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supporting transitions A Guide for Parents and Families 2011-2012 The Division of Student Affairs


How Can Families

HELP?

Welcome to the Ram Family! Many of you attended an on-campus Preview or Next Step Orientation prior to your student’s enrollment and met one of us during the Parent & Family Transitions Session. Blanche Hughes, Vice President of Student Affairs, Jody Donovan, Interim Dean of Students and Executive Director of Parent and Family Programs, and Kacee Collard Jarnot, Assistant Director of Parent and Family Programs are a part of a larger team dedicated to supporting students’ learning in and out of the classroom. We are partners with you, focused on your student’s success, academic excellence, and ultimately, graduation! This calendar serves as a “handbook” for parents and families. It includes helpful information regarding typical monthly student issues and concerns, deadlines, programs, and strategies to support students throughout their Colorado State University experience. Each page also includes suggestions for keeping the lines of communication open between you and your student. This publication is just one component of our comprehensive Parent and Family Program at Colorado State. Please visit the parent and family website at http://parentsandfamily.colostate.edu to see the vast types of support services and information available to you. We encourage you to use these resources because we know you play an integral role in your student’s success at Colorado State University.

• Help your student understand that change is exciting, but it can also be stressful. Whether your student is a first-time or transfer college student or living off campus for the first time, acknowledge the impact of change in his or her life. • Let your student know by what you say and do that their importance in the family has not changed, but your interactions may change. Left to right: Jody Donovan, Blanche Hughes, and Kacee Collard Jarnot

We’d like to highlight the RAMFAM Association as an excellent way to learn more about CSU, contribute your time and talents to improving programs and services for prospective and current students and their families, and be connected to the University. One parent enthusiastically shared, “being a part of RAMFAM allows me to get the insider’s information and be involved without my student feeling like I’m hovering.” Dates and times of the monthly meetings as well as a description of the RAMFAM priorities are printed in this calendar. In closing, you have two direct liaisons with the University: Jody Donovan and Kacee Collard Jarnot. They are available by phone at (970) 491-5312, email (jody.donovan@ colostate.edu or kacee.collard@colostate.edu) or in person (201 Administration Building). They can answer questions or connect you to others who can provide additional assistance regarding your specific questions or concerns. Thank you for sharing your student with the Colorado State University community and we look forward to interacting with you during your student’s academic career.

• Plan a time when you and your student can sort through incoming information and take appropriate action. • Dialogue about expectations regarding academics, student employment, friends, living arrangements, finances, and other important topics. • Be aware of your own and your student’s emotional ups and downs.

Sincerely, Blanche Hughes Vice President for Student Affairs

Can We

TALK?

(Conversation starters for you and your student)

Jody Donovan Interim Dean of Students/Executive Director of Parent and Family Programs

student and Family

ISSUES

Kacee Collard Jarnot Assistant Director of Parent and Family Programs

Preparation for College

• Encourage your first year or transfer student to sign up for a First-Year Mentoring Program. More information can be found at www.otp.colostate.edu. Jody Donovan and Kacee Collard Jarnot

Parent and Family Programs Phone: (970)491-5312

• How are you feeling about the upcoming school year? • What are some challenges you think you might face this year?

July can be a month filled with mixed emotions as your student prepares for college. It can be a busy and exciting time as you and your student pack and shop for school. On the other hand, it can also be a time when family members and students experience feelings of sadness, nervousness, or anxiety. Families should be aware of the many emotional ups and downs of this time. Increase communication with your student and discuss your concerns and expectations for the coming months. Check out the parent and family website for more information and great resources: http://parentsandfamily.colostate.edu/.

E-mail: jody.donovan@colostate.edu or kacee.collard@colostate.edu Location: 201 Administration Building


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Parent’s Day (24) Ramadan (begins at sundown) (31) 2010-2011 Parking Permits Expire (31)

Notes Division of student affairs


How Can Families

HELP? • Talk with your student about how often you will communicate by phone, letter, text message or email. • Talk about visits home or family visits to campus. This tends to change semester by semester. • If your student is living in the residence halls, encourage him/ her to get to know the Resident Assistant (RA). If your student is living off campus, encourage him/ her to get to know their neighbors and visit Off-Campus Life in the Lory Student Center for tips on how to be a good neighbor. • Encourage your student to participate in Ram Welcome activities four days before school starts. Go to www. ramwelcome.colostate.edu for a listing of this year’s events. • Reassure your student that adjustments are common and expected for first-year and continuing students.

Can We

TALK?

(Conversation starters for you and your student)

• How was your first week of classes? • Tell me about your friends . . .

student and Family

ISSUES

Transition

College is a time of transition for students and families. Your student may be feeling a bit overwhelmed with the campus, new and unfamiliar services, different policies and procedures, a new roommate(s), and few familiar faces. Changes for family members who are staying at home can also cause concern for you and the rest of the family. Frequent phone calls, emails, text messages or letters will help everyone in this time of transition. Returning to campus brings about choices and decisions regarding new relationships, academic and social challenges, as well as opportunities. Acknowledging the three phases of transition may be helpful: letting go of the old, the neutral zone in between, and the new beginning. Check out William Bridges’ Transitions: Making Sense of Life’s Changes (2004) as a helpful resource.

