turning in all assigned coursework prior to the close of grades. All grades of incomplete must be pre-approved by administration. All grades of incomplete must be converted to an appropriate course grade within 10 school days of report card distribution. Therefore, any make-up work must be completed and turned in to a teacher before the tenth day after the close of a given marking period, in order to be credited toward the final numerical grade. Failure to complete assignments within the given time frame will automatically convert incomplete grades to Failure. In rare instances, the ten day requirement may be extended with the prior approval of administration and consultation with the parent. Some examples of documented extenuating circumstances may include: long term illness such as that requiring hospitalization or extended time out of school (requires documentation from a licensed medical professional); absences as a result of completing a legal obligation such as time in a juvenile detention facility (require documentation from the probation department or the court). Frequent but sporadic absences, truancy, or school suspensions will not meet the criteria for an incomplete grade. WEIGHT MODIFICATION WITHIN COURSES Grade weights within certain courses may be modified by agreement between the student and teacher (with the advice and consent of the school counselors and administrative departments) in order to best meet the needs of individual students. HONORS AND ELIGIBILITY A number of honors are made available or received annually by Tourtellotte Memorial students. Students must also maintain appropriate academic standards to be eligible for participation in extra-curricular activities. HONORS High Honors = Honors = Recognition =

an average of 90% or better; only one grade below 90, but no lower than 87 an average of 85% or better: no grade below 80% an average of 80% or better: no grade below 75%

Calculations determining the honor are based on weighted grades. ELIGIBILITY A student must meet course requirements and digital portfolio requirements in order to establish eligibility.  Course Requirements – At the end of a quarter, a student cannot have failed more than one academic subject and must have at least one grade of 70% or better. Fall eligibility will be based on final grades from the previous school year. Digital Portfolio - Students must also be in compliance with all requirements stated in the Digital Portfolio Handbook. If a student is not in compliance, his/her eligibility may be restored once the requirements are met. 27


RETENTION/SUMMER SCHOOL/CREDIT RECOVERY If a student does not meet the necessary credit requirements to advance to his/her next grade level, that student will be retained at his/her present grade level. When a student is not promoted, credit is earned for those subjects passed and the student does not repeat those subjects. If the student accumulates credits through a repeat year or summer school, s/he is placed in the grade level which is comparable to the earned credits. Two types of credit deficit programs are provided at Tourtellotte Memorial High School. The Credit Recovery Program provides students with the opportunity to make up only the specific course objectives that were not met during the school year. To be eligible for credit recovery a student must have a course average of 55 or greater and have passed two quarters in a full-year course and one quarter in a half-year course during the academic year. Credit recovery courses may only be taken in the summer immediately following the failure. The Full Credit Course Program may only be taken at the discretion of the administration in consultation with the student’s teacher and school counselor. In this program, a student would be responsible to demonstrate mastery of all course objectives regardless of performance during the school year. A student is allowed to make up no more than two courses in summer school programming. All summer programming at TMHS is done through online courseware such as Edmentum. Course makeup credit may also be earned by successful completion in accredited high school correspondence courses or successful completion of a college course. Approval must be given by the administration and school counselor before any course makeup is attempted. GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS In addition to needing 24 credits for graduation, students must meet performance requirements. All students must achieve a score of a three or higher on the CAPT Science Assessment and demonstrate proficiency on the school wide expectations through their digital portfolio. Students who have an individual education plan (IEP) may require modifications from the performance standards as determined by the planning and placement team (PPT). DIGITAL PORTFOLIO In addition to the twenty-four credits students must acquire to be awarded a high school diploma, students will be required to maintain a digital portfolio and achieve a proficiency rating with each of the school-wide expectations by the time s/he graduates. The digital portfolio is a collection of evidence demonstrating that students have the skills and knowledge required of all graduates of Tourtellotte Memorial High School. Please see the Digital Portfolio Handbook for more detailed information. During the freshman year, each student will be assigned a login name and password to create his/her own personal digital portfolio. During the years at Tourtellotte, each student will be provided opportunities in all courses to create proficient artifacts for the portfolio. It is the student’s responsibility to enter these tasks into his/her portfolio. If there are technical problems or other extenuating circumstances that prevent completion of an entry into the graduation digital portfolio, the student should seek out a solution to the problem. Faculty is available to provide guidance. Ultimately, the student must have a complete portfolio demonstrating proficiency in Tourtellotte’s proficiency-based graduation requirements. Tourtellotte provides the resources and support necessary for successful portfolio completion and exhibition. 28


GRADUATION CEREMONY Seniors who choose to take part in the formal exercise of graduation wearing cap and gown also automatically agree to wear appropriate attire under the gown. Appropriate attire includes dresses, skirts, slacks, dress pants, dress shirts and ties. Sneakers, blue jeans, shorts, cut offs, work boots, beach sandals, or similar attire will not be permitted. Also, students must attend all rehearsals in order to take part in the ceremony. Students failing to abide by these rules will not be allowed to take part in the ceremony. After formal classes have ended for seniors, any student who commits a violation which warrants a suspension will be barred from all remaining activities, including senior week activities and graduation exercises. For these students and anyone not taking part in graduation exercises, a diploma will be awarded on the first business day following graduation. It is the policy of the Thompson Board of Education that “students who have not come within one credit of academic requirements for graduation may not participate in graduation exercises. Upon completion of academic requirements for graduation, a diploma will be issued. Students who have more than one credit to complete and do so after their class has graduated may participate in the next graduation.” As a formal graduation occurs only a few times in an individual’s life, the ceremony will be conducted in a formal setting. During the actual graduation ceremony, proper protocol must be observed. Students who engage in disruptive behavior, or possess silly string, balloons, squirt guns, etc., will be removed from the graduation ceremony. VALEDICTORIAN/SALUTATORIAN AND HONORS ESSAY SELECTION Process for Selection the Valedictorian(s)/Salutatorian(s) The Valedictorian(s)/Salutatorian(s) for the graduating class of Tourtellotte Memorial High School will be determined by the Valedictorian/Salutatorian Committee. Calculation of the GPA for the purpose of selecting the Valedictorian and Salutatorian will be completed after the third marking period of the senior year. The announcement of the Valedictorian(s)/Salutatorian(s) is the sole responsibility of the High School Principal who will be assisted in the selection process by the school counselors and two additional faculty members appointed by the principal. They shall verify the results of the calculations before any announcement of Valedictorian(s) or Salutatorian(s) is made. If there is a disputed decision, every effort is made that that information remain with the selection committee and the parties involved, until the resolution of the matter has been accepted by the principal and the committee. Eligibility: To be considered for Valedictorian/Salutatorian, a student must meet the following criteria:  The student must have been enrolled in Tourtellotte Memorial High School for the previous six marking periods (all of junior year and the first two marking quarters of senior year). 

The Student must be eligible for graduation and participation in the graduation ceremony. Criteria for Selection of Valedictorian/Salutatorian

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The Valedictorian shall be the student with the highest overall Grade Point Average (“GPA�). The Salutatorian shall be the student with the second highest overall GPA. The calculation for both the Valedictorian and Salutatorian shall be carried to a minimum of four decimal places. In the event that there is an actual tie to four decimal places, the number of honors and AP/UCONN classes taken to contribute to GPA will be used to select the class valedictorian or salutatorian. In the event that there is an actual tie to four decimal places for valedictorian, and the number of honors and AP/UCONN classes taken to contribute to GPA does not break the tie, covaledictorians should be named and there would still be a salutatorian. In the event that there is an actual tie to four decimal places for salutatorian, and the number of honors and AP/UCONN classes taken to contribute to GPA does not break the tie, cosalutatorians would be named. Challenge The selected Valedictorian(s)/Salutatorian(s) will be notified by the Principal confidentially. If either selectee, or other seniors in contention, should desire to challenge or dispute the selection, they then have five school days to make this challenge after the above decision has been announced. The Principal must be notified in writing that a challenge is being made. If there is a tie for either Valedictorian or Salutatorian, there will be two selectees. The parameter in establishing a tie is that both candidates are within a rounded tenth of a point of each other. Formula The formula for determination of class rank for the purposes of selecting the Valedictorian/Salutatorian shall be as follows: The three-and-one-half-year average will be used to determine the class standings; years one, two, and three will be added to the half-year points and credits. To determine the half-year points and credits, as is necessary to divide the fourth year points and credits by two. The Valedictorian will be the senior(s) with the highest Grade Point Average (G.P.A. / weighted) determined over his/her three-and-one-half-years of course work at an approved, accredited secondary school. The Salutatorian will be the senior(s) with the second highest Grade Point Average (G.P.A. / weighted) as determined over his/her three-and-one-half-years of course work at an approved, accredited secondary school. Graduation Addresses It is expected that the Valedictorian(s)/Salutatorian(s) will offer the Valedictory and Salutatory addresses at graduation. While tradition also dictates that they give the honors essays as well, the Valedictorian/Salutatorian Committee, in its discretion, may select other seniors to deliver the honors essays. Honors Essay Selection An honors essay may be offered by any senior class member. The essay is to be written by May 15th and judged by the Valedictorian/Salutatorian Committee by May 31st and delivered at graduation exercises in place of the Valedictorian/Salutatorian speaking. File Number: JI-A Date Adopted: May 11, 1992 Date Revised: March 11, 2013

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DIPLOMAS Tourtellotte Memorial High School does not differentiate its diploma. However, the students program of study will still be noted and those interested in pursuing a four-year college degree should select courses in the appropriate academic program.

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PART IV: STUDENT RESPONSIBILITIES TEXTBOOK POLICY The Thompson Board of Education provides textbooks for all students in all classes. When books are issued to students, it is their responsibility to maintain those books in good order and return the book at the end of the year. Reasonable wear and tear is expected. In order to enhance the life span of the books, all books should be covered. Students losing, damaging, or misplacing books will be charged the school replacement cost before another book is issued. Students failing to return books at the end of the year will have to pay for the lost books before they are issued a report card or class schedule for the next school year. CELL PHONES AND PERSONAL ELECTRONIC DEVICES The faculty at Tourtellotte Memorial High School recognizes the role personal technology plays in our world. There are times when these devices are helpful in our daily lives and that they play a significant role in our social interaction with one another. However, they also can be a detriment to the success of students in the academic environment. As a matter of respect for the classroom teacher and the learning of others, cell phones and other personal electronic devices are to remain off and stored during class time unless otherwise instructed. Assemblies and other formal gatherings are also inappropriate times for using these devices. Controlling the use of these devices is an effort to create an environment that respects the teachers’ ability to perform effectively. The TMHS faculty expects student cooperation with teacher direction with regard to these devices, and students can expect similar understanding of teachers in unstructured settings during the school day, provided student safety and well-being is not in jeopardy. Violation of the cell phone and personal electronic devices policy may result in disciplinary action. (See section on student conduct) ELEVATOR Students may only use the elevator with a pass from the school nurse, an administrator, or school secretary. Students using the elevator without permission will be subject to disciplinary action. A student who has a pass to use the elevator may have one student accompanying him or her. IDENTIFICATION CARDS All Tourtellotte students are issued photo I.D. cards early in the school year. I.D. cards should be carried at all times. They are used primarily at dances, athletic events, and other public, schoolsponsored functions. Pictures this year will be taken in September. (This includes both I.D.’s and photo packages for grades 9, 10 & 11). Substitute I.D. cards are available to students if they are absent during picture day. LAVATORIES Lavatories are available to all students during class changes. If there is the possibility that the student may be late to the next class, they are to check in with that teacher and then use the lavatories. Lavatory passes will not be issued during instructional time unless there is an extreme need. If this extreme need is a regular occurrence, then the school nurse, parent, and administration will become involved.

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Any student found behaving inappropriately in the lavatories will be subject to a monitoring program set up by the administration in addition to any other disciplinary measures, which may include up to a five (5) day in-school suspension for the first offense and other appropriate disciplinary action for any future offenses. It is state law that smoking is prohibited in school and on school property. Any student found violating this policy will be subject to disciplinary measures, which includes up to a five day (5) in-school suspension for the first offense and other appropriate disciplinary action for any future offenses. LOCKERS Lockers are available for all students. Students are assigned lockers for their use, which are the property of Tourtellotte Memorial High School. Students should have no expectation of privacy in their lockers. Lockers are provided for the temporary convenience of students only. The Board of Education authorizes the administration and/or law enforcement officials to search lockers and other school property available for use by students for the presence of weapons, contraband or the fruits of a crime if there are reasonable grounds at the inception of the search for suspecting that the search will reveal evidence that the student has violated or is violating either the law or the rules of the school. Moreover, the scope of the search shall be reasonably related to the objectives of the search and shall not be excessively intrusive in light of the age and sex of the student and the nature of the infraction. If the administration reasonably suspects that a student is not maintaining a locker or other storage area assigned to him/her in a sanitary condition, or that the storage area contains items the possession of which are illegal or in violation of school regulations or that endanger the health, safety or welfare of the student or others, it has the right to open and examine the storage area and to seize any such items that are found. When required by law and otherwise at the option of the administration, items that have been seized shall be submitted to the police department for proper disposition. Items not submitted to the police department shall be disposed of as directed by the administration. In addition to disciplinary action, the cost of repair to any willfully damaged locker will be charged to the student to whom it was assigned. The school will provide locks for both the hall and gym lockers. Only school locks may be used on the lockers. Any lock that is damaged or lost will cost the student $10. The school cannot assume responsibility for replacing any stolen items. This also applies to lockers in the gym. As there is a limited amount of time between class changes, students are encouraged to stop at their lockers before the first period of the day, before and after lunch, and at the end of the school day. Being at a locker is not an acceptable reason for being late for class. All lockers must have a lock on them at all times. Do not share your locker or combination. PARKING: RULES AND REGULATIONS All students who drive to school must register their vehicles in the school office and must have a parking sticker on the vehicle. Students are expected to follow all rules and regulations found in the student’s car registration application. Any student not applying for a parking sticker may lose the privilege of parking on school property. A fee will apply for replacing a lost parking sticker. 33


Driving to school is a privilege that student drivers must continue to earn, and it may be denied at any time due to failure to follow school rules or any parking regulations stated in the handbook. Good traffic control is going to take the cooperation of everyone. Driving regulations will be strictly enforced. All vehicles are expected to arrive and exit the school by using the regular high school routes. No student is allowed to use Mary R. Fisher Elementary Road as an exit. Students should arrive at school no earlier than 7:00 a.m. Upon arrival at school, students should leave their vehicles immediately and enter the school building. Students who drive vehicles to school must adhere to the following additional regulations:  Student parking is limited to the parking lot in front of the main high school building.  Students may not park along the sidewalk.  Student vehicles are not permitted in the elementary or middle school parking lots.  Any student who is habitually absent or late to school will lose his/her parking privilege.  Any student smoking or allowing others to smoke in his/her vehicle will lose his/her parking privilege, as well as incur consequences for smoking on school property.  Any student who loses his/her parking privilege must immediately turn in the permit to the office. When the privilege is restored, the permit will be returned. The length of time a student is denied a parking privilege will be determined by the administration on a case-by-case basis. OPEN CAMPUS: REQUIREMENTS AND REGULATIONS Open Campus (O.C.) is a privilege that allows seniors only to leave the school grounds during their study periods. This practice has been in existence for many years. However, juniors who have passed the Science CAPT may apply for Open Campus for the fourth quarter. All other students must be in their assigned study halls. Open campus is a privilege and can be revoked at any time by the administration for failure to follow school rules and regulations. Requirements for Open Campus (OC): 

 

Academic Eligibility o At the end of a quarter, a student cannot have failed more than one academic subject and must have at least one grade of 70% or better. o First quarter eligibility will be based on the grades from the first progress reports. Digital Portfolio Requirements o Students must also be in compliance with all requirements stated in the Digital Portfolio Handbook. o Expectations are subject to change as the year progresses. Attendance/Tardiness o Excessive absences from school will affect O.C. for a period of time to be determined by the administration. o Unexcused tardiness to school will result in loss of O.C. on the next day O.C. is available to the student. Full Tiger Pass Status All Class Dues Paid 34


Regulations for Open Campus (OC): 1 2 3

4

5

6 7 8

All participating students must have a permission form signed by a parent or guardian, before the privilege becomes effective. Students must sign out at the office when leaving for O.C. When students are on Open Campus, they must immediately leave the school grounds. Students are not to congregate in any location in the building or on the school grounds, i.e., locker areas, lavatories, cars, or parking lot. Even though a student may be off school grounds during Open Campus, s/he is a representative of the school; therefore, it is expected that proper behavior will be demonstrated at all times. Students must sign in at the office upon arrival from O.C. Depending on the arrival time, students may remain in the office or report to the assigned study hall or the library. Students are not to loiter in the halls or lavatories. Students who are tardy returning to school must report to the office to obtain an admittance slip. Teachers will not admit tardy seniors without this slip. Students who are late for class because of O.C. will lose the Open Campus privilege for the next two days. If a student with the OC privilege chooses to remain at school, s/he must report to the assigned study hall prior to the late bell. Students with OC during the first period of the day must be in the school building by 8:10 a.m. so they can get to homeroom on time. Students with OC during the second period of the day cannot leave the building until after homeroom at 8:18 a.m.

It is very important for seniors to realize that open campus is a privilege, and it can be denied by the administration at any time.

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PART V: SCHOOL SERVICES BUS TRANSPORTATION Riding on the bus to and from school is a privilege. Students misbehaving on the bus will be subject to disciplinary action including suspension from the school bus in accordance with state law and district policy. We are unable to accommodate students requesting to ride on a bus other than the one to which they were assigned. GYMNASIUM Students scheduled for physical education are required to report to the gym prepared to take the class. Preparation for the class includes wearing the proper clothing. Because of personal hygiene, all students must have a change of clothes. Students will be notified by the physical education department at the beginning of the school year as to what clothes are acceptable and what are not. Any student reporting to the gym unprepared to participate in class will be dealt with as any student who is not prepared for class as reflected in the syllabus distributed at the beginning of the year. A student may be excused from participating in physical education. However, only one parent excuse will be acceptable per quarter. A note will excuse the student for that gym class on that one day. The note must have the date of the class in question. The school nurse may excuse a student from participating in physical education due to injury or sickness on a one-day basis. A note from the doctor is mandatory to excuse a student from physical education classes beyond that one day. Doctors may excuse a student permanently or for a specified period of time if, in the physician’s opinion, participation in physical education is contraindicated based on the student’s documented medical or health condition. Unexcused nonparticipation in physical education class may result in a failing grade. Any student who is excused from a physical education class must report to that class, unless the student has prior approval from the administration. Being excused from participating in the class is not an acceptable reason to be in any other part of the building or to leave school, unless permission has been granted in advance. Interscholastic athletic participation does not exempt participation from physical education class for a day or the year. No student should be in the gym without adult supervision. The gym should not be used as a hallway or short-cut between classes. LIBRARY MEDIA CENTER The Library Media Center offers a number of resources including: the Internet, a variety of technologies, periodicals, daily newspapers, books on tape, and more than 7,500 volumes of printed materials. A student may utilize the media center during study periods on a first-come-firstserve basis by reporting to the Media Center Librarian before school or receiving a pass from the study hall teacher. Unfortunately, due to space limitations, not all students may be accommodated during a given period. Students using the computer facilities in the media center should be familiar with the school department computer-use policy found in this handbook, the Board of Education’s Student Discipline Policy, Bullying Intervention Policy and Safe School Climate Plan and Sexual Harassment Policy. 36


CAFETERIA Breakfast Breakfast is available to all high school students each morning in the high school cafeteria. A person who qualifies for free or reduced lunch also qualifies for free or reduced breakfast. Breakfast is served from 7:15 to 7:25 a.m. Please take advantage of this opportunity to start your day off with a well-prepared, quality meal. However, having breakfast is not an acceptable reason for being late to first period class. Lunch program A variety of sandwiches, soups, snacks, and milk are offered on an a la carte basis daily in the cafeteria. If you choose to bring your own lunch, you still must eat in the cafeteria. Decorum All students must report immediately to the cafeteria at the start of their assigned lunch and remain there until dismissed from lunch. Any special arrangements should be communicated to the office in advance so that the staff providing coverage in the cafeteria is aware. It is expected that students will maintain the degree of cleanliness that reflects pride in themselves as well as their school. The tables and floors are to be kept clean. All litter must be deposited in wastebaskets, and all trays and utensils must be returned to their proper places. The cafeteria is an opportunity to relax during the normal school day. Any unacceptable behavior may result in disciplinary action, including being removed from the cafeteria for breakfast or lunch. All consumption of food should take place in the cafeteria. At no time, during the school day, is food to be brought into or eaten in the gymnasium or locker rooms. MY SCHOOLBUCKS PROGRAM The Thompson Public Schools have a computerized system that allows parents to deposit money into their child’s individual account, it is called “MySchoolbucks” and can be located at our school’s website www.thompsonpublicschools.org. Deposits received are entered daily into student accounts by 10:30 a.m. All deposits received after 10:30 a.m. are deposited into your child’s account the next business day. No change will be returned unless requested in writing by a parent/ guardian. Each student is issued a Personal Identification Number (PIN) and this number remains the same while your child is a student in Thompson Public Schools. All students have an established account. Although you are not required to make advance payments, we do encourage you to do so. It helps to keep our lunch lines moving smoothly and quickly, allowing your child more time to eat their lunch. If you wish to pay in advance, please choose from the following options:

“MySchoolBucks” The Simple Way to Pay for School Meals... myschoolbucks.com Download the FREE app today!  View account balances and meal purchases  Schedule automatic payments  Make payments anytime, anywhere from our mobile app Sign up for your FREE account in 3 easy steps! Step 1: Go to myschoolbucks.com Step 2: Create your account Step 3: Pay with your credit/debit card or electronic check

On-Line Payments @ MySchoolbucks.com 37


If you want your on-line deposit to be “lunch only” or “breakfast only,” please contact Lisa Durand to do so. Advance Payment Option Meals may be purchased in advance. This money will go into your child’s “general” account for breakfast, lunch, and/or a la carte items. If you wish your child’s money be used for “lunch only” or “breakfast only”, you will need to specify this on your deposit slip, personal check, or money order. You need only send in one (1) deposit per family, however, you must specify how much money is to go into each child’s individual account. Please make checks payable to the “Thompson Lunch Program”. BREAKFAST PRICES LUNCH PRICES High School @ $1.75 High School @ $3.00 Milk (8 oz.) Juice (4 oz.) (Reduced Price @ .30) (Reduced Price @ .40) .50 cents each (when purchased separately) Please contact the Food Service Manager, Lisa Durand, with any questions or comments you may have. Phone (860) 923-9581, x588, Fax (860) 963-4862 E-mail - ldurand@thompsonpublicschools.org NURSE’S OFFICE Visit Procedure   

When high school students visit the nurse’s office, it is essential that they have a pass. Students receiving a pass to the nurse must report directly to the nurse’s office. Going to areas other than the nurse’s office may result in disciplinary action. Only the nursing staff may make phone calls to parents to get students dismissed from school due to illness. Students must see the nurse before requesting to leave school due to illness.

Communicating with the School Concerning a Student’s Health    

The school nurse should be notified of changes in the student’s status, illness, injury, or hospitalization. Parents/guardians should call the school office if their children are absent because of illness. The school requires a doctor’s note to excuse a student from gym for more than one day. Parents/guardians should consult the school counselors’ office if they anticipate a student may be absent for medical reasons for ten (10) days or longer. The school counselors’ office will help to arrange medical certification and appropriate home-based instruction by a qualified teacher. Please contact the school counselors’ office in advance of the absence if possible or as soon as possible in an emergency situation.

