Page 1

designDC Metro ISSUE 2 | 2020

Design Impacts Lives

WASHINGTON METRO

VIRGINIA


Van Noord

©2020 Ferguson Enterprises LLC 0620 1953349

MAKE THE MOST OF YOUR HOME

YOUR LOCAL SHOWROOMS: CHANTILLY | ALEXANDRIA | WINCHESTER | ROCKVILLE | ANNAPOLIS | WASHINGTON, D.C.

Shop online or schedule a personalized appointment from the comfort of your home today at fergusonshowrooms.com.


$QQDSROLV0' &KHY\&KDVH0' )DOOV&KXUFK9$ 7KH6RPHUYLOOH%DWK$QG.LWFKHQ6WRUHFRP


President’s Message WASHINGTON METRO CHAPTER

ASID WASHINGTON METRO 312 West Commercial Street East Rochester, NY 14445 202-488-4100 administrator@dcmetro.asid.org www.dcmetro.asid.org

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

PRESIDENT Rebecca Hubler, ASID, CID, NCIDQ, CAPS President@dcmetro.asid.org PRESIDENT-ELECT Rafael Fuentes, ASID

President-elect@dcmetro.asid.org

DIRECTOR AT LARGE Kate Magee, ASID, WELL AP, LEED GA

At-Large@dcmetro.org

MEMBERSHIP DIRECTOR Melvin Hooks, Industry Partner Membership@dcmetro.asid.org FINANCIAL DIRECTOR Patrick J. Baglino, Jr., ASID Finance@dcmetro.asid.org PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR Sydnye Pettengill, ASID ProfessionalDevelopment@dcmetro.asid.org COMMUNICATIONS DIRECTOR Lindsay Jones, ASID, NCIDQ Communications@dcmetro.asid.org STUDENT REPRESENTATIVE TO THE BOARD Isabella Bastien-Curtis, Student ASID StudentRep@dcmetro.asid.org NOMINATING COMMITTEE CHAIR/ PAST PRESIDENT Donna Sharpe, ASID dsharpe@kcct.com CHAPTER ADMINISTRATOR Terry Parker Duane administrator@nyu-cane.asid.org

Dear Colleagues, Entering August we continue to be in the midst of Covid-19 and many changes within our ASID design community. I think you will like this change; our first digital edition of Design DC Metro. In this issue we are focusing on innovative health and wellness projects and cutting edge kitchen and bath design. Be prepared to be wowed. Your Washington Metro Chapter board and committees have been Zooming along abiding by Covid-19 restrictions. In June we held our first Zoom M&M organized by Judy Boitz and hosted by Dan Kluger of Dan Kugler Design Center and I have to say it was great to see all those in attendance and be able to take part in the lively banter that ensued. The Alexandria Peer Group, led by Joann Manzig, held its Zoom meeting the same night and although I first thought “enough Zooming for me,” I found myself totally absorbed seeing and chatting with the group. What a challenge the past few months have been, leaving us dazed by the wild rollercoaster ride of momentous events and emotions that is Covid-19. Everyone has been affected. Sometimes I find that looking for anything good and trying to stay positive in the midst of all this is hard and downright daunting. On a recent walk with Flora, my beagle buddy, I was thinking how fortunate she was to be a dog and innocent of all of the current happenings. For Flora, being on a walk in the park surrounded by the sights, sounds, and sniffs of nature is one of her main joys (her other very favorite main joys include FOOD and lots of good-behind-the- ear scratches and belly rubs). For me, seeing her tail swish back and forth excitedly and hearing her chortle and howl just makes me smile. As I looked at the greenery of the park, listened to the chirping birds, and watched the water trickling over the rocks in the stream I was immediately transformed to a more serene state of being. The term that came to mind was “biophilia” which is defined as “a love of life and the living world; the affinity of human beings for other life forms.” At that moment in time, I was fortunate too. With businesses slowly opening, more of us are cautiously venturing out, trying to regain the feelings of normalcy that was January. The prospect of speaking to one another even mask to mask while social distancing seems exhilarating and yes, a little scary all at the same time. Dare we hope our rollercoaster is starting to ascend and will stay at the precipice?? For each of us finding the positive can take different forms. For me, it can be as simple as taking a walk in the park with Flora; but please hold off on giving me belly rubs and good scratches behind my ears. Enjoy whatever is good, stay positive, safe and well.