• Encourage your student to look into joining a fraternity or sorority. For more information, visit www.csugreeks.celect.org/home. • Establish or reestablish expectations for budgeting and finances. • Register to attend Homecoming & Family Weekend, September 30 - October 2, 2011 and encourage grandparents, siblings, etc. to also attend.


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Ram Welcome

Student Veterns Orientation

Summer grades available on RAMweb

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Ram Welcome

Ram Welcome

Pick up reserved text books from the CSU bookstore (ends 8/21)

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Ram Welcome

First Day of Fall Classes

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Women’s Equality Day

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Notes Division of student affairs


How Can Families

HELP? • Ask your student if you can come to visit and go out for dinner if you are nearby. Be sensitive about your student’s schedule. • Reassure your student that feeling overwhelmed is normal for students learning to manage new academic demands and personal responsibilities. • Suggest exploration of opportunities for involvement in the residence hall or a student organization. Your student can ask their RA about involvement opportunities in the halls, and/or can visit the SLiCE Office to learn about the variety of ways to get involved at CSU! • Talk honestly with your student about family issues, but avoid creating guilt because he or she is not at home or available to help.

Can We

TALK?

(Conversation starters for you and your student)

• How do you decide when something isn’t safe for you or your friends? • What communities and/or groups have you gotten involved with on campus? If you haven’t gotten involved yet, have you found groups you would be interested in joining?

student and Family

ISSUES

• Anticipate that your student may call home to let off steam, share worries or sort through situations out loud. Use these moments as opportunities to let them do their own problem-solving by listening, asking questions, and affirming your belief in their decision making.

Safety

Helping your student stay safe is a high priority for families and Colorado State University. There are several ways you can help encourage your student to take personal responsibility: • Advise them to lock their doors when they leave their rooms, apartments, houses and cars.

• Remind your student not to leave valuables in plain sight or unattended in vehicles or rooms.

• Check your homeowners insurance to see if it covers property in your student’s residence hall room or off-campus residence. If not, purchase renter’s insurance.

• Encourage them to use the CSU Police Department Safewalk program (491-1155) if they are out late at night on campus.

• Remind your student to use safe practices when surfing the internet. Encourage your student to use sound judgment and not post personal or incriminating information on social network websites such as Facebook, MySpace, etc. See the ACNS Acceptable Use Policy at www.acns.colostate.edu.

• Is your student or your student’s roommate struggling with depression? Visit the CSU Health Network website and click on the Mental Health link (www. health.colostate.edu/parents/ index.cfm) for ideas on how to support your student.


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Grandparent’s Day

Billing Due Date

Career Fair

Career Fair

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Career Fair

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Mexican Independence Day

Rocky Mountain Showdown – Invesco Field

Stepfamily Day

Constitution Day and Citizenship Day

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9th Annual Diversity Conference

International Day of Peace

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9th Annual Diversity Conference

Rosh Hashanah (begins at sundown)

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Notes Division of student affairs


How Can Families

HELP?

Can We

TALK?

(Conversation starters for you and your student)

• What do you and your friends do for fun? • What have you noticed about your sleeping patterns this year?

student and Family Credit Cards and Student Employment

ISSUES

Many college students have credit cards and checking accounts, and having a credit card for emergencies may be a good idea. Credit card companies feel that students are a good risk and will inundate students with applications as soon as they arrive on campus. Credit cards and their pitfalls can become a serious concern. Talk with your student about how to choose a credit card, and discuss the various interest rates, application and annual fees, etc. Also, talk about how he or she intends to pay for expenses. Student employment has been shown to assist students in structuring their time for more productivity. The American Council on Education states that full-time students who work less than 14 hours a week are more likely to stay in college than those who work more than 15 hours a week or who don’t work at all.

• Attend Homecoming & Family Weekend activities, September 30 - October 2, 2011. • Convey your confidence in your student’s ability to navigate this complex environment. • Encourage contact with the SLiCE Office located in the Lory Student Center to become involved helping others in the community. • Acknowledge that your student may be sad about missing family birthdays and holiday celebrations. • Remind your student of previous success in making friends and having relationships. • Encourage your student to apply to become an Orientation Leader or Ram Welcome Leader. • The services provided by Parent and Family Programs are made possible by the Parents Fund. If a Call-A-Ram caller contacts you, please consider making a donation. • By sophomore year, your student should begin to select a major, refine career options, and begin defining their purpose. Encourage your student to participate in the many employment fairs, workshops, and services sponsored by the Career Center. • By junior year, your student should seek an internship experience in their career field. The Career Center can assist your student in this process. • By senior year, your student should attend Career Fairs and Graduate School Fairs to gain exposure to all of the opportunities that await!


