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designDC Metro ISSUE 1 | 2019

Design Impacts Lives

WASHINGTON METRO

VIRGINIA


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designDC Metro ISSUE 1 | 2019

Design Impacts Lives

2020 SPRING SPRUCE UP Volunteers Needed! ASID VIRGINIA CHAPTER PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE Volunteer, Participate and Share By Matthew Lee, ASID, CID, LEED AP BD+C 2020 EVENTS Networking and CEU events SEO FOR INTERIOR DESIGNERS Separating Fact from Fiction By Deb Mitchell

PUBLISHING STAFF

Advertising Sales Duff Tussing • 972-562-6966 Jamie Williams • 352-448-5873 Art Director Dawn Lyon • 972-436-2841

Design D.C. Metro magazine is published quarterly for the Washington Metro Chapter of the American Society of Interior Designers by DSA Publishing & Design, Inc. Editorial content and Design D.C. Metro magazine are controlled and owned by the Washington Metro Chapter of ASID. Reproduction of this publication in whole, in part, in any form is strictly prohibited without the written permission of the Washington Metro Chapter of ASID.

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04 05 06 07 08

ASID WASHINGTON METRO CHAPTER PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE Change is in the Air By Rebecca Hubler, ASID

10 18 19 20 22

DESIGN TRANSFORMS LIVES 2019-2020 AWARD WINNERS NEW MEMBERS Welcome our newest members to Washington Metro and Virgina chapters CONNECTING DESIGNERS WITH INDUSTRY PARTNERS KEYS TO GETTING YOUR INTERIOR DESIGN TEAM TO DO THINGS RIGHT By Julia Molloy 36 LEGAL DO’S AND DON’TS FOR INTERIOR DESIGNERS By Alan M. Siegel, Esq.

23 | American Eye

07 | Benjamin Moore & Co.

designDC Metro

24 | Daltile

ISSUE 1 | 2019

02 | Ferguson Enterprises

Design Impacts Lives

18 | Gretchen Everett Design 17 | Hunter Douglas, Inc.

05 | Miss Pixie’s Furnishings & Whatnot

19 | Plumbing Parts Plus / Rockville

on the cover Environments Designed to Entertain Firm: HVS Design Project: Porch Kitchen & Bar

WASHINGTON METRO

VIRGINIA

ASID WASHINGTON METRO AND VIRGINIA CHAPTERS | ISSUE 1 2019 - 3 -


President’s Message WASHINGTON METRO CHAPTER

ASID WASHINGTON METRO 312 West Commercial Street East Rochester, NY 14445 202-488-4100 administrator@dcmetro.asid.org www.dcmetro.asid.org

BOARD OF DIRECTORS PRESIDENT Rebecca Hubler, ASID

President@dcmetro.asid.org PRESIDENT-ELECT Rafael Fuentes, ASID

President-elect@dcmetro.asid.org

Change is in the Air Dear Fellow Washington Metro Chapter Colleagues, Winter is the time of year we look forward to cold, crisp mornings, snowfall and holiday breaks for kids. It is the time of year marked by celebrating with family and friends and making plans for the new year. For our Chapter, it marks the end of FY 2019 and the start of the FY 2020, which includes a new

DIRECTOR AT LARGE Kate Magee At-Large@dcmetro.org

MEMBERSHIP DIRECTOR Kwajo Oteng Agipong Membership@dcmetro.asid.org FINANCIAL DIRECTOR Patrick J. Baglino, Jr., ASID Finance@dcmetro.asid.org PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR Sydnye Pettengill, ASID ProfessionalDevelopment@dcmetro.asid.org COMMUNICATIONS DIRECTOR Lindsay Jones, Allied ASID Communications@dcmetro.asid.org STUDENT REPRESENTATIVE TO THE BOARD Isabella Bastien-Curtis, Student ASID StudentRep@dcmetro.asid.org NOMINATING COMMITTEE CHAIR/ PAST PRESIDENT Donna Sharpe, ASID dsharpe@kcct.com CHAPTER ADMINISTRATOR Terry Parker Duane administrator@nyu-cane.asid.org

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Board of Directors. As a Board we are celebrating the wonderful changes and initiatives that have been put in place by the 2019 Board, and we say, “thank you”

We encourage you to share your news with us; please submit your projects, articles, photos, and also postings and ideas for this publication that reflect who we are and what we do.

for all of their hard work. As we build on the great foundation that has been laid in the past year, the new board has been busy planning exciting programs and events. We have listened and heard what you, our members, want and we are revamping and expanding our initiatives and programs to reflect that. Continuing in 2020 will be the monthly newsletter, informative CEU Road Shows and programs, M&M (Mix & Mingle) networking, and other fun events, such as the tour of the National Museum of African American History and Culture and lunch at the Hamilton Restaurant. One of the initiatives that is brand-spanking new is THIS magazine. We encourage you to share your news with us; please submit your projects, articles, photos, and also postings and ideas for this publication that reflect who we are and what we do. I look forward to serving as your President in FY 2020 and ask you to join with the board and me as we continue to grow and embrace new ideas. Let’s all celebrate how design impacts life and let’s make FY 2020 the best year yet. Rebecca Hubler, ASID President, ASID Washington Metro Chapter