Rebecca Hubler, ASID, CID, NCIDQ, CAPS President, ASID Washington Metro Chapter - 4 - ISSUE 2 2020| ASID WASHINGTON METRO AND VIRGINIA CHAPTERS


designDC Metro ISSUE 1 | 2019

Design Impacts Lives

VIRGINIA CHAPTER OF ASID

DESIGNING THE NEW PARADIGM By Julia A. Molloy

18 20 24

CREATING EQUITY BY DESIGN By Lynne Wilkinson

EXCELLENCE IN DESIGN / RESIDENTIAL Shawna Dillon, ASID; Kitchen and Bath Designer EXCELLENCE IN DESIGN / COMMERCIAL Gensler Tama Duffy Day, FASID, FACHE, FIIDA, Bonnie Slater, ASID, NCIDQ

EXCELLENCE IN DESIGN / RESIDENTIAL Anthony Wilder Design/Build Team

Publishing staff

advertising sales Duff Tussing • 972-562-6966 Jamie Williams • 352-448-5873 art Director Dawn Lyon • 972-436-2841

Design D.C. Metro magazine is published quarterly for the Washington Metro Chapter of the American Society of Interior Designers by DSA Publishing & Design, Inc. Editorial content and Design D.C. Metro magazine are controlled and owned by the Washington Metro Chapter of ASID. Reproduction of this publication in whole, in part, in any form is strictly prohibited without the written permission of the Washington Metro Chapter of ASID.

advertisers

04 06 08 12

ASID WASHINGTON METRO CHAPTER PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE By Rebecca Hubler, ASID, CID, NCIDQ, CAPS

23 | American Eye

15 | Benjamin Moore & Co. 16 | California Closets 27 | Daltile

30 | Dan Kugler’s Design

02 | Ferguson Enterprises 15 | Hunter Douglas, Inc. 07 | M. Jane Johnson

07 | Miss Pixie’s Furnishings & Whatnot

28 | Plumbing Parts Plus / Rockville 29 | The Container Store 15 | The Dixie Group

03 | Thos. Somerville Bath & Kitchen

on the cover Anthony Wilder Design/Build Team Project: Mid-Centruy Modern Makeover ASID WASHINGTON METRO AND VIRGINIA CHAPTERS | ISSUE 2 2020 - 5 -


Acoustical Ceilings/Sound Masking ADA Comp ues Appliances Aquariums Art Art Installation ASID VIRGINIA P.O. Box 2 Eggleston, VA 24086 804-370-5616 info@va.asid.org www.va.asid.org

BOARD OF DIRECTORS PRESIDENT

Matthew Lee, ASID, CID, LEED AP BD+C President@va.asid.org

PRESIDENT-ELECT

Gillian Bowman, ASID, CID, NCIDQ President-elect@va.asid.org

DIRECTOR AT LARGE

Heather Hopkins, ASID, NCIDQ, LEED APA At-large@va.asid.org

Audio-Video/Electronics Awnings Bedding/M Cabinetry Carpets/Rugs Ceilings Cleaning S Computer/Software Services/Web Design Const r/Millwork Custom Storage Solutions Decorative ving Designer Services Doors Drafting/Survey

s h o p industry partners

Shutters Fabric Protection Fabrics Fans Faux eplaces Flooring Framing Furniture Commerci m Furniture Refinishing Furniture Residential G Products Hardware Hardwood Flooring Home

