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SILICON VALLEY

DESIGN

ASID CA PENINSULA / SILICON VALLEY CHAPTER MAGAZINE ISSUE I 2017


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CA PENINSULA/SILICON VALLEY

ASID CA PenInSulA/SIlICon VAlley ChAPter offICe 1346 The Alameda, Suite 7-195 San Jose, CA 95126-5006 1.408.906.9577 administrator@capen.asid.org www.asidcapen.org ASID nAtIonAl 1152 15th St. NW, Suite 910 Washington, DC 20005 Tel: 202.546.3480 Fax: 202.546.3240 membership@asid.org www.asid.org eDItorIAl StAff Marie Chan, ASID, CID, GREEN AP Editor & Communications Director

PuBlIShInG StAff Advertising Sales Mike Watt • 972.989.2208 Design Chronicles magazine is published quarterly for the California Peninsula Chapter of the American Society of Interior Designers by DSA Publishing and Design, Inc. The editorial content and the Design Chronicles magazine are controlled and owned by the California Peninsula Chapter of ASID. Reproduction of this publication in whole, in part, in any form is strictly prohibited without the written permission of the California Peninsula Chapter of ASID.

CA Peninsula/Silicon Valley Chapter News 04 04 06 07 08 10 12 13 14

PRESIDENT’S LETTER | Yukari Haitani, Allied ASID, CID, CBD, CKD 2017 ASID CALIFORNIA PENINSULA/SILICON VALLEY CHAPTER BOARD JUDGING DESIGNERS WELCOME NEW MEMBERS JAPAN | A Voyage of Discovery 2017 CES SENDS BIG HUGS TO DESIGNERS ASID CINEQUEST 2017 2017 CHAPTER SPONSORS DEMYSTIFYING TITLE 24 | Updates to California Title 24 2016 Energy Code

Index Of Advetisers 02

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FORMATION STONE

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CALIFORNIA HOMES

05

MENLO FLOORING & DESIGN

06

COAST LIGHTING

13

PURCELL MURRAY

05

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15

RIGGS DISTRIBUTING

07

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ON THE COVER

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GOLD AWARD WINNER COMMERCIAL INSTITUTIONAL Ariel Richardson, Allied ASID ASR Design Studio Photographer: Kathleen Harrison Photography CA PENINSULA/SILICON VALLEY CHAPTER | ISSue I 2017 - 3 -


President’s Letter

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Time flew by so fast and the first half of the 2017 fiscal year is already over! How do you evaluate our chapter’s programs this term?

The board brought two exciting projects to the chapter in the second quarter: an educational trip to Japan and the Cinequest Film Festival, held in San Jose. The committee has been preparing for the Japan trip for one and a half years, and finally 23 members travelled to Tokyo and Kyoto for 8 days in March. The group, which included professional, IP and student members, shared an unforgettable time together. Denny Holland also joined us and presented ‘Zen and the Art of American Design’ in Kyoto, the city that is the heart of Japan's Zen culture. This incredible experience will be shared with all chapter members during our April meeting with Denny’s lecture, which is approved for .1 CEU. The Cinequest project supported the Communication pillar of National’s strategic priorities. The goal of this pillar is to communicate not only internally, but also with the general public, our future clients. The Cinequest project provided an excellent opportunity to show how ASID designers impact our clients’ lives. Coast Lighting, our Gold Sponsor, contributed to the project. We also made changes to our student scholarship for this spring semester. It is the first scholarship to be funded by IP members in our chapter. All Natural Stone, our platinum sponsor, and Rohl came forward as co-sponsors. This is another fantastic example of how our community is helping each other. To summarize our projects in terms of National strategic pillars: v Design impacts life: inspiration from the Japan trip to elevate our design sensibility in future projects. v living the brand: new chapter website; bringing the ASID brand to Japan. v Communication: new chapter website for communications with our members; reaching out to the general public through the Cinequest project. v Diversity and inclusion: including all members for all projects. v Alternative revenue: support from both core sponsors and IP members outside of core sponsorship I’d like to thank the board members for their hard work. We would love to know your thoughts on how we are doing! Yukari Haitani, Allied ASID, CID, CBD, CKD ASID CA Peninsula/Silicon Valley Chapter President 2016-2017

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ASID CA PENINSULA/SILICON VALLEY 1346 The Alameda, Suite 7-195 San Jose, CA 95126-5006 1.408.906.9577 administrator@capen.asid.org www.asidcapen.org BOARD OF DIRECTORS