! d e d e e N s r e e t n u l o V 2020 Spring Spruce Up Fundraiser for the ASID DC Metro Chapter

ASID Washington Metro Chapter is in looking for both residential and

commercial designers to participate in our annual fundraising event, Spring Spruce Up. Please consider donating one or two hours of your time to DMV community members in need of design consultation services. This is an easy (and fun!) way to demonstrate to the general public the value of working with an interior designer. The event, in its 24th year, will occur in March 2020 (date TBD), and applications will open to the public a few weeks prior to the event. Consultations are available in one-hour or a maximum two-hour time block, and individuals pay a promotional rate of $125 an hour for to work with a local designer. The Spring Spruce Up encompasses Washington, D.C., Northern Virginia and all of Maryland. Proceeds from the event support our chapter’s educational initiatives.

2020 ASID WASHINGTON METRO COMMITTEE CHAIRS & MEMBERS NOMINATING COMMITTEE

Penniman W. Wells, ASID, Chair EMERGING PROFESSIONALS COMMITTEE

Kwajo Oteng-Agipong, Industry Partner Lindsay Jones, Allied ASID Shavonne Maclin, ASID

STUDENT AFFAIRS COMMITTEE

EVENTS COMMITTEE

Rebecca Hubler, ASID, Chair

Cathy Thompson, Allied ASID Annette Phillips, ASID

Judy Boitz, Industry Partner Kati Pope

Lisa Allred

Krystal Tchatchouk, Allied ASID Marj Prince, ASID

Isabella Bastien-Curtis, Student ASID, Chair

Stanley Lewis, Industry Partner

CEU COMMITTEE CHAIR

Donna Sharpe, ASID

Sydney Pettengill, ASID QPREP CHAIR

Shavonne Maclin, Allied ASID SPRING SPRUCE UP COMMITTEE Annette Phillips, ASID

Sydnye Pettengill, ASID Mathilda Cox, ASID Dee Lenehan

Kwajo Oteng Agipong, I Industry Partner Melvin Hooks

Anna Light, Allied ASID Judy Bracht

Meg Poff DiPaola, ASID

Jennifer Johson

Teri Dorfman, ASID

Vicki Butz, Student ASID

Phyllis Lustig, Allied ASID

Dee Rollins

ASID WASHINGTON METRO AND VIRGINIA CHAPTERS | ISSUE 1 2019 - 5 -


President’s Message ASID VIRGINIA P.O. Box 2 Eggleston, VA 24086 804-370-5616 info@va.asid.org www.va.asid.org

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

PRESIDENT Matthew Lee, ASID, CID, LEED AP BD+C President@va.asid.org PRESIDENT-ELECT Gillian Bowman, ASID, CID, NCIDQ President-elect@va.asid.org DIRECTOR AT LARGE Heather Hopkins, ASID, NCIDQ, LEED APA At-large@va.asid.org MEMBERSHIP DIRECTOR Linda Pye, ASID, CID, LEED AP ID+C, WELL AP Membership@va.asid.org FINANCIAL DIRECTOR Vienna Romesburg, ASID, CID, NCIDQ Finance@va.asid.org PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR Philip Purgason, Industry Partner Rep of Architectural Ceramics ProfessionalDevelopment@va.asid.org

COMMUNICATIONS DIRECTOR Heather Davis, ASID, CID, NCIDQ, WELL AP Communications@va.asid.org STUDENT REPRESENTATIVE TO THE BOARD Lillie Price, Student ASID StudentRep@va.asid.org CHAPTER ADMINISTRATOR Sharlyn Thacker, ASID, CID, LEED Fellow, WELL AP Administrator@va.asid.org

Volunteer, Participate and Share Dear Fellow Virginia Chapter Members, First and foremost, give yourselves a hand for a successful FY2019! With your dedication to the profession and to each other, we made great strides in bringing our community closer together. This year

we are looking to continue to stoke that fire. Your chapter leadership has been hard at work on plans to create more opportunities for us to come together and celebrate each other and our successes. Together we are also a resource to everyone around us, especially those who are beginning their careers as students and emerging professionals. Our strong future lies in their success as much as our own. Being embraced by the ASID community deepened my love of the profession as a young designer. As the year progresses, look for upcoming opportunities to engage with our student design communities and emerging professionals. Remember that YOU are our greatest resource. We are continuously focused on creating shared successes as a chapter.