Staying Home from School To safeguard everyone’s health, students must stay home from school if they:          

have a fever of 100 degrees or more have an undiagnosed rash are vomiting have more than one episode of diarrhea have copious yellow/green mucus discharge from nose complain of severe earache, with or without fever have a severe sore throat with symptoms indicating possible strep throat have conjunctivitis (pink eye) have active head lice have a communicable illness 38


Students must remain home for 24 hours AFTER:      

their temperature returns to normal a physician has determined the results of a throat culture for strep their first dose of medication with a diagnosis of strep throat, to prevent the spread of infection vomiting has ended treatment for conjunctivitis is initiated being treated for head lice and must display reasonable improvement and must be checked by the nurse prior to re-entering the classroom

Illness in School In case of illness while in school, a student may report to the nurse’s office. The nurse will evaluate the student and, if appropriate, return the student to class. In the discretion of the nurse, a student may be permitted to rest in the nurse’s office for a period of time, but upon the nurse’s direction, the student must return to class immediately. Students who do not report back to class in a timely fashion after being directed to do so by the nurse will face disciplinary action. Leaving School because of Illness In addition, as a result of the nurse’s evaluation of the student, the school nurse may determine that a student must be dismissed from school due to illness or injury and the nurse will arrange with the parent/guardian for the student to be picked up from school. Student Medication The administration of medications at Tourtellotte Memorial High School shall be in accordance with Board of Education Policy JHCD “Administration of Student Medications in the Schools.” For students who must take medication during school hours -- including medication prescribed by a physician for short-term use (antibiotics), daily medication, medication needed only occasionally, over-the-counter medication, and medication for emergencies (epi-pens and inhalers) -- the parents/guardians must provide the school nurse with the written medication order of an authorized prescriber, the written authorization of the student's parent or guardian or the written authorization of the eligible student; and the written permission of a parent for the exchange of information between the prescriber and the school nurse necessary to ensure safe administration of such medication. The written order of the authorized prescriber must include:  The name, strength, and dosage of the prescribed medication  Directions for administering the medication  The time the medication is to be administered  The duration of the order  Side effects, if any The parent/guardian is responsible for delivering the medication to the school nurse. Do not send any medication to school with a student. The medication must be in its original container, clearly labeled with the student’s name, the physician’s name, the prescription number, the date it was ordered, the name of the medication, its strength, and directions for administering the prescription. Parents must notify the nurse concerning any changes in the prescribed dosage. Forms are available in the nurses’ office. A new form must be provided each school year for each medication. Students are not permitted to carry medication at any time while in school without approval of the school nurse. Under the following conditions, and as in accordance with Board Policy, students may carry and self-administer EpiPens® and inhalers if authorized to do so in writing by a physician and with the permission of their parents(s) guardian(s). The written authorization must be 39


maintained in the nurses’ office. The nurse cannot keep more than 45 days’ supply of medication at the school at any one time. The parent or a responsible adult must pick up unused medication within one week of completion, or it will be disposed of by the school nurse. Health Assessments Requirements for School Entry In accordance with Connecticut General Statues, Section 10-206, the Thompson Board of Education requires each student to have a “health assessment” within twelve (12) months prior to entry into the Thompson school system. The mandated health assessment MUST be performed by a legally qualified practitioner of medicine (M.D. or D.O.) who is licensed in this or another state or by a nurse practitioner or physician assistant licensed to practice in this state. The health assessment must be documented on the State Department of Education’s required HAR3 or “blue form” and must include, but is not limited to, the following:     

State-mandated immunizations Hemoglobin or hematocrit Blood pressure, height and weight Vision, auditorium, gross dental and postural screenings and Risk assessment for tuberculosis (by healthcare provider). If student is in a high-risk group, a Mantoux test for tuberculosis sensitivity must have been administered at least 48 hours before school entry, since it takes that long before the results can be determined.

All new students must present the completed and signed health assessment form, including documentation of state-mandated immunization, prior to school entry. Families who may require financial assistance in order to obtain a health assessment for their children should contact the school nurse. The sports health assessment for any student wanting to participate in a sport must be after July 1st of the current academic year in which the sport is played. If a parent or legal guardian (or student who is 18 years old or an emancipated minor) objects on religious grounds to either of the following: 1. The state-mandated health assessment; a signed statement to that effect must be submitted to the school nurse prior to school entry. 2. Immunizations; a properly acknowledged religious exemption form or letter in accordance with state law must be provided. If an immunization is contraindicated for medical reasons, a written statement from the physician, documenting the reason for such medical contraindication, must be submitted to the school nurse prior to school entry. The HAR-3 form is reviewed by the school nurse and filed in the student’s confidential school health record. If parents have questions or confidentiality concerns, please speak with the school nurse. Health Assessments - Screenings Tourtellotte has the full time service of a nurse during school hours. In addition to seeing all sick and injured students, the nurse administers tests for vision, hearing, and scoliosis. Parents will be notified when any deviation from the norm is found. Complete and confidential health records are maintained by the nurse for each student. Parents will also be notified if the nurse was unable to 40


perform the required screenings on their child, and will be informed of the reason why the nurse was not able to perform the screenings in a brief statement. Immunization Requirements In accordance with Connecticut General Statutes, Sec. 10-204a, all students must be protected by adequate immunization. Students must show compliance with the immunization requirements by documentation from a physician or local health agency before they may attend school. This rule applies to initial entry into school. Month, Day and Year must be recorded for each dose:       

 

DTP - Five (5) doses, Diphtheria, tetanus, Pertussis (whooping cough), unless the last dose was given after the fourth birthday, in which case four is adequate. POLIO - Four (4) doses unless the third dose was given after the fourth birthday, in which case three may be accepted. MEASLES - Two (2) doses, the first one given on or after the first birthday and a second dose prior to entering kindergarten. MUMPS - One (1) dose given on or after the first birthday. RUBELLA - One (1) dose given on or after the first birthday. HEMOPHILUS INFLUENZAE TYPE B (HIB) - One (1) dose given at fifteen months or older, but not required after age five. VARICELLA (Chicken Pox) - One (1) dose given on or after the student’s first birthday and before the thirteenth birthday, OR two (2) doses given at least 4 weeks apart if the first dose was given on or after the thirteenth birthday OR a signed statement from the student’s physician indicating that the student has already had Chicken Pox. All students born January 1, 1997 or later entering preschool or kindergarten and all students entering the 7th grade must show proof of immunization OR immunity to varicella. Proof of immunity is a signed statement from the student’s physician indicating that the student has had a confirmed case of Chicken Pox or confirmation by specific blood test conducted by a certified laboratory. HEPATITIS B - (HBV) - Three (3) doses, the first two doses given at least four weeks apart, followed by a third dose given four to six months after the initial dose. All students entering the 7th grade must show proof of at least one dose of Hepatitis B vaccine and all students entering the 8th grade must show proof of three doses of Hepatitis B vaccine. Meningococcal (Meningitis) - 1 dose in grades 7-11. TUBERCULOSIS TEST - A Mantoux test for sensitivity to tuberculosis is required prior to the entry into school of any student who is identified as “high risk” for possible exposure to tuberculosis. Determination of high risk must be made by the physician, advanced practice registered nurse, or physician assistant who performs the required health assessment for school entry, according to guidelines of the Connecticut State Department of Public Health. If the school medical advisor questions a low-risk determination, the medical advisor may require the student to have a Mantoux test prior to school entry.

SCHOOL COUNSELORS’ DEPARTMENT/CAREER CENTER The school counselors’ department assists students when they need and/or want help. The school counselors help students plan their programs, aid them in solving personal problems, and assist them in deciding upon the type of work they would be most suited for after high school. Here, students can get information about colleges, the military, scholarships, aptitude tests, and interest inventories. The career center also has information to help in planning the student’s future. Appointments are recommended to make sure a counselor is available. However, if a student has an immediate need, s/he must contact the school counseling office, and a counselor will see him or 41


her as soon as possible. To make an appointment, students should see the school counseling secretary before or after school or during the day with teacher permission. Teachers should call the school counseling secretary to see if a counselor is available before sending a student to the school counseling office. Students must have a pass from the classroom teacher when they come to school counseling office during the school day. Students are urged to visit the school counseling department often, whether to talk to a counselor or to make use of the reference materials that are available. QVCC PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM Tourtellotte Memorial High School and Quinebaug Valley Community College offer a partnership program to juniors and seniors who meet the criteria listed below. We encourage TMHS students to take advantage of this opportunity for college credit either in late afternoon or evening sessions at Quinebaug Valley Community College (QVCC). QVCC will agree to waive the tuition and fees for any high school student from Tourtellotte Memorial High School, providing the student meets the following criteria: The student must be in their junior or senior year of high school and have an 80 average. Students with special educational needs will be considered where it can be demonstrated that they have sufficient skills to anticipate success in the selected college course. The student must be recommended by the High School Partnership Program coordinator of Tourtellotte Memorial High School, in cooperation with the high school principal. OTHER OPERATING PARAMETERS INCLUDE:  Before the start of each semester, the Superintendent will identify, in writing to the college, a counselor, teacher, or administrator, to serve as the high school coordinator for the program. The Director of Admissions will serve as the college coordinator for the program.  The student’s tuition and fees will be waived by the college for a maximum of two courses per semester.  Regular admissions procedures will be required of the high school students, including participation in QVCC’s academic assessment program, which will help determine proper placement in college courses. Exception for assessment will be based on the recommendation of the high school principal and concurrence of the QVCC Admissions Office.  The courses for which tuition and fees are waived will be on-campus credit courses only, offered day and evening Monday through Friday, supported through the general fund. Courses must be ones in which space is available.  The costs of books and transportation shall not be borne by the college or the town.

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PART VI: CO-CURRICULAR INFORMATION In accordance with the philosophy of Tourtellotte Memorial High School, extra-curricular activities are considered to be an integral part of the educational experience of its students. A wide variety of well-organized programs have been developed to encourage participation in sports, clubs, and class functions. It is important for students to know that involvement in these extra-curricular activities is a privilege. Therefore, such participation is subject to the academic eligibility of the student. Additionally, the privilege of participating in extra-curricular activities may be revoked by the administration if a student violates school rules and regulations or any Board of Education Policy. All students attending any school function must be academically eligible and in attendance that day. For events which occur on Saturday, school attendance on the Friday before the event is expected and required. In order to be eligible for participation, a student must have a course load of at least six (6) credits during the regular school day. The student cannot fail more than one academic subject and must have at least one grade of 70% or better. Participation in the fall of the year will be determined by the final academic grade for the previous school year. For the purpose of eligibility, the day report cards are issued or ten (10) calendar days following the end of the previous marking period, whichever comes first, will be the day of eligibility determination. Scholastic failures cannot be made up for eligibility purposes until the next report card, except that credits earned during the summer which are accepted by the Thompson Board of Education will be utilized in determining eligibility. With the exception of students who have been ill for extended periods, incompletes must be made up within ten (10) school days following the end of the marking period. Incomplete grades are not to be considered passing grades. Moreover, eligibility for interscholastic athletics will be determined subject to additional regulations established by the Connecticut Interscholastic Athletic Conference (CIAC). ELIGIBILITY POLICY The eligibility policy of Tourtellotte Memorial High School will apply to all of the following:  Interscholastic Athletics o Including all student athletes, managers, scorekeepers, statisticians, etc.  Class Organizations o Elected and appointed officers, participants in committee activities, etc.  Voluntary Organizations and Clubs o Participants in Drama, Ski Club, Yearbook, TNT, Midnight Madness, etc.  Band and Chorus o All participants except those registered in the specific class as an academic course  Field Trips o All participants except those who are registered in the academic class taking the field trip when that field trip is an integral part of that course  Attendance at all Athletic Events and Dances-including all proms and senior dinner dances  Any other special activity sponsored by the school

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ACTIVITIES In addition to after school extra help, activities are available for student participation. These include: Diversity Club, Yearbook, Video Club, and Drama Club. This selection of activities is subject to change based on student suggestions/interest. All school rules apply during after school activities. ATHLETICS Listed below are the athletic teams that presently exist at the high school. All students are encouraged to participate in these sports as well as in other activities of the school. A mandatory pre-season meeting is held each season (fall, winter, spring) with the administration, coaches, parents, and players. This meeting will address policies, procedures, and expectations of the student athletes. In addition, tryout information will be presented by each of the coaches. Tryouts for the teams will be announced via the intercom and morning written announcement. Not being aware of the times is not a justifiable reason for missing the tryouts. FALL Boys’ Cross-Country Girls’ Cross-Country Football - Varsity, Fresh. J.V. (Co-op with Putnam and Ellis Tech) Girls’ Soccer - Varsity

WINTER Boys’ Basketball -Varsity, J.V. Girls’ Basketball - Varsity, J.V. Cheerleading Boys’ Baseball-Varsity

SPRING Boys’ Track Girls’ Track Golf Girls’ Softball -Varsity, J.V.

Please refer to the section entitled “ELIGIBILITY CO-CURRICULAR/ATHLETIC” for the minimum standards that must be met in order to take part in the above-mentioned activities. Spectators, as well as the athletes, must remember that at all athletic events, regardless of the site of the activity, they represent our school and must adhere to all of the school’s rules and regulations. While cheering for our teams is encouraged, taunting, belittling, or ridiculing our opponents is not acceptable and will not be tolerated. Individuals who demonstrate this unsportsmanlike conduct will be removed from the event. Student spectators must meet eligibility requirements to attend athletic events. A WARNING MAY BE GIVEN THE FIRST TIME A STUDENT PLAYING A SPORT IS LATE TO SCHOOL. THE SECOND TIME STUDENT/PLAYER WILL NOT PARTICIPATE IN HIS/HER SPORT ON THAT DAY.

CIAC: THE CONNECTICUT INTERSCHOLASTIC ATHLETIC CONFERENCE The love of sports is so deeply rooted in our national consciousness that the values of millions of people, participants and spectators, are directly conveyed by organized sports at all levels of competition. This places significant responsibility on those who influence sports-school administrators, coaches, athletes, officials-to assure that athletic competition helps build character and ethics of participants and spectators and to promote the value of education based athletics. The CIAC Sportsmanship Committee believes that athletic excellence and sportsmanship are achieved through respect, honor and fair play. To that end, the committee has developed the following set of standards for sportsmanship for all Connecticut high schools with the expectation that all schools will promote and implement these standards at their events. The effective implementation of these standards and the promotion of good sportsmanship is everyone’s responsibility! 44


Sportsmanship Standards  Be positive and courteous  Lead by example  Maintain self-control  Display ethical behavior  Know, understand, appreciate, and observe the rules of the game  Display modesty in winning and graciousness in defeat  Show respect for all Eastern Connecticut Conference Athletes  Demonstrate respect for your opponents, their fans and the game officials  Accept the responsibility and privilege the student-athlete has in representing your school  Work for the good of your team at all times  Win and lose graciously  Refrain from the use of illegal substances to gain an unfair advantage  Abide by all the rules of the game Parents/Fans  Help develop a community reputation for good sportsmanship  Show respect for all players, coaches, game officials and visiting team spectators  Be a positive role model for other spectators and your child  Cheer for your team and not against your opponent  Respect the judgment and strategy of the coach  Recognize and show appreciation for an outstanding play by either team DANCES Dances are limited to Tourtellotte students and guests who are at least 9th graders. A Tourtellotte student may bring one guest. A guest form will be available prior to the dance. Each student wishing to bring a guest must complete and submit the form five (5) school days prior to the day of the dance so that the administration and advisors will have enough time to screen all guests. Guests attending a school dance must meet the following guidelines:  Guests must at least be in 9th grade and be no older than 20 years of age, unless granted special permission by the administration.  Guests from other high schools must be in good standing and not, at the time of the dance, be under suspension. These guests must also receive a positive recommendation from his/her school administrator.  All guests must be prepared to present a driver’s license or other photo ID to enter a school dance. All school rules are in effect at all dances. This applies to guests as well as members of the student body. Even though dances may be held off school property, such events are school-sponsored and therefore students and their guests are subject to all school rules and all Board of Education policies and regulations. Students and their guests attending a school dance are subject to a breathalyzer test. 45


Students attending dances are expected to remain in the building once they have entered the dance. Students wishing to leave may do so; however, any student who leaves the dance will not be allowed to return. A student removed from a dance for disciplinary reasons will be dealt with pursuant to school rules and Board of Education policy and regulations. All sections of the building will be closed to students except the gym, refreshment area, and the guest lavatories. All participants must wear soft-soled footwear for the protection of the gym floor. This will be strictly enforced. Should the Junior/Senior Prom fall on a school night, the administration and faculty understand that students attending the dance may wish to be dismissed early. In an effort to respect this request and still ensure maximum instructional time, students attending the dance may be dismissed with parent permission following the completed “long period” class. Students with last lunch during “long period” may be dismissed in lieu of going to the cafeteria. This policy only applies to students that arrive to school on time. Students who are tardy on the day of Junior/Senior Prom are expected to stay for the full day. FIELD TRIPS Field trips are scheduled by teachers as a method of enhancing the curriculum for a particular course. While on field trips, students are responsible for adhering to all school rules and Board of Education policies and regulations. This includes full school attendance on the day of a field trip. When a trip is scheduled as a partial day trip, students are expected to arrive at school for the start of the student day (7:30 a.m.). This will ensure that proper attendance is taken. In addition, students are expected to be prepared for all classes they are required to attend on the day of a field trip. It is expected that other students will not interfere with students or chaperones attending a schoolsponsored field trip. “Interfere,” in this case, means that no student will be allowed to knowingly go to a place where a field trip is in progress and communicate, mingle, etc., with students in attendance on such a field trip. Violation of this handbook regulation will result in disciplinary action, including suspension, dependent on the degree of interference caused. Students who have academic/behavioral difficulty in other classes may be denied permission to attend a field trip. This is at the discretion of the administration and the teacher in charge of the field trip. Students who are unable to attend a field trip will be expected to be in attendance and participate in all regularly scheduled academic activities. Field Trip Permission forms are required for all students going on field trips.

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FUND RAISING All fund-raising programs must be approved in advance by the administration. If approved, the student must document the fund-raising date with the main office. The administration will make every effort to ensure that no more than two fundraisers run concurrently. Fund-raising activities that advisors anticipate will result in more than $5000 in revenue must have Board of Education approval. STUDENT GOVERNMENT STUDENT COUNCIL The Student Council at Tourtellotte Memorial High School allows students the opportunity to provide leadership to the entire student body. Student Council has four elected officers (President, Vice President, Secretary, and Treasurer) and elected representatives from every class. Student Council is an excellent training ground for future leaders of business, government, education, the military, or any organization. Over the course of the year, Student Council helps with assemblies, dances, blood drives, and a variety of other events that change from year to year. Student Council will meet on a regular basis as determined by the officers and advisor. Students who fail to meet their obligations will be removed from the council. This includes elected officers. CLASS OFFICERS Each class will elect class officers along with representatives towards the end of the school year. Freshman elections will be held during the month of September. These groups will meet periodically to conduct class business. Request for such meetings must be made to the administration by the class advisors. Please note: Roberts Rules of Order will prevail at all class or club meetings in the high school. A complete book of these rules is available from the administration. Multiple copies are in the library. It is the responsibility of each class advisor or officer to conduct all class business by these rules.

NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY The following criteria are considered for a student’s selection into the Tourtellotte Chapter of the National Honor Society:     

A student must be in grades 10 or 11 A student must have a cumulative, weighted grade point average of 90 or better A student must demonstrate leadership, service and character as defined by the National Association of Secondary School Principals A student is invited to complete an application Teachers are then asked to rate these students in areas of scholarship, leadership, service, and character

The National Honor Society Faculty Council then meets to review and assess information form, teacher ratings, and related comments. The council then makes nominations and votes on students to be inducted into the Honor Society. The student’s weighted grade point average must be maintained at 90% or above once accepted as a member.

47


The Faculty Council consists of five (5) voting members appointed annually by the principal. The chapter advisor is an ex-officio, non-voting sixth member of the faculty council. The council meets at least once a year to select members and to consider dismissal, non-selection, and warning cases. All determinations regarding induction and dismissal from the National Honor Society shall be conducted in accordance with the National Honor Society Constitution. Students elected to the NHS must maintain the Four Pillars of the National Honor Society: Scholarship, Leadership, Character, and Service to continue membership. Any student who is removed from the NHS for cause will have the membership designated deleted from their permanent academic record.

48


PART VII: ASSOCIATED BOARD POLICIES STUDENT ATTENDANCE, TRUANCY AND CHRONIC ABSENTEEISM Regular and punctual student attendance in school is essential to the educational process. Connecticut state law places responsibility for assuring that students attend school with the parent or other person having control of the child. To assist parents and other persons in meeting this responsibility, the Board of Education, through its Superintendent, will adopt and maintain procedures to implement this policy. In addition, the Board of Education takes seriously the issue of chronic absenteeism. To address this issue, the Board of Education, through its Superintendent, will adopt and maintain procedures regarding chronic absenteeism in accordance with state law. ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS REGARDING ATTENDANCE, TRUANCY AND CHRONIC ABSENTEEISM A. Definitions for Section I: 1. “Absence” - any day during which a student is not considered “in attendance” at his/her assigned school, or on a school sponsored activity (e.g. field trip), for at least one half of the school day. 2. “Disciplinary absence”- Any absence as a result of school or district disciplinary action. Any student serving an out-of-school suspension or expulsion should be considered absent. Such absence is not considered excused or unexcused for attendance and truancy purposes. 3. “Educational evaluation” - for purposes of this policy, an educational evaluation is an assessment of a student’s educational development, which, based upon the student’s presenting characteristics, would assess (as appropriate) the following areas: health, vision, hearing, social and emotional status, general intelligence, academic performance, communicative status and motor abilities. 4. “Excused absence” - a student is considered excused from school if the school has received written documentation describing the reason for the absence within ten (10) school days of the student’s return to school, or if the child has been excluded from school in accordance with section 10-210 of the Connecticut General Statutes (regarding communicable diseases), and the following criteria are met: a. Any absence before the student’s tenth (10th) absence, is considered excused when the student’s parent/guardian approves such absence and submits appropriate written documentation in accordance with this regulation. b. For the student’s tenth (10th)absence and all absences thereafter, a student’s absences from school are, with appropriate documentation in accordance with this regulation, considered excused only for the following reasons: 1) student illness (verified by an appropriately licensed medical professional); 2) religious holidays; 3) mandated court appearances (documentation required); 4) funeral or death in the family, or other emergency beyond the control of the student’s family; 5) extraordinary educational opportunities pre-approved by the district administrators and in accordance with Connecticut State Department of Education guidance; 6) lack of transportation that is normally provided by a district other than the one the student attends. c. A student, age five (5) to eighteen (18), whose parent or legal guardian is an active duty member of the armed forces who has been called for duty, is on leave from or has immediately returned from deployment to a combat zone or combat support posting, shall be granted ten (10) days of excused absences in any school year, and, 49


5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

in the discretion of the administration, additional excused absences, to visit such student’s parent or legal guardian with respect to the parent’s leave or deployment. In the case of such excused absences, the student and parent or legal guardian are responsible for obtaining assignments from the student’s teacher prior to any period of excused absence, and for ensuring that such assignments are completed by the student prior to his or her return to school. “In Attendance” - Any day during which a student is present at the student’s assigned school, or an activity sponsored by the school for at least half of the regular school day. “Student” - a student enrolled in the Thompson Public Schools “Truant” - any student five (5) to eighteen (18) years of age, inclusive, who has four (4) unexcused absences from school in any one month or ten (10) unexcused absences from school in any school year. “Unexcused absence” - any absence from a regularly scheduled school day for at least one half of the school day, which is not excused or considered a disciplinary absence The determination of whether an absence is excused will be made by the building principal or his/her designee. Parents or other persons having control of the child may appeal that decision to the Superintendent or his/her designee, whose decision shall be final.

B. Written Documentation Requirements for Absences 1. Written documentation must be submitted for each incidence of absence within ten (10) school days of the student’s return to school. Consecutive days of absence are considered one incidence of absence. 2. The first nine (9) days of absence will be excused upon receipt of a signed note from the student’s parent/guardian, a signed note from a school official that spoke in person with the parent/guardian regarding the absence, or a note confirming the absence by the school nurse or by a licensed medical professional, as appropriate. 3. For the student’s tenth (10th) absence, and all absences thereafter, documentation of the absence must be submitted in accordance with paragraphs 1 and 2 above, and must also include the reason for the absence and the following additional information: a. student illness: 1) a signed note from a medical professional, who may be the school nurse, who has evaluated the student confirming the absence and giving an expected return date; or 2) signed note from school nurse who has spoken with the student’s medical professional and confirmed the absence, including the date and location of the consultation b. religious holidays: none. c. mandated court appearances: 1) a police summons; 2) a subpoena; 3) a notice to appear; 4) a signed note from a court official; or 5) any other official, written documentation of the legal requirement to appear in court d. funeral or death in the family, or other emergency beyond the control of the student’s family: written document explaining the nature of the emergency. e. extraordinary educational opportunity pre-approved by the district administrators and in accordance with Connecticut State Department of Education guidance and this policy: written pre-approval from the administration, in accordance with this regulation. 50


4.