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Homecoming/Family Weekend

Spring 2011 Class Schedule Available Online

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National Coming Out Day

Cans Around the Oval

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Alternative Spring Break applications due to SLICE Office

Last Day to Repeat/Delete End of Course Withdrawal Period

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24/31 Spring Registration Begins (24)

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Textbook reservation begins for spring (24) Halloween (31)

Notes Division of student affairs


How Can Families

HELP? • Encourage your student to visit professors during office hours to get help or discuss academic performance. • If your student seems to be depressed or anxious, encourage him/her to talk to a counselor at CSU Health Network. • Should you become aware that your student is using alcohol as a way of dealing with stress, suggest that he/she gather information and talk to a counselor or staff member at CSU Health Network. • Encourage your student to achieve a sense of balance including a healthy diet, adequate sleep and exercise, and relaxation. • Frequently share with your student that you trust them to make good choices and that the majority of CSU students are also making good choices. The power of positive messages is much stronger than fear or distrust.

Can We

TALK?

(Conversation starters for you and your student)

• Are you worried about any of your friends? What resources are available for them? • What are you doing to stay healthy?

student and Family

ISSUES

Communication and Involvement

You have a new role as a parent or family member of a college student; you are becoming a mentor for your student. He or she will be encountering adult responsibilities and choices and you can become a trusted adviser in the process of making those decisions. An essential piece of mentoring is effective communication. Try to listen without evaluation or judgment. Listen without “fixing” the problem. Take notice of verbal and nonverbal behavior. Asking open ended questions will encourage dialogue and assist with the adjustment to these new roles. Ask your student about involvement on campus. Research indicates that students who are involved on campus are more invested in their college experience, have higher grades, and are better prepared for life after graduation. A tremendous amount of learning takes place outside of the classroom.

• Encourage your student to read the campus newspaper, The Collegian, and seek organizations or activities that interest him or her. • By senior year, students should have a current resumé listing parttime employment and internship experiences. Career Counselors are available at the Career Center in the Lory Student Center.


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Veternas Day 5K Run 9 a.m. on CSU Oval

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RAMFAM Association Meeting

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Notes Division of student affairs


How Can Families

HELP? • Reassure your student that the next few weeks will be stressful and challenging, but you are there to support him/her. • Be aware that students may not earn the same superior grades in college that they did in high school or when their courses were easier. • Encourage your student to apply to become an RA, ASCSU senator, Ram Welcome Leader, or officer in a student organization. • Offer support by phoning, text messaging, sending emails, or visiting campus if you can. However, avoid putting another demand on his/her time unless absolutely necessary. • Send a care package with enough treats for your student to share with friends, roommates, or classmates. • Tensions are often are high during the final exam period, encourage your student to avoid making important decisions during this time.

Can We

TALK?

(Conversation starters for you and your student)

• Do you feel it is your responsibility to address your friends’ drinking habits? Why or why not? • What are you doing for yourself to ensure you stay well during Finals Week?

student and Family

ISSUES

Coming Home for Winter Break

December is a hectic month for your student. When final exams are finished, many students head home for the winter break. They may have concerns about their families and how they will adjust to routines at home. It is important to discuss expectations with your student before he/she returns home for winter break. Prepare yourself and other family members that the student who returns may not be the student you sent off to college. It may help to renegotiate curfew hours and family responsibilities. It is an important time of adjustment for everyone as your family grows and changes. Discussions and family meetings before and after the student returns can ease the adjustment for all family members. Also note that some students choose to remain in Fort Collins over winter break to work and/or save money. Talk with your student about these decisions as well.

• Encourage your student to reserve next semester’s textbooks through the CSU Bookstore. • Make sure your student’s voice is heard! Encourage your student to participate in assessments to provide feedback on campus services and academic experiences.


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Last day of classes

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Final Exams

Final Exams

Final Exams

Final Exams

Commencement Ceremonies

Commencement Ceremonies

Winter Break (begins)

Residence Halls Close at 10 p.m.

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Fall Grades Available on RAMweb

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University Holiday

University Holiday

University Holiday

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Kwanzaa (begins)

Notes Division of student affairs


How Can Families

HELP? • Congratulate your student on his or her academic successes and progress toward graduation. • Encourage your student to take a renewed, invigorated look at new classes and potential classmates as opportunities for new connections and improved academic performance. • If your student is seeking resources or has concerns regarding an aspect of their identity, have your student utilize one of the student diversity programs and services on campus. They include: El Centro; Black/African American Cultural Center; Asian/Pacific American Cultural Center; Native American Cultural Center; Women and Gender Advocacy Center; Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Resource Center; and Resources for Disabled Students.

Can We

TALK?

(Conversation starters for you and your student)

• What are your rules if you decide to drink alcohol? • Have you visited the Student Recreation Center? What are your favorite areas/equipment there?

student and Family

ISSUES

Changing Majors and Possible Internships

Now that your student has completed fall semester courses, changing majors may be on his/her mind. This often creates worry and concern on the part of both you and your student. Choosing a major is a difficult process. This can be a good opportunity for your student to explore interests and determine what he/she really wants to study. Your student may also benefit from an internship or other employment to help determine career options. National studies estimate that students change their majors several times during their college years. It is important to remember however, that students are more than their majors. The best way to prepare for a career is to get a sound education and gain career-related experience through internships, community service, part-time jobs and campus involvement. Encourage your student to contact an academic adviser and the Career Center to explore the variety of available options.