MEMBERSHIP DIRECTOR

Linda Pye, ASID, CID, LEED AP ID+C, WELL AP Membership@va.asid.org

FINANCIAL DIRECTOR

Vienna Romesburg, ASID, CID, NCIDQ Finance@va.asid.org

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR

Philip Purgason, Industry Partner Rep of Architectural Ceramics

ProfessionalDevelopment@va.asid.org

COMMUNICATIONS DIRECTOR

Heather Davis, ASID, CID, NCIDQ, WELL AP

Communications@va.asid.org

STUDENT REPRESENTATIVE TO THE BOARD Lillie Price, Student ASID

StudentRep@va.asid.org

CHAPTER ADMINISTRATOR

Sharlyn Thacker, ASID, CID, LEED Fellow, WELL AP

e Rooms HVAC/Air Circulation Kitchens Lamin

Research the newest and best products anytime you wish. Landscaping Liaison/Design Center/Showroom It’s quick, it’s easy, and it’s Bedding Marble/Granite/Stone Mu the right thing to Mattresses do. Shop Industry Partners first Wallsand Other Outdoorthose Furniture/Accessories/Gard support companies that make our Chapter events nting Photography Pianos/Musical Instruments programs and CEU’s possible. g PlumbingFixtu res Pools and Spas Professio

your greatest resource rtz Surfaces Reproductions Restoration Servic for the finest interior products and services able Designs Textile Protection Tile Upholstery

stom Painting Wainscoting/Raised Panel Wall C

Administrator@va.asid.org

ces - 6 - ISSUE 2 2020| ASID WASHINGTON METRO AND VIRGINIA CHAPTERS

AMERICAN SOCIETY OF INTERIOR Window DESIGNER CoveringS Motorization

Window Film

ment Windows Wine Cellars / Storage Wood F


M. Jane Johnson M. Jane Johnson is an well established award winning artist based at the Workhouse Arts Center in Lorton, VA. Her work is created from acrylic, collage, oil pastel, stenciling and often has more the 50 layers creating beautiful colors and rich textural surfaces. She works with interior designers finding and creating the right work for their projects.

COMMISSIONS WELCOME www.mjanejohnsonart.com www.instagram.com/mjanejohnsonart www.facebook.com/mjanejohnsonart Jane@mjanejohnsonart.com 703-980-9656

2020 ASID WASHINGTON METRO COMMITTEE CHAIRS & MEMBERS CEU COMMITTEE

sydney Pettengill, asiD, Chair Dana Lehmer, ASID

Cindy McClure, ASID, MCR, CKD, GCP Jewel Norlin, ASID

EMERGING PROFESSIONALS

Claire Tamburro, ASID

Cathy Thompson, Allied ASID

Krystal Tchatchouk, Allied ASID MEMBERSHIP COMMITTEE

Melvin hooks, asiD iP, Chair Judy Boitz, ASID IP

COMMITTEE

Lauren Cupples, ASID IP

Melvin Hooks, ASID IP

Jennifer Lynn Johnson

EVENTS COMMITTEE

NOMINATING COMMITTEE

lindsay Jones, asiD, nCiDQ, Chair

Rebecca hubler, asiD CiD, nCiDQ, CaPs, Chair Judy Boitz, ASID IP

Melvin Hooks, ASID IP

Rafael Fuentes, ASID

Donna sharpe, asiD, Chair

STUDENT AFFAIRS COMMITTEE

Anna Light, Allied ASID

isabella bastien-Curtis, student asiD, Chair

Annette Phillips, ASID

SPRING SPRUCE UP COMMITTEE

Krystal Tchatchouk, Allied ASID

Meg Poff DiPaola, ASID

Sydnye Pettengill, ASID Claire Tamburo, ASID

Cathy Thompson, Allied ASID GALA COMMITTEE

Patrick J baglino Jr., asiD, Chair Brittany Flock, ASID

Melvin Hooks, ASID IP

Rebecca Hubler, ASID, CID, NCIDQ, CAPS

annette Phillips, asiD, Chair Teri Dorfman, ASID

Rebecca Hubler, ASID, CID, NCIDQ, CAPS Phyllis Lustig, Allied ASID Kate Magee, ASID