5. 6.

f. lack of transportation that is normally provided by a district other than the one the student attends: none. Neither e-mail nor text message shall serve to satisfy the requirement of written documentation. In rare and extraordinary circumstances, a building administrator may, in his/her own discretion, accept the delivery of written documentation through a scanned copy sent by e-mail. 5. The Thompson Public Schools reserves the right to randomly audit written documentation received, through telephone and other methods of communication, to determine its authenticity. 6. Any absence that is not documented in accordance with this regulation within ten (10) school days after the incidence of absence will be recorded as unexcused. If documentation is provided within ten (10) school days, but is incomplete, the building principal may, at his/her own discretion, grant up to a five (5) school day extension for provision of the completed documentation.

C. Extraordinary Educational Opportunities 1. To qualify as an extraordinary educational opportunity, the opportunity must:

2. 3.

4.

5. 6. 7.

a. be educational in nature and must have a learning objective related to the student’s course work or plan of study; b. be an opportunity not ordinarily available to the student; c. be grade and developmentally appropriate; and d. include content that is highly relevant to the student; while some opportunities will be relevant to all students, others will contain very specific content that would limit their relevance to a smaller group of students. Family vacations do not qualify as extraordinary educational opportunities All requests for approval of extraordinary educational opportunities must: a. be submitted to the building principal in writing prior to the opportunity, but no later than ten (10) school days prior to the opportunity except in exceptional circumstances at the discretion of the building administrator; b. contain the signatures of both the parent/guardian and the student; c. include an outline of the learning objective of the opportunity and include detail as to how the objective is linked to the student’s coursework or plan of study; d. and include additional documentation, where available, about the opportunity. The building principal shall provide a response in writing and include the following: a. either approval or denial of the request; b. brief reason for any denial; c. any requirements placed upon the student as a condition of approval; d. the specific days approved as excused absences for the opportunity; e. the understanding that the building administrator may withdraw its approval if the opportunity is canceled or the student fails to meet the agreed-upon requirements of the approval. All decisions of the building principal relating to extraordinary educational opportunities shall be final. Students who are granted excusal from school to participate in extraordinary educational opportunities are expected to share their experiences with other students and/or school staff when they return. Approval for an extraordinary educational opportunity is determined on a case-by-case basis and the analysis of individualized factors. An opportunity approved for one student may not be approved for another. 51


D. Truancy Exceptions: 1. A student five (5) or six (6) years of age shall not be considered truant if the parent or person having control over such student has appeared personally at the school district office and exercised the option of not sending the child to school at five (5) or six (6) years of age. 2. A student seventeen (17) years of age shall not be considered truant if the parent or person having control over such student consents to such student’s withdrawal from school. Such parent or person shall personally appear at the school district office and sign a withdrawal form indicating such consent. Such withdrawal form must include an attestation from a guidance counselor or school administrator from the school that the district provided the parent (or person having control of the child) with information on the educational options available in the school system and community. 3. If a parent or guardian of an expelled student chooses not to enroll the student in an alternative program, the student shall not be considered to be “truant.”

E. Readmission to School Following Voluntary Withdrawal 1. Except as noted in paragraph 2 below, if a student voluntarily withdraws from school (in accordance with Section D, above) and subsequently seeks readmission, the Board may deny school accommodations to the student for up to ninety (90) school days from the date of the student’s withdrawal from school. 2. If a student who has voluntarily withdrawn from school (in accordance with Section D, above) seeks readmission within ten (10) school days of his/her withdrawal, the Board shall provide school accommodations to the student not later than three (3) school days after the student requests readmission.

F. Determinations of Whether a Student is “In Attendance”: 1. A student serving an out of school suspension or expulsion shall be reported as absent unless he or she receives an alternative educational program for at least one half of the regular school day. In any event, the absence is considered a disciplinary absence, and will not be designated as excused or unexcused. 2. On early dismissal days and days shortened due to inclement weather, the regular school day for attendance purposes is considered to be the amount of instructional time offered to students on that day. For example, if school is open for four hours on a shortened day scheduled, a student must be present for a minimum of two hours in order to be considered “in attendance.” 3. Students placed on homebound instruction due to illness or injury in accordance with applicable regulations and requirements are counted as being “in attendance” for every day that they receive instruction from an appropriately certified teacher for an amount of time deemed adequate in accordance with applicable law.

G. Procedures for students in grades K-8* 1. Notification a. Annually at the beginning of the school year and upon the enrollment of any child during the school year, the administration shall notify the parent or other person having control of the student enrolled in grades K - 8 in writing of the obligations pursuant to Conn. Gen. Stat. §10-184 to ensure that such a student attends school regularly or to show that the child is elsewhere receiving equivalent instruction in the studies taught in the Thompson Public Schools. b.Annually at the beginning of the school year and upon the enrollment of any child during the school year, the administration shall obtain from the parent or other person having control of the student in grades K-8 a telephone number or other means of contacting such parent or other person during the school day. 52


2. Monitoring Each school shall implement a system of monitoring individual unexcused absences of students in grades K-8. Whenever such a student fails to report to school on a regularly scheduled school day, school personnel under the direction of the building principal or his/her designee shall make a reasonable effort to notify the parent or other person having control of such student by telephone and by mail of the student's absence, unless school personnel have received an indication that the parent or other person is aware of the student's absence. Reasonable efforts shall include two (2) attempts to reach the parent or other person at the telephone number provided by the parent or other person. Such attempts shall be recorded on a form provided by the Superintendent. Mailed notice of the student’s absence shall include a warning that two unexcused absences from school in a month or five unexcused absences in a school year may result in a complaint filed with the Superior Court pursuant to section 46b-149 of the Connecticut General Statutes alleging the belief that the acts or omissions of the child are such that the child's family is a family with service needs. Any person who, in good faith, gives or fails to give such notice shall be immune from liability, civil or criminal, which might otherwise be incurred or imposed and shall have the same immunity with respect to any judicial proceeding which results from such notice or failure to give notice.

H. Procedures applicable to students ages five (5) to eighteen (18) 1. Intervention a. When a student is truant, the building principal or his/her designee shall schedule a meeting with the parent (or other person having control of such student) and appropriate school personnel to review and evaluate the reasons for the student’s truancy. This meeting shall be held no later than ten (10) days after the student becomes truant. The district shall document the meeting, and if parent or other person declines to attend the meeting, or is otherwise is non responsive, that fact shall also be documented and the meeting shall proceed with school personnel in attendance. b.When a student is truant, the Superintendent or his/her designee shall coordinate services with and referrals of students to community agencies providing child and family services, as appropriate. The district shall document efforts to contact and include families and to provide early intervention in truancy matters c. If the parent or other person having control of a student who is truant fails to attend the meeting held pursuant to subsection a., above, or otherwise fails to cooperate with the school in attempting to solve the truancy problem, the Superintendent shall file, within fifteen (15) calendar days of such failure to attend the meeting or other failure to cooperate with the school in attempting to solve the truancy problem, for such truant a written complaint with the Superior Court pursuant to Conn. Gen. Stat. § 46b - 149 alleging the belief that the acts or omissions of the truant are such that his/her family is a family with service needs. d. In addition to the procedures specified in subsections a through c above, a regular education student who is experiencing attendance problems should be referred to the building Child Study Team to consider the need for additional interventions and/or assistance. The Team will also consider whether the student should be referred to a planning and placement team (“PPT”) meeting to review the student’s need and eligibility for special education. A special education student who is experiencing attendance problems should be referred to a PPT meeting for program review. 53


e. If a family with service needs petition is filed and the court orders an educational evaluation of the student, the district shall conduct an appropriate educational evaluation if no such evaluation has been performed within the preceding year. 1) For a regular education student, the educational evaluation will be conducted or arranged for by appropriate school personnel and coordinated through the Child Study Team. Upon completion of the evaluation of a regular education student, the Child Study Team shall review the evaluations and make appropriate recommendations for alternative procedures, programs or interventions. Such recommendations may include a referral of the student for further evaluation and/or consideration for special education eligibility. 2) In the case of a student who requires or may require special education and related services, the district shall convene a PPT to determine what evaluations may be appropriate to assess any specific areas of concern. The PPT shall reconvene to review the evaluations and make appropriate recommendations regarding the student’s need for special education services and the need, if any, to write and/or revise the student’s individualized education program (“IEP”).

I. Attendance Records All attendance records developed by the Board shall include the individual student’s state assigned student identifier (SASID). II.

Chronic Absenteeism A. Definitions for Section II 1. “Chronically absent child” - a child who is enrolled in a school under the jurisdiction of the Thompson Board of Education and whose total number of absences at any time during a school year is equal to or greater than ten percent (10%) of the total number of days that such student has been enrolled at such school during such school year; 2. “Absence” - (a) an excused absence, unexcused absence or disciplinary absence, as those terms are defined by the State Board of Education pursuant to section 10-198b of the general statutes and these administrative regulations, or (b) an in-school suspension, as defined in section 10-233a of the general statutes, that is greater than or equal to one-half of a school day; 3. “District chronic absenteeism rate” - the total number of chronically absent children under the jurisdiction of the Thompson Board of Education in the previous school year divided by the total number of children under the jurisdiction of the Board of Education for such school year; and 4. “School chronic absenteeism rate” - the total number of chronically absent children for a school in the previous school year divided by the total number of children enrolled in such school for such school year. B.

Establishment of Attendance Review Teams If the Thompson Board of Education has a district chronic absenteeism rate of ten percent (10%) or higher, it shall establish an attendance review team for the school district. If a school under the jurisdiction of the Thompson Board of Education has a school chronic absenteeism rate of fifteen percent (15%) or higher, it shall establish an attendance review team for that school. If the Thompson Board of Education has more than one school with a school chronic absenteeism rate of fifteen percent (15%) or higher, it shall establish an attendance review team for the school district or at each such school. 54


If the Thompson Board of Education has a district chronic absenteeism rate of ten percent (10%) or higher and one or more schools with a school chronic absenteeism rate of fifteen percent (15%) or higher, it shall establish an attendance review team for the school district or at each such school. C.

Composition and Role of Attendance Review Teams Any attendance review team established under these regulations may include school administrators, guidance counselors, school social workers, teachers, representatives from community-based programs who address issues related to student attendance by providing programs and services to truants, as defined under I.A.7, and chronically absent children and their parents or guardians. Each attendance review team shall be responsible for reviewing the cases of truants and chronically absent children, discussing school interventions and community referrals for such truants and chronically absent children and making any additional recommendations for such truants and chronically absent children and their parents or guardians. Each attendance review team shall meet at least monthly.

D.

III.

State Chronic Absenteeism Prevention and Intervention Plan The Thompson Board of Education and its attendance review teams, if any, will consider any chronic absenteeism prevention and intervention plan developed by the State Department of Education.

Reports to the State Regarding Truancy Data: Annually, each local and regional board of education shall include information regarding the number of truants and chronically absent children in the strategic school profile report for each school under its jurisdiction and for the school district as a whole submitted to the Commissioner of Education. Measures of truancy include the type of data that is required to be collected by the Department of Education regarding attendance and unexcused absences in order for the department to comply with federal reporting requirements and the actions taken by the board of education to reduce truancy in the school district.

J. Home-School Communications The key to regular attendance is good communication between parents/guardians and school personnel. Both the parents/guardians, who are ultimately responsible for regular attendance and the school, have certain responsibilities. It is the responsibility of parents/guardians or students age 18 or over to: 1. provide the school with a daytime telephone number where they can be reached; 2. make every effort to schedule personal appointments for their child after school hours; 3. plan vacations when school is not in session; 4. stress the importance of regular school attendance with their child; 5. in cases of long-term illness, notify the school as soon as possible so that provisions may be made for appropriate instruction It is the responsibility of Thompson Public Schools personnel to: 1. keep accurate attendance records; 2. obtain from parent/guardian a telephone number where s/he may be reached during the school day; 3. monitor all absences by making efforts to contact the parent/guardian by telephone on the 55


day of the unexcused absence;

4. provide the opportunity for the student to make up work. Specific guidelines for make-up work may be found in the student handbook of the schools;

5. provide a system of consequences and referral for excessive unexcused absences of the failure to notify the school of the reason for the absence or tardiness; 6. schedule a meeting with the parent/guardian of a child who is “truant� within ten (10) school days of the fourth (4th) unexcused absence in a month or the tenth (10th) unexcused absence in a school year for the purpose of reviewing and evaluating the reasons for the child being truant; 7. coordinate services with and referrals of children considered truant to community agencies.

K. Tardiness and Early Dismissal Tardiness will be treated in a manner similar to absences. A student arriving late to school must bring a note from his/her parent/guardian explaining the reason for the lateness. Disciplinary action will be taken if a note is not received by the school office. Early dismissals are not encouraged or condoned but reasons may parallel those given for absences. A note from the parent/guardian must be received in the school office prior to the time of the dismissal. A student will be picked up by the parent/guardian or other authorized adult in the appropriate school office (to ensure student safety). The parent/guardian is requested to sign his/her child out at the Thompson Public Schools. A student authorized to drive to school, and with a note from the parent, may be dismissed from the appropriate school office without an adult chaperone Date Revised: MAY 9, 2005 Date Revised: January 14, 2013 STUDENT DISCIPLINE - BOARD OF EDUCATION POLICY I. Definitions A. Dangerous Instrument means any instrument, article or substance which, under the circumstances in which it is used or attempted or threatened to be used, is capable of causing death or serious physical injury, and includes a "vehicle" or a dog that has been commanded to attack. B.

Deadly Weapon means any weapon, whether loaded or unloaded, from which a shot may be discharged, or a switchblade knife, gravity knife, billy, blackjack, bludgeon or metal knuckles. A weapon such as a pellet gun and/or air soft pistol may constitute a deadly weapon if such weapon is designed for violence and is capable of inflicting death or serious bodily harm. In making such determination, the following factors should be considered: design of weapon; how weapon is typically used (e.g. hunting); type of projectile; force and velocity of discharge; method of discharge (i.e. spring v. CO2 cartridge) and potential for serious bodily harm or death.

C.

Electronic Defense Weapon means a weapon which by electronic impulse or current is capable of immobilizing a person temporarily, but is not capable of inflicting death or serious physical injury, including a stun gun or other conductive energy device.

D.

Emergency means a situation in which the continued presence of the student in school poses such a danger to persons or property or such a disruption of the educational process that a hearing may be delayed until a time as soon after the exclusion of such student as possible.

E.

Exclusion means any denial of public school privileges to a student for disciplinary purposes. 56


F.

Expulsion means the exclusion of a student from school privileges for more than ten (10) consecutive school days and shall be deemed to include, but not be limited to, exclusion from the school to which such pupil was assigned at the time such disciplinary action was taken. The expulsion period may not extend beyond one (1) calendar year.

G.

Firearm, as defined in 18 U.S.C § 921, means (a) any weapon that will, is designed to, or may be readily converted to expel a projectile by the action of an explosive, (b) the frame or receiver of any such weapon, (c) a firearm muffler or silencer, or (d) any destructive device. The term firearm does not include an antique firearm. As used in this definition, a "destructive device" includes any explosive, incendiary, or poisonous gas device, including a bomb, a grenade, a rocket having a propellant charge of more than four ounces, a missile having an explosive or incendiary charge of more than one-quarter ounce, a mine, or any other similar device; or any weapon (other than a shotgun or shotgun shell particularly suited for sporting purposes) that will, or may be readily converted to, expel a projectile by explosive or other propellant, and which has a barrel with a bore of more than ½" in diameter. The term "destructive device" also includes any combination of parts either designed or intended for use in converting any device into any destructive device or any device from which a destructive device may be readily assembled. A “destructive device” does not include: an antique firearm; a rifle intended to be used by the owner solely for sporting, recreational, or cultural purposes; or any device which is neither designed nor redesigned for use as a weapon.

H.

In-School Suspension means an exclusion from regular classroom activity for no more than ten (10) consecutive school days, but not exclusion from school, provided such exclusion shall not extend beyond the end of the school year in which such in-school suspension was imposed. No student shall be placed on in-school suspension more than fifteen (15) times or a total of fifty (50) days in one (1) school year, whichever results in fewer days of exclusion.

I.

Martial Arts Weapon means a nunchaku, kama, kasari-fundo, octagon sai, tonfa or Chinese star.

J.

Removal is the exclusion of a student from a classroom for all or part of a single class period, provided such exclusion shall not extend beyond ninety (90) minutes.

K.

School Days shall mean days when school is in session for students.

L.

School-Sponsored Activity means any activity sponsored, recognized or authorized by the Board and includes activities conducted on or off school property.

M.

Seriously Disruptive of the Educational Process, as applied to off-campus conduct, means any conduct that markedly interrupts or severely impedes the day-to-day operation of a school.

N.

Suspension means the exclusion of a student from school and/or transportation services for not more than ten (10) consecutive school days, provided such suspension shall not extend beyond the end of the school year in which such suspension is imposed; and further provided no student shall be suspended more than ten (10) times or a total of fifty (50) days in one school year, whichever results in fewer days of exclusion, unless such student is granted a formal hearing as provided below.

O.

Weapon means any BB gun, any blackjack, any metal or brass knuckles, any police baton or nightstick, any dirk knife or switch knife, any knife having an automatic spring release devise by which a blade is released from the handle, having a blade of over one and one-half inches in length, any stiletto, any knife the edged portion of the blade of which is four inches and over in length, any martial arts weapon or electronic defense weapon, or any other 57


dangerous or deadly weapon or instrument, unless permitted by law under section 29-38 of the Connecticut General Statutes. P.

II.

Notwithstanding the foregoing definitions, the reassignment of a student from one regular education classroom program in the district to another regular education classroom program in the district shall not constitute a suspension or expulsion.

Scope of the Student Discipline Policy A.

Conduct on School Grounds or at a School-Sponsored Activity: Students may be disciplined for conduct on school grounds or at any schoolsponsored activity that endangers persons or property, is seriously disruptive of the educational process, or that violates a publicized policy of the Board.

B.

Conduct off School Grounds: 1.

Students may be disciplined for conduct off school grounds if such conduct is seriously disruptive of the educational process and in violation of a publicized policy of the Board. In making a determination as to whether such conduct is seriously disruptive of the educational process, the administration and the Board of Education may consider, but such consideration shall not be limited to, the following factors: (1) whether the incident occurred within close proximity of a school; (2) whether other students from the school were involved or whether there was any gang involvement; (3) whether the conduct involved violence, threats of violence, or the unlawful use of a weapon, as defined in section Conn. Gen. Stat. ยง 29-38, and whether any injuries occurred; and (4) whether the conduct involved the use of alcohol. In making a determination as to whether such conduct is seriously disruptive of the educational process, the administration and/or the Board of Education may also consider whether such off-campus conduct involved the illegal use of drugs.

III.

Actions Leading to Disciplinary Action, including Removal from Class, Suspension and/or Expulsion Conduct which may lead to disciplinary action (including, but not limited to, removal from class, suspension and/or expulsion in accordance with this policy) includes conduct on school grounds or at a school-sponsored activity (including on a school bus), and conduct off school grounds, as set forth above. Such conduct includes, but is not limited to, the following: 1.

Striking or assaulting a student, members of the school staff or other persons.

2.

Theft.

3.

The use of obscene or profane language or gestures, the possession and/or display of obscenity or pornographic images or the unauthorized or inappropriate possession and/or display of images, pictures or photographs depicting nudity.

4.

Violation of smoking, dress, transportation regulations, or other regulations and/or policies governing student conduct.

5.

Refusal to obey a member of the school staff, law enforcement authorities, or school volunteers, or disruptive classroom behavior.

6.

Any act of harassment based on an individual's sex, sexual orientation, race, color, religion, disability, national origin, ancestry, gender identity or expression or any other characteristic protected by law.

58


7.

Refusal by a student to identify himself/herself to a staff member when asked, misidentification of oneself to such person(s), lying to school officials or otherwise engaging in dishonest behavior.

8.

Inappropriate displays of public affection of a sexual nature and/or sexual activity on school grounds or at a school-sponsored activity.

9.

A walk-out from or sit-in within a classroom or school building or school grounds.

10.

Blackmailing, threatening or intimidating school staff or students (or acting in a manner that could be construed to constitute blackmail, a threat, or intimidation, regardless of whether intended as a joke).

11.

Possession of any weapon, weapon facsimile, deadly weapon, martial arts weapon, electronic defense weapon, pistol, knife, blackjack, bludgeon, box cutter, metal knuckles, pellet gun, air pistol, explosive device, firearm, whether loaded or unloaded, whether functional or not, or any other dangerous object or instrument. The possession and/or use of any object or device that has been converted or modified for use as a weapon.

12.

Possession of any ammunition for any weapon described above in paragraph 11.

13.

Unauthorized entrance into any school facility or portion of a school facility or aiding or abetting an unauthorized entrance.

14.

Possession or ignition of any fireworks, combustible or other explosive materials, or ignition of any material causing a fire. Possession of any materials designed to be used in the ignition of combustible materials, including matches and lighters.

15.

Unlawful possession, sale, distribution, use, or consumption of tobacco, electronic nicotine delivery systems (e.g. e-cigarettes), vapor products, drugs, narcotics or alcoholic beverages (or any facsimile of tobacco, drugs, narcotics or alcoholic beverages, or any item represented to be tobacco, drugs or alcoholic beverages), including being under the influence of any such substances or aiding in the procurement of any such substances. For the purposes of this Paragraph 15, the term “electronic nicotine delivery system” shall mean an electronic device that may be used to simulate smoking in the delivery of nicotine or other substance to a person inhaling from the device and includes, but is not limited to, an electronic cigarette, electronic cigar, electronic cigarillo, electronic pipe or electronic hookah and any related device and any cartridge or other component of such device. For the purposes of Paragraph 15, the term “vapor product” shall mean any product that employs a heating element, power source, electronic circuit or other electronic, chemical or mechanical means, regardless of shape or size, to produce a vapor that may or may not include nicotine, that is inahled by the user of such product. For the purposes of this Paragraph 15, the term "drugs" shall include, but shall not be limited to, any medicinal preparation (prescription and non-prescription) and any controlled substance whose possession, sale, distribution, use or consumption is illegal under state and/or federal law.

16.

Sale, distribution, or consumption of substances contained in household items; including, but not limited to glue, paint, accelerants/propellants for aerosol canisters, and/or items such as the aerators for whipped cream; if sold, distributed or consumed for the purpose of inducing a stimulant, depressant, hallucinogenic or mind-altering effect. 59


17.

Unlawful possession of paraphernalia used or designed to be used in the consumption, sale or distribution of drugs, alcohol or tobacco, as described in subparagraph (15) above. For purposes of this policy, drug paraphernalia includes any equipment, products and materials of any kind which are used, intended for use or designed for use in growing, harvesting, manufacturing, producing, preparing, packaging, storing, containing or concealing, or injecting, ingesting, inhaling or otherwise introducing controlled drugs or controlled substances into the human body, including but not limited to items such as "bongs," pipes, "roach clips," vials, tobacco rolling papers, and any object or container used, intended or designed for use in storing, concealing, possessing, distributing or selling controlled drugs or controlled substances.

18.

The destruction of real, personal or school property, such as, cutting, defacing or otherwise damaging property in any way.

19.

Accumulation of offenses such as school and class tardiness, class or study hall cutting, or failure to attend detention.

20.

Trespassing on school grounds while on out-of-school suspension or expulsion.

21.

Making false bomb threats or other threats to the safety of students, staff members, and/or other persons.

22.

Defiance of school rules and the valid authority of teachers, supervisors, administrators, other staff members and/or law enforcement authorities.

23.

Throwing snowballs, rocks, sticks and/or similar objects, except as specifically authorized by school staff.

24.

Unauthorized and/or reckless and/or improper operation of a motor vehicle on school grounds or at any school-sponsored activity.

25.

Leaving school grounds, school transportation or a school-sponsored activity without authorization.

26.

Use of or copying of the academic work of another individual and presenting it as the student's own work, without proper attribution; or any other form of academic dishonesty, cheating or plagiarism.

27.