• Discuss with your student the academic and tutoring services available on campus if they did not do as well as they had expected the previous semester. The directory of campus tutoring services can be found on The Institute for Learning and Teaching (TILT) website. Click on the Tutorial Programs link at: http://tilt.colostate. edu/learning/tutoring.cfm.


C

reated in 2009, the Colorado State University RAMFAM Association is made up of volunteer parents and families who serve as liaisons to Colorado State University and represent parents and family members of undergraduate students. Brought to you by the Parents Fund, the Association meets regularly to discuss issues, learn more about University programs and developments affecting students, and assist in planning programs and events that involve CSU parents and families. RAMFAM’s primary goals are to support families and students; enhance the connection between families, students and the University administration; provide feedback to the University on student and family issues; communicate family concerns to elected governmental officials; and assist with the recruitment and retention of students and RAMFAM Association members. During each meeting, we create programming based on your feedback from assessments, emails or other connections. Our extensive campus relationships allow us to find speakers on programs you find interesting or services on campus you’d like to learn more about to better support your student. In the last three years, we’ve tackled everything from financial aid to health and safety on

campus and we continue to look for ways to share more information with you as family members. There are many opportunities to become involved with the RAMFAM Association. First, we encourage you to attend our meetings. During the 20112012 academic year, RAMFAM will meet from 10:00 am – noon (MST) on the following dates. Locations will be posted on the Parent and Family website (www. parentsandfamily.colostate.edu): • September 10, 2011 • October 1, 2011 (Homecoming/ Family Weekend) • November 12, 2011 • February 11, 2012 • April 21, 2012 Second, for families living outside of northern Colorado we offer webcasting and blogging opportunities during RAMFAM Association meetings. We hope you’ll participate virtually and we do our best to work your questions and comments in to the on-campus meeting. You also have the option of creating a Hometown RAMFAM Club in your area! We can help you connect with other Colorado State families to host events and create relationships closer to home. We currently have three Hometown RAMFAM Clubs that are ‘up and running’ in the Maryland/DC area, in the

Dallas area, and in Southern California. If you are interested in starting a Hometown RAMFAM Club in your area, or in connecting with an existing club, please contact us at 970-491-5312 or by emailing jody.donovan@colostate.edu or kacee.collard@colostate.edu. Third, we hope you’ll become a fan of our Colorado State Parents and Families Facebook page. In the 2010 bi-annual survey to parents and families of all CSU students, we asked: How would you prefer to communicate with other parents/family members of CSU students? Many of our families indicated an online discussion board would work best, so we created a page as a space for you to connect with one another and use the wisdom of the collective group to discuss issues and concerns. Lastly in terms of involvement, we are working to include the family perspective in planning and hosting campus-wide events. We need your help and presence at Ram Welcome and Homecoming and Family Weekend! Because the planning of these events happens months in advance and we want to include both in-state and out-of-state families, the committees for these events will mostly meet via email. Please let us know if you’re interested in participating!

Division of student affairs


The Parents Fund

t

he Parents Fund at Colorado State University was created to keep parents and families updated about critical campus information and to serve students’ greatest needs.

communications have provided enough information about Colorado State programs, services, and processes to allow you to redirect your student back to an appropriate campus resource.

What do we mean by ‘critical campus information’? We think it is vitally important to communicate with parents and family members of our students to help you learn about resources, important events and deadlines, and health and safety issues on campus. Through the Parents Fund, we are able to provide you with information about students’ greatest needs through avenues such as the RAMFAM Association, a monthly e-newsletter, the annual Supporting Transitions Calendar with important University dates, and regular e-mail updates.

We also know the health and safety of your students is on your mind. We believe it is essential for you to receive updates regarding these issues in a timely fashion. E-mail and website updates regarding health issues such as the H1N1 flu virus and meningococcal disease, as well as safety issues on campus are made possible through the Parents Fund.

Through these communications, we work to cover everything from tutoring resources to career options to financial aid assistance. Should your student call you with questions, we hope our

Contributions to the Parents Fund allow us to continue these communications and services, as well as support

leadership, service, diversity and other enriching experiences for your students. We know students learn both inside and outside of the classroom and the Parents Fund supports programs that create community for all CSU students. Parents and families are an important component of success in a student’s education and we hope you’ll help us support you and your student on the journey. If you’d like additional information, please contact Jody Donovan and Kacee Collard Jarnot in Parent and Family Programs at any time via phone (970-491-5312), email (jody.donovan@colostate.edu or kacee. collard@colostate.edu) or in person (201 Administration Building).