Cathy Thompson, Allied ASID

Krystal Tchatchouk, Allied ASID

ASID WASHINGTON METRO AND VIRGINIA CHAPTERS | ISSUE 2 2020- 7 -


Designing the New Paradigm By Julia A. Molloy

We are standing on the precipice of a new world. Uncertainty

sets in as we gaze upon uncharted territory. With so many

moving reference points and unknowns, it can be a challenge

to get our bearings and move with a sure-footed stride.

So where do we, as a design community fit in to the new

paradigm? Has the designers’ role changed and how are our

business models going to adapt to the rapidly evolving needs

of the world? These are the questions our community has

been grappling with. In fact, all business sectors are evaluating

the same questions for themselves. I would argue however,

that the design industry in particular, is faced with a

newfound responsibility.

It is important to remember that our profession is actually

quite young. It was only around 1913 that the fabulous Elsie

de Wolfe carved out this role for us all. Her focus was

aesthetics and space planning. Compared to other profes-

sions like lawyer, physician, architect, grocer, barber, you

name it, it likely has a few hundred-year head start on interior

designers.

“I believe there is no greater force than design in transforming the planet, one person at a time, one family at a time and one community at a time. We create an invisible ripple effect as we impact the minds, bodies and spirits of the lives we touch.”

- Julia A. Molloy

- 8 - ISSUE 2 2020| ASID WASHINGTON METRO AND VIRGINIA CHAPTERS


There are turning points in each of our lives that grow us up, seemingly overnight. We have arrived at that

turning point for the design industry. We should not look to the past for the new normal but take our place as

the key player in designing the new paradigm. Seriously, what other industry has this intrinsic multi-faceted

influence? No other I can think of. We are the ones!

So, with that as our foundation, I look to the future world we are designing. What will we see? What are the

new set of needs and demands our world will contour to? In having some foresight, we provide ourselves with

a whole host of opportunities that we can choose to participate in as business owners. This is the foundation

upon which we navigate and pivot our businesses and industry as a whole.

As an industry business expert and consultant, I’ve been breaking apart the challenge into bite size pieces so I

can help my clients and design community to make sense of the choices ahead of them. I believe we must

“Designing to match client values will be the new focus.” – Julia A. Molloy

make educated predictions to understand the possible trends so we can create some growth strategies for our

businesses. I’m going to share with you what I anticipate.

25 Predictions JULIA MOLLOY’S

I don’t have a crystal ball by any means, nor will all of the predic-

tions be perfect or complete, but these are the things I believe we

will see anew or with more prevalence in the years to come. The

speed of this evolution will largely be determined by the choices

you as designers, architects, manufacturers, builders, and product

designers make from this point forward.

1. Anti-microbial metals, coatings and fabrics will be common-

place and used not only for high touch surfaces, but in fashion,

upholstery, phones and accessories, vehicles and appliances.

They will be standard in residential products and design. They

will be mandated in commercial, government and hospitality

spaces.

2. Hardware, fixtures, door pulls, light switches, doorknobs and

high touch design elements will be rated or certified based on

their anti-microbial properties.

3. All manner of no touch solutions will be prevalent in residential design, not just airport and restaurant bathrooms.

4. Suggested by LA based Interior and Product Designer,

Christopher Grubb, Similar to LEED certification, buildings,

restaurants, home developments, workplaces will be graded

on their anti-microbial and wellness factor. Diners in California

are already used to seeing a similar rating near the front door

as they walk into a restaurant, that indicates how well it did on

its last health inspection.