Possession and/or use of a cellular telephone, radio, portable audio player, CD player, blackberry, personal data assistant, walkie talkie, Smartphone, mobile or handheld device, or similar electronic device, on school grounds or at a school-sponsored activity in violation of Board policy and/or administrative regulations regulating the use of such devices.

28.

Possession and/or use of a beeper or paging device on school grounds or at a schoolsponsored activity without the written permission of the principal or his/her designee.

29.

Unauthorized use of or tampering with any school computer, computer system, computer software, Internet connection or similar school property or system, or the use of such property or system for inappropriate purposes.

30.

Possession and/or use of a laser pointer, unless the student possesses the laser pointer temporarily for an educational purpose while under the direct supervision of a responsible adult.

31.

Hazing. 60


32.

Bullying, defined as the repeated use by one or more students of a written, oral or electronic communication, such as cyberbullying, directed at another student attending school in the same district, or a physical act or gesture by one or more students repeatedly directed at another student attending school in the same school district, which: a) b) c) d) e)

causes physical or emotional harm to such student or damage to such student’s property; places such student in reasonable fear of harm to himself or herself, or of damage to his or her property; creates a hostile environment at school for such student; infringes on the rights of such student at school; or substantially disrupts the education process or the orderly operation of a school.

Bullying includes, but is not limited to, repeated written, oral or electronic communications or physical acts or gestures based on any actual or perceived differentiating characteristics, such as race, color, religion, ancestry, national origin, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, socioeconomic status, academic status, physical appearance, or mental, physical, developmental or sensory disability, or by association with an individual or group who has or is perceived to have one or more of such characteristics. 33.

Cyberbullying, defined as any act of bullying through the use of the Internet, interactive and digital technologies, cellular mobile telephone or other mobile electronic devices or any electronic communications.

34.

Acting in any manner that creates a health and/or safety hazard for staff members, students, or the public, regardless of whether the conduct is intended as a joke.

35.

Engaging in a plan to stage or create a violent situation for the purposes of recording it by electronic means; or recording by electronic means acts of violence for purposes of later publication.

36.

Engaging in a plan to stage sexual activity for the purposes of recording it by electronic means; or recording by electronic means sexual acts for purposes of later publication.

37.

Using computer systems, including email, instant messaging, text messaging, blogging or the use of social networking websites, or other forms of electronic communications, to engage in any conduct prohibited by this policy.

38.

Use of a privately owned electronic or technological device in violation of school rules, including the unauthorized recording (photographic or audio) of another individual without permission of the individual or a school staff member.

39.

Engaging in teen dating violence, defined as any act of physical, emotional or sexual abuse, including stalking, harassing and threatening, that occurs between two students who are currently in or who have recently been in a dating relationship

40.

Any action prohibited by any Federal or State law.

41.

Any other violation of school rules or regulations or a series of violations which makes the presence of the student in school seriously disruptive of the educational process and/or a danger to persons or property.

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IV.

Discretionary and Mandatory Expulsions A.

A principal may consider recommendation of expulsion of a student in grades three to twelve, inclusive, in a case where he/she has reason to believe the student has engaged in conduct described at sections II.A. and II.B. above.

B.

A principal must recommend expulsion proceedings in all cases against any student in grades kindergarten to twelve, inclusive, whom the administration has reason to believe: 1.

was in possession on school grounds or at a school-sponsored activity of a deadly weapon, dangerous instrument, martial arts weapon, or firearm as defined in 18 U.S.C. § 921 as amended from time to time; or

2.

off school grounds, possessed a firearm as defined in 18 U.S.C. § 921, in violation of Conn. Gen. Stat. § 29-35, or possessed and used a firearm as defined in 18 U.S.C. § 921, a deadly weapon, a dangerous instrument or a martial arts weapon in the commission of a crime under chapter 952 of the Connecticut General Statutes; or

3.

was engaged on or off school grounds in offering for sale or distribution a controlled substance (as defined in Conn. Gen. Stat. § 21a-240(9)), whose manufacturing, distribution, sale, prescription, dispensing, transporting, or possessing with intent to sell or dispense, offering or administering is subject to criminal penalties under Conn. Gen. Stat. §§21a-277 and 21a-278. The terms “dangerous instrument,” “deadly weapon,” electronic defense weapon,” “firearm,” and “martial arts weapon,” are defined above in Section I.

C.

In any preschool program provided by the Board of Education or provided by a regional educational service center or a state or local charter school pursuant to an agreement with the Board of Education, no student enrolled in such a preschool program shall be expelled from such preschool program, except an expulsion hearing shall be conducted by the Board of Education in accordance with Section VIII of this policy whenever the administration has reason to believe that that a student enrolled in such preschool program was in possession of a firearm as defined in 18 U.S.C. § 921, as amended from time to time, on or off school grounds or at a preschool program-sponsored event. The term “firearm” is defined above in Section I.

D.

Upon receipt of an expulsion recommendation, the Superintendent may conduct an inquiry concerning the expulsion recommendation. If the Superintendent or his/her designee determines that a student should or must be expelled, he or she shall forward his/her recommendation to the Board of Education so that the Board can consider and act upon this recommendation.

E.

In keeping with Conn. Gen. Stat. § 10-233d and the Gun-Free Schools Act, it shall be the policy of the Board to expel a student in grades kindergarten to twelve, inclusive, for one (1) full calendar year for: the conduct described in Section IV(B)(1), (2) and (3) of this policy and to expel a student enrolled in a preschool program for one (1) calendar year for the conduct described in Section IV(C). For any mandatory expulsion offense, the Board may modify the term of expulsion on a case-by-case basis.

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V.

VI.

Procedures Governing Removal from Class A. A student may be removed from class by a teacher or administrator if he/she deliberately causes a serious disruption of the educational process. When a student is removed, the teacher must send him/her to a designated area and notify the principal or his/her designee at once. B.

A student may not be removed from class more than six (6) times in one school year nor more than twice in one week unless the student is referred to the building principal or designee and granted an informal hearing at which the student should be informed of the reasons for the disciplinary action and given an opportunity to explain the situation.

C.

The parents or guardian of any minor student removed from class shall be given notice of such disciplinary action within twenty-four (24) hours of the time of the institution of such removal from class.

Procedures Governing Suspension A. The principal of a school, or designee on the administrative staff of the school, shall have the right to suspend a student for breach of conduct as noted in Section II of this policy for not more than ten (10) consecutive school days. In cases where suspension is contemplated, the following procedures shall be followed. 1.

Unless an emergency situation exists, no student shall be suspended prior to having an informal hearing before the principal or designee at which the student is informed of the charges and given an opportunity to respond. In the event of an emergency, the informal hearing shall be held as soon after the suspension as possible.

2.

If suspended, such suspension shall be an in-school suspension, except the principal or designee may impose an out-of-school suspension on any pupil:

a.

in grades three to twelve, inclusive, if during the informal hearing, (i) the principal or designee determines that the studentposes such a danger to persons or property or such a disruption of the educational process that he or should be excluded from school during the period of suspension; or (ii) the principal or designee determines that an out-of-school suspension is appropriate based on evidence of (A) the student’s previous disciplinary problems that have led to suspensions or expulsion of such student, and (B) previous efforts by the administration to address the student’s disciplinary problems through means other than out-of-school suspension or expulsion, including positive behavioral support strategies, or

b.

in grades preschool to two, inclusive, if the principal or designee determiens that an out-of-school suspension is appropriate for such pupil based on evidence that such pupil’s conduct on school grounds is of a violent or sexual nature that endangers persons.

3.

Evidence of past disciplinary problems that have led to removal from a classroom, suspension, or expulsion of a student who is the subject of an informal hearing may be received by the principal or designee, but only considered in the determination of the length of suspensions.

4.

By telephone, the principal or designee shall make reasonable attempts to immediately notify the parent or guardian of a minor student following the suspension and to state the cause(s) leading to the suspension. 63


B.

5.

Whether or not telephone contact is made with the parent or guardian of such minor student, the principal or designee shall forward a letter promptly to such parent or guardian to the last address reported on school records (or to a newer address if known by the principal or designee), offering the parent or guardian an opportunity for a conference to discuss same.

6.

In all cases, the parent or guardian of any minor student who has been suspended shall be given notice of such suspension within twenty-four (24) hours of the time of the institution of the suspension.

7.

Not later than twenty-four (24) hours after the commencement of the suspension, the principal or designee shall also notify the Superintendent or his/her designee of the name of the student being suspended and the reason for the suspension.

8.

The student shall be allowed to complete any classwork, including examinations, without penalty, which he or she missed while under suspension.

9.

The school administration may, in its discretion, shorten or waive the suspension period for a student who has not previously been suspended or expelled, if the student completes an administration-specified program and meets any other conditions required by the administration. Such administration-specified program shall not require the student and/or the student’s parents to pay for participation in the program.

10.

Notice of the suspension shall be recorded in the student's cumulative educational record. Such notice shall be expunged from the cumulative educational record if the student graduates from high school. In cases where the student’s period of suspension is shortened or waived in accordance with Section VI.A(9), above, the administration may choose to expunge the suspension notice from the cumulative record at the time the student completes the administration-specified program and meets any other conditions required by the administration.

11.

If the student has not previously been suspended or expelled, and the administration chooses to expunge the suspension notice from the student’s cumulative record prior to graduation, the administration may refer to the existence of the expunged disciplinary notice, notwithstanding the fact that such notice may have been expunged from the student’s cumulative file, for the limited purpose of determining whether any subsequent suspensions or expulsions by the student would constitute the student’s first such offense.

12.

The decision of the principal or designee with regard to disciplinary actions up to and including suspensions shall be final.

13.

During any period of suspension served out of school, the student shall not be permitted to be on school property and shall not be permitted to attend or participate in any school-sponsored activities, unless the principal specifically authorizes the student to enter school property for a specified purpose or to participate in a particular school-sponsored activity.

In cases where a student’s suspension will result in the student being suspended more than ten (10) times or for a total of fifty (50) days in a school year, whichever results in fewer days of exclusion, the student shall, prior to the pending suspension, be granted a formal hearing before the Board of Education. The principal or designee shall report the student to the Superintendent or designee and request a formal Board hearing. If an emergency situation exists, such hearing shall be held as soon after the suspension as possible. 64


VII.

VIII.

Procedures Governing In-School Suspension A.

The principal or designee may impose in-school suspension in cases where a student's conduct endangers persons or property, violates school policy, seriously disrupts the educational process or in other appropriate circumstances as determined by the principal or designee.

B.

In-school suspension may not be imposed on a student without an informal hearing by the building principal or designee.

C.

In-school suspension may be served in the school that the student regularly attends or in any other school building within the jurisdiction of the Board.

D.

No student shall be placed on in-school suspension more than fifteen (15) times or for a total of fifty (50) days in one school year, whichever results in fewer days of exclusion.

E.

The parents or guardian of any minor student placed on in-school suspension shall be given notice of such suspension within twenty-four (24) hours of the time of the institution of the period of the in-school suspension.

Procedures Governing Expulsion Hearing A.

Emergency Exception: Except in an emergency situation, the Board of Education shall, prior to expelling any student, conduct a hearing to be governed by the procedures outlined herein and consistent with the requirements of Conn. Gen. Stat. § 10-233d and Public Act 15-96, and the applicable provisions of the Uniform Administrative Procedures Act, Conn. Gen. Stat. §§ 4-176e to 4180a, and § 4-181a. Whenever an emergency exists, the hearing provided for herein shall be held as soon as possible after the expulsion.

B.

C.

Hearing Panel: 1.

Expulsion hearings conducted by the Board will be heard by any three or more Board members. A decision to expel a student must be supported by a majority of the Board members present, provided that no less than three (3) affirmative votes to expel are cast.

2.

Alternatively, the Board may appoint an impartial hearing board composed of one (1) or more persons to hear and decide the expulsion matter, provided that no member of the Board may serve on such panel.

Hearing Notice: 1.

Written notice of the expulsion hearing must be given to the student, and, if the student is a minor, to his/her parent(s) or guardian(s) within a reasonable time prior to the time of the hearing.

2.

A copy of this Board policy on student discipline shall also be given to the student, and if the student is a minor, to his/her parent(s) or guardian(s), at the time the notice is sent that an expulsion hearing will be convened.

3.

The written notice of the expulsion hearing shall inform the student of the following: a. The date, time, place and nature of the hearing. b. The legal authority and jurisdiction under which the hearing is to be held, including a reference to the particular sections of the legal statutes involved. 65


c. A short, plain description of the conduct alleged by the administration. d. The student may present as evidence relevant testimony and documents concerning the conduct alleged and the appropriate length and conditions of expulsion; and that the expulsion hearing may be the student’s sole opportunity to present such evidence. e. The student may cross-examine witnesses called by the administration. f.

The student may be represented by any third party of his/her choice, including an attorney, at his/her expense or at the expense of his/her parents. g. A student is entitled to the services of a translator or interpreter, to be provided by the Board of Education, whenever the student or his/her parent(s) or guardian(s) requires the services of an interpreter because he/she/they do(es) not speak the English language or is(are) disabled. h. The conditions under which the Board is not legally required to give the student an alternative educational opportunity (if applicable). i. Information about free or reduced-rate legal services and how to access such services. D.

Hearing Procedures: 1.

The hearing will be conducted by the Presiding Officer, who will call the meeting to order, introduce the parties, Board members and counsel, briefly explain the hearing procedures, and swear in any witnesses called by the administration or the student.

2.

The hearing will be conducted in executive session. A verbatim record of the hearing will be made, either by tape recording or by a stenographer. A record of the hearing will be maintained, including the verbatim record, all written notices and documents relating to the case and all evidence received or considered at hearing.

3.

Formal rules of evidence will not be followed. The Board has the right to accept hearsay and other evidence if it deems that evidence relevant or material to its determination. The Presiding Officer will rule on testimony or evidence as to it being immaterial or irrelevant.

4.

The hearing will be conducted in two (2) parts. In the first part of the hearing, the Board will receive and consider evidence regarding the conduct alleged by the administration.

5.

In the first part of the hearing, the charges will be introduced into the record by the Superintendent or his/her designee.

6.

Each witness for the administration will be called and sworn. After a witness has finished testifying, he/she will be subject to cross-examination by the opposite party or his/her legal counsel, by the Presiding Officer and by Board members.

7.

After the administration has presented its case, the student will be asked if he/she has any witnesses or evidence to present concerning the charges. If so, the witnesses will be sworn, will testify, and will be subject to cross examination and to questioning by the Presiding Officer and/or by the Board. The student may also choose to make a statement at this time. If the student chooses to make a statement, he or she will be sworn and subject to cross examination and questioning by the Presiding Officer and/or by the Board. Concluding statements will be made by the administration and then by the student and/or his or her representative.

66


E.

8.

In cases where the student has denied the allegation, the Board must determine whether the student committed the offense(s) as charged by the Superintendent.

9.

If the Board determines that the student has committed the conduct as alleged, then the Board shall proceed with the second portion of the hearing, during which the Board will receive and consider relevant evidence regarding the length and conditions of expulsion.

10.

When considering the length and conditions of expulsion, the Board may review the student’s attendance, academic and past disciplinary records. The Board may not review notices of prior expulsions or suspensions which have been expunged from the student’s cumulative record, except as so provided in Section VI.A (9), (10), (11), above, and Section X, below. The Board may ask the Superintendent for a recommendation as to the discipline to be imposed.

11.

Evidence of past disciplinary problems which have led to removal from a classroom, suspension or expulsion of a student being considered for expulsion may be considered only during the second portion of the hearing, during which the Board is considering length of expulsion and nature of alternative educational opportunity to be offered.

12.

Where administrators presented the case in support of the charges against the student, such administrative staff shall not be present during the deliberations of the Board either on questions of evidence or on the final discipline to be imposed. The Superintendent may, after reviewing the incident with administrators, and reviewing the student’s records, make a recommendation to the Board as to the appropriate discipline to be applied.

13.

The Board shall make findings as to the truth of the charges, if the student has denied them; and, in all cases, the disciplinary action, if any, to be imposed. While the hearing itself is conducted in executive session, the vote regarding expulsion must be made in open session and in a manner that preserves the confidentiality of the student’s name and other personally identifiable information.

14.

Except for a student who has been expelled based on possession of a firearm or deadly weapon as described in subsection IV.B (1) and (2) above, the Board may, in its discretion, shorten or waive the expulsion period for a student who has not previously been suspended or expelled, if the student completes a Board-specified program and meets any other conditions required by the Board. The Board-specified program shall not require the student and/or the student’s parents to pay for participation in the program.

15.

The Board shall report its final decision in writing to the student, or if such student is a minor, also to the parent(s) or guardian(s), stating the reasons on which the decision is based, and the disciplinary action to be imposed. Said decision shall be based solely on evidence presented at the hearing. The parents or guardian or any minor student who has been expelled shall be given notice of such disciplinary action within twenty-four (24) hours of the time of the institution of the period of the expulsion.

Presence on School Grounds and Participation in School-Sponsored Activities During Expulsion: During the period of expulsion, the student shall not be permitted to be on school property and shall not be permitted to attend or participate in any school-sponsored activities, except 67


for the student’s participation in any alternative educational program provided by the district in accordance with this policy, unless the Superintendent specifically authorizes the student to enter school property for a specified purpose or to participate in a particular schoolsponsored activity. F.

Stipulated Agreements: In lieu of the procedures used in this section, the administration and the parents (or legal guardians) of a student facing expulsion may choose to enter into a Joint Stipulation of the Facts and a Joint Recommendation to the Board concerning the length and conditions of expulsion. Such Joint Stipulation and Recommendation shall include language indicating that the parents (or legal guardians) understand their right to have an expulsion hearing held pursuant to these procedures, and language indicating that the Board, in its discretion, has the right to accept or reject the Joint Stipulation of Facts and Recommendation. If the Board rejects either the Joint Stipulation of Facts or the Recommendation, an expulsion hearing shall be held pursuant to the procedures outlined herein. If the Student is eighteen years of age or older, the student shall have the authority to enter into a Joint Stipulation and Recommendation on his or her own behalf. If the parties agree on the facts, but not on the disciplinary recommendation, the administration and the parents (or legal guardians) of a student facing expulsion may also choose to enter into a Joint Stipulation of the Facts and submit only the Stipulation of the Facts to the Board in lieu of holding the first part of the hearing, as described above. Such Joint Stipulation shall include language indicating that the parents understand their right to have a hearing to determine whether the student engaged in the alleged misconduct and that the Board, in its discretion, has the right to accept or reject the Joint Stipulation of Facts. If the Board rejects the Joint Stipulation of Facts, a full expulsion hearing shall be held pursuant to the procedures outlined herein.

IX.

Alternative Educational Opportunities for Expelled Students A.

Students under sixteen (16) years of age: Whenever the Board of Education expels a student under sixteen (16) years of age, it shall offer any such student an alternative educational opportunity.

B.

Students sixteen (16) to eighteen (18) years of age: 1.

The Board of Education shall provide an alternative educational opportunity to a sixteen (16) to eighteen (18) year old student expelled for the first time if he/she requests it and if he/she agrees to the conditions set by the Board of Education. Such alternative educational opportunity may include, but shall not be limited to, the placement of a pupil who is at least sixteen years of age in an adult education program. Any pupil participating in an adult education program during a period of expulsion shall not be required to withdraw from school as a condition to his/her participation in the adult education program.

2.

The Board of Education is not required to offer an alternative educational opportunity to any student between the ages of sixteen (16) and eighteen (18) who is expelled for the second time, or if it is determined at the hearing that (1) the student possessed a dangerous instrument, deadly weapon, firearm or martial arts weapon on school property or at a school-sponsored activity, or (2) the student offered a controlled substance for sale or distribution on school property or at a schoolsponsored activity. 68


3.

C.

The Board of Education shall count the expulsion of a pupil when he/she was under sixteen years of age for purposes of determining whether an alternative educational opportunity is required for such pupil when he/she is between the ages of sixteen and eighteen.

Students eighteen (18) years of age or older: The Board of Education is not required to offer an alternative educational opportunity to expelled students eighteen (18) years of age or older.

D.

Students identified as eligible for services under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (“IDEA”): Notwithstanding Sections IX.A. through C. above, if the Board of Education expels a student who has been identified as eligible for services under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (“IDEA”), it shall offer an alternative educational opportunity to such student in accordance with the requirements of IDEA, as it may be amended from time to time.

E.

Students for whom an alternative educational opportunity is not required: The Board of Education may offer an alternative educational opportunity to a pupil for whom such alternative educational opportunity is not required as described in this policy.

X.

Notice of Student Expulsion on Cumulative Record Notice of expulsion and the conduct for which the student was expelled shall be included on the student’s cumulative educational record. Such notice, except for notice of an expulsion of a student in grades nine through twelve, inclusive, based upon possession of a firearm or deadly weapon, shall be expunged from the cumulative educational record by the Board if the student graduates from high school. In cases where the student’s period of expulsion is shortened or waived in accordance with Section VIII.D (14), above, the Board may choose to expunge the expulsion notice from the cumulative record at the time the student completes the Board-specified program and meets any other conditions required by the Board. If a student’s period of expulsion was not shortened or waived, the Board may choose to expunge the expulsion notice from the student’s cumulative record prior to graduation if such student has demonstrated to the Board that the student’s conduct and behavior in the years following such expulsion warrants an expungement. In deciding whether to expunge the expulsion notice, the Board may receive and consider evidence of any subsequent disciplinary problems that have led to removal from a classroom, suspension or expulsion of the student. If the student has not previously been suspended or expelled, and the administration chooses to expunge the expulsion notice from the student’s cumulative record prior to graduation, the administration may refer to the existence of the expunged notice, notwithstanding the fact that such notice may have been expunged from the student’s cumulative file, for the limited purpose of determining whether any subsequent suspension or expulsion by the student would constitute the student’s first such offense.

XI.

Change of Residence During Expulsion Proceedings A.

Student moving into the school district: 1.

If a student enrolls in the district while an expulsion hearing is pending in another district, such student shall not be excluded from school pending completion of the expulsion hearing unless an emergency exists, as defined above. The Board shall retain the authority to suspend the student or to conduct its own expulsion hearing. 69


2.

B.

Where a student enrolls in the district during the period of expulsion from another public school district, the Board may adopt the decision of the student expulsion hearing conducted by such other school district. The student shall be excluded from school pending such hearing. The excluded student shall be offered an alternative educational opportunity in accordance with statutory requirements. The Board shall make its determination based upon a hearing held by the Board, which hearing shall be limited to a determination of whether the conduct which was the basis of the previous public school district’s expulsion would also warrant expulsion by the Board.

Student moving out of the school district: Where a student withdraws from school after having been notified that an expulsion hearing is pending, but before a decision has been rendered by the Board, the notice of the pending expulsion hearing shall be included on the student’s cumulative record and the Board shall complete the expulsion hearing and render a decision. If the Board subsequently renders a decision to expel the student, a notice of the expulsion shall be included on the student’s cumulative record.

XII.

Procedures Governing Suspension and Expulsion of Students Identified as Eligible for Services under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (“IDEA”) A.

Suspension of IDEA students: Notwithstanding the foregoing, if the administration suspends a student identified as eligible for services under the IDEA (an “IDEA student”) who has violated any rule or code of conduct of the school district that applies to all students, the following procedures shall apply:

B.

1.

The administration shall make reasonable attempts to immediately notify the parents of the student of the decision to suspend on the date on which the decision to suspend was made, and a copy of the special education procedural safeguards must either be hand-delivered or sent by mail to the parents on the date that the decision to suspend was made.

2.

During the period of suspension, the school district is not required to provide any educational services to the IDEA student beyond that which is provided to all students suspended by the school district.

Expulsion and Suspensions that Constitute Changes in Placement for IDEA students: Notwithstanding any provision to the contrary, if the administration recommends for expulsion an IDEA student who has violated any rule or code of conduct of the school district that applies to all students, the procedures described in this section shall apply. The procedures described in this section shall also apply for students whom the administration has suspended in a manner that is considered under the IDEA, as it may be amended from time to time, to be a change in placement: 1.

The parents of the student must be notified of the decision to recommend for expulsion (or to suspend if a change in placement) on the date on which the decision to suspend was made, and a copy of the special education procedural safeguards must either be hand-delivered or sent by mail to the parents on the date that the decision to recommend for expulsion (or to suspend if a change in placement) was made.

2.