If you would like to join other parents and families who contribute to the Parents Fund, please make your gift payable to the Colorado State University Foundation, P.O. Box 1870, Fort Collins, CO 80522-1870 or online at https://advancing.colostate.edu/parents

Bridges’ Transition Model

The New Beginning

Intensity

The Neutral Zone Ending, Losing, Letting Go Time Bridges, W. (2003). Managing transitions: Making the most of change (2nd ed.). Cambridge, MA: Da Capo Press.


Student & Family Issues: Alcohol and Other Drugs

C

olorado State University takes seriously the risks associated with underage drinking and illegal drug use. Although research shows a large majority of students do not drink or use drugs, other students come to college with well-established patterns, increasing their risk for a number of issues including poor academic performance, relationship violence, accidents, addictions, depression and death. Colorado State’s programs are designed to create a healthy culture, promoting, reducing risky behavior and providing the support students need to successful at CSU and beyond. • Prevention – The CSU Health Network’s Health Education and Prevention Services, in collaboration with on and off campus partners, coordinates a comprehensive, campus alcohol and other drug prevention program, using evidence-based practices. Several programs are specifically designed for freshman students. For example, all incoming students are required to complete a state-of-the-art, web-based prevention program called Alcohol Edu. • Early Intervention – These programs are designed for the student experiencing mild to moderate negative impacts of alcohol and other drug use. Students learn skills necessary to cope with pressures of college community and make healthier choices. These services can be arranged through the CSU Health Network’s Counseling Services. • Treatment – Unfortunately, some students experience significant problems with alcohol/other drug abuse or addiction. For those students, getting the proper level of treatment, at the appropriate time, is critical for academic and life success. To meet this need, the CSU Health Network’s Counseling Services’ DAY

Program (Drugs, Alcohol and You) is the national leader in on-campus, out-patient treatment for students experiencing substance abuse and dual-diagnosis problems.

How families can help? Research shows that a parent or family member can have a powerful impact on a student’s alcohol and/or drug use. Despite how it may seem at times, your student cares about your opinion and will continue to seek your guidance, even away from home. Here are some basic tips to help: • Talk: Before your student comes to campus, have an open conversation about the pressures they may experience, the choices they will have to make, and the potential consequences. Perhaps wait until they complete AlcoholEdu online and then start up a conversation. • Make Healthy Choices: Keep the lines of communication open with your student while they are on campus. New students often feel an amazing amount of independence during their first year in college. You may find your student testing boundaries and exploring new beliefs and behaviors. Sometimes, however, they are unaware of the consequences of their decisions. Your student will need your support and guidance to make the right choices. Your expectations and opinions still matter! • Stay Involved: As a parent or family member, you can stay involved; inquire about campus alcohol policies, call your student and ask about their roommates and living arrangements. Pay attention to your students’ experiences and activities, especially during the first 6 weeks on campus. • Get the Facts: Research shows that many parents and family members underestimate the amount and

frequency their first-year students drink. Also, students actually overestimate the amount their peers are drinking and may try to drink more to fit in. In order to support your student in their choices, having accurate information is imperative. A few resources to help: Alcohol, Other Drugs and College: A Parent’s Guide: http://www. higheredcenter.org/services/ publications/alcohol-other-drugsand-college-parents-guide u What Parents Need to Know about College Drinking: http://www. collegedrinkingprevention. gov/NIAAACollegeMaterials/ parentBrochure.aspx u

• Know the Warning Signs: Be aware of the signs of possible alcohol and/ or other drug abuse (e.g., lower grades, never available or reluctant to talk with you, unwilling to talk about activities with friends, trouble with campus authorities, serious mood changes). Help your student feel comfortable getting help for themselves or a friend. Your student can connect with a caring professional by: • Visiting CSU Health Network Counseling Services in 123 NW Aylesworth Hall with walk-in hours: M-F 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Tuesdays 7:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. • Calling CSU Health Network Counseling Services: (970) 491-6053 • Know as a parent or family member, you can call Student Case Management at (970) 491-8051 for help with locating resources and referrals for your student.

Division of student affairs


ReSOuRCeS for Concerned Parents and Families

a

student’s well-being is often at the heart of their personal and academic success. Colorado State University cares about your student, and we have a number of resources to help them if they are going through a difficult time. As a parent or family member, consider: • Engaging your student in conversations about how they are doing on a regular basis. • Letting them know about the anonymous, student mental health screening options available: http:// www.mentalhealthscreening.org/ screening/COLORADO.

• Sharing resources like Ulifeline, an online resource center where college students can be comfortable searching for the information they need and want regarding mental health and suicide prevention: http://ulifeline.org/page/ main/StudentLogin.html.

help develop a plan, or, in some cases, take direct action. Below is a brief chart of some important resources to help you decide whom to call depending upon the level and type of your concern. However, any of these offices can help you or direct you to the appropriate resource.

• Using Student Case Management for help with locating resources and referrals for your student.

The Federal Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), does not inhibit university employees from speaking to one another when concerns about students exist.