Volunteer. Get to know your peers, your industry supporters and the up-and-coming talent. Volunteer. Step into a leadership role with the support of the Virginia ASID board and training. Participate. Share your ideas of topics that are of interest to you – tours, continuing education, socials, outreach to other design or community organizations. Attend design community and chapter meetings. Follow us on social media (Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn). Check the ASID Virginia website for upcoming events and resources. Share your projects with us on social media and the website news via the Sector Focus feature. Share news of your accolades and accomplishments. We invite you to visit our chapter website for information on upcoming engagements and information regarding your continuing education requirements. The current two-year reporting period ends on December 31, 2019. Also look for information regarding ASID’s partnership with the International WELL Building Institute to launch the inaugural WELL Conference. Enjoy the fast-approaching holiday season. Take time to connect with family and friends. We look forward to connecting with you. Matthew Lee, ASID, CID, LEED AP BD+C President, ASID Virginia Chapter

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VIRGINIA CHAPTER


2020 Events Please bookmark these chapter web pages and reference regularly for upcoming

networking and CEU events. dcmetro.asid.org/events va.asid.org/events

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©2019 Benjamin Moore & Co. Benjamin Moore and the triangle riangle “M” symbol are registered trademarks licensed to Benjamin Moor ore & Co. Color accuracy is ensured only when tinted in quality Benjamin Moore Moor paints. Color respresentations may differ slightly from actual p paint. 10 0/ /19

ASID WASHINGTON METRO AND VIRGINIA CHAPTERS | ISSUE 1 2019 - 7 -


SEOfor Interior Designers By Deb Mitchell

SEPARATING FACT FROM FICTION

Let's be clear - I don't consider myself an Search Engine Optimization expert. But as a copywriter, it's vital that I maintain a working knowledge of SEO basics and that I stay on top of current best practices.

Besides, I love software and apps that help me do my job better, and working with my clients' SEO gives me an excuse to geek out on all the cool tech tools out there for SEO keyword research. It's true that - even when it's explained in the simplest possible terms - SEO is complex and confusing. As a business owner, you may not really understand the ins and outs of SEO, but you certainly feel its effects when you lose business to your competition because they show up in your prospects' Google searches and you don't.

SEO is the only form marketing that really works these days FACT

While that may be true for online businesses whose sales of products and services happen exclusively online, you're actually a local service provider. You serve your clientele mostly in person within your local area (excepting e-design services and selling products in an online shop). Take it as good news that a lot of the deeper complexities and usages of SEO are meant to apply to businesses competing for sales online in a sea of competition from all over the world. For those businesses it's highly likely the only way prospects will ever even know they exist is if they're effective with SEO.

But don't worry - you don't have to be an SEO expert to help get your business in front of your prospects online. To help you take the first step toward understanding and using SEO, I've pinpointed a few of the more commonly held ideas and fact-checked them for accuracy in light of what they mean to you and your business. By separating fact from fiction, you can avoid wasting time and/or money on SEO efforts that ultimately won't help you grow your bottom line.

SEO is complicated and highly technical FACT

SEO truly is something of a bottomless pit of information. Most of us who aren't tech gurus who work with it full-time are hard-pressed to devote enough time and energy into understanding it and putting it into practice in full measure. In addition, SEO is also a moving target. As businesses find ways (both honest and nefarious) to beat Google's algorithm in order to rank at the top of a search, they up the stakes on how hard the rest of us have to work to rank highly too. When search results that have little or nothing to do with what searchers are actually looking for get thrown into the mix, Google is compelled to react by changing their algorithm to filter out those bad search results. That all said you actually don't need to understand SEO or Google's algorithm completely to be able to put it to work for your design business. Read on!

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You, on the other hand, have the advantage of being a needle in a little pile of hay - not a global haystack. When someone searches online for, say, an interior designer in Portland, Oregon, Google only needs to sift through a fairly small handful of potentially relevant search results. Compare that to a search for something like "online business coach" and it's easy to see how your SEO needs are relatively small and simple. What that means is that SEO is important for you, but it should only be one slice of your marketing pie. Ranking higher in online searches may play a role in getting you in front of the right clients, but so does doing great work that gets you awesome client reviews, putting your project images out on social media, and going where your prospects are (both online and off ) and building genuine relationships with them. If you're already doing all of that but you're still not getting all the clients you want and need, giving your SEO more attention could make a difference. But conversely, I can promise you that focusing all of your resources on SEO at the expense of the quality of your work or in lieu of connecting personally with prospects in your area will put your business on shaky ground in the long run.

Keywords are the key to effective SEO FACT

The whole concept of SEO is based on the notion that people use certain words and phrases to search online for specific information. Keywords are the force behind Google's algorithm, a complex decision tree - IF a searcher enters a certain keyword or phrase THEN Google quickly