The school district shall immediately convene the student’s planning and placement team (“PPT”), but in no case later than ten (10) school days after the 70


recommendation for expulsion or the suspension that constitutes a change in placement was made. The student’s PPT shall consider the relationship between the student’s disability and the behavior that led to the recommendation for expulsion or the suspension which constitutes a change in placement, in order to determine whether the student’s behavior was a manifestation of his/her disability.

C.

3.

If the student’s PPT finds that the behavior was a manifestation of the student’s disability, the administration shall not proceed with the recommendation for expulsion or the suspension that constitutes a change in placement.

4.

If the student’s PPT finds that the behavior was not a manifestation of the student’s disability, the administration may proceed with the recommended expulsion or suspension that constitutes a change in placement.

5.

During any period of expulsion, or suspension of greater than ten (10) days per school year, the administration shall provide the student with an alternative education program in accordance with the provisions of the IDEA.

6.

When determining whether to recommend an expulsion or a suspension that constitutes a change in placement, the building administrator (or his or her designee) should consider the nature of the misconduct and any relevant educational records of the student.

Transfer of IDEA students for Certain Offenses: School personnel may transfer an IDEA student to an appropriate interim alternative educational setting for not more than forty-five (45) school days if the student: 1.

Was in possession of a dangerous weapon, as defined in 18 U.S.C. 930(g)(2), as amended from time to time, on school grounds or at a school-sponsored activity, or

2.

Knowingly possessed or used illegal drugs or sold or solicited the sale of a controlled substance while at school or at a school-sponsored activity; or

3.

Has inflicted serious bodily injury upon another person while at school, on school premises, or at a school function.

The following definitions shall be used for this subsection XII.C. 1.

Dangerous weapon means a weapon, device, instrument, material, or substance, animate or inanimate, that is used for, or is readily capable of, causing death or serious bodily injury, except that such term does not include a pocket knife with a blade of less than 2.5 inches in length.

2.

Controlled substance means a drug or other substance identified under schedules I, II, III, IV, or V in section 202(c) of the Controlled Substances Act, 21 U.S.C. 812(c).

3.

Illegal drug means a controlled substance but does not include a substance that is legally possessed or used under the supervision of a licensed health-care professional or that is legally possessed or used under any other authority under the Controlled Substances Act or under any other provision of federal law.

4.

Serious bodily injury means a bodily injury which involves: (A) a substantial risk of death; (B) extreme physical pain; (C) protracted and obvious disfigurement; or (D) protracted loss or impairment of the function of a bodily member, organ, or mental faculty.

71


XIII.

Procedures Governing Expulsions for Students Identified as Eligible under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (“Section 504”) A.

B.

XIV.

Except as provided in subsection B below, notwithstanding any provision to the contrary, if the administration recommends for expulsion a student identified as eligible for educational accommodations under Section 504 who has violated any rule or code of conduct of the school district that applies to all students, the following procedures shall apply: 1.

The parents of the student must be notified of the decision to recommend the student for expulsion.

2.

The district shall immediately convene the student’s Section 504 team (“504 team”) for the purpose of reviewing the relationship between the student’s disability and the behavior that led to the recommendation for expulsion. The 504 team will determine whether the student’s behavior was a manifestation of his/her disability.

3.

If the 504 team finds that the behavior was a manifestation of the student’s disability, the administration shall not proceed with the recommended expulsion.

4.

If the 504 team finds that the behavior was not a manifestation of the student's disability, the administration may proceed with the recommended expulsion.

The Board may take disciplinary action for violations pertaining to the use or possession of illegal drugs or alcohol against any student with a disability who currently is engaging in the illegal use of drugs or alcohol to the same extent that such disciplinary action is taken against nondisabled students. Thus, when a student with a disability is recommended for expulsion based solely on the illegal use or possession of drugs or alcohol, the 504 team shall not be required to meet to review the relationship between the student’s disability and the behavior that led to the recommendation for expulsion.

Procedures Governing Expulsions for Students Committed to a Juvenile Detention Center A.

Any student who commits an expellable offense and is subsequently committed to a juvenile detention center, the Connecticut Juvenile Training School or any other residential placement for such offense may be expelled by the Board in accordance with the provisions of this section. The period of expulsion shall run concurrently with the period of commitment to a juvenile detention center, the Connecticut Juvenile Training School or any other residential placement.

B.

If a student who committed an expellable offense seeks to return to a school district after having been in a juvenile detention center, the Connecticut Juvenile Training School or any other residential placement and such student has not been expelled by the board of education for such offense under subdivision (A) of this subsection, the Board shall allow such student to return and may not expel the student for additional time for such offense.

XV.

Early Readmission to School An expelled student may apply for early readmission to school. The Board delegates the authority to make decisions on readmission requests to the Superintendent. Students desiring readmission to school shall direct such readmission requests to the Superintendent. The Superintendent has the discretion to approve or deny such readmission requests, and may condition readmission on specified criteria.

XVI.

Dissemination of Policy The Board of Education shall, at the beginning of each school year and at such other times as it may deem appropriate, provide for an effective means of informing all students, parent(s) and/or guardian(s) of this policy. 72


XVII.

Compliance with Documentation and Reporting Requirements A. The Board of Education shall include on all disciplinary reports the individual student’s stateassigned student identifier (SASID). B. The Board of Education shall report all suspensions and expulsions to the State Department of Education. C. If the Board of Education expels a student for sale or distribution of a controlled substance, the Board shall refer such student to an appropriate state or local agency for rehabilitation, intervention or job training and inform the agency of its action. D. If the Board of Education expels a student for possession of a deadly weapon or firearm, as defined in Conn. Gen. Stat. § 53a-3, the violation shall be reported to the local police.

Legal References: Connecticut General Statutes: §§ 4-176e through 4-180a and § 4-181a Uniform Administrative Procedures Act §10-222d Safe School climate plans. Definitions. Safe school climate assessments §§ 10-233a through 10-233f Suspension and expulsion of students. §19a-342a Use of electronic nicotine delivery system or vapor product prohibited §§ 21a-408a through 408p Palliative Use of Marijuana § 29-38 Weapons in vehicles § 53a-3 Definitions § 53a-344b Sale and delivery of electronic nicotine delivery system or vapor products to minors §53-206 Carrying of dangerous weapons prohibited. Packer v. Board of Educ. of the Town of Thomaston, 246 Conn. 89 (1998). State v. Hardy, 896 A.2d 755, 278 Conn. 113 (2006). State v. Guzman, 955 A.2d 72, 2008 Conn. App. LEXIS 445 (Sept. 16, 2008). Federal law: Honig v. Doe, 484 U.S. 305 (1988) Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, 20 U.S.C. 1400 et seq., as amended by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004, Pub. L. 108-446. Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, 29 U.S.C. § 794(a). 18 U.S.C. § 921 (definition of “firearm”) 18 U.S.C. § 930(g) (2) (definition of “dangerous weapon”) 18 U.S.C. § 1365(h) (3) (identifying “serious bodily injury”) 21 U.S.C. § 812(c) (identifying “controlled substances”) 34 C.F.R. § 300.530 (defining “illegal drugs”) Gun-Free Schools Act, 20 U.S.C. § 7151 ADOPTED: 9/14/98 REVISED: 9/08/03 Date Revised: January 14, 2013 73


BULLYING PREVENTION AND INTERVENTION POLICY The Board of Education is committed to creating and maintaining an educational environment that is physically, emotionally and intellectually safe and thus free from bullying, teen dating violence, harassment and discrimination. In accordance with state law and the Board’s Safe School Climate Plan, the Board expressly prohibits any form of bullying behavior on school grounds; at a school-sponsored or school-related activity, function or program, whether on or off school grounds; at a school bus stop; on a school bus or other vehicle owned, leased or used by a local or regional board of education; or through the use of an electronic device or an electronic mobile device owned, leased or used by Board of Education. The Board also prohibits any form of bullying behavior outside of the school setting if such bullying (i) creates a hostile environment at school for the student against whom such bullying was directed, (ii) infringes on the rights of the student against whom such bullying was directed at school, or (iii) substantially disrupts the education process or the orderly operation of a school. Discrimination and/or retaliation against an individual who reports or assists in the investigation of an act of bullying is likewise prohibited. Students who engage in bullying behavior or teen dating violence shall be subject to school discipline, up to and including expulsion, in accordance with the Board’s policies on student discipline, suspension and expulsion, and consistent with state and federal law. For purposes of this policy, “Bullying” means the repeated use by one or more students of a written, oral or electronic communication, such as cyberbullying, directed at or referring to another student attending school in the same school district, or a physical act or gesture by one or more students repeatedly directed at another student attending school in the same school district, that: 1) causes physical or emotional harm to such student or damage to such student’s property; 2) places such student in reasonable fear of harm to himself or herself, or of damage to his or her property; creates a hostile environment at school for such student; 3) infringes on the rights of such student at school; or 4) substantially disrupts the education process or the orderly operation of a school. Bullying shall include, but not be limited to, a written, verbal or electronic communication or physical act or gesture based on any actual or perceived differentiating characteristics, such as race, color, religion, ancestry, national origin, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, socioeconomic status, academic status, physical appearance, or mental, physical, developmental or sensory disability, or by association with an individual or group who has or is perceived to have one or more of such characteristics. For purposes of this policy, “Cyberbullying” means any act of bullying through the use of the Internet, interactive and digital technologies, cellular mobile telephone or other mobile electronic devices or any electronic communications. For purposes of this policy, “Teen Dating Violence” means any act of physical, emotional or sexual abuse, including stalking, harassing and threatening, that occurs between two students who are currently in or who have recently been in a dating relationship. Consistent with the requirements under state law, the Thompson Board of Education authorizes the Superintendent or his/her designee(s), along with the Safe School Climate Coordinator, to be responsible for developing and implementing a Safe School Climate Plan in furtherance of this policy. As provided by state law, such Safe School Climate Plan shall include, but not be limited to provisions which: 1) Enable students to anonymously report acts of bullying to school employees and require students and the parents or guardians of students to be notified at the beginning of each school year of the process by which students may make such reports; 74


2) enable the parents or guardians of students to file written reports of suspected bullying; 3) require school employees who witness acts of bullying or receive reports of bullying to orally notify the safe school climate specialist, or another school administrator if the safe school climate specialist is unavailable, not later than one school day after such school employee witnesses or receives a report of bullying, and to file a written report not later than two school days after making such oral report; 4) require the safe school climate specialist to investigate or supervise the investigation of all reports of bullying and ensure that such investigation is completed promptly after receipt of any written reports made under this section; and that the parents or guardians of the student alleged to have committed an act or acts of bullying and the parents or guardians of the student against whom such alleged act or acts were directed receive prompt notice that such investigation has commenced; 5) require the safe school climate specialist to review any anonymous reports, except that no disciplinary action shall be taken solely on the basis of an anonymous report; 6) include a prevention and intervention strategy for school employees to deal with bullying and teen dating violence; 7) provide for the inclusion of language in student codes of conduct concerning bullying; 8) require each school to notify the parents or guardians of students who commit any verified acts of bullying and the parents or guardians of students against whom such acts were directed not later than forty-eight hours after the completion of the investigation; 9) require each school to invite the parents or guardians of a student against whom such act was directed to a meeting to communicate to such parents or guardians the measures being taken by the school to ensure the safety of the student against whom such act was directed and policies and procedures in place to prevent further acts of bullying; 10) require each school to invite the parents or guardians of a student who commits any verified act of bullying to a meeting, separate and distinct from the meeting required in subdivision (9) above, to discuss specific interventions undertaken by the school to prevent further acts of bullying; 11) establish a procedure for each school to document and maintain records relating to reports and investigations of bullying in such school and to maintain a list of the number of verified acts of bullying in such school and make such list available for public inspection, and annually report such number to the Department of Education and in such manner as prescribed by the Commissioner of Education; 12) direct the development of case-by-case interventions for addressing repeated incidents of bullying against a single individual or recurrently perpetrated bullying incidents by the same individual that may include both counseling and discipline; 13) prohibit discrimination and retaliation against an individual who reports or assists in the investigation of an act of bullying; 14) direct the development of student safety support plans for students against whom an act of bullying was directed that address safety measures the school will take to protect such students against further acts of bullying; 15) require the principal of a school, or the principal’s designee, to notify the appropriate local law enforcement agency when such principal, or the principal’s designee, believes that any acts of bullying constitute criminal conduct; 16) prohibit bullying (A) on school grounds, at a school-sponsored or school-related activity, function or program whether on or off school grounds, at a school bus stop, on a school bus or other vehicle 75


owned, leased or used by a local or regional board of education, or through the use of an electronic device or an electronic mobile device owned, leased or used by the local or regional board of education, and (B) outside of the school setting if such bullying (i) creates a hostile environment at school for the student against whom such bullying was directed, or (ii) infringes on the rights of the student against whom such bullying was directed at school, or (iii) substantially disrupts the education process or the orderly operation of a school; 17) require, at the beginning of each school year, each school to provide all school employees with a written or electronic copy of the school district’s safe school climate plan; and 18) require that all school employees annually complete the training described in Conn. Gen. Stat. §10220a. The notification required pursuant to subdivision (8) (above) and the invitation required pursuant to subdivisions (9) and (10) (above) shall include a description of the response of school employees to such acts and any consequences that may result from the commission of further acts of bullying. Any information provided under this policy or accompanying Safe School Climate Plan shall be provided in accordance with the confidentiality restrictions imposed under the Family Educational Rights Privacy Act (“FERPA”) and the district’s Confidentiality and Access to Student Information policy and regulations. The Thompson Board of Education shall submit the Safe School Climate Plan to the Department of Education for review and approval. Not later than thirty (30) calendar days after approval by the Board, the Board shall make such plan available on the Board’s and each individual school in the school district’s web site and ensure that the Safe School Climate Plan is included in the school district’s publication of the rules, procedures and standards of conduct for schools and in all student handbooks. Legal References: Conn. Gen. Stat. §10-145o Conn. Gen. Stat. §10-220a Conn. Gen. Stat. § 10-222d Conn. Gen. Stat. § 10-222g

Conn. Gen. Stat. § 10-222h Conn. Gen. Stat. §§ 10-223a – 10233f File Number: JFJ

Adopted: December 9, 2002 Date revised: January 14, 2013

DRUG AND ALCOHOL USE BY STUDENTS Policy Statement The Board is required by Connecticut law to prescribe rules for the management and discipline of its schools. In keeping with this mandate, the unlawful use, sale, distribution or possession of controlled drugs, controlled substances, drug paraphernalia, as defined in C.G.S. Section 21a-240, or alcohol on or off school property or during any school sponsored activity is prohibited. It shall be the policy of the Board to take positive action through education, counseling, discipline, parental involvement, medical referral, and law enforcement referral, as appropriate, in the handling of incidents in the schools involving the unlawful possession, distribution, sale or use of substances that affect behavior. Definitions (1)

Controlled Drugs: means those drugs which contain any quantity of a substance which has been designated as subject to the federal Controlled Substances Act, or which has been designated as a depressant or stimulant drug pursuant to federal food and drug laws, or which has been designated by the Commissioner of Consumer Protection pursuant to C.G.S. Section 21a-243, as having a stimulant, depressant or hallucinogenic effect upon the higher functions of the central nervous 76


system and as having a tendency to promote abuse or psychological or physiological dependence, or both. Such controlled drugs are classifiable as amphetamine-type, barbiturate-type, cannabis-type, cocaine-type, hallucinogenic, morphine-type and other stimulant and depressant drugs. C.G.S. Section 21a-240(8). (2)

Controlled Substances: means a drug, substance or immediate precursor in schedules I to V, inclusive, of the Connecticut controlled substance scheduling regulations adopted pursuant to C.G.S. Section 21a-243. C.G.S. Section 21a-240(9).

(3)

Professional Communication: any communication made privately and in confidence by a student to a professional employee of such student's school in the course of the professional employee's employment. C.G.S. Section 10-154a (a) (4).

(4)

Professional Employee: means a person employed by a school who "(A) holds a certificate from the State Board of Education, (B) is a member of a faculty where certification is not required, (C) is an administration officer of a school, or (D) is a registered nurse employed by or assigned to a school." C.G.S. Section 10-154a (a) (2).

(5)

Drug Paraphernalia: means any equipment, products and materials of any kind which are used, intended for use or designed for use in planting, propagating, cultivating, growing, harvesting, manufacturing, compounding, converting, producing, processing, preparing, testing, analyzing, packaging, repackaging, storing, containing or concealing, or injecting, ingesting, inhaling or otherwise introducing controlled drugs or controlled substances into the human body, including but not limited to all items specified in C.G.S. Section 21a-240(20)(A), such as "bongs," pipes, "roach clips," miniature cocaine spoons, crack cocaine vials, tobacco rolling papers, and any object or container used, intended or designed for use in storing, concealing, possessing, distributing or selling controlled drugs or controlled substances. C.G.S. Section 21a-240(20) (A). Procedures

(1)

Emergencies. If an emergency situation results from drug or alcohol use, the student shall be sent to the school nurse or medical advisor immediately. The parent or designated responsible person will be notified.

(2)

Prescribed Medications. The parent or guardian of any student who is required to take any prescribed medication during the school day shall so inform the school nurse or the person designated to act in the absence of a nurse. Such prescribed medication will then be administered to the student under the supervision of the school nurse or designee in accordance with C.G.S. Section 10-212a and the applicable regulations and in accordance with any Board policies and regulations concerning medication administration. Students taking improper amounts of a prescribed medication, or taking a prescribed medication without proper notification and supervision of the school nurse or designee will be subject to the procedures for improper drug or alcohol use outlined in this policy.

(3)

Voluntary Disclosure of Drug/Alcohol Problem (Self-Referral). The following procedures will be followed when a student privately, and in confidence, discloses to a professional employee in a professional communication information concerning the student's use, possession, distribution or sale of a controlled drug, controlled substance or alcohol. (a)

Professional employees are permitted, in their professional judgment, to disclose any information acquired through a professional communication with a student, when such information concerns alcohol or drug abuse or any alcohol or drug problem of such student. In no event, however, will they be required to do so. C.G.S. Section 10-154a (b). 77


(4)

(b)

Any physical evidence obtained from such student through a professional communication indicating that a crime has been or is being committed by the student must be turned over to school administrators or law enforcement officials as soon as possible, but no later than two calendar days after receipt of such physical evidence, excluding Saturdays, Sundays and holidays. Employees are encouraged to contact the school administrator immediately upon obtaining physical evidence. In no case, however, will such employee be required to disclose the name of the student from whom the evidence was obtained. C.G.S. Section 10-154a (b).

(c)

Any professional employee who has received a professional communication from a student may obtain advice and information concerning appropriate resources and refer the student accordingly, subject to the rights of the professional employee as described in paragraph (a) above.

(d)

If a student consents to disclosure of a professional communication concerning the student's alcohol or drug problem, or if the professional employee deems disclosure to be appropriate, the professional employee should report the student's name and problem to the school's building administrator or designee who shall refer the student to appropriate school staff members for intervention and counseling.

Involuntary Disclosure or Discovery of Drug/Alcohol Problems. When a professional employee obtains information related to a student from a source other than the student's confidential disclosure, that the student, on or off school grounds or at a school sponsored activity, is under the influence of, or possesses, uses, dispenses, distributes, administers, sells or aids in the procurement of a controlled drug, controlled substance, drug paraphernalia or alcohol, that information is considered to be involuntarily disclosed. In this event, the following procedures will apply. (a)

The professional employee will immediately report the information to the building administrator or designee. The building administrator or designee will then refer the student to appropriate school staff members for intervention and counseling.

(b)

Any physical evidence (for example, alcohol, drugs or drug paraphernalia) obtained from a student indicating that a crime has been or is being committed by the student must be turned over to the building administrator or designee or to law enforcement officials as soon as possible, but no later than within two calendar days after receipt of such physical evidence, excluding Saturdays, Sundays and holidays. C.G.S. Section 10-154a (b). Because such evidence was not obtained through a professional communication, the name of the student must be disclosed to the building administrator or designee.

(c)

Search and Seizure of Students and/or Possessions: A professional employee who reasonably suspects that a student is violating a state/federal law or a school substance abuse policy must immediately report his/her suspicion to the building administrator or designee. The building administrator or designee may then search a student's person or possessions connected to that person, in accordance with the Board's policies and regulations if he/she has reasonable suspicion from the inception of the search that the student has violated or is violating either the law or a school substance abuse policy. Any physical evidence obtained in the search of a student, or a student's possessions, indicating that the student is violating or has violated a state or federal law must be turned over to law enforcement officials as soon as possible, but not later than within three calendar days after receipt of such physical evidence, excluding Saturdays, Sundays and holidays. C.G.S. Section 10-154a(c). All school employees are encouraged to contact the school administration immediately upon obtaining physical evidence. 78


(5)

Consequences for the Use, Sale, Distribution or Possession of Controlled Drugs, Controlled Substances, Drug Paraphernalia or Alcohol. (a)

Any student in the Thompson Public Schools using, consuming, possessing, being under the influence of, manufacturing, distributing, selling or aiding in the procurement of controlled drugs, controlled substances, drug paraphernalia or alcohol either on or off school property, or at a school-sponsored activity, except as such use or possession is in accordance with Connecticut General Statutes § 21a-408a through 408q, is subject to discipline up to and including expulsion pursuant to the Board's student discipline policy.

(b)

In conformity with the Board’s student discipline policy, students may be suspended or expelled for drug or alcohol use off school grounds if such drug or alcohol use is considered seriously disruptive of the educational process. In determining whether the conduct is seriously disruptive of the educational process, the administration and the Board may consider, among other factors: 1) whether the drug or alcohol use occurred within close proximity of a school; 2) whether other students from the school were involved; and 3) whether any injuries occurred.

(c)

If a school administrator has reason to believe that any student was engaged, on or off school grounds, in offering for sale or distribution a controlled substance (as defined by Conn. Gen. Stat. § 21a-240(9), whose manufacturing, distribution, sale, prescription, dispensing, transporting, or possessing with intent to sell or dispense, offering or administering is subject to criminal penalties under Conn. Gen. Stats. §§ 21a-277 and 21a-278, the administrator will recommend such student for expulsion, in accordance with the Board’s student discipline policy.

(d)

Students found to be in violation of this policy may be referred by the building administrator to an appropriate agency licensed to assess and treat drug and alcohol involved individuals. In such event, assessment and treatment costs will be the responsibility of the parent or guardian.

(e)

A meeting may be scheduled with appropriate school staff members for the purpose of discussing the school's drug and alcohol policy with the student and parent or guardian.

(f)

Law enforcement officials may be contacted by the building administrator in the case of suspected involvement in the use, sale or distribution of controlled drugs, controlled substances, drug paraphernalia or alcohol.

Legal References: Connecticut General Statutes: Section 10-154a Sections 10-233a through 10-233f Section 10-212a Section 21a-240 Section 10-221 Section 21a-243 Section 21a-408a through 408q File Number: JFCIA ADOPTED:

June 14, 1993

REVISED:

February 9, 2004

Date Revised: April 29, 2013

79


REGULATIONS REGARDING SEX DISCRIMINATION & SEXUAL HARASSMENT (STUDENTS) It is the policy of the Board of Education that any form of sex discrimination or sexual harassment is forbidden, whether by students, Board employees or third parties subject to the control of the board. Students, Board employees and third parties are expected to adhere to a standard of conduct that is respectful of the rights of students. Any student or employee who engages in conduct prohibited by the Board’s sex discrimination and sexual harassment policy shall be subject to disciplinary action. Definitions Sex discrimination occurs when a person, because of his or her sex, is denied participation in or the benefits of any education program receiving federal financial assistance. Sexual harassment: In a school setting, sexual harassment is conduct that 1) is sexual in nature; 2) is unwelcome; and 3) denies or limits a student’s ability to participate in or benefit from a school’s educational program. Sexual harassment can be verbal, nonverbal or physical. Sexual violence is a form of sexual harassment. Sexual harassment creates a hostile environment if the conduct is sufficiently severe or pervasive that it interferes with or limits a student’s ability to participate in or benefit from the school’s program. Although not an exhaustive list, the following are examples of sexual conduct prohibited by this policy: 1.

Statements or other conduct indicating that a student’s submission to, or rejection of, sexual overtures or advances will affect the student’s grades and/or other academic progress.