President Yukari Haitani, Allied ASID, CID, CBD, CKD 408.836.5926 President@capen.asid.org President-Elect Patricia McDonald, ASID 408.292.6997 President-elect@capen.asid.org Financial Director Cynthia Campanile, Industry Partner ASID 605.954.4441 Finance@capen.asid.org Communications Director Marie Chan, ASID, CID, GREEN AP 408.261.2181 Communications@capen.asid.org Professional Development Director Cita Rojas–Sila, Allied ASID, LEED GA 408.314.1942 ProfessionalDevelopment@capen.asid.org Membership Director Janine Arietta, Allied ASID 408.265.8484 Membership@capen.asid.org Emerging Professional Chair Anny Wong, Allied ASID 408.502.6011 EPAC@capen.asid.org At-Large Director, IP Liaison Jackie Bartlett, Industry Partner ASID 408.544.9600 at-large@capen.asid.org Student Representative Milan Chen, Student ASID 650.799.9069 StudentRep@capen.asid.org Chapter Administrator Monika Rose 408.906.9577 administrator@capen.asid.org


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CA PENINSULA/SILICON VALLEY CHAPTER | ISSue I 2017 - 5 -


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Judging DESIGNERS by Mary Ann McEwan, ASID, CID, MBA I recently came across a wonderful word: splanchnic, from the Greek word for spleen (at one time the spleen was considered the seat of emotions or passions). What does it mean? It means visceral, or an emotional response coming from deep inside, from the guts. This may be a more understandable way to think about how someone makes a subjective judgment on a design project. There are the rational, logical criteria for which our projects have to pass muster, but then there’s splanchnic, a gut reaction. I asked a couple of our members who were judges at design competitions (Barbara Jacobs, FASID, and Lilley Yee, ASID, CMKBD, CID) about what makes a design project stand out as a winner. Both judges agreed that their first response to a project is emotional, followed by a more rational evaluation.

1

Here are the elements that judges look for in a design competition entry: The client’s objectives are clearly stated. The word count should be very strictly enforced. Too many members are turning in concept statements which are too long. Once the concept statement is written, the ‘word count’ feature should be used to pare it down. Both judges mentioned that bullet points make their jobs easier, and help keep the word count to a minimum. Judges have a very short timeframe on judging day, so they cannot spend time on reading long statements. As Barbara stated, ‘the idea is to keep the descriptions succinct…not all the adjectives and flourishes, just the facts.’

The entry adheres to design principles to effectively present unique elements with respect to texture, color, proportion, style and shape. As Lilley told me, ‘judges give high points for innovative solutions.’ While often high-end projects get the most press, the most important aspect of our profession is giving the clients what they want. Barbara mentioned that, ‘It’s an emotional impression. I can look at a project without looking at the criteria and know ‘it’s not a winner.’ On the other hand, if a project looks like a winner but the elements are not met, it will not be in the winners’ circle. Is it a creative design solution? Both judges agreed that there must be a ‘wow’ factor (Barbara calls this the ‘money shot’), yet after that initial reaction they spend even more time examining it critically and checking the various points. It’s the problem/solution criteria that must mesh with the ‘wow’ factor. The creativity in solving the design challenge is what fuels the winning design. Lilley explains that, ‘we look at all the pictures and look at the statement to see if it actually solved the client’s problems.’ There was an example given of a color that seemed outdated, yet in the design concept statement it was explained that the client asked for that particular color. That detail overrode the judge’s initial reaction to the color. Another example would be that if there were a restriction on changing an existing space, it would be important to mention that fact in the concept statement. Barbara notes that, ‘the wow factor doesn’t win the prize, the wow factor draws the judge in to really scrutinize it.’