There may be times when you have concerns about individuals (student, faculty, or staff) or the safety of others in our community. The best initial step is to report your concerns to a campus resource that can answer your questions,

Student Affairs Case Management • 491-8051 Support and referral services for students and consultation for faculty and staff. Dean of Students • 491-5312 Concerns about individual students or safety of the community. CSU Police • 491-6425 or 491-7111 or 911 Immediate concerns for an individual’s and/or public safety. CSU Health Network • 491-7121 • After Hours 491-7111 Medical and mental health services for students, including health education and prevention services, and 24-hour mental health emergency response. Tell Someone • 491-1350 Report concerns that someone you care about might be too stressed, sad, or angry. Conflict Resolution and Student Conduct Services • 491-7165 Mediation and disciplinary services for students and consultation for faculty and staff. Victim Assistance Team • 491-6384 • After Hours 491-7111 Advocacy services for victims of sexual assault, including 24 hour response. Please use the CSU’s Public Safety site, http://safety.colostate.edu/, to become informed about campus safety situations and public health emergencies. If you are concerned about the immediate safety of your student, contact the CSU Police Department.

Division of student affairs


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Residence Halls Open for new students at 8 a.m.

Spring Ram Welcome

Spring Ram Welcome

Pick up reserved text books from the CSU bookstore (end 1/16)

Student Venterans Orientation

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Orientation, advising, and registration for new students Spring Ram Welcome – University Welcome

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Spring Ram Welcome

Spring Ram Welcome

Spring Ram Welcome

Spring Ram Welcome

Spring Ram Welcome

University Holiday – Martin Luther King, Jr. Day

First Day of Classes

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Last day to cancel Spring 2012 registration

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End of Special B drop period

Chinese New Year – Year of the Dragon

Student Veterans Welcome Back

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Notes Division of student affairs


How Can Families

HELP? • Communicate the importance of balancing academic and social demands. • Suggest that your student visit Career and Internship Fairs. • Decisions about returning to the residence halls next year need to be made in order to reserve a space. • Students may also begin seeking roommates for off-campus housing during this time. Encourage your student to visit Off-Campus Life in the Lory Student Center for assistance. • If your student decides to live off campus next year, check out the Student Legal Services website (www.sls.colostate.edu) for tips on evaluating leases before signing! • You may want to reevaluate your student’s financial status and look into additional on-campus employment opportunities or adjusting your financial support.

Can We

TALK?

(Conversation starters for you and your student)

• Do you have a MySpace or Facebook account? What does it say about you? • What will you do if you are feeling sick on campus?

student and Family

ISSUES

• Encourage your student to check out the Student Recreation Center and Outdoor Adventure Program to prevent the winter blues.

Study Abroad Opportunities

The global society your student will be entering is reason enough for your student to consider Study Abroad programs. It is also remembered by students as one of the most influential and positive aspects of their college education and many find it to be an experience that changed their lives. When they return from their studies abroad, the confidence gained, independence, global awareness, and knowledge of a multicultural world will enhance everything they do in the future, personally, academically, and professionally. Check out the website at www.studyabroad.colostate.edu. The world is calling, when will your student answer?

• This may be a good time to revisit the idea of having a vehicle on campus. Is it helping or hindering your student academically? • Encourage your first-year student to attend the “Getting to Year Two @ CSU” conference in February! Students can get more information and register at www.otp.colostate.edu.


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Billing due date

RAMFAM Association Meeting

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Career Center Spring On-Campus Interviews begin

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Mardi Gras

Ash Wednesday

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President’s Leadership Program Applications Available

PLP Applications due – Current CSU students, transfer students, non-traditional first-year students

Notes Division of student affairs


How Can Families

HELP? • Take the time to discuss living options for next year with your student. Listen to ideas about what he/she would like to do and what may be feasible. • Ask your student about their academic adviser meeting in preparation for next fall’s registration. • Encourage your student to think through his/her choices regarding spring break activities. • Understand that your student’s passage into an independent and successful adulthood will be gradual and can be best aided by your respectful and simultaneous challenge and support. • If your student is experiencing troublesome conflict, direct them to Conflict Resolution and Student Conduct Services in the Lory Student Center. Trained mediators can assist students to resolve their conflicts.

Can We

TALK?

(Conversation starters for you and your student)

• What choices have you explored for Spring Break to stay safe? • How do you decide when something isn’t safe for you and your friends?

student and Family

ISSUES

• Talk with your student about what he or she is learning both in and out of the classroom.

Spring Break Expectations

Students can become very excited about the upcoming prospect of spending a week away from the pressures of school. Many students make plans with their friends to take trips during this time. Many students choose to participate in an Alternative Spring Break doing community service and learning about different populations and geographic areas. Alternative Spring Break is a week of immersion into different cultural, environmental and socioeconomic communities across the nation. Sometimes students experience a sense of disappointment if they are “just going home.” Other issues may arise when your student is faced with making difficult choices about behaviors in which they may not normally engage. Talk about your student’s choices openly and encourage thinking through the choices and consequences. If your student makes wise choices, he/she can come back from break refreshed and renewed to finish the rest of the semester.