2. Unwelcome attention and/or advances of a sexual nature, including verbal comments, sexual invitations, leering and physical touching. 3. Display of sexually suggestive objects, or use of sexually suggestive or obscene remarks, invitations, letters, emails, text messages, notes, slurs, jokes, pictures, cartoons, epithets or gestures. 4. Touching of a sexual nature or telling sexual or dirty jokes. 5. Transmitting or displaying emails or websites of a sexual nature. 6. Using computer systems, including email, instant messaging, text messaging, blogging or the use of social networking websites, or other forms of electronic communications, to engage in any conduct prohibited by this policy. Sexual Violence: Sexual violence is a form of sexual harassment. For the purposes of this policy, sexual violence refers to physical acts that are sexual in nature, perpetrated against a person’s will or where a person is incapable of giving consent due to the victim’s use of drugs or alcohol. Complaint Procedure 1.

It is the express policy of the Board of Education to encourage victims of sex discrimination or sexual harassment to promptly report such claims. Preferably, complaints should be filed within thirty (30) days of the alleged occurrence. Timely reporting of complaints facilitates the investigation and resolution of such complaints.

2. As soon as a student feels that he or she has been subjected to sex discrimination or sexual harassment, s/he or his/her parental or legal guardian should make a written complaint to the building principal, or his/her designee. The student will be provided a copy of the Board’s policy and regulation and made aware of his or her rights. 3. The complaint should state the: A. Name of the complainant, B. Date of the complaint, 80


C. Date(s) of the alleged harassment/discrimination, D. Name(s) of the harasser(s) or discriminator(s), E. Location where such harassment/discrimination occurred, F. Names of any witness(es) to the harassment/discrimination, and G. Detailed statement of the circumstances constituting the alleged harassment/discrimination; and H. Remedy requested. 4. Any student who makes an oral complaint of harassment or sex discrimination to any of the abovementioned personnel will be provided a copy of this regulation and will be requested to make a written complaint pursuant to the above procedure. In appropriate circumstances, such as due to the age of the student making the complaint, a parent or school administrator may be permitted to fill out the form on the student’s behalf. 5. If the complainant is a minor student, the person to whom the complaint is given should consider whether a child abuse report should be completed in accordance with the Board’s policy on the Reports of Suspected Child Abuse or Neglect of Children. 6. All complaints are to be forwarded immediately to the building principal or designee unless that individual is the subject of the complaint, in which case the complaint should be forwarded directly to the Superintendent of Schools or designee. In addition, a copy of any complaint filed under this policy shall be forwarded to the Title IX Coordinator. 7. The Title IX Coordinator or designee shall promptly investigate all complaints of sexual discrimination or sexual harassment against a student, regardless of whether the conduct occurred on or off-school grounds. The investigation shall be conducted discreetly, maintaining confidentiality insofar as possible while still conducting an effective and thorough investigation. 8. Any student who makes a complaint shall be notified of the District’s intent to investigate the complaint. In the event the student requests confidentiality or that an investigation not be conducted, the District will take reasonable steps to investigate and respond to the complaint to the extent possible, given the request for confidentiality or that the District not investigate the complaint. If the student insists that his/her personally identifiable information not be shared with the alleged perpetrator, the student will be informed that the District’s ability to investigate and/or take corrective action may be limited. 9. Upon receipt of a sexual harassment or sex discrimination complaint, the Title IX Coordinator shall either promptly commence an investigation of the complaint, or shall designate a school administrator to promptly investigate the complaint. The Title IX Coordinator or designee shall: a) offer to meet with the complainant within ten (10) school days to discuss the nature of the complaint, identify individuals the complainant believes has relevant information, and obtain any relevant documents the complainant may have; b) provide the complainant with a copy of the Board’s sexual harassment policy and accompanying regulations; c) consider whether any interim measures may be appropriate to protect the alleged victim, pending the outcome of the investigation; d) investigate the factual basis of the complaint, including, as applicable, conducting interviews with individuals deemed relevant to the complaint; e) consider whether alleged sex discrimination or sexual harassment has created a hostile school environment, including consideration of the effects of off-campus conduct on the school; f) communicate the outcome of the investigation in writing to the complainant, and to any individual properly identified as a party to the complaint (to the extent permitted by state and 81


federal confidentiality requirements), within sixty (60) school days from the date the complaint was received by the Superintendent’s office. The investigator may extend this deadline for no more than fifteen (15) additional school days if needed to complete the investigation. The complainant shall be notified of such extension. The written notice shall include a finding whether the complaint was substantiated and if so, shall identify, to the extent possible, how the district will remedy the discrimination or harassment, adhering to the requirements of state and federal law; g) when sex discrimination or sexual harassment has been found, take steps that are reasonably calculated to end the discrimination, take corrective and/or disciplinary action aimed at preventing the recurrence of the harassment or discrimination, as deemed appropriate by the Superintendent or his/her designee, and take steps to remedy the effects of the sex discrimination or sexual harassment; 10. If the student complainant or alleged perpetrator is dissatisfied with the findings of the investigation, he or she may file a written appeal within thirty (30) calendar days to the Title IX Coordinator, or, if he or she conducted the investigation, to the Superintendent of Schools, who shall review the Title IX Coordinator or designee’s written report, the information collected by the Title IX Coordinator or designee together with the recommended disposition of the complaint to determine whether the alleged conduct constitutes sexual harassment or sex discrimination. The Title IX Coordinator or Superintendent of Schools may determine if further action and/or investigation is warranted. After completing this review, the Title IX Coordinator or Superintendent of Schools shall respond to the complainant, in writing, within fifteen (15) school days following the receipt of the written request for review. If a sex discrimination complaint raises a concern about bullying behavior, the Title IX Coordinator shall notify the Safe School Climate Specialist or designee who shall coordinate any bullying investigation with the Title IX Coordinator, so as to ensure that any such bullying investigation complies with the requirements of applicable Board policies. Retaliation against any individual who complains pursuant to the Board’s policy and regulations is strictly prohibited. The district will take actions necessary to prevent retaliation as a result of filing a complaint. At any time, a complainant alleging sex discrimination or sexual harassment may file a formal complaint with the U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights, 8th Floor, 5 Post Office Square, Suite 900, Boston, MA 02109-0111 (TELEPHONE NUMBER (617) 289-0111). Copies of this regulation will be distributed to all students. Title IX Coordinator The Title IX Coordinator for the Thompson Board of Education is: Dr. Michael Jolin, whose office is located at 785 Riverside Drive, North Grosvenordale, CT 06255-0835, and whose telephone number is (860) 923-9581. File Number JP Date Adopted 5/10/99 Date Revised: November 12, 2012

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COMPLAINT FORM REGARDING SEX DISCRIMINATION & SEXUAL HARASSMENT (STUDENTS) Name of the complainant ________________________________________________________ Date of the complaint ___________________________________________________________ Date of the alleged discrimination/harassment _______________________________________ Name or names of the discriminator(s) or harasser(s) _________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ Location where such discrimination/harassment occurred ______________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ Name(s) of any witness(es) to the discrimination/harassment.

Detailed statement of the circumstances constituting the alleged discrimination or harassment __________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ Remedy Requested: __________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ File Number: JP

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POSSESSION OF DEADLY WEAPONS OR FIREARMS POLICY I. Definitions: Deadly Weapon means “any weapon, whether loaded or unloaded, from which a shot may be discharged, or a switchblade knife, gravity knife, billy, blackjack, bludgeon, or metal knuckles.” Conn. Gen. Stat. § 53a-3 (6). Firearm means “any sawed-off shotgun, machine gun, rifle, shotgun, pistol, revolver, or other weapon, whether loaded or unloaded, from which a shot may be discharged.” Conn. Gen. Stat. § 53a-3 (19). Peace Officer means a state police officer, a member of the local police department, an inspector in the state Division of Criminal Justice, a sheriff, deputy sheriff or special deputy sheriff, a conservation officer or special conservation officer, a constable who performs criminal law enforcement duties, a special policeman, an adult probation officer, a Department of Correction official authorized by the Commissioner of Correction to make arrests in a correctional institution or facility, an investigator in the investigations unit of the Office of the State Treasurer, or any special agent of the federal government authorized to the provisions of Title 21 of the United States Code. Conn. Gen. Stat. § 53a-3 (9). Real Property means the land and all temporary and permanent structures comprising the district’s elementary and secondary schools, and administrative office buildings. Real property includes, but is not limited to, the following: classrooms, hallways, storage facilities, theaters, gymnasiums, fields and parking lots. School-Sponsored Activity “means any activity sponsored, recognized or authorized by a board of education and includes activities conducted on or off school property.” Conn. Gen Stat. § 10-233a (h). II.

Prohibition of Deadly Weapons and Firearms: In accordance with Conn. Gen. Stat. § 29-28(e) and § 53a-217b, the possession and/or use of a deadly weapon or firearm on the real property of any school or administrative office building in this district, or at a school-sponsored activity, is prohibited, even if the person possessing the deadly weapon or firearm has a permit for such item.

III.

Peace Officer Exception: A peace officer engaged in the performance of his or her official duties who is in lawful possession of a deadly weapon or firearm may bring such item on the real property of any school or administrative office building in this district, or to a school-sponsored activity.

IV.

Other Exceptions Persons in lawful possession of a deadly weapon or firearm may possess such item on the real property of any school or administrative office building in this district, or to a school-sponsored activity if: The person brings the deadly weapon or firearm on the real property of any school or administrative office building or to a school-sponsored activity for use in a program approved by school officials. In such case, the person must give school officials notice of his/her intention to bring such item, and the person must receive prior written permission from school officials. The person possesses the deadly weapon or firearm on the real property of any school or administrative office building or at a school-sponsored activity pursuant to a written agreement with school officials or a written agreement between such person’s employer and school officials.

V.

Consequences A. Unless subject to one of the exceptions listed above, any person who possesses a deadly weapon or firearm on the real property of an elementary or secondary school in this district, or administrative office building, or at a school-sponsored activity, whether or not the person is lawfully permitted to carry such deadly weapon or firearm, will be reported to the local police authorities once school officials become aware of its possession. B. A student who possesses and/or uses any deadly weapon or firearm on school property in violation of this policy shall be disciplined in accordance with Board of Education Student Discipline Policy. 84


The Board of Education reserves the right to forbid anyone caught possessing a deadly weapon or firearm on the real property of its school buildings or administrative office buildings, or at a school-sponsored activity, from using any and all school facilities. Policy Number: KGD Policy approved by Policy Committee: April 1, 2013 Legal Reference: Connecticut General Statutes: § 10-2333a § 29-28(e) § 53a-217b POLICY REGARDING STUDENT USE OF THE DISTRICT'S COMPUTER SYSTEMS AND INTERNET SAFETY Computers, computer networks, electronic devices, Internet access, and e-mail are effective and important technological resources. The Board of Education provides computers, a computer network, including Internet access and an e-mail system, as well as other electronic devices that access the network such as wireless and/or portable electronic hand-held equipment that can be used for word processing, wireless Internet access, image capture and recording, sound recording, information transmitting and/or receiving, storing etc. (including, but not limited to, laptops, Kindles, radios, I-Pads or other tablet computers), referred to collectively as "the computer systems", in order to enhance both the educational opportunities for our students and the business operations of the district. These computer systems are business and educational tools. As such, they are made available to students in the district for education related uses. The administration shall develop regulations setting forth procedures to be used by the administration in an effort to ensure that such computer systems are used by students solely for education related purposes. The Board will educate minor students about appropriate online behavior, including interacting with other individuals on social networking websites and in chat rooms and cyber-bullying awareness and response. Additionally, the Board will implement a technology protection measure to block or filter Internet access to visual depictions that contain obscene material, contain child pornography, or are harmful to minors, and ensure that such filtering technology is operative during computer use by minor students. As the owner of the computer systems, the Board reserves the right to monitor the use of the district’s computers and computer systems. Legal References: Children’s Internet Protection Act, Pub. L. 106-554, codified at 47 U.S.C. § 254(h) Conn. Gen. Stat. §§ 53a-182b; 53a-183; 53a-250 Electronic Communication Privacy Act, 18 U.S.C. §§ 2510 through 2520 No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, Pub. L. 107-110, codified at 20 U.S.C. § 6777 Protecting Children in the 21st Century Act, Pub. Law 110-385, codified at 47 U.S.C. § 254(h) (5) (B) (iii). Adopted: June 25, 2001 Date Revised and Approved: June 10, 2013 (Refer to the Administrative Regulations to Board Policy IIBH - “Computer/Internet Use.”)

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CHARGE POLICY It is the policy of the Thompson Board of Education (the “Board” or “District”) to ensure that students receive healthy and nutritious meals through the District’s Food Services Program (the “Program”). In order to sustain the Food Services Program, the Program cannot permit the excessive charging of student meals. Therefore, any charging of meals must be consistent with this policy and its accompanying regulations. The Superintendent or his/her designee shall develop regulations designed to effectively and respectfully address family responsibility for unpaid meals. The Board encourages any parent or guardian who anticipates a problem with paying for meals to contact the Food Service Manager and/or the applicable school principal as soon as possible for assistance. The National School Lunch Program The District participates in the National School Lunch Program, sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, which permits the school system to offer free and reduced price meals to students who qualify. The Thompson Board of Education encourages all families who may have a child who is eligible for free or reduced price lunch to apply. Families may apply at any time during the summer or school year and may file a new application if there is a change in household income or the number of members of a family’s household. Applicants are responsible to pay for meals until the application for free and reduced price lunch is completed and approved. All applications for free and reduced price lunch and any related information will be considered strictly confidential and will not be shared outside the Program.

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Policy Applicable to Non-Payment of Lunch Fees: No student will ever be denied a lunch. No alternative meal consisting of unflavored milk, a piece of fruit and sunbutter sandwich will be given as a “consequence” of parent not paying for lunch. FOOD SERVICE CHARGE ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS In order to sustain the Food Service Program (the “Program”) in the Thompson Public Schools (the “District”), the Board requires that each family pay in advance for each student’s school meals. To facilitate payment in advance for school meals, the Board has established a payment program whereby parents or guardians may pay for meals in advance either by cash or check or through www.myschoolbucks.com through the My School Bucks program. For more information about payment methods or if you have a question, please contact the Food Service Manager at (860) 923-9581, x588. If at any time, a parent or guardian anticipates a problem with paying for meals, he/she shall be encouraged to contact the Food Service Manager and/or the applicable school principal as soon as possible for assistance. Parents and guardians are encouraged to apply for free and reduced price meals for their children. In order to qualify, families must meet eligibility criteria. Applications can be filed at any time during the summer or school year and new applications may be filed if there is a change in household income or in the number of household members. Applicants are responsible to pay for meals until the application for free and reduced price lunch is completed and approved. All applications for free and reduced price lunch and any related information will be considered strictly confidential and will not be shared outside the Program. No child may be denied a school meal due to lack of pre-payment, however, the following steps shall be taken whenever a child does not have sufficient funds in his or her school meal account. Thompson Middle School and Tourtellotte Memorial High School Step I If a student’s meal account falls below $10, the Food Service Manager shall send home a reminder letter with the student reminding the parent to deposit funds into the student’s meal account. Step II If the parent or guardian does not deposit sufficient funds into the school meal account and the school meal account balance becomes negative, the Food Service Manager shall send home a second reminder letter with the student reminding the parent or guardian to deposit funds into the student’s meal account. This letter will include information for the parent or guardian about the National School Lunch Program’s eligibility criteria for free and reduced price lunch along with an application for the free and reduced price lunch program. The Food Service Manager shall also make a phone call to the parent or guardian reminding the parent or guardian of the lack of funds and the consequences for non-payment. Step III If the parent does not deposit sufficient funds into the school meal account and the student charges three (3) additional meals, the Food Services Manager shall send a Certified Letter to the parent or guardian reminding the parent or guardian of the need to deposit funds into the student’s meal account immediately. This letter will include additional information for the parent or guardian about the National School Lunch Program’s eligibility criteria for free and reduced price lunch along with an additional application for the free and reduced price lunch program. The Middle School Counselor shall place a second phone call to the parent or guardian reminding the parent or guardian of the lack of funds and the consequences for non-payment. 87


Step IV If the parent or guardian does not deposit funds into the school meal account after the Certified Letter has been sent, the Principal shall place a third call to the parent or guardian to remind the parent or guardian to deposit funds and to pay any accumulated arrears and to inform the parent that the student’s progress reports and report cards may be withheld until payment of the arrears has been received and processed by the Food Services Program. If necessary, the Principal shall also schedule a meeting with the parent or guardian of the student to discuss the arrearage. For Tourtellotte Memorial High School students, the student may be denied a cap and gown if payment of arrears is not received and processed by the Food Services Program prior to the last day of school.

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CERTIFICATION OF CHRONIC ILLNESS

During an appeal for reinstatement of credit, the Appeals Board may request confirmation from a doctor to explain specific and frequent absences, which occurred due to medical reasons. Students and parents are advised to monitor the number of absences, which have accumulated because of medical reasons. When absences for medical reasons are frequent, it may be advisable to seek documentation from a doctor that a chronic illness exists. Presentation of verified information regarding chronic illness and specific dates of absence will strengthen a student’s case in an appeal for reinstatement of credit. Just as with parent notes, doctors’ notes need to specifically address dates of absences and may not be “blanket excuses” for all absences which have occurred over a period a time. Such information must be presented on going and not at the end of a course.

CONCUSSION PLAN TOURTELLOTTE MEMORIAL HIGH SCHOOL CONCUSSION EDUCATION PLAN & CONSENT FORM - STUDENT & PARENT NOTE: This document was developed to provide coaches with an annual review of current and relevant information regarding concussions and head injuries. A new form is required to be read, signed, dated and kept on file by their associated school district annually to comply with Public Act No. 14-66 AN ACT CONCERNING STUDENT ATHLETES AND CONCUSSIONS. A concussion is the immediate and transient alteration of neurological function in the brain caused by mechanical acceleration and deceleration forces. Part I – SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF A CONCUSSION A concussion should be suspected if any one or more of the following signs or symptoms are present, OR if the coach/evaluator is unsure. 1.

Signs of a concussion may include (what the athlete looks like):  Confusion/disorientation/irritability  Act silly/combative/aggressive  Trouble resting/getting comfortable  Repeatedly ask same questions  Lack of concentration  Dazed appearance  Slow response/drowsiness  Restless/irritable  Incoherent/slurred speech  Constant attempts to return to play  Slow/clumsy movements  Constant motion  Loss of consciousness  Disproportionate/inappropriate reactions  Amnesia/memory problems  Balance problems

2. Symptoms of a concussion may include (what the athlete reports):  Head ache or dizziness  Oversensitivity to sound/light/touch  Nausea or vomiting  Ringing in ears  Blurred or double vision  Feeling foggy or groggy 91


Note: Public Act No. 14-66 requires that a coach MUST immediately remove a student- athlete from participating in any intramural or interscholastic athletic activity who (A) is observed to exhibit signs, symptoms or behaviors consistent with a concussion following a suspected blow to the head or body, or (B) is diagnosed with a concussion, regardless of when such concussion or head injury may have occurred. Upon removal of the athlete a qualified school employee must notify the parent or legal guardian within 24 hours that the student athletes has exhibited the signs and symptoms of a concussion. Part II - RETURN TO PARTICIPATION (RTP) Currently, it is impossible to accurately predict how long concussions will last. There must be full recovery before someone is allowed to return to participation. Connecticut Law now requires that no athlete may resume participation until they have received written medical clearance from a licensed health care professional (Physician, Physician Assistant, Advanced Practice Registered Nurse, Athletic Trainer) trained in the evaluation and management of concussions. Concussion Management Requirements: 1. No athlete SHALL return to participation (RTP) on the same day of concussion. 2. Any loss of consciousness, vomiting or seizures the athlete MUST be immediately transported to the hospital. 3. Close observation of an athlete MUST continue following a concussion. This should be monitored for an appropriate amount of time following the injury to ensure that there is no escalation of symptoms. 4. Any athlete with signs or symptoms related to a concussion MUST be evaluated from a licensed health care professional (Physician, Physicianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Assistant, Advanced Practice Registered Nurse, Athletic Trainer) trained in the evaluation and management of concussions. 5. The athlete MUST obtain an initial written clearance from one of the licensed health care professionals mentioned above directing them into a well-defined RTP stepped protocol similar to one outlined below. If at any time signs or symptoms should return during the RTP progression the athlete should cease activity*. 6. After the RTP protocol has been successfully administered (no longer exhibits any signs or symptoms or behaviors consistent with concussions), final written medical clearance is required by one of the licensed health care professionals mentioned above for them to fully return to unrestricted participation in practices and competitions. Medical Clearance RTP protocol (Recommended one full day between steps) 2 Rehabilitation stage Functional exercise at each stage of rehabilitation 1. No activity Complete physical and cognitive rest until asymptomatic. School may need to be modified. 2. Light aerobic Walking, swimming or stationary cycling keeping activity intensity, <70% of maximal exertion; no resistance training 3. Sport Specific Skating drills in ice hockey, running drills in soccer; Exercise no head impact activities 4. Non-contact Progression to more complex training drills, i.e. Training drills passing drills in football and ice hockey; may start progressive resistance training 5. Full Contact Following final medical clearance, participate in Practice normal training activities

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Objective of each stage Recovery Increase Heart Rate

Add Movement Exercise, coordination and cognitive load Restore confidence and assess functional skills by coaching staff


* If at any time signs or symptoms should worsen during the RTP progression the athlete should stop activity that day. If the athlete’s symptoms are gone the next day, s/he may resume the RTP progression at the last step completed in which no symptoms were present. If symptoms return and don’t resolve, the athlete should be referred back to their medical provider Part III - HEAD INJURIES Injuries to the head includes:  Concussions: (See above information). There are several head injuries associated with concussions which can be severe in nature including: a) Second impact Syndrome - Athletes who sustain a concussion, and return to play prior to being recovered from the concussion, are also at risk for Second Impact Syndrome (SIS), a rare but life-altering condition that can result in rapid brain swelling, permanent brain damage or death; and b) Post-Concussion Syndrome - A group of physical, cognitive, and emotional problems that can persist for weeks, months, or indefinitely after a concussion.  Scalp Injury: Most head injuries only damage the scalp (a cut, scrape, bruise or swelling)... Big lumps (bruises) can occur with minor injuries because there is a large blood supply to the scalp. For the same reason, small cuts on the head may bleed a lot. Bruises on the forehead sometimes cause black eyes 1 to 3 days later because the blood spreads downward by gravity;  Skull Fracture: Only 1% to 2% of children with head injuries will get a skull fracture. Usually there are no other symptoms except for a headache at the site where the head was hit. Most skull fractures occur without any injury to the brain and they heal easily;  Brain Injuries are rare but are recognized by the presence of the following symptoms: (1) difficult to awaken, or keep awake or (2) confused thinking and talking, or (3) slurred speech, or (4) weakness of arms or legs or (5) unsteady walking” (American Academy of Pediatrics Healthychildren, 2010) . Please see Athletic Director for Concussion Plan and Consent Form to Sign 1. 2.

3. 4. 5.

• •

References: NFHS. Concussions. 2008 NFHS Sports Medicine Handbook (Third Edition). 2008: 77-82. http://www.nfhs.org. McCrory, Paul MBBS, PhD; Meeuwisse, Willem MD, PhD; Johnston, Karen MD, PhD; Dvorak, Jiri MD; Aubry, Mark MD; Molloy, Mick MB; Cantu, Robert MA, MD. Consensus Statement on Concussion in Sport 3rd International Conference on Concussion in Sport Held in Zurich, November 2008. Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine: May 2009 - Volume 19 - Issue 3 - pp 185-200 http://journals.lww.com/cisportsmed/Fulltext/2009/05000/Consensus_Statement_on_Concussion_in_Sport_3rd.l.aspx Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Heads Up: Concussion in High School Sports. http://www.cdc.gov/NCIPC/tbi/Coaches_Tool_Kit.htm. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Centers For Disease Control and Prevention. A Fact Sheet for Coaches (2009). Retrieved on June 16, 2010. http://www.cdc.gov/concussion/pdf/coaches_Engl.pdf American Academy of Pediatrics - Healthychildren. Symptom check: Head Injury. Retrieved on June 16, 2010. http://www.healthychildren.org/english/tips-tools/symptom-checker/pages/Head-Injury.aspx Resources: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Injury Prevention & Control: Traumatic Brain Injury. Retrieved on June 16, 2010. http://www.cdc.gov/TrautnaticBrainInjury/index.html Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Heads Up: Concussion in High School Sports Guide for Coaches. Retrieved on June 16, 2010.