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The space just feels right. It is a pleasing combination of function and aesthetics, taking into consideration the lifestyle of the client and creating a harmonious balance among the elements within the whole space. Lilley states, ‘I feel so comfortable in that space…it gives me an idea of who that client is, who lives there.’ Barbara adds, ‘you know it when you see it, it speaks to you, speaks to your heart.’ Just as in finding the perfect fabric for a project, you say, ‘that’s it.’ She states further that the judges are drawn to certain projects and feel ownership to them, a connection: ‘for the top award, all judges feel ownership of the same project.’ Quality professional photography is important. The judges want to see the degree of transformation between the ‘Before’ and ‘After’ photos. While ‘Before’ photos can be simple digital shots from a smartphone, the ‘After’ photos need to be done by a professional photographer who specializes in photographing interiors. They should have an eye for balance, proportion and color correction (to make sure the photographed image is as close as possible to the actual colors). Barbara noted that, ‘some photos jump right out as not being good; they are too fuzzy, too light, too dark.’ If one of the judges is from the media, the question is often, ‘Can I publish this project?’ While national magazines usually take their own photos for a publication, the magazines in our area tend to use the designers’ photos. As Barbara states, ‘the photographs have to tell the story of the design in a reach-outand-grab-you way.’ Lilley reminds us that the ‘Before’ and ‘After’ photos should be taken from as close to the same angle as possible. Finally, remember that there is always an element of subjectivity in judging. We shouldn’t be too focused on winning to the point of assuming that the

only other option is losing. Not every worthy movie wins an Oscar. ‘The Wizard of Oz’ was nominated for Best Picture in 1939, but lost to ‘Gone with the Wind’. However, it did win for Best Original Song (‘Over the Rainbow’) and Best Original Score. We certainly can’t think of this film as a ‘loser’ in any way. In the same vein, submitting a project for a design award competition means that you now have photographs that can be used for other publications, for a website, and for other marketing uses. What does it mean to judge a space where someone lives or works? That space is transitory. What makes us stop to take a second look, to say, ‘there is something special or meaningful about this space’? During Cinequest 2017, I saw the premier of a Danish movie, ‘Secluded’. It was a brilliant film dealing with the concept of presenting ourselves to the world as being perfect on the surface, whether in our jobs, our families, or over the internet. In reality, there is another less perfect side below the surface that is not being shown. That side is no less real, and those flaws may often be important to reveal. In a way, ‘The Wizard of Oz’ had a similar theme. Let’s not forget that ASID promotes our profession by stating that, ‘we demonstrate and celebrate the power of design to positively change people’s lives.’ Are we focusing design competitions on the surface image of a space, while ignoring the depth of meaning that space may have for someone? While design competitions are important and give us the incentive to strive for excellence, let’s not allow them to define who we are as designers. While following the rules of good design, when creating spaces let’s also remember the elusive ingredient of splanchnic.

Welcome

NEW

MEMBERS

ASID CA Peninsula/Silicon Valley Chapter would like to extend a warm welcome to our newest members. Come make friends and get involved please contact Monika Rose, our chapter administrator, for a committee to match your interests. She can be reached at 408.906.9577 or administrator@capen.asid.org. We look forward to seeing you at our meetings and working with you as design leaders!

ALLIED MEMBER

Ruth Crump, Allied ASID (Emerging Professional)

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS

Denease G. Rowell, Associate ASID

Dominique D. Stenzel, Associate ASID

STUDENT MEMBERS

Kravet Lee Jofa Brunschwig & Fils Ralph Lauren Home Groundworks Duralee Highland Court Bailey & Griffin Clarke & Clarke Lulu DK James Hare Robert Allen Beacon Hill And so much more!

Nadia Kravchuk, Student ASID Louise Rother, Student ASID

IP MEMBERS Century Stereo

TBS Design Gallery CA PENINSULA/SILICON VALLEY CHAPTER | ISSue I 2017 - 7 -


Japan

A Voyage of Discovery

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Twenty three Chapter members embarked on a whirlwind tour of Tokyo and Kyoto in March to experience firsthand Zen philosophyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s influence on design and architecture. Aside from experiencing leading edge research at the Toto Technical Center and Universal Design Lab, the group saw exquisite handmade textiles and kimonos, enjoyed a magical evening entertained by a maiko, as well as visited museums and temples galore. Here are some favorite images from the trip. Enjoy!


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Big Hugs

2017 CES Sends 2017’s new TV offerings and related innovations will have most designers doing a happy dance. Those of you who embrace multipurpose audio/video living spaces should see an increased number of clients wanting upgrades and complete renovations. Expect this trend to last at least 2 years.