5. Health and wellness certification entities and programs, similar to LEED will emerge to guide and certify on a whole host of

new metrics that will be tracked and monitored will be the

mainstream.

6. New apps will emerge to helping people to find these new health-oriented businesses, restaurants, hotels etc.

7. Most commercial and government spaces will have advanced air filtration and UV systems that filter down to .124 microns

(the size of the corona virus).

8. NYC Interior Designer, Benjamin Huntington, ASID President Elect, suggests that entry rooms or mud rooms may be

updated into what are essentially decontamination zones to

clean off, change clothing and sterilize items before coming

into the home.

9. Anti EMF technology in the home will become a thing. As 5G wifi and other electromagnetic field radiation emitting tech-

nologies bombard the modern human to ill effect, solutions to

protect or counteract the lowered immunity and DNA muta-

tion caused by ceaseless exposure, will emerge.

10. Smart home technology will take the lead in design and will

incorporate new monitoring, tracking, sterilization and filtra-

tion systems.

11. Personal bio metrics will be incorporated into many smart home designs and systems. This means that personal fit

tracker devices will sync up with smart home systems and will

adjust aspects of the environment to influence your wellness

bio markers.

a. For instance, sunlight adjustments, music, aroma therapy,

chroma light therapy solutions are automatic upon receiving

bio metrics that indicate high stress indicators, like elevated

heart rate and cortisol levels.

ASID WASHINGTON METRO AND VIRGINIA CHAPTERS | ISSUE 2 2020- 9 -


12. 3D printing for everything and new materials to print them with, many

making use of recycled, reclaimed, refuse and bio waste resources. Also

integrating nano tech and responsive materials is going to be the next level.

This is cool for many reasons. I’m pretty excited to see how we integrate

the idea of ‘seamless, ‘interlocking pattern’ and ‘responsive’ into design of

all disciplines. Seamless, responsive, smart clothing…

13. Custom everything.

15. Biophilia and bio mimicry in interior and product design will become main-

stream in residential, commercial, hospitality and public space design. Many

countries have already embraced these design principals in public buildings.

Think Zaha Hadid and the Singapore Changi Airport Jewel Terminal. The

United States with its slow to

adopt modus operandi, will begin

the shift can be equated to

economic advantages.

16. Many health gyms will adapt by

incorporating wellness into their

design and programs. Think steril-

ization, anti-microbial coatings, UV

and air filtration systems coupled

with biophilic designed spaces,

organic juice bar, wellness assess-

ments, wellness coaches and

programs.

17. Commercial office spaces will

shrink and require upgrades to

incorporate new safety, wellness

and remote team member integra-

tion. Many commercial office

spaces will be converted to

and oxygen therapy lounges.

18. Remote working a few days a week will become much more prevalent. 4day work weeks will become commonplace. Homes will need to be

updated with remote work tech, lighting, sound, productivity and concen-

tration solutions.

14. Curated everything.

to evolve more quickly now that

biophilic design wellness focused businesses of all kinds. Think meditation

labs, sensory deprivation meditation tanks, cryotherapy, chroma therapy,

19. Outdoor spaces, both residential and commercial will be maximized for usability.

20. Remote shopping and meetings will become the norm.

21. Showrooms and design centers will add virtual shopping and virtual reality

Imagine this scenario: A commercial building with an entire floor of converted office space, now a wellness floor. It’s a part of your wellness membership, a perk that came with the new job. Picture “Nap Labs” where you can go take a 30 minute nap, have a smoothie and an oxygen dose to recharge. After work you visit the “Rant Room”. It has anger venting soundproof rooms where you put on your goggles and then scream at the top of your lungs while blasting death metal and smashing a stack of china plates against the concrete wall, specifically designed to amplify the crash. (These already exist in Asia.) Then you go to the wellness gym, have a quick shower, sit in the calming chroma therapy pod, and freshen up. Finally, you go grab dinner and a drink on the rooftop lounge with a couple friends before heading home. Forward thinking commercial property owners and companies will be looking for these kinds of integrated solutions in their remodels.