returns a set of results it deems relevant to those search terms. From another angle, IF you use the keywords your prospects are searching for THEN you'll land in their results (ideally, at or near the top). Businesses' increasing need to earn high search rankings has prompted the development of apps and software that help them determine the keywords their prospects are using. And while, as mentioned earlier, I love playing around with those tools and I'm always quick to test out new ones, I actually find that the two most effective tools for finding the right keywords to use in my clients' marketing are about as non-tech as you can get - empathy and imagination. Knowing your prospects well and having a deep understanding of how they think is crucial for anticipating the search terms they'll use when looking for interior design help. For example, you may want to be known for delivering a highly professional level of service to your clients because you know they value solid processes and great communication. But if you truly understand your prospects, you'll realize that when they sit down to look online for an interior designer to help them renovate their kitchen, their minds won't be on an "interior designer who's a great communicator" - which also means that's not what they'll be typing into Google's search bar. What will be on their minds and in their search bars, however, is an interior designer in their area who's well qualified and experienced in kitchen renovations. Knowing that, you can then use your imagination to come up with a handful of search terms they're likely to use, such as "interior designer Your City kitchen design renovation," "professional kitchen design Your City," and even "interior design help with kitchen cabinets, lighting, and flooring in Your City." It's not that your commitment to delivering the help they're looking for with professional service and great communication skills isn't relevant to them. It's just that they're looking for all of that when they talk with you on the phone and in person, as well as when they review what your processes look like - not when they're searching online to figure out who to call in the first place.

SEO is a one-time project that involves getting the right keywords on your website

FICTION

While determining a set of relevant keywords for your business and putting them on your website is part of the picture, no SEO strategy is "set it and forget it" - something placed deep in the recesses of your site that works automatically and indefinitely to get you better Google rankings. In fact, the top experts agree that SEO should be approached by any business as an ongoing activity. How your website is or isn't being found by your prospects is ever changing. Monitoring that and changing your SEO efforts accordingly on a regular basis is just part of the deal.

So what should that kind of maintenance look like in a basic, DIY-able form? • Do some keyword research to find what terminology your prospects use to search online for interior designers. Here's a great article on how to get started with keyword research: How to do Keyword Research for SEO: A Beginner's Guide by Rachel Leist • Local SEO is important to get you in front of your prospects, so opt for keywords like "Your City, your state interior designer" over general terms like "polished, timeless interior design." • Because SEO is a process that ebbs and flows, it's ideal to look at it over the course of a 3-month period of time so you can get a complete picture of what's happening overall. Every 3 months or so, review your target keywords and how you're ranking for them. • To do that, search each of the keywords you're using in an incognito browser window to see where you rank in the search results (if you don't go incognito, your computer might remember that you look at your own site often and react by pulling it to the top of your keyword search to personalize the results to you, as opposed to showing how you actually rank when others search that keyword) • If you're ranking well for certain keywords, capitalize on them by increasing their use in your web copy, blog posts, design project descriptions, etc. • If you're not ranking well for others, increase their use as well, or if you think they're simply not good target keywords for you, retire them and replace them with new ones. • When creating new content, be sure to optimize it by placing your keywords whenever possible in blog post headlines, subheadings, copy, image alt tags, and meta descriptions. As much as I sometimes wish there was a tech tool I could just plug into my website that would automatically do it all for me, at the end of the day, SEO is more about understanding the thoughts and needs of our prospects than it is about technology. And as business owners and high-touch service providers who truly care about our clients and prospects, those human factors can't (and shouldn't) be left to automation anyway. By approaching your SEO strategy and all of your marketing efforts as vital parts of learning how to better serve your clients, your business can't help but grow - no matter how Google ranks you!

Previously a freelance features writer for lifestyle and shelter publications, Deb Mitchell now works with interior designers and other creative professionals through one-on-one copywriting, ghostblogging services, and online courses in content creation and marketing. With nearly a decade of experience in and around the interior design industry, Deb has a deep understanding of designers' unique marketing needs. She's currently undergoing a full rebrand and getting a new website for her own business, so she knows the struggle is real! For more of Deb's website tips, visit http://bit.ly/sneaky-website-mistakes .

ASID WASHINGTON METRO AND VIRGINIA CHAPTERS | ISSUE 1 2019 - 9 -


Design Transforms Lives 2019-2020 Award Winners after before Environments Designed for Personal/Private Living Entrant overview: Exploring dichotomies between materials promotes interest and breathes personality into this kitchen, validating it as an integral part of the home. Firm: Snaidero DC Metro Project Name: Industrial Chic Designer: Shawna J. Dillon, ASID Client: Jim Dillon Photographer: Jennifer Hughes

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Environments Designed for Public Living Entrant overview: The Blake uses timeless elements to combine all that is alive and thriving in New Haven and capture the city's character and charm within its walls. Firm: HVS Design Project: The Blake Hotel Design team: Christine Shanahan, ASID, Susan Yu, Federico Pelayo Architect: Jonathan Nehmer + Associates Restaurant designer: Alexander Waterworth Interiors MEP/FP engineer: Peterson Engineering Group Structural engineer: Cagley & Associates Food service consultants: McFarland Kistler & Associates, Inc. and Trimark Lighting designer: J&M Lighting Design, Inc. Clients: RMS Companies Photographers: Read McKendree and Whitney Cox

after concept

ASID WASHINGTON METRO AND VIRGINIA CHAPTERS | ISSUE 1 2019 - 11 -


after

Environments Designed for Work Entrant overview: Create an International, Class A headquarters reflective of world-renowned organization's life-saving mission and brand through design elements. Firm: DCS Design Project: IFPRI Headquarters Design team: Lena Scott, Jay Choi, Rodrigo Udaeta, Brittany Brown Clients: IFPRI

concept 3D perspective before

Architect: DCS Design MEP Engineer: KTA Group Structural Engineer: Structura, Inc. Photographer: Jay Choi