THOMPSON PUBLIC SCHOOLS STUDENT & PARENT – SUDDEN CARDIAC ARREST AWARENESS INFORMED CONSENT FORM

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PART I – SUDDEN CARDIAC ARREST - What is sudden cardiac arrest? Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) is when the heart stops beating, suddenly and unexpectedly. When this happens, blood stops flowing to the brain and other vital organs. SCA doesn’t just happen to adults; it takes the lives of students, too. However, the causes of sudden cardiac arrest in students and adults can be different. A student’s SCA will likely result from an inherited condition, while an adult’s SCA may be caused by either inherited or lifestyle issues. SCA is NOT a heart attack. A heart attack may cause SCA, but they are not the same. A heart attack is caused by a blockage that stops the flow of blood to the heart. SCA is a malfunction in the heart’s electrical system, causing the heart to suddenly stop beating. PART II - HOW COMMON IS SUDDEN CARDIAC ARREST IN THE UNITED STATES? SCA is the #1 cause of death for adults in this country. There are about 300,000 cardiac arrests outside hospitals each year. It is a leading cause of death for student-athletes. According to an April 2014 study for PubMed the incidence was: • 0.63 per 100,000 in all students (6 in one million) • 1.14 per 100,000 athletes (10 in one million) • 0.31 per student non-athletes (3 in one million) • The relative risk of SCA in student-athletes vs non-athletes was 0.65 • There is a significantly higher risk of SCA for boys than girls Leading causes of sudden death among high school and college athletes, according to the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) (on CBS News, June 28, 2012)* are heat stroke, heart disease and traits associated with sickle cell anemia. Prevention of sudden death, the same study concludes, is associated with more advanced cardiac screening with attention to medical histories and birth records, improved emergency procedures, and good coaching and conditioning practices. SCA can be prevented if the underlying causes can be diagnosed and treated. PART III - WHAT ARE THE WARNING SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS? Although SCA happens unexpectedly, some people may have signs or symptoms, such as: fainting or seizures during exercise; unexplained shortness of breath; dizziness; extreme fatigue; chest pains; or racing heart. These symptoms can be unclear in athletes, since people often confuse these warning signs with physical exhaustion. Sudden cardiac arrest is a medical emergency. If not treated immediately, it causes sudden cardiac death. With fast, appropriate medical care, survival is possible. Administering cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) – or even just compressions to the chest – can improve the chances of survival until emergency personnel arrive. (http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/sudden-cardiac-arrest/basics/) WHAT ARE THE RISKS OF PRACTICING OR PLAYING AFTER EXPERIENCING THESE SYMPTOMS? There are risks associated with continuing to practice or play after experiencing these symptoms. When the heart stops, so does the blood that flows to the brain and other vital organs. Death or permanent brain damage can occur in just a few minutes. Most people who experience SCA die from it. REMOVAL FROM PLAY Any student-athlete who shows signs or symptoms of SCA must be removed from athletic activity and referred to a licensed health care profession trained specifically in the treatment of cardiac care. The symptoms can happen before, during or after activity. RETURN TO PLAY Before returning to play, the athlete must be evaluated. Clearance to return to play must be in writing. The evaluation must be performed and written clearance be provided by a licensed medical provider. 94


To summarize: • SCA is, by definition, sudden and unexpected. • SCA can happen in individuals who appear healthy and have no known heart disease. • Most people who have SCA die from it, usually within minutes. • Rapid treatment of SCA with a defibrillator can be lifesaving. • Training in recognition of signs of cardiac arrest and SCA, and the availability of AED’s and personnel who possess the skills to use one, may save the life of someone who has had an SCA. (National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute)

Please see Athletic Director for Sudden Cardiac Arrest Awareness Informed Consent Form to Sign NOTE: This document was developed to provide student-athletes and parents/guardians with current and relevant information regarding sudden cardiac arrest. A new form is required to be read, signed, dated and kept on file by the student athlete’s associated school district annually to comply with Connecticut General Statutes Chapter 163, Section 10-149f: SUDDEN CARDIAC ARREST AWARENESS EDUCATION PROGRAM.

Sources: Simons Fund – http://www.simonsfund.org/ Pennsylvania Department of Health – http://www.simonsfund.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/Parent-Handout-SCA.pdf

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PART VIII: LEGAL NOTICES NON-DISCRIMINATION COMPLIANCE STATEMENT Enforcement of Title VI, VII, IX and Section 504 and applicable CT State Statutes It is the policy of the Thompson Board of Education not to discriminate against otherwise qualified individuals in any of its educational programs, activities, or employment practices on the basis of race, sex, national origin, ancestry, color, religion, disability, age, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, genetic information, marital status, protected veteran status or on any other basis prohibited by law. Thompson Public Schools are required to honor the above statutes in all school activities and throughout the physical plant. Should a student or employee believe that he/she has been discriminated against in violation of law or Board policy, s/he may file a complaint by contacting the appropriate coordinator listed below. Staff/Student/Student Title IX Coordinator Dr. Michael Jolin Thompson Public Schools Superintendent (860) 923-9581

Employer/Employee Complaints Sexual Harassment Dr. Michael Jolin Thompson Public Schools Superintendent (860) 923-9581

Section 504 Coordinator Mr. Scott Sugarman Thompson Public Schools Director of Pupil Services (860) 923-9581

For all other complaints of discrimination, contact Dr. Michael Jolin, Thompson Public Schools, 785 Riverside Drive, North Grosvenordale, CT, 06255, (860) 923-9581.

HAZARDOUS MATERIAL IN SCHOOLS-PEST MANAGEMENT/PESTICIDE APPLICATION General Provisions: It is the policy of the Thompson Board of Education to implement an integrated pest management plan to reduce the amounts of pesticides applied in any building, or the grounds of any Thompson public school, by using all available pest control techniques including judicious use of pesticides, when warranted, to maintain a pest population at or below an acceptable level, while decreasing the use of pesticides. The decision to apply pesticide in any building, or the grounds of any Thompson public school is dependent on results of periodic monitoring for pest populations to determine if a pest problem exists that exceeds acceptable threshold levels. No application of pesticide shall be made in any building, or the grounds of any Thompson public school during regular school hours or during planned activities at any school except as provided by Connecticut statute or regulation. Parents or guardians of children in any school and/or staff members in any school may register for prior notice of pesticide application at their school. Each school shall maintain a registry of persons requesting such notice, and shall provide notice to registered individuals in accordance with applicable Connecticut statutory and regulatory provisions. The Superintendent may direct that an emergency application of a lawn care pesticide be made without prior notice to parents or guardians of children in any school and/or staff members in the event of a threat to human health, subject to applicable Connecticut statutory and regulatory provisions. The Superintendent may direct that an emergency application of a pesticide be made during regular school hours or during planned activities at school without prior notice to parents or guardians of children 96


and/or staff members in any school in the event of an immediate threat to human health, subject to applicable Connecticut statutory and regulatory provisions. There shall be no application of any lawn care pesticide on the grounds of any school with students in grade eight (8) or lower, except on an emergency basis, subject to applicable Connecticut statutory and regulatory provisions. Definitions: 1. Pesticide: means a fungicide used on plants, an insecticide, an herbicide or a rodenticide, but does not mean a sanitizer, disinfectant, antimicrobial agent or a pesticide bait. 2. Lawn Care Pesticide: means a pesticide registered by the United States Environmental Protection Agency and labeled pursuant to the federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act for use in lawn, garden and ornamental sites or areas. 3. Integrated Pest Management: means use of all available pest control techniques including judicious use of pesticides, when warranted, to maintain a pest population at or below an acceptable level, while decreasing the use of pesticides. 4. Restricted Use Pesticide: means any pesticide or pesticide use classified as restricted by the administrator of the United States Environmental Protection Agency or by the Connecticut Commissioner of Environmental Protection. Integrated Pest Management Plan: 1. The districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s integrated pest management plan shall be consistent with the model pest control management plan developed by the Connecticut Commissioner of Environmental Protection pursuant to Section 22a-66l of the Connecticut General Statutes. Notice of Pesticide Application: 1. Parents or guardians of children in any school and/or staff members in any school may register for prior notice of pesticide application at their school. 2. Each school shall maintain a registry of persons requesting such notice. 3. Parents or guardians of children in any school and/or staff members in any school who register for prior notice of pesticide application at their school shall be provided notice of each scheduled pesticide application at their school on or before the day that any application of pesticide is to take place. 4. The notice shall include the following information: a. The name of the active ingredient of the pesticide being applied, b. The location of the application on school property, c. The date of the application, d. The name of the school administrator, or designee, who may be contacted for further information. Emergency Pesticide Application: 1. In the event of a threat to human health, the Superintendent may direct that an emergency application of a lawn care pesticide be made without prior notice to parents or guardians of children in any school and/or staff members. 2. In the event of an immediate threat to human health, the Superintendent may direct that an emergency application of a pesticide be made, during regular school hours or during planned activities at school, without prior notice to parents or guardians of children in any school and/or staff members. Such application may only be made if (1) it is necessary to make the application during such period, and (2) such emergency application does not involve a restricted use pesticide. 97


3. In the event of such emergency application, no child may enter the area of such application until it is safe to do so according to the provisions on the pesticide label. 4. In the event of such emergency application, the provision set forth below regarding authorized pesticide applicators shall not apply if the Superintendent determines that it is impractical to obtain the services of any such applicator, provided that the application does not involve a restricted use pesticide. Record of Pesticide Application: 1. A copy of the record of each pesticide application at a school shall be maintained at the school for a period of five (5) years, which record shall include the information required by Section 22a-66a of the Connecticut General Statutes, as it may be amended from time to time. Authorized Pesticide Applicator: 1. No person, other than a pesticide applicator with supervisory certification under Section 22a-54 of the Connecticut General Statutes or a pesticide applicator with operational certification under Section 22a-54 under the direct supervision of a supervisory pesticide applicator, may apply pesticide within any building or on the grounds of any school within the district. Prohibition on Use of Lawn Care Pesticides at District Schools with Students through Grade 8: There shall be no application of any lawn care pesticide on the grounds of any school with students in grade eight (8) or lower, except on an emergency basis, subject to applicable Connecticut statutory and regulatory provisions and the conditions set forth above. Legal References: Connecticut General Statutes: §10-231a §22a-47 §10-231b §22a-54 §10-231d §22a-66a §19a-79a §22a-66l United States Code: Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act, 7 U.S.C. § 136 et seq. Date Adopted: 10/12/99 Policy approved by Policy Committee: April 15, 2013 (Refer to Board of Education Policy ECF - “Hazardous Material.”)

ASBESTOS NOTIFICATION The Thompson Board of Education, in compliance with federal law, has developed an asbestos management plan, concerning the presence or suspected presence of asbestos-type materials within district school buildings, and required inspections and preventive measures related thereto. In accordance with federal law, members of the public, including parents, teachers and other employees, shall be permitted access to the asbestos management plan of the Thompson Board of Education. Upon request, the district shall permit members of the public, including parents, teachers and other employees, to inspect any asbestos management plan. The district shall grant access to such management plans within a reasonable period of time after a request from a member of the public is received.

98


NOTICE OF PARENT/STUDENT RIGHTS UNDER SECTION 504 OF THE REHABILITATION ACT OF 1973 Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (commonly referred to as “Section 504”) is a nondiscrimination statute enacted by the United States Congress. Section 504 prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability. Under Section 504, the school district also has specific responsibilities to identify, evaluate and provide an educational placement for students who are determined to have a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits a major life activity. The school district’s obligation includes providing such eligible students a free appropriate public education (“FAPE”). Section 504 defines FAPE as the provision of regular or special education and related services that are designed to meet the individual educational needs of a student with a disability as adequately as the needs of students without disabilities are met, and that are provided without cost (except for fees imposed on nondisabled students/parents). A student is covered under Section 504 if it is determined that he/she suffers from a mental or physical disability that substantially limits one or more major life activity such as (but not limited to) caring for oneself, performing manual tasks, seeing, hearing, eating, sleeping, walking, standing, lifting, bending, speaking, breathing, learning, reading, concentrating, thinking, communicating and working. A major life activity may also include the operation of a major bodily function, such as an individual’s immune, digestive, respiratory or circulatory systems. A student can be disabled and be covered by Section 504 even if he/she does not qualify for, or receive, special education services under the IDEA. The purpose of this notice is to provide parents/guardians and students with information regarding their rights under Section 504. Under Section 504, you have the right: 1. To be informed of your rights under Section 504; 2. To have your child take part in and receive benefits from the Thompson School District’s education programs without discrimination based on his/her disability. 3. For your child to have equal opportunities to participate in academic, nonacademic and extracurricular activities in your school without discrimination based on his/her disability; 4. To be notified of decisions and the basis for decisions regarding the identification, evaluation, and educational placement of your child under Section 504; 5. If you suspect your child may have a disability, to request an evaluation, at no expense to you, to have an eligibility determination under Section 504, and if eligible, placement decisions made by a team of persons who are knowledgeable of your child, the assessment data, and any placement options; 6. If your child is eligible for services under Section 504, for your child to receive a free appropriate public education (FAPE). This includes the right to receive regular or special education and related services that are designed to meet the individual needs of your child as adequately as the needs of students without disabilities are met. 7. If your child is eligible for services under Section 504, for your child to receive reasonable accommodations and services to allow your child an equal opportunity to participate in school, extracurricular and school-related activities; 8. For your child to be educated with peers who do not have disabilities to the maximum extent appropriate; 9. To have your child educated in facilities and receive services comparable to those provided to nondisabled students; 10. To review all relevant records relating to decisions regarding your child’s Section 504 identification, evaluation, and educational placement; 11. To examine or obtain copies of your child’s educational records at a reasonable cost unless the fee would effectively deny you access to the records; 99


12. To request changes in the educational program of your child, to have your request and related information considered by the team, a decision made by the team, and if denied, an explanation for the team’s decision/determination; 13. To an impartial due process hearing if you disagree with the school district’s decisions regarding your child’s Section 504 identification, evaluation or educational placement. The costs for this hearing are borne by the local school district. You and the student have the right to take part in the hearing and to have an attorney represent you at your expense. 14. To file a local grievance/complaint with the district’s designated Section 504 Coordinator to resolve complaints of discrimination, including, but not limited to, claims of discrimination directly related to the identification, evaluation or placement of your child. 15. To file a formal complaint with the U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights. The Section 504 Coordinator for this district is: Mr. Scott Sugarman 785 Riverside Drive North Grosvenordale, Connecticut, 06255 Phone: 860-923-9581 Fax: 860-923-9638 ssugarman@thompsonpublicschools.org For additional assistance regarding your rights under Section 504, you may contact: Boston Regional Office Connecticut State Department of Education Office for Civil Rights Bureau of Special Education and Pupil Services U.S. Department of Education P.O. Box 2219 8th Floor Hartford, CT 06145 5 Post Office Square, Suite 900 Telephone: (860) 807-2030 Boston, MA 02109-3921 Telephone: (617) 289-0111

SAFE SCHOOL CLIMATE PLAN The Board is committed to creating and maintaining a physically, emotionally, and intellectually safe educational environment free from bullying, teen dating violence, harassment and discrimination. In order to foster an atmosphere conducive to learning, the Board has developed the following Safe School Climate Plan, consistent with state law and Board Policy. This Plan represents a comprehensive approach to addressing bullying, cyberbullying and teen dating violence and sets forth the Board’s expectations for creating a positive school climate and thus preventing, intervening, and responding to incidents of bullying and teen dating violence. Bullying behavior and teen dating violence are strictly prohibited, and students who are determined to have engaged in such behavior are subject to disciplinary action, which may include suspension or expulsion from school. The district’s commitment to addressing bullying behavior and teen dating violence, however, involves a multi-faceted approach, which includes education and the promotion of a positive school climate in which bullying will not be tolerated by students or school staff. I.

Prohibition Against Bullying, Teen Dating Violence and Retaliation A. The Board expressly prohibits any form of bullying behavior and teen dating violence on school grounds; at a school-sponsored or school-related activity, function or program whether on or off school grounds; at a school bus stop; on a school bus or other vehicle owned, leased or used by a local or regional board of education; or through the use of an electronic device or an electronic mobile device owned, leased or used by Board of Education. 100


B.

C. D.

E.

The Board also prohibits any form of bullying behavior outside of the school setting if such bullying (i) creates a hostile environment at school for the student against whom such bullying was directed, (ii) infringes on the rights of the student against whom such bullying was directed at school, or (iii) substantially disrupts the education process or the orderly operation of a school; The Board further prohibits any form of teen dating violence outside of the school setting if such violence substantially disrupts the educational process; In addition to prohibiting student acts that constitute bullying, the Board also prohibits discrimination and/or retaliation against an individual who reports or assists in the investigation of an act of bullying. Students who engage in bullying behavior or teen dating violence in violation of Board Policy and the Safe School Climate Plan shall be subject to school discipline, up to and including expulsion, in accordance with the Board's policies on student discipline, suspension and expulsion, and consistent with state and federal law.

II.

Definition of Bullying A. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bullyingâ&#x20AC;? means the repeated use by one or more students of a written, oral, or electronic communication, such as cyberbullying, directed at or referring to another student attending school in the same district, or a physical act or gesture by one or more students repeatedly directed at another student attending school in the same school district, that: 1. causes physical or emotional harm to such student or damage to such studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s property; 2. places such student in reasonable fear of harm to himself or herself, or of damage to his or her property; 3. creates a hostile environment at school for such student; 4. infringes on the rights of such student at school; or 5. substantially disrupts the education process or the orderly operation of a school. B. Bullying shall include, but not be limited to, a written, verbal or electronic communication or physical act or gesture based on any actual or perceived differentiating characteristics, such as race, color, religion, ancestry, national origin, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, socioeconomic status, academic status, physical appearance, or mental, physical, developmental or sensory disability, or by association with an individual or group who has or is perceived to have one or more of such characteristics.

III.

Other Definitions A.

"Cyberbullying" means any act of bullying through the use of the Internet, interactive and digital technologies, cellular mobile telephone or other mobile electronic devices or any electronic communications.

B.

"Electronic communication" means any transfer of signs, signals, writing, images, sounds, data or intelligence of any nature transmitted in whole or in part by a wire, radio, electromagnetic, photo electronic or photo-optical system;

C.

"Hostile environment" means a situation in which bullying among students is sufficiently severe or pervasive to alter the conditions of the school climate;

D.

"Mobile electronic device" means any hand-held or other portable electronic equipment capable of providing data communication between two or more individuals, including, but not limited to, a text messaging device, a paging device, a personal digital assistant, a laptop computer, equipment that is capable of playing a video game or a digital video disk, or equipment on which digital images are taken or transmitted; 101


IV.

E.

"Outside of the school setting" means at a location, activity or program that is not school related, or through the use of an electronic device or a mobile electronic device that is not owned, leased or used by a local or regional board of education;

F.

"Prevention and intervention strategy" may include, but is not limited to, (1) implementation of a positive behavioral interventions and supports process or another evidence-based model approach for safe school climate or for the prevention of bullying identified by the Department of Education, (2) school rules prohibiting bullying, harassment and intimidation and establishing appropriate consequences for those who engage in such acts, (3) adequate adult supervision of outdoor areas, hallways, the lunchroom and other specific areas where bullying is likely to occur, (4) inclusion of grade-appropriate bullying education and prevention curricula in kindergarten through high school, (5) individual interventions with the bully, parents and school employees, and interventions with the bullied child, parents and school employees, (6) school-wide training related to safe school climate, (7) student peer training, education and support, and (8) promotion of parent involvement in bullying prevention through individual or team participation in meetings, trainings and individual interventions.

G.

"School climate" means the quality and character of school life with a particular focus on the quality of the relationships within the school community between and among students and adults.

H.

"School employee" means (1) a teacher, substitute teacher, school administrator, school superintendent, guidance counselor, psychologist, social worker, nurse, physician, school paraprofessional or coach employed by a local or regional board of education or working in a public elementary, middle or high school; or (2) any other individual who, in the performance of his or her duties, has regular contact with students and who provides services to or on behalf of students enrolled in a public elementary, middle or high school, pursuant to a contract with the local or regional board of education.

I.

“School-Sponsored Activity” shall mean any activity conducted on or off school property (including school buses and other school-related vehicles) that is sponsored, recognized or authorized by the Board of Education.

J.

“Teen dating violence” means any act of physical, emotional or sexual abuse, including stalking, harassing and threatening, that occurs between two students who are currently in or who have recently been in a dating relationship.

Leadership and Administrative Responsibilities A.

Safe School Climate Coordinator The Superintendent shall appoint, from existing school district staff, a District Safe School Climate Coordinator (“Coordinator”). The Coordinator shall: 1.

be responsible for implementing the district’s Safe School Climate Plan (“Plan”);

2.

collaborate with Safe School Climate Specialists, the Board, and the Superintendent to prevent, identify and respond to bullying in district schools;

3.

provide data and information, in collaboration with the Superintendent, to the Department of Education regarding bullying;

4.

meet with Safe School Climate Specialists at least twice during the school year to discuss issues relating to bullying the school district and to make recommendations concerning amendments to the district’s Plan. 102


B.

Safe School Climate Specialist The Principal of each school (or principal’s designee) shall serve as the Safe School Climate Specialist. The Safe School Climate Specialist shall investigate or supervise the investigation of reported acts of bullying and act as the primary school official responsible for preventing, identifying and responding to reports of bullying in the school.

V.

VI.

Development and Review of Safe School Climate Plan A.

The Principal of each school shall establish a committee or designate at least one existing committee (“Committee”) in the school to be responsible for developing and fostering a safe school climate and addressing issues relating to bullying in the school. Such committee shall include at least one parent/guardian of a student enrolled in the school, as appointed by the school principal.

B.

The Committee shall: 1) receive copies of completed reports following bullying investigations; 2) identify and address patterns of bullying among students in the school; 3) implement the provisions of the school security and safety plan, if applicable, regarding the collection, evaluation and reporting of information relating to instances of disturbing or threatening behavior that may not meet the definition of bullying, 4) review and amend school policies relating to bullying; 5) review and make recommendations to the Coordinator regarding the Safe School Climate Plan based on issues and experiences specific to the school; 6) educate students, school employees and parents/guardians on issues relating to bullying; 7) collaborate with the Coordinator in the collection of data regarding bullying; and 8) perform any other duties as determined by the Principal that are related to the prevention, identification and response to school bullying.

C.

Any parent/guardian serving as a member of the Committee shall not participate in any activities which may compromise the confidentiality of any student, including, but not limited to receiving copies of investigation reports, or identifying or addressing patterns of bullying among students in the school.

D.

The Board of Education shall approve the Safe School Climate Plan developed pursuant to Board policy and submit such plan to the Department of Education. Not later than thirty (30) calendar days after approval by the Board, the Board shall make such plan available on the Board's and each individual school in the school district's web site and ensure that the Safe School Climate Plan is included in the school district's publication of the rules, procedures and standards of conduct for schools and in all student handbooks.

Procedures for Reporting and Investigating Complaints of Bullying A.

Students and parents (or guardians of students) may file written reports of bullying. Written reports of bullying shall be reasonably specific as to the basis for the report, including the time and place of the alleged conduct, the number of incidents, the target of the suspected bullying, and the names of potential witnesses. Such reports may be filed with any building administrator and/or the Safe School Climate Specialist (i.e. building principal), and all reports shall be forwarded to the Safe School Climate Specialist for review and actions consistent with this Plan.

B.

Students may make anonymous reports of bullying to any school employee. Students may also request anonymity when making a report, even if the student’s identity is known to the school employee. In cases where a student requests anonymity, the Safe School Climate Specialist or his/her designee shall meet with the student (if the student’s identity is known) to review the request for anonymity and discuss the impact that maintaining the anonymity of the complainant may have on the investigation and on any possible remedial action. All 103


anonymous reports shall be reviewed and reasonable action will be taken to address the situation, to the extent such action may be taken that does not disclose the source of the report, and is consistent with the due process rights of the student(s) alleged to have committed acts of bullying. No disciplinary action shall be taken solely on the basis of an anonymous report.