- 10 - ISSUE 2 2020| ASID WASHINGTON METRO AND VIRGINIA CHAPTERS

to their repertoire.

22. Community and connection will be more deeply valued. Design

will facilitate these gatherings and

personal connection while main-

taining a roomy setting. This will

include a focus on room acoustics

and minimizing high touch items.

23. Vegan and conscious product design will become the new

luxury. Designing to match client

values will be the new focus.

24. Membership and subscription models will continue to be

adopted by service centric busi-

nesses.

25. Home delivery for everything.


The Possibilities

As we adapt as business owners we leverage our own passions,

strengths, capabilities and desires and combine them with what we antic-

ipate the future needs of our clientele. If we don’t see what we like in any of

those scenarios, we shift clientele or our capabilities.

I see 3 main categories of adaptation: Materials, Purpose Driven and

Delivery Method.

Materials Used:

Evolution in Materials has been happening since

the stone age. As our technology advances and

our needs as a society evolve, we create and

adopt these materials and incorporate them into

our creations, designs, and our lives. This is no

different. We live in an incredibly exciting time as

far as materials go. Nano tech, materials that

respond, move and shapeshift in response to

changes in light, temperature, water, chemical

signatures, sound and proximity are evolving

quickly.

Purpose Driven:

Purpose driven design is already here, but it has been more

quickly adopted by technology and nutrition industries. Purpose will become

the prevalent mindset in interior design. It is all about BRAND POSITIONING. It

is a matter of shifting the narrative about design from what it is to WHY. Aging

in place and commercial design are the early adopters in this arena. As compa-

Julia Molloy is the leading operations specialist for

messaging and positioning. Now firms will base their entire focus of their busi-

decades of operations experience, 12 of

nies pivot, they will break out of the box of the standard service provider

ness on a particular need or desire, instead of providing services based on work

needed, budget and service area.

Delivery Method:

Delivery is all about HOW we provide our products and services. This category

of adaptation has been shifting rapidly for the last decade with the growth of

online product sourcing. Now, we see that in person meetings aren’t always

necessary and the actual service side of what we do is changing. E-Design has

been addressing this over the last 5 years and will continue to grow, but there

are other constraints to break and possibilities to discover in this arena.

Memberships, wrap around services, full life cycle business models will emerge

with more prevalence in the design sector and represents huge opportunity. Look at the possibilities with fresh eyes and don’t be afraid to come up with

something new. This is the essence of innovation and I expect we’ll be seeing a

lot of it as our industry and the world evolves. I see the most opportunity for

wealth development and business strategy for companies that take the lead in

integrating wellness into everyday living. This time has indeed been challenging,

but it is also an amazing time for innovation. Let’s embrace the change and

move forward without fear as we design the new paradigm!

the interior design industry. She has over 2 them in the design field and has a wealth of knowledge from the interior design, graphic design, operations and technology sectors. She is a sought after

speaker, a Business of Design faculty

member, on the Better Practices Network

board of advisors, has been a continued educa-

tion instructor to the faculty at New York School of

Interior Design and a member of ASID. Molloy has also

chaired the ASID Student Affairs Committee and the board of advisors for the Art Institute – Interior Design program.

Julia Molloy is also the founder of the renowned BOLD Summit – Business of

Luxury Design Summit. This event focuses on the special business needs unique to firms positioned in the luxury market and is a powerful catalyst for luxury focused interior designers and architects around the world. In pursuing her

mission to advance the industry, each year she galvanizes the world’s leaders in luxury design to share their wisdom and advice. The BOLD Summit continues to be a driving force for enriching lives and propelling excellence in the design community around the globe.