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Deadline for 2012-2013 CSU Scholarship Application

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Purim (begins at sundown)

International Women’s Day

Spring Recess begins (ends 3/18)

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Daylight Saving Time begins

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End of Course Withdrawal Period

Spring Equinox

International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination

Summer Registration begins Nowruz (begins)

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sat

Priority Date for 2012-2013 FAFSA

Fall Class Schedule Available on-line

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Notes Division of student affairs


How Can Families

HELP? • Keep the lines of communication open and supportive. One of the best strategies students have against stress and fatigue is talking with someone they trust. • Send care packages complete with snacks, multivitamins, and encouraging notes. • If you have the capability, send a text message to say hello and let your student know you care. • Emphasize the wisdom of approaching finals with the attitude of doing the very best he/she can, and not worrying tediously about what has or has not happened so far in the semester. • Encourage your student to speak to professors about difficult classes or exams on which he/ she did not perform well before the end of the semester.

Can We

TALK?

(Conversation starters for you and your student)

• How are you dealing with any stress or anxiety associated with the end of the semester? • What opportunities have you taken advantage of to explore Fort Collins and/or Colorado?

student and Family

ISSUES

• Encourage your student to look into job shadowing, volunteering, working or interning in their professional field of choice for the summer. It is not too early for your student to look into summer educational opportunities.

Relationships

Personal struggles are a reality for most college students. Relationship issues and managing stress consume a great deal of your student’s energy and can cause worry for you as a family member. The “instant” friendships developed initially due to proximity in activities, classes and living arrangements may not withstand the test of time. There may also be a broken heart or two along the way. It is crucial to understand these struggles are an important and natural part of your student’s development. Offering an understanding and sympathetic ear may be the best thing you can do to help your student deal with relationship issues.


april 2012 sun

1 Palm Sunday April Fool’s Day

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tues

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Fall Registration begins Textbook reservation begins

Adult Learner and Veteran Students Recognition Ceremony

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Passover (begins at sundown)

Alternative Break End of the Year Slideshow

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sat

Good Friday

Easter

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Student Organizations and Advisor Recognition (SOAR) at the LSC Main Ballroom

Administrative Professionals Day

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Arbor Day

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Notes Division of student affairs


How Can Families

HELP? • Talk with your student ahead of time about your expectations when or if he/she returns home. • Be aware that your student may be experiencing sadness over leaving new friendships and/or significant relationships at school. • Independence is asserted more in the first year than in all the other previous years combined. • Both you and your student may have a realization of how college influences life decisions. Discuss your insights. • Talk with your student about how your relationship may have changed over the past year. • Ask your student about what was most helpful in terms of your support and communication. Be open to your student’s feedback about those things that may not have been helpful.

Can We

TALK?

(Conversation starters for you and your student)

• What ways may you safely celebrate the end of this academic year? • What kind of relationships have you developed over this year? How are they different from the ones you developed last year?

student and Family

ISSUES

Reentry Transition

May is another month of high pressure for your student. While finals are looming, so is the thought of returning home and leaving new-found friends or perhaps remaining in Fort Collins and missing family members. Your student may be concerned that relationships may not survive the summer break. Some students are concerned about not being able to maintain their independence. This is a good time to increase communication with your student. Encourage your student through finals and discuss plans for the summer.

• Help your student look at grades in the context of the entire year. Did he/she study and not socialize? Did he/she socialize and not study? Are his/her grades moderate, but he/she took advantage of leadership opportunties? • Celebrate this major milestone that another year has passed!


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Commencement Ceremonies

Residence Halls close at 10 p.m. Commencement Ceremonies

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University Holiday – Memorial Day

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Notes Division of student affairs


How Can Families

HELP? • Review the events of the past year with your student. Identify problem areas and encourage your student to consider possible solutions. • Review your student’s financial needs for the upcoming year. • Evaluate changes that may be needed for money management. • Examine the need for career counseling to establish career or academic goals. • Discuss strategies for time management and/or the balance of time devoted to school, work, and recreation. • Talk about the changing family dynamics as your student matures. • Increase expectations for personal responsibility and taking care of academic business. • Continue to express trust and a belief in your student’s ability to be successful at Colorado State.

Can We

TALK?

(Conversation starters for you and your student)

• What are your own early warning signals that your internet use is causing difficulties? • What resources did you use on campus last year, which ones would you like to use in the coming year?

student and Family

ISSUES

Home for the Summer

Summer at home with a returned college student can mean major adjustments for you, your student, and the rest of the family. You may notice changes in your student including appearance and behaviors. Now is a good time to discuss expectations regarding curfew, social activities, and family responsibilities. Clarity, consistency, and compromise can go a long way in finding common ground. It is also an adjustment if your student chooses not to return for the summer opting instead for an internship, summer school or other opportunities away from home. Remember adjustments take time and before you know it your student will be heading back to Colorado State University for another school year.


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Summer Solstice

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Father’s Day

University Census

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Notes Division of student affairs


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Canada Day

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University Holiday – Independence Day

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Notes Division of student affairs


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Ram Welcome

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Ram Welcome

Fall classes begin

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Notes Division of student affairs


pareNt aNd Family Resources Books

web sites

Arnett, Jeffrey Jensen: Emerging Adulthood: The Winding Road from Late Teens through the Twenties. (2004)

Clery Act (safety reporting) – http://safety.colostate.edu/cleryact/index.aspx

Barkin, Carol: When your kid goes to college: A parent’s survival guide. (1999)

College Parent Central FERPA Tips – http://www.collegeparentcentral.com/2009/06/whatferpa-means-for-you-and-your-college-student/

Bridges, William: Transitions: Making sense of life changes. (2004). Coburn, Karen and Treeger, Madge: Letting go: A parent’s guide to understanding the college years. (5th ed.) (2009) Coombes, Michael and DeBard, Robert: Serving the millennial generation: New directions for student services. (2004). Howe, Neil & Strauss, William: Millennials rising: The next great generation. (2000). MacKay, Jacqueline and Ingram, Wanda: Let the journey begin: A parent’s monthly guide to the college experience. (2001) McGarry, Kaye: A new beginning: A survival guide for parents of college freshmen. (1998)

Colorado State University Website – http://www.colostate.edu Comprehensive Housing Website – http://www.reslife.net CSU Parent & Family Website – http://www.parentsandfamily.colostate.edu CSU Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) Policies – http://registrar.colostate.edu/faculty/ferpa.aspx

Moustaki, Nikki: 10 things you gotta know about your first year of college. (2005).

Higher Education Center Parent Connection Website – http://www.higheredcenter.org /services/audiences/parents

Newman, Barbara and Newman, Philip: When kids go to college: A parents guide to changing relationships. (1992)

Membership Organization for Parents of College Students – http://www.collegeparents.org

Pasick, Patricia: Almost grown: Launching your child from high school to college. (1998)

Nationwide Campus Safety Issues – http://www.securityoncampus.org

Savage, Marjorie: You’re on your own (but I’m here if you need me). (2003)

RAMFAM Association – http://parentsandfamily.colostate.edu/ramfam.aspx

Please tell us what you think . . . We’d like to know what you think about Supporting Transitions: A Guide for Parents and Families. Since you’re the people we hope will benefit from this publication, we consider you the experts. Did you find it useful? Was it easy to use? Could you find information when you wanted it? How could we improve it? Send your comments and suggestions to: Jody Donovan and Kacee Collard Jarnot, Parent and Family Programs 201 Administration Building • Fort Collins, CO 80523-8004 • Call (970) 491-5312 or fax (970) 491-7025 E-mail jody.donovan@colostate.edu or kacee.collard@colostate.edu thank you!

university

phoNe Numbers

970 is the Area Code for Colorado State University. Admissions ............................................................................491-6909 Adult Learner and Veteran Services ........................................491-3977 Alumni Relations, Office of ....................................................491-6533 Athletics .................................................................................491-5300 Bookstore ..............................................................................491-6692 Campus Activities ..................................................................491-6626 Career Center ......................................................................... 491-5707 Cashier’s Office ..................................................................... 491-2767 Center for Advising and Student Achievement (CASA) .......... 491-7095 Colleges Agricultural Sciences ............................................ 491-6272 Applied Human Sciences ......................................491-6331 Business ............................................................... 491-6471 Engineering ...........................................................491-3366 Liberal Arts............................................................ 491-5421 Warner College of Natural Resources .................. 491-6675 Natural Sciences ....................................................491-1300 Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences ........ 491-7051 Colorado State Police Department (non-emergency) .............491-6425 Emergencies ............................................................................ 911 CSU Health Network ................................................................491-7121 Division of Continuing Education ........................................... 491-5288 Financial Aid ...........................................................................491-6321 Greek Life, Office of ...............................................................491-0966 Health Education and Prevention Services ............................. 491-2785 Housing and Dining Services .................................................. 491-6511 Information Services ..............................................................491-6444 International Student Services ................................................ 491-5917 Lory Student Center ................................................................491-6395 Off-Campus Life ..................................................................... 491-2248 Orientation and Transition Programs ..................................... 491-6011 Records and Registration ....................................................... 491-7148 Recreation Center ...................................................................491-6359 Student Accounts Receivable .................................................491-6467 Student Diversity Programs and Services Asian/Pacific American Cultural Center .............................. 491-6154 Black/African American Cultural Center .............................. 491-5781 El Centro.............................................................................. 491-5722 Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Resource Center.491-4342 Native American Cultural Center ..........................................491-1332 Resources for Disabled Students ........................................491-6385 Women and Gender Advocacy Center .................................491-6384 Student Employment Services................................................ 491-5714 Student Leadership, Involvement and Community Engagement, Office of ...................................491-1682 Student Legal Services ...........................................................491-1482 Transfer Evaluations ................................................................491-7147 Vice President for Student Affairs ........................................... 491-5312 University Counseling Center..................................................491-6053 University Parking Services .................................................... 491-7041


2011-2012 Supporting Transitions Calendar  

2011-2012 Supporting Transitions Calendar

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