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after Environments Designed to Entertain Entrant overview: The Porch is a lively, casual dining restaurant that takes recognizable elements of the past and reinvents them in a way that is fresh and new. Firm: HVS Design Project: Porch Kitchen & Bar Design team: Christine Shanahan, ASID, Michelle West, and Allie Corneal Client: RLJ Lodging Trust Architect: Jonathan Nehmer + Associates Project Management: Beacon Bay Project Management MEP/FP Engineer: KMB Design Group Structural Engineer: Cagley & Associates

before before Lighting Designer: Lighting Design Collaborative Drapery Window Treatment: Wonderlys

Food Service Consultant: McFarland-Kistler & Associates Photographer: Whitney Cox

General Contractor: S&A Industries

ASID WASHINGTON METRO AND VIRGINIA CHAPTERS | ISSUE 1 2019 - 13 -


after before

Environments Designed to Promote Health and Wellness Entrant overview: The design team re-imagined this butler-style building with interior enhancements that elevate members' health, wellness, socialization and lifestyle. Firm: Chambers Project: Oxford Athletic Club Design team: Megan Koets Hochman, ASID, Bob Hickman, Charlie Turner, Lee Hyden, John Snellinger, Lindsay Jones, ASID, Colin Smith, Patricia Sampson, Prachee Bihani, Marishka Bachman, Lauren Gordon Architect: Chambers Structural/mechanical/electrical/ plumbing engineer: Loftus Food service: Camacho

Lighting design: The Lighting Practice

Client: PCG Capital

Acoustic design: Shen Milsom Wilke

Photographer: David Geier

General contractor: A Martini & Co

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Conceptual Design – Projects Not Built Entrant overview: This law office is an innovative and professional environment that reflects the forward-thinking reputations of both the firm and its clients. Firm: Perkins and Will, Washington Project: Morrison & Foerster LLP, Washington, D.C. Office Design team: Ken Wilson, ASID, FAIA, FIIDA, LEED Fellow, Tom Gregory, David Cordell, ASID, Haley Nelson, ASID, Brittany McNairy, Carissa Loehr Clients: Peter Elton, Kevin Blafkin

ASID WASHINGTON METRO AND VIRGINIA CHAPTERS | ISSUE 1 2019 - 15 -


Out of the Box Entrant overview: The revolution of this net zero urban office building is a bold embodiment of how we will work in the future. Firm: Perkins and Will Project: Revolution: Changing the Urban Paradigm Design team: Ken Wilson, ASID, FAIA, FIIDA, LEED Fellow, Carl Knutson, Rod Letonja, Armando Nazario, Keegan Wilson Structural engineer: ARUP Mechanical/electrical/ plumbing engineer: GHT Ltd.

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Conceptual Design – Student Work Project: Futures Without Violence Women and Children's Shelter Entrant overview: The shelter provides homeless women, domestic violence survivors, sexual assault victims, and their children food and housing for up to two years, counseling and legal services, vocational training, and other long-term solutions that prepare them for a new, independent stage of life. Student: Nghi Le, Allied ASID, Marymount University

INTRODUCING THE

Design Trade Program

HUNTER DOUGLAS Design Trade Program Giving trade professionals easier access to inspiring innovative products. DESIGN TRADE PROGRAM Join the Hunter Douglas Design Trade Program today. www.hunterdouglas.com/trade

ASID WASHINGTON METRO AND VIRGINIA CHAPTERS | ISSUE 1 2019 - 17 -


WELCOME NEW MEMBERS WASHINGTON METRO CHAPTER PROFESSIONAL Katherine Susan Fries, ASID Jordan Hawes, ASID Kaili Mang Jeyarajah, ASID Jennifer Kirby, ASID Lida Lewis, ASID, MA, BA, WELL AP, LEED AP Shelby K. Mamizuka, ASID Julie Elizabeth Manning, ASID Cassandra Fay Offutt, ASID Laura L. Ortel, ASID Christine Marie Shanahan, ASID Steven Sorrell, ASID, CID Steven Whitsitt, ASID, NCIDQ ALLIED PRACTIONER Andrew Adere, Allied ASID Brenda Iris Santoyo Benicio, Allied ASID Lisa B. Brown, Allied ASID Jenny Cisneros, Allied ASID Dawn C. Crovo, Allied ASID Amelia Fiduccia, Allied ASID Shaina Mae Figueroa, Allied ASID Maggie Goodrich, Allied ASID Joevannah Harris, Allied ASID Deborah Haymond, Allied ASID Emily Hwang, Allied ASID Jean S. Jones, Allied ASID Nghi Le, Allied ASID Susan Lewis-Ragland, Allied ASID Anna T. Light, Allied ASID Matt Miller, Allied ASID Leslie Ann Plotkin, Allied ASID Andrea Pohl, Allied ASID Rebecca Quandt, Allied ASID

Tracy L. Reichert, Allied ASID Autumn Chapman Riley, Allied ASID Alexandria K. Seimetz, Allied ASID Laura F. Skaff, Allied ASID Robin J. Stern, Allied ASID Charles C Whitley, Allied ASID ALLIED PRACTIONER Kelly Dashner, Associate ASID Fariba Farzad, Associate ASID Pamela C. Harper, Associate ASID Catherine L Harvey, Associate ASID Debra Levovitz, Associate ASID Susie Shockley, Associate ASID STUDENT Manuel Bonifacio Belisario Jr., Student ASID Grace S. Boateng, Student ASID Victoria Butz, Student ASID Deborah L. Colledge, Student ASID Isabella Luxe Bastien Curtis, Student ASID Ashley D East, Student ASID Camila Elson, Student ASID Marisol Fernandini-Gaffney, Student ASID Amy Alexandra Fick, Student ASID Farida Fox, Student ASID Hallie Gillespie, Student ASID Sonya Michelle Hayes, Student ASID Jenny Clarinda Hodges, Student ASID Lanita Jones, Student ASID Hannah Kasabian, Student ASID Lily Shira Katz, Student ASID Verena Klug, Student ASID Ariane Sperole Kombou, Student ASID Brooklyn Elyse Kovacs, Student ASID Abigail Irene Kowalewski, Student ASID

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Wren Eileen Lake, Student ASID Dana J. Lepere, Student ASID, LePere Carlie N. Logan, Student ASID Nora M. Ludden, Student ASID Julie Martin, Student ASID Melany McGillvray, Student ASID Pauline McPherson, Student ASID Heather O’Sullivan, Student ASID Stephanie M Payne, Student ASID Kimberly Phillips, Student ASID Dorinda Phillips, Student ASID Candice Prather, Student ASID Amy Lamoureux Riella, Student ASID Emma Benton Ritzert, Student ASID Daniel Schrei, Student ASID Nelly Ursula Seminario, Student ASID Kathy Shaffer, Student ASID Chelsea Walsh Stake, Student ASID Nkili Sudah, Student ASID, Nkili Sudah Stefany Katzuki Sugiura, Student ASID Lauren Symmes, Student ASID Audra Trammell, Student ASID Tram N. Tran, Student ASID Walinda P. West, Student ASID Denise Yearwood, Student ASID Julia Young, Student ASID

VIRGINIA CHAPTER PROFESSIONAL Nicholas Gary Brinen, ASID Janie E. Nabors, ASID, RID, NCIDQ Tamara Delbene Roadfuss, ASID ADVANCE TO PROFESSIONAL Paige C. Conrad, ASID

ALLIED PRACTIONER Erin Childs, Allied ASID Courtney Rice Dugan, Allied ASID Tiffany Glenski, Allied ASID Elizabeth S. Hart, Allied ASID STUDENT Lindsay Barnett, Student ASID Sarah E. Bullen, Student ASID Madeline Clark, Student ASID Mckenna Ann Davies, Student ASID Lila Beverly De La Rosa, Student ASID Grace Evans, Student ASID Sydney E. Flax, Student ASID Molly A. Fleming, Student ASID Monique Gagnon, Student ASID Kristy Hanshaw, Student ASID Julia Rae Harris, Student ASID Imani Hart, Student ASID Brandy Hemelt, Student ASID Angelica Rose Hoelzli, Student ASID Cat Jensen, Student ASID Katelin Arlene Karlinchak, Student ASID Julia King, Student ASID Mary Leland Lawson, Student ASID Elinore Grayson Levitch, Student ASID Margaret Mclaughlin, Student ASID Julia L. Mingione, Student ASID Mackenzie Lyn Oesterreich, Student ASID Carly Ritter, Student ASID Julia Marie Sorenson, Student ASID Rebecca Sorto-Robles, Student ASID Elizabeth Tzoumas, Student ASID Kimrey A. Walls, Student ASID Jessica Zapata, Student ASID


Connecting Designers with Industry Partners ASID Washington Metro offers many chances for industry partners to host events for our members. M&M STRICTLY SOCIAL These mix and mingle events provide members and industry partners an opportunity to get together and have some fun. These excellent networking opportunities take place once a month from 6-8 p.m. at different locations in Maryland, D.C. and Northern Virginia. Industry partners have the opportunity to host an M&M event in their showroom. The events will be publicized in our monthly newsletter and other communications.

ROAD SHOWS The chapter also hold Road Shows, which allow local industry partners to bring CEUs to a showroom near you! Time and travel are two of the major obstacles of attending events to gain CEUs. To address this issue, local industry partners that have multiple showrooms in the D.C. Metro area will offer the same CEU in multiple locations over multiple days to fit designer’s needs and ability to travel. In addition to these opportunities, we offer local sponsorships and use of our mailing list to send announcements to designers.

For more information, please contact Kwajo Oteng-Agipong at kwajo@mdcwall.com or (202) 374-8770.

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ASID WASHINGTON METRO AND VIRGINIA CHAPTERS | ISSUE 1 2019 - 19 -


Keys to Getting Your Interior Design Team to Do Things Right! By Julia Molloy

A

Empowering feedback, does just that. It empowers the employee to be more effective and take more personal accountability for their performance.

s many of you are building your teams to handle the new wave of business this year, you are faced with the challenges associated with getting your team to do what they are supposed to do. As the Principal Interior Designer, it is your job to not only be an amazing designer, but to also manage and lead your team. This is a tall order and getting your employees efficient and keeping the quality of work high is incredibly challenging! I want to share with you my thoughts on the power of effective communication, as it relates to team development. The smaller your firm, the more important each employee’s productivity is. How do you maximize your return on investment as it relates to your team members?

First and foremost, it is important to remember that this is not about you. Come from the perspective of the company and what it needs to fulfill its purpose and run really well. (As always, refer back to your Company Vision and Key Characteristics). Phrase your feedback in terms of the company’s needs and their role within the company. Try not to start your comments with “I like / don’t like”. Conversely, do not make the feedback about them either. Everyone has intrinsic value and you are judging their work, not them as a person. You are providing feedback on the ROLE they play and the work they DO. Phrase your feedback in terms of the task or objective. It is about their work. Tie in how their work impacts the company and/or the client’s experience. After all, that is what it is really about; the outcome of their actions and choices. Use the power of ‘self-referral’. Brain science now tells us that people more often modify their behavior based on their own self-assessment, versus the words of others. A very powerful technique for inspiring change is to ask questions. Lead them to the conclusion you are looking to get and then expound on it. For example, a Jr. Designer turned in a CAD drawing that was sloppy, incomplete and did not follow your company standards for line weights and file set up… AGAIN! A knee jerk response would be to pick it apart and tell them all the things wrong with it. Or for some of you less confrontational or exhausted designers, just not say anything at all and fix it yourself (and internally give up on them.) Here’s an alternative approach. Ask them a series of questions that puts the onus on them:

I know this is how you feel when they don’t do what you asked and you spend more time getting them to do it right than it would have taken you to just do it yourself. No, you are not alone!

Have you reviewed this CAD Drawing and made sure it includes all details? Do you understand our guidelines for line weights and file structure? Do you understand how this drawing impacts the project? Are you willing to verify that it’s perfect? Do you want to review it again before you submit something as an example of your work?

One of the keys to successful management is feedback. Not just feedback though, ’EMPOWERING FEEDBACK.’ Empowering feedback is guidance that is given that truly hones your team members’ skills, methods and clarity. It is important to share with them what they are doing well and what needs improvement. Here are some tips on doing this effectively.

In another situation, you may ask them what they feel they could have done better and then agree with them and expand on the idea. Ask them if they think their work is congruent with the company’s standards for excellence and so on.

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Utilizing these techniques really helps to hone in their skills. You invest time, energy, and money in these people. At a certain point, you need it to start coming back to you. Empowering feedback is a great method to boost your team’s value to the firm and keep them on the right track. In reality, your team will make or break your design firm. Getting it right is a huge challenge and is of paramount importance. I hope you are able to incorporate these techniques into your own leadership style and experience the joy of leading a happy and effective team. Expecting Great Things.

Get them to evaluate their own work and then provide your input. Train them to be more accountable for the quality of their work and their decisionmaking.

You get the idea. Ask them a question or a series of questions that lead them to the right answer. In addition, refer them to your operations manual. If you don’t have a well-developed manual, you’re in for a rough road. Without it, upholding quality standards and procedures is an ongoing battle. If this is the case for you, be in touch. I have a template you can purchase that will save you about 5 years of ops manual development time. Asking well-devised questions that lead them to the self-awareness of the issue at hand or modification needed is your goal. Give them a framework for evaluating their work. Let them know what the important details are and what questions to ask themselves when assessing the quality of their own work. This in practice could look something like this: “I see 3 things that need adjusting. Let’s take a look at this drawing together. What details are you are looking for when QC’ing your drawings before you pass them on?” “What do you see? What details are you looking for? What do you reference to double check your work?” Guide them to the realization you want them to get to by asking questions. When possible, do NOT give them the answer. Make them FIND the problem themselves. Step away and have them come to you with the answer and the proposed solution. This approach will have a much higher rate of sinking into their brain and will translate to better work or improved performance.

Finally, be sure to be specific in your feedback in general. When a team member does something well, the natural inclination would be to say, “Great job!” or something of the like. More effective praise may sound more like, “Your attention to detail and the speed you cranked that out was impressive!” And conversely, when they don’t hit the mark, make it clear exactly what it is that could have been done better. If they did a really good job, let them know what it was about what they did, that was so effective. Be very specific about what didn’t work, or what did work.

Brain science shows us that people are more likely to modify their behavior based on their own evaluation and inner dialogue versus the critique of a supervisor.

Julia Molloy is the leading operations specialist for the interior design industry. She has over 2 decades of operations experience, 12 of them in the design field and has a wealth of knowledge from the interior design, graphic design, operations and technology sectors. She is a sought after speaker, a Business of Design faculty member, on the Better Practices Network board of advisors, has been a continued education instructor to the faculty at New York School of Interior Design and a member of ASID. Molloy has also chaired the ASID Student Affairs Committee and the board of advisors for the Art Institute – Interior Design program. Julia Molloy is also the founder of the renowned BOLD Summit – Business of Luxury Design Summit. This event focuses on the special business needs unique to firms positioned in the luxury market and is a powerful catalyst for luxury focused interior designers and architects around the world. In pursuing her mission to advance the industry, each year she galvanizes the world’s leaders in luxury design to share their wisdom and advice. The BOLD Summit continues to be a driving force for enriching lives and propelling excellence in the design community around the globe.

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LEGAL MATTERS

36 Legal Do’s and Don’ts for Interior Designers 36 DO’S AND DON’TS

Alan M. Siegel, Esq.

I

must confess; I am a die-hard list maker. Some of my lists are of no real consequence, and others have a very short lifespan, particularly when they are forgotten in a pocket and sent to the dry cleaner. Other lists survive longer, and often become the basis for one of my articles. Such is the case with my everevolving list below. The Do’s and Don’ts are in no particular order of importance—they are all important! Some are obvious, others not so much. Some are self-explanatory, others need explanation. No doubt this list is not exhaustive; nor is it intended to be. If you have any questions, need an explanation, or wish to offer a comment, feel free to send me an e-mail at asiegel@LSSLLP.com

• Do not select the wrong client to work for.

• Do not do favors for clients at your own peril.

• If you intend to use a form contract, use the correct one, and be sure to modify it according to the project requirements.

• Do advise your advisors (your attorneys, accountants and insurance brokers) as to what you actually do for a living. They will then be in a much better position to advise you.

• Do understand the legal importance of contract “boilerplate” provisions.

• Do use the contract as an opportunity to educate your client. Remember, a surprised client is not a happy client.

• Do understand your vendor’s terms of sale. They are not in your best interests!

• Do recognize when you have a problem (in other words—do not stick your head in the sand!).

• Deal with the problem on a timely basis. Problems do not go away over time—they only get worse.

• Do be familiar with local laws applicable to your services.

• Do not forget the three biggest client

• Do not put all your “contractor eggs” in one basket.

• Do not make “innocuous” representations; particularly when they are not “innocuous.”

• Do understand contract termination rights.

• Do contractually reserve the right to suspend performance of services and to withhold delivery of merchandise if your client fails to make timely payments.

• Do take a flexible approach to your fees and compensation.

• Do keep historical time records. They help you determine how best to charge fees on your next project.

• Do have the last letter in the file. You will make your attorney happy.

• Do understand your insurance coverage; specifically, what is and what is not covered.

• Do not ignore your client’s calls. The client you don’t want to call back is the first client you should call back.

• Do communicate often with your client, even if nothing is happening.

• Do understand the importance of the pre-contract phase. How can you prepare a contract when you don’t understand your new project?

• Do not relinquish intellectual ownership rights in your designs to your clients.

• Do not underestimate your client’s anger or frustration.

• Do reserve the right to photograph your client’s project and to use the photographs (for business purposes).

• Do try to contractually shift responsibilities over to third parties where they properly belong.

• Do not violate the home improvement contractor laws. The consequences are usually quite severe.

• Do not practice “interior architecture” or hold yourself out as being an “interior architect.”

• Do understand the exclusions of your professional errors and omissions insurance policy.

• Do limit your personal exposure by operating your design business in a legal entity that provides you with the benefit of limited liability.

• Do remember, however, that some types of business liability can become personal obligations (e.g. sales tax), even though your business entity enjoys limited liability.

• Do not ignore the statutory licensing requirements governing interior designers in the states where your client’s project is located.

• Do not be “hard of hearing” during contract negotiations.

• Do practice good risk management techniques.

Alan M. Siegel is a partner of the New York law firm of Levy, Sonet & Siegel, LLP, 630 Third Avenue, New York, New York 10017, (212) 661-1212; asiegel@LSSLLP.com. 40+ years of legal experience within the design and architectural industry representing the interests of interior designers, architects, product designers and resources to the design industry. For over twenty years served as national legal counsel to the American Society of Interior Designers.

Co-author of A Guide to Business Principles and Practices for Interior Designers, published by Whitney Library of Design. Frequent lecturer and contributor to industry and trade groups publications.

General Counsel for the Association for the Contract Textiles Inc. and the Decorative Fabrics and Furnishing Association. Honorary Fellow of the American Society of

Alex K. Ross, a senior associate in the firm, assisted with the preparation of this article.

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Interior Designers, Inc. Member of National Board of Trustees of DIFFA. Trustee of the Angelo Donghia Foundation.


Photography: Jen Chappell

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