To Designers

Let’s explore the reasons for this accelerating rate of client upgrades and how to take advantage of them. Afterwards, I ask you to pay close attention to one unfortunate industry hiccup which was announced in Las Vegas. Not being aware of this misstep can cause your client major pain. Conversely, your clients will thank you profusely for bringing it to their attention. Consumers are buying fewer TVs these days, but they are spending more on their primary displays in family and living rooms. Those dollars buy more when it comes to picture quality and display size. For 2017, high quality 75” 4K LG displays can be had for under $2,700.00, half the 2015 price. Beyond cost, picture quality has become compelling even to casual observers. Without great looking content, 2017 displays would be nicely engineered sheets of glass. But today, almost everything, especially on Netflix, Amazon, and YouTube is being filmed in 4K with HDR. Even if you believe TV should never have been invented, it is imperative that you visit a Video Only or Best Buy / Magnolia and experience what’s exciting your clients. Ask to see 4K content with and without HDR as well as a SONY or LG OLED TVs. If you don’t catch the bug, you can at least recognize it in your clients. You will hear some new buzz words moving forward. Here is the world’s shortest introduction to new TV technology. Our most recent TVs showed 1,080 lines of resolution and a maximum of 16 million colors. 4K TV provides you 4,000 lines of resolution and billions of colors. Our eyes can process billions of colors but they have not had the opportunity to do so. Those additional colors and contrast levels

are known as High Dynamic Range (HDR). Don’t buy a TV without HDR and Dolby Vision. That’s it. Beyond TVs, much of today’s media furniture will not be able to support 65”+ displays. There are also many new ways to make speakers hide in plain sight or disappear altogether into ceilings and cabinets. One example is Artison USA. Check out their website images and make friends with a local dealer. Artison dealers need designers who can help complete their vision. Wider TVs mean taller TVs. Many fireplaces will need to be replaced or eliminated. Finally, the technical landmine I describe next may mean an increase in the number of media cabinets and fewer designs with components located away from the TV. Here’s the cautionary tale. Today’s HDMI cables connecting TV and source components can barely carry the information needed for 4K with HDR. 4K will continue to evolve, and 8K will join 4K in 2018. On January 4, a new standard, HDMI 2.1, was announced that carries 3 times the information of current cables. Not yet available, HDMI 2.1 cables will eventually be needed by all. If current cables can’t be pulled out, you need to run a parallel conduit or smurf tube in-wall between TV and components to futureproof your clients. It’s inexpensive insurance. Enjoy this exciting adventure! James Stout is a Home Technology Professional and Chief

Concealment Officer at The Integrated Lifestyle. He can be

reached at james@theintegratedlifestyle.com or by phone at 408-

393-4779. Most of what he writes about can be seen at his

Campbell showcase (by appointment) located within Valet Custom Cabinets at 1190 Dell Ave., Ste. J, Campbell, CA 95008


CA ALIFO OR RNIA I HOM MES ES

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2017

ASID CINEQUEST By Mary Ann McEwan, ASID, CID, MBA

The 27th annual CINEQUEST film festival took place this year between February 28th and March 12th. Our team of three ASID professional designers (Patty McDonald - Chair, Julie Lohr Hoefler and Mary Ann McEwan) was asked to create an imaginative space for the Virtual Reality (VR) experience, in a room that is normally a plain beige rehearsal hall at the historic California Theater downtown (home of Opera San Jose and other theatrical events). We worked closely with Antonea Colón, Business Development and Operations Manager with CINEQUEST, and Kendall Stevens, Virtual Reality Project Manager. For our design, we coordinated with Impact Lighting, a theatrical lighting company, were loaned a beautiful round ceiling fixture at no charge from our Sponsor Coast Lighting, borrowed some sofas and benches from CINEQUEST itself, and had a few pillows made from a variety of fabrics we pooled together. The labor and filling for the pillows were donated by Upholstery Specialists in San Jose. There were three different light settings created, and the VR crew decided each day which of the colors best represented the two films being featured that day. The Virtual Reality room was very well received, and Luxe Magazine has shared some of their photos, which will be published in their next issue. The photographer was Chris Gill of WestBoundary Photography. The VR experience was a large part of CINEQUEST this year, showcasing the fact that this annual film festival is in the heart of Silicon Valley. There were many other non-VR movies being shown, in the California Theater as well as other venues in San Jose and Redwood City.

During the course of the festival, we had the opportunity to see the premier of “The Zookeeper’s Wife”, “Secluded”, a funny short called “The 11 O’Clock”, plus live interviews with Fred Armisen, Jane Lynch and others. At each movie during the two-week period, attendants viewed ad slides on the screen (in addition to posters and flyers), showcasing our ASID Peninsula Chapter. We very much enjoyed the partnership, thank everyone who participated, and look forward to working with CINEQUEST again!