ASID WASHINGTON METRO AND VIRGINIA CHAPTERS | ISSUE 2 2020- 11 -


Excellence in

residential

MID-CENTURY MODERN MAKEOVER BETHESDA, MARYLAND This Bethesda, Maryland home’s transformation from a mid-century ranch to a sleek, modern home

required collaboration creativity between the homeowners and the Anthony Wilder Design/Build

team. What started as a pair of simple interior tasks—adding a shared bath for two growing boys and

expanding the kitchen’s footprint—transformed into a full-scale, structurally complex facelift. Now the

homeowners enjoy open interior spaces including a new kitchen, two bathrooms and a powder room,

as well as an exterior with curb appeal, plus a new roof—all achieved within the home’s original foot-

print. Existing windows were preserved, but enlarged, while the facade is finished with stucco and

wood-like aluminum siding, giving it a classic chalet look.

- 12 - ISSUE 2 2020| ASID WASHINGTON METRO AND VIRGINIA CHAPTERS


Kitchen:

The Anthony Wilder team removed a wall and

swapped the original locations of the kitchen

and dining area to enlarge the kitchen and

create a breakfast room to provide more

usable space for the family. In addition, the

kitchen is now visible from the living and family

rooms, which are separated by an open, grid-

patterned bookshelf.

To warm up the white lacquered cabinets, the

design team selected a resilient vinyl flooring

as the backsplash in the kitchen. This unex-

pected material is also used on the ceiling in

the foyer. By insetting the refrigerator into the

wall, it functions as part of the cabinetry to

maintain the kitchen’s sleek, modern look. A

new sliding French door connects the kitchen

and breakfast area to the front patio. In addi-

tion, the team incorporated earthy tones

throughout the home, including on wood

closet doors.

Anthony Wilder Team: Anthony Wilder Founder and Principal Sean Mullin, AIA Project Architect Shannon Kadwell, CMKBD, Allied ASID Kitchen and Bath Designer Mike Marion, CLC

Lead Carpenter John Botkin, CLC Project Manager

Photography by Stacy Zarin Goldberg ASID WASHINGTON METRO AND VIRGINIA CHAPTERS | ISSUE 2 2020- 13 -


Master Bath:

The master bath was streamlined to include a double vanity, which is

custom-made from pecan-stained cherry wood with tapered legs, made-to-

match handles, and a white matte finish countertop. A large round mirror above

the vanity highlights its vintage appearance, while the vanity’s countertop spills

into the shower where soap bottles are hidden behind built-in cubbies. Special

features include horizontal wall tiles made of compressed Italian newspaper that

draw your eyes through the glass door, giving the appearance of a larger shower,

and a medicine cabinet door made from a piece of framed art for a touch of

whimsey. Wood barn doors stained to match the vanity open into walk-in

closets in the hallway leading from the bathroom to the bedroom.

Powder Room

The small, unusual shape of the powder room

off the entry hallway required the team to think

creatively about their design approach. A floor-to-

ceiling mirrored wall creates the illusion of a larger

room and reflects the hallway’s natural light. The

vanity and hand towel bar are mounted through the

mirror, with the flush-mount light fixture offering

interchangeable shades, lending the ability to

change the color palette of the room quickly and

easily.

The family now enjoys a home with stylish, func-

tional spaces that offer abundant natural light and

increased flow between rooms, as well as a unique

mid-century modern aesthetic. The Anthony Wilder

team of architects, kitchen and bath designers, and

lead carpenters worked closely with the clients to

provide innovative solutions for opening up the

spaces and designing a more connected and

brighter home. - 14 - ISSUE 2 2020

Jack and Jill Bathroom

In the boys’ Jack and Jill bathroom, a vanity

separates the toilet from the shower,

providing privacy, while the sink is placed at a

functional height for growing boys. Neutral

paint and finishes allow the boys to customize the space with accessories that suit their

personal tastes.


Hunter Douglas 1/4 PAGE

© 2020 Hunter Douglas. All referenced trafe property of Hunter Douglas.