VII.

C.

School employees who witness acts of bullying or receive reports of bullying shall orally notify the Safe School Climate Specialist or another school administrator if the Safe School Climate Specialist is unavailable, not later than one (1) school day after such school employee witnesses or receives a report of bullying. The school employee shall then file a written report not later than two (2) school days after making such oral report.

D.

The Safe School Climate Specialist shall be responsible for reviewing any anonymous reports of bullying and shall investigate or supervise the investigation of all reports of bullying and ensure that such investigation is completed promptly after receipt of any written reports. The Safe School Climate Specialist shall also be responsible for promptly notifying the parents or guardians of the student alleged to have committed an act or acts of bullying, and the parents or guardians of the student against whom such alleged act or acts were directed, that an investigation has commenced. In order to allow the district to adequately investigate complaints filed by a student or parent/guardian, the parent of the student suspected of being bullied should be asked to provide consent to permit the release of that studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s name in connection with the investigation process, unless the student and/or parent has requested anonymity.

E.

In investigating reports of bullying, the Safe School Climate Specialist or designee will consider all available information known, including the nature of the allegations and the ages of the students involved. The Safe School Climate Specialist will interview witnesses, as necessary, reminding the alleged perpetrator and other parties that retaliation is strictly prohibited and will result in disciplinary action.

Responding to Verified Acts of Bullying A.

Following investigation, if acts of bullying are verified, the Safe School Climate Specialist or designee shall notify the parents or guardians of the students against whom such acts were directed as well as the parents or guardians of the students who commit such acts of bullying of the finding not later than forty-eight hours after the investigation is completed. This notification shall include a description of the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s response to the acts of bullying. In providing such notification, however, care must be taken to respect the statutory privacy rights of other students, including the perpetrator of such bullying. The specific disciplinary consequences imposed on the perpetrator, or personally identifiable information about a student other than the parent/guardianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own child, may not be disclosed except as provided by law.

B.

In any instance in which bullying is verified, the Safe School Climate Specialist or designee shall invite the parents or guardians of the student against whom such act was directed to a meeting to communicate the measures being taken by the school to ensure the safety of the student/victim and policies and procedures in place to prevent further acts of bullying. The Safe School Climate Specialist or designee shall also invite the parents or guardians of a student who commits any verified act of bullying to a meeting, separate and distinct from the previously described meeting, to discuss specific interventions undertaken by the school to prevent further acts of bullying. The invitation may be made simultaneous with the notification described above in Section VII.A. 104


C.

If bullying is verified, the Safe School Climate Specialist or designee shall develop a student safety support plan for any student against whom an act of bullying was directed. Such support plan will include safety measures to protect against further acts of bullying.

D.

A specific written intervention plan shall be developed to address repeated incidents of bullying against a single individual or recurrently perpetrated bullying incidents by the same individual. The written intervention plan may include counseling, discipline and other appropriate remedial actions as determined by the Safe School Climate Specialist or designee, and may also incorporate a student safety support plan, as appropriate.

E.

Notice to Law Enforcement If the Principal of a school (or his/her designee) reasonably believes that any act of bullying constitutes a criminal offense, he/she shall notify appropriate law enforcement. Notice shall be consistent with the Boardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s obligations under state and federal law and Board policy regarding the disclosure of personally identifiable student information. In making this determination, the Principal or his/her designee, may consult with the school resource officer, if any, and other individuals the principal or designee deems appropriate.

F.

VIII.

IX.

If a bullying complaint raises a concern about discrimination or harassment on the basis of a legally protected classifications (such as race, religion, color, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, age, disability or gender identity or expression), the Safe School Climate Specialist or designee shall also coordinate any bullying investigation with other appropriate personnel within the district as appropriate (e.g. Title IX Coordinator, Section 504 Coordinator etc.), so as to ensure that any such bullying investigation complies with the requirements of such policies regarding nondiscrimination.

Teen Dating Violence A.

The school strictly prohibits, and takes very seriously any instances of, teen dating violence, as defined above. The school recognizes that teen dating violence may take many different forms and may also be considered bullying and/or sexual harassment.

B.

Students and parents (or guardians of students) may bring verbal or written complaints regarding teen dating violence to any building administrator. The building administrator shall review and address the complaint, which may include referral of the complaint to the Safe School Climate Specialist and/or Title IX Coordinator.

C.

Prevention and intervention strategies concerning teen dating violence shall be implemented in accordance with Section X below. Discipline, up to and including expulsion, may be imposed against the perpetrator of teen dating violence, whether such conduct occurs on or off campus, in accordance with Board policy and consistent with federal and state law.

Documentation and Maintenance of Log A.

Each school shall maintain written reports of bullying, along with supporting documentation received and/or created as a result of bullying investigations, consistent with the Boardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s obligations under state and federal law. Any educational record containing personally identifiable student information pertaining to an individual student shall be maintained in a confidential manner, and shall not be disclosed to third parties without written prior written consent of a parent, guardian or eligible student, except as permitted under Board policy and state and federal law.

B.

The Principal of each school shall maintain a list of the number of verified acts of bullying in the school and this list shall be available for public inspection upon request. Consistent with district obligations under state and federal law regarding student privacy, the log shall not 105


contain any personally identifiable student information, or any information that alone or in combination would allow a reasonable person in the school community to identify the students involved. Accordingly, the log should be limited to basic information such as the number of verified acts, name of school and/or grade level and relevant date. Given that any determination of bullying involves repeated acts, each investigation that results in a verified act of bullying for that school year shall be tallied as one verified act of bullying unless the specific actions that are the subject of each report involve separate and distinct acts of bullying. The list shall be limited to the number of verified acts of bullying in each school and shall not set out the particulars of each verified act, including, but not limited to any personally identifiable student information, which is confidential information by law. C.

X.

The Principal of each school shall report the number of verified acts of bullying in the school annually to the Department of Education in such manner as prescribed by the Commissioner of Education.

Other Prevention and Intervention Strategies A.

Bullying behavior and teen dating violence can take many forms and can vary dramatically in the nature of the offense and the impact the behavior may have on the victim and other students. Accordingly, there is no one prescribed response to verified acts of bullying or to teen dating violence. While conduct that rises to the level of “bullying” or “teen dating violence,” as defined above, will generally warrant traditional disciplinary action against the perpetrator of such bullying or teen dating violence, whether and to what extent to impose disciplinary action (e.g., detention, in-school suspension, suspension or expulsion) is a matter for the professional discretion of the building principal (or responsible program administrator or his/her designee). No disciplinary action may be taken solely on the basis of an anonymous complaint of bullying. As discussed below, schools may also consider appropriate alternative to traditional disciplinary sanctions, including age-appropriate consequences and other restorative or remedial interventions.

B.

A specific written intervention plan shall be developed to address repeated incidents of bullying against a single individual or recurrently perpetrated bullying incidents by the same individual. This plan may include safety provisions, as described above, for students against whom acts of bullying have been verified and may include other interventions such as counseling, discipline, and other appropriate remedial or restorative actions as determined by the responsible administrator.

C.

The following sets forth possible interventions which may also be utilized to enforce the Board’s prohibition against bullying and teen dating violence: i.

Non-disciplinary interventions When verified acts of bullying are identified early and/or when such verified acts of bullying do not reasonably require a disciplinary response, students may be counseled as to the definition of bullying, its prohibition, and their duty to avoid any conduct that could be considered bullying. Students may also be subject to other forms of restorative discipline or remedial actions, appropriate to the age of the students and nature of the behavior. If a complaint arises out of conflict between students or groups of students, peer or other forms of mediation may be considered. Special care, however, is warranted in referring such cases to peer mediation. A power imbalance may make the process intimidating for the victim and therefore inappropriate. In such cases, the victim 106


should be given additional support. Alternatively, peer mediation may be deemed inappropriate to address the concern. When an act or acts of teen dating violence are identified, the students involved may be counseled as to the seriousness of the conduct, the prohibition of teen dating violence, and their duty to avoid any such conduct. Students may also be subject to other forms of restorative discipline or remedial actions, appropriate to the age of the students and nature of the behavior. ii.

Disciplinary interventions When acts of bullying are verified or teen dating violence occurs, and a disciplinary response is warranted, students are subject to the full range of disciplinary consequences. Anonymous complaints of bullying, however, shall not be the basis for disciplinary action. In-school suspension and suspension may be imposed only after informing the accused perpetrator of the reasons for the proposed suspension and giving him/her an opportunity to explain the situation, in accordance with the Boardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Student Discipline policy. Expulsion may be imposed only after a hearing before the Board of Education, a committee of the Board or an impartial hearing officer designated by the Board of Education in accordance with the Boardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Student Discipline policy. This consequence shall normally be reserved for serious incidents of bullying and teen dating violence, and/or when past interventions have not been successful in eliminating bullying behavior.

iii.

Interventions for bullied students and victims of teen dating violence The building principal (or other responsible program administrator) or his/her designee shall intervene in order to address incidents of bullying or teen dating violence against a single individual. Intervention strategies for a bullied student or victim of teen dating violence may include the following: a. Referral to a school counselor, psychologist or other appropriate social or mental health service; b. Increased supervision and monitoring of student to observe and intervene in bullying situations or instances of teen dating violence; c. Encouragement of student to seek help when victimized or witnessing victimization; d. Peer mediation or other forms of mediation, where appropriate; e. Student Safety Support plan; f. Restitution and/or restorative interventions; and g. Periodic follow-up by the Safe School Climate Specialist and/or Title IX Coordinator with the bullied student or victim of teen dating violence.

iv.

General Prevention and Intervention Strategies In addition to the prompt investigation of complaints of bullying and direct intervention when acts of bullying are verified, other district actions may ameliorate potential problems with bullying in school or at school-sponsored activities. Additional district actions may also ameliorate potential problems with teen dating 107


violence. While no specific action is required, and school needs for specific prevention and intervention strategies may vary from time to time, the following list of potential prevention and intervention strategies shall serve as a resource for administrators, teachers and other professional employees in each school. Such prevention and intervention strategies may include, but are not limited to: a.

b. c.

d. e.

f. g. h.

i. j.

k. l. m. n. o. p. q. D.

School rules prohibiting bullying, teen dating violence, harassment and intimidation and establishing appropriate consequences for those who engage in such acts; Adequate adult supervision of outdoor areas, hallways, the lunchroom and other specific areas where bullying or teen dating violence are likely to occur; Inclusion of grade-appropriate bullying and teen dating violence education and prevention curricula in kindergarten through high school, which may include instruction regarding building safe and positive school communities including developing healthy relationships and preventing dating violence as deemed appropriate for older students; Individual interventions with the perpetrator, parents and school employees, and interventions with the bullied student, parents and school employees; School-wide training related to safe school climate, which training may include Title IX/Sexual harassment training, Section 504/ADA Training, cultural diversity/multicultural education or other training in federal and state civil rights legislation or other topics relevant to safe school climate; Student peer training, education and support; and Promotion of parent involvement in bullying prevention through individual or team participation in meetings, trainings and individual interventions; Implementation of a positive behavioral interventions and supports process or another evidence-based model approach for safe school climate or for the prevention of bullying and teen dating violence, including any such program identified by the Department of Education; Respectful responses to bullying and teen dating violence concerns raised by students, parents or staff; Planned professional development programs addressing prevention and intervention strategies, which training may include school violence prevention, conflict resolution and prevention of bullying and teen dating violence, with a focus in evidence based practices concerning same; Use of peers to help ameliorate the plight of victims and include them in group activities; Avoidance of sex-role stereotyping; Continuing awareness and involvement on the part of school employees and parents with regards to prevention and intervention strategies; Modeling by teachers of positive, respectful, and supportive behavior toward students; Creating a school atmosphere of team spirit and collaboration that promotes appropriate social behavior by students in support of others; Employing classroom strategies that instruct students how to work together in a collaborative and supportive atmosphere; Culturally competent school-based curriculum focusing on social-emotional learning, self-awareness and self-regulation.

In addition to prevention and intervention strategies, administrators, teachers and other professional employees may find opportunities to educate students about bullying and help 108


eliminate bullying behavior through class discussions, counseling, and reinforcement of socially-appropriate behavior. Administrators, teachers and other professional employees should intervene promptly whenever they observe mean-spirited student conduct, even if such conduct does not meet the formal definition of “bullying.” E. XI.

XII.

Funding for the school-based bullying intervention and school climate improvement strategy may originate from public, private, federal or philanthropic sources.

Annual Notice and Training A.

Students, and parents or guardians of students shall be notified annually of the process by which students may make reports of bullying.

B.

The Board shall provide for the inclusion of language in student codes of conduct concerning bullying.

C.

At the beginning of each school year, each school shall provide all school employees with a written or electronic copy of the school district’s safe school climate plan and require that all school employees annually complete training on the identification, prevention and response to bullying as required by law.

D.

After July 1, 2014, any person appointed by the district to serve as district safe school climate coordinator shall complete mental health and first aid training offered by the Commissioner of Mental Health and Addiction Services.

School Climate Assessments

Biennially, the Board shall require each school in the district to complete an assessment using the school climate assessment instruments, including surveys, approved and disseminated by the Connecticut State Department of Education. The Board shall collect the school climate assessments for each school in the district and submit such assessments to the Connecticut State Department of Education. Legal References: Conn. Gen. Stat. § 10-222d Conn. Gen. Stat. §§ 10-233a through 10-233f Connecticut State Department of Education Circular Letter C-8, Series 2008-2009 (March 16, 2009) Public Act 14-172, “An Act Concerning Improving Employment Opportunities Through Education And Ensuring Safe School Climates” Public Act 14-232, “An Act Concerning The Review And Approval Of Safe School Climate Plans By The Department Of Education And A Student Safety Hotline Feasibility Study” Public Act 14-234, “An Act Concerning Domestic Violence And Sexual Assault” COMPUTER AGREEMENT The Thompson Board of Education has a policy regarding computer use in the schools. This policy is to be adhered to by all students. A parent/guardian signature from the Handbook Receipt page of this handbook will satisfy the “written permission” requirement of this policy. A complete copy of the policy with state law cited is found below. Any violation of the Computer Use Policy, misuse of the computer system, Internet, email, or other technological hard/software, will be dealt with by the school administration. Students are reminded that the Student Discipline Policy, Bullying Intervention Policy, Safe School Climate Plan, Sexual Harassment Policy, and all school rules and regulations also govern use of school computers and other devices and the use of personal devices while using the school internet servers. 109


“Non-Discrimination Statement” In accordance with Federal Law and U.S. Department of Agriculture policy, the Thompson Public Schools Food Service Department is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age or disability. If you feel you have been treated unfairly, you may file a complaint of discrimination by writing USDA, Director, Office of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington D.C. 20250-9410 or call toll free (866) 632-9992 (Voice). Individuals who are hearing impaired or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800) 877-8339; or (800) 845-6136 (Spanish). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer. STUDENT RECORDS The Thompson schools are required to maintain records on each student. These records contain academic information, health status, and possibly special needs information. Records are subject to three categories: Category A - Grades, awards, attendance, general information, such as date of birth, address, parents, etc., maintained for 50 years after date of graduation. Category B - Information used for a limited period of time, such as profiles of tests, Standardized Achievement scores, educational or vocational interests, speech and hearing evaluations, and disciplinary files of any kind, etc., will be destroyed six years after graduation. Category C - Planning and placement team meetings, referrals, neurological or psychiatric evaluations, school social work summaries, health records, including medication, inoculations, etc., will be destroyed six years after graduation. Parents have the right to examine school records pertaining to their children less than eighteen years of age. The record must be made available for parent inspection within a two week period (10 school days). Upon request, copies of any information found in the student’s record may be made available for a nominal fee. Graduates have a right to copy any information that has been collected before records are destroyed. With a few exceptions, no individuals or organizations but the parent, student, and school personnel working directly with the student are allowed to have access to information in the student record without the specific, informed, written consent of the parent or student. In Thompson, the building principal in each school, under the direction of Mr. Scott Sugarman, the custodian of records, has the responsibility of maintaining, reviewing, discarding, and preserving the confidentiality and security of student records. A complete set of regulations pertaining to student records may be found with the custodian of records. (Refer to Board of Education Policy – “Student Records.”) TRANSCRIPTS A transcript is the official school report of a student’s dates of attendance, courses taken, and grades and credits received. Transcripts are most often requested by colleges, employers, and receiving high schools when a student moves out of town. Copies of transcripts may be requested by contacting the school counselors’ office. A release of records form must be signed before records will be sent. Release forms may be signed by a student 18 years and older, by a parent, or a legal guardian. Official records are stamped with the school seal and are delivered by mail only. Transcripts that are hand carried are identified as “Student Copy” and are not considered official records. Request for records require a 48-hour notice. (Refer to Board of Education Policy – “Student Records.”) 110


FERPA NOTICE THOMPSON PUBLIC SCHOOLS NOTIFICATION OF RIGHTS UNDER FEDERAL EDUCATIONAL RIGHTS AND PRIVACY ACT (FERPA) The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), 20 U.S.C. § 1232g, et seq., affords parents and eligible students (i.e., students over 18, emancipated minors, and those attending post-secondary educational institutions) certain rights with respect to the student's education records. They are: 1.

The right to inspect and review the student's education records within forty-five (45) calendar days of the day the District receives a request for access. Parents or eligible students should submit to the school principal a written request that identifies the record(s) they wish to inspect. The principal will make arrangements for access and notify the parents or eligible student of the time and place where the records may be inspected.

2.

The right to request the amendment of the student's education records that the parents or eligible student believe are inaccurate or misleading, or otherwise violate the student's privacy rights. Parents or eligible students who wish to ask the District to amend a record should write the school principal, clearly identify the part of the record the parents or eligible student want changed, and specify why it should be changed. If the District decides not to amend the record as requested by the parents or eligible student, the District will notify the parents or eligible student of the decision and advise them of their right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the parents or eligible student when notified of the right to a hearing.

3.

The right to privacy of personally identifiable information in the student’s education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. One exception that permits disclosure without consent is disclosure to a school official with legitimate interests. A school official is a person employed by the District as an administrator, supervisor, instructor or support staff member (including health or medical staff and law enforcement unit personnel); a person serving on the Board of Education; a person or company with whom the District has outsourced services or functions it would otherwise use its own employees to perform (such as an attorney, auditor, medical consultant, or therapist); or a parent or student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee; or a parent, student, or other volunteer assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility. Upon request, the District discloses a student's education record without consent to officials of another school, including other public schools, charter schools, and post-secondary institutions, in which the student seeks or intends to enroll, or is already enrolled if the disclosure is for purposes of the student’s enrollment or transfer.

4.

The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the District to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the agency that administers FERPA is: Family Policy Compliance Office U.S. Department of Education 400 Maryland Avenue, S.W. Washington, DC 20202-4605 111


Unless notified in writing by a parent or eligible student to the contrary within two weeks of the date of this notice, the school district will be permitted to disclose "Directory Information" concerning a student, without the consent of a parent or eligible student. Directory Information includes information contained in an education record of a student that would not generally be considered harmful or an invasion of privacy if disclosed. It includes, but is not limited to, the parent’s name, address and/or e-mail address, the student’s name, address, telephone number, e-mail address, photographic, computer and/or video images, date and place of birth, major field(s) of study, grade level, enrollment status (full-time; part-time), participation in school-sponsored activities or athletics, weight and height (if the student is a member of an athletic team), dates of attendance, degrees, honors and awards received, the most recent previous school(s) attended and student identification numbers for the limited purposes of displaying a student identification card. The student identification number, however, will not be the only identifier used when obtaining access to educational records or data. Directory information does not include a student’s social security number, student identification number or other unique personal identifier used by the student for purposes of accessing or communicating in electronic systems unless the identifier cannot be used to gain access to education records except when used in conjunction with one or more factors that authenticate the user’s identity, such as a PIN or password. The school district may disclose directory information about students after they are no longer in enrollment in the school district. Notwithstanding the foregoing, the district will continue to honor any valid objection to the disclosure of directory information made while a student was in attendance unless the student rescinds the objection. An objection to the disclosure of directory information shall not prevent the school district from disclosing or requiring a student to disclose the student’s name, identified or institutional email address in a class in which the student is enrolled. Parents and/or eligible students may not use the right to opt out of directory information disclosures to prohibit the school district from requiring students to wear or display a student identification card. The written objection to the disclosure of directory information shall be good for only one school year. School districts are legally obligated to provide military recruiters and institutions of higher learning, upon request, with the names, addresses and telephone numbers of secondary school students, unless the secondary student or the parent of the student objects to such disclosure in writing. Such objection shall be in writing and shall be effective for one school year. In all other circumstances, information designated as directory information will not be released when requested by a third party unless the release of such information is determined by the administration to be in the educational interest of the school district and is consistent with the district’s obligations under both state and federal law. PPRA NOTICE THOMPSON PUBLIC SCHOOLS NOTIFICATION OF RIGHTS UNDER THE PROTECTION OF PUPIL RIGHTS AMENDMENT (PPRA) The Protection of Pupil Rights Amendment (PPRA), 20 U.S.C. § 1232h, affords parents and eligible students (i.e. students over 18 or emancipated minors) certain rights with respect to the administration of student surveys, the collection and use of personal information, and the administration of certain physical exams. These rights include: 1.

the right of a parent to inspect, upon request, a survey created by a third party before the survey is administered or distributed by a school to a student; 112


2.

the right of a parent to inspect, upon request, any survey concerning one or more of the following confidential topics: a. b. c. d. e.

3.

political affiliations or beliefs of the student or the student’s parent; mental or psychological problems of the student or the student’s family; sex behavior or attitudes; illegal, anti-social, self-incriminating, or demeaning behavior; critical appraisals of other individuals with whom respondents have close family relationships; f. legally recognized privileged relationships, such as those with lawyers, doctors, physicians, or ministers; g. religious practices, affiliations, or beliefs of the student or the student’s parent; or h. income, other than as required by law to determine eligibility for certain programs or for receiving financial assistance under such programs; the right of a parent to consent before a student is required to submit to a survey that concerns one or more of the confidential topics (see #2, above, a-h) if the survey is funded in whole or in part by a program of the U.S. Department of Education;

4.

the right of a parent to inspect, upon request, any instructional material used as part of the educational curriculum. Instructional material means any instructional content that is provided to a student, regardless of its format, including printed or representational materials, audio-visual materials, and materials in electronic or digital formats (such as materials accessible through the Internet) but does not include academic tests or academic assessments;

5.

the right of a parent to inspect, upon request, any instrument used in the collection of personal information from students gathered for the purpose of marketing, selling or otherwise providing that information to others for that purpose. Personal information means individually identifiable information including, a student or parent’s first and last name, a home or other physical address; a telephone number or a social security number;

6.

the right of a parent whose student(s) is scheduled to participate in the specific activities provided below to be directly notified of the specific or approximate dates of the following activities, as well as the right of a parent or eligible student to opt-out of participation in these activities: a.

b. c.

activities involving the collection, disclosure, or use of personal information collected from students for the purpose of marketing or selling that information (or otherwise providing that information to others for that purpose); the administration of any survey containing confidential topics (see #2, above, a-h); or any non-emergency, invasive physical examination or screening that is required as a condition of attendance, administered by the school and unnecessary to protect the immediate health and safety of a student. Such examinations do not include a hearing, vision, or scoliosis screening or other examinations permitted or required by State law.

Parents and eligible students may not opt-out of activities relating to the collection, disclosure, and/or use of personal information collected from students for the exclusive purpose of developing, evaluating, or providing education products or services for, or to students or educational institutions, such as the following: a.

college or other post-secondary education recruitment, or military recruitment; 113


b. c. d.

book clubs, magazines, and programs providing access to low-cost literary products; curriculum and instructional materials used by elementary and secondary schools; tests and assessments used by elementary and secondary schools to provide cognitive, evaluative, diagnostic, clinical, aptitude, or achievement information about students; e. the sale by students of products or services to raise funds for school-related or education-related activities; f. student recognition programs. To protect student privacy in compliance with the PPRA, the THOMPSON school district has adopted policies regarding these rights. Parents and/or eligible students who believe their rights have been violated under the PPRA may contact: Family Policy Compliance Office U.S. Department of Education 400 Maryland Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20202-4605

Date Revised:

January 14, 2013

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TMHS 2016-2017 Student Handbook  
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