Photography by Chris Gill of West Boundary Photography


2017 CA Peninsula Chapter Sponsors

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CA PENINSULA/SILICON VALLEY CHAPTER | ISSue I 2017 - 13 -


Demystifying Title 24 Updates to California Title 24 2016 Energy Code By Nancy McCoy Coast Lighting in Redwood City was filled with ASID professionals and students gathering to hear a lighting seminar regarding updates to the California Title 24

Energy Code presented by Nancy McCoy of McCoy

Lighting Design and Angela McDonald of PG&E.

Nancy focused on the residential side of the code changes and Angela spoke about the commercial

changes. In addition, five vendor tables dotted the

perimeter giving attendees the chance to see new LED lighting fixtures up close, ask questions and make

appointments with the vendors for more information. The Coast Lighting showroom looked great with

many new LED fixtures on display throughout the

n

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space.

NO Edison base incandescent sockets are allowed

in any recessed downlights.

Kitchen under cabinet lighting shall be switched

separately from other lighting.

Bathrooms, Laundry and Utility Rooms must have

at least one fixture controlled by a vacancy sensor.

All LED fixtures and lamps shall have a minimum

CRI of 90.

All lighting in the residence must be controlled by

a dimmer or vacancy sensor.

The builder shall provide a schedule of all luminaires

and lamps installed in the home to the owner after the final inspection.

And – there is a bonus! You may use blank electrical

junction boxes located 5 feet and above the finish

floor with no JA8 requirements. You can put any

fixture there you want! Use halogen!

Use fluorescent! Use incandescent! The

number of boxes shall be no greater

than the number of bedrooms in the

The Title 24 2016 Commercial Energy

January 1, 2017. The residential changes are more

comprehensive than the previous iteration in 2013,

changes. (The big changes had been

which concentrated more on commercial construction

instituted with the 2013 update.) A few changes include:

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updates. A summary of 2016 residential changes

n

energy.ca.gov. The JA8 requirements focus on high CRI rating (90+), dimming down to 10%, high

lumens per watt and 5 year warranties among other points.

- 14 - ISSue 1 2017 | CA PENINSULA/SILICON VALLEY CHAPTER

than 2 fixtures are replaced in a space.

For the 2019 code being written now, they may change those requirements.

Thank you to all who attended the evening! Angela

and I enjoyed the conversations over food and wine before the presentation and interacting with you

during the meeting. We trust all those who attended learned a lot and if you need more input please feel

free to contact me at: nancy@nmccoy.com. Good

Luck and Good Lighting!!

On/Off switches

need not be acces-

stalls, parking areas, stairwells and corri-

must be compliant with a section of the code

of California website https://cacertappliances.

move or change in a space alteration or when more

California Energy Commission list and be above 90 CRI.

with more than 2

All fixtures and/or lamps used in the residence

fixtures and lamps have to be listed on the State

Lighting code triggers when 10% or more fixtures

lighting in these circumstances would have to comply

in public restrooms

Kitchen wattage calculation is no longer required.

referred to as Joint Appendix #8 (JA8). The compliant

Two questions that piqued my interest were about the

newer internal LED lighting in medicine cabinets and

sible to the public

includes: n

Commission for answers.

caveat - you must control these boxes

Code was also updated with minor

three years and the most recent code went into effect

know” and followed up with the California Energy

with JA8 requirements – meaning it has to be on the

speed control as is required by code.

n

code. Angela and I answered questions following

the presentation. In some cases, we said “I don’t

also in kitchen drawers. CEC response was that the

with a dimmer, vacancy sensor or fan

The California Title 24 Energy Code is updated every

As you read this, there are probably a lot of questions

entering your mind about the changes to the 2016

home. If you have three bedrooms –

you get three “freebie” boxes. Only

leD lit landscape lighting in Sonoma. lighting by McCoy lighting Design. Photo by Treve Johnson Photography

leD lit kitchen in Berkeley. lighting by McCoy lighting Design. Photo by Cesar Rubio Photography

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dors.

Stairwells can be

controlled

per

building (not per

floor as required in 2013).

leD lit art accent lighting in napa. lighting by McCoy lighting Design. Photo by Henley Photography


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ASID California Peninsula Vol1 2017  
ASID California Peninsula Vol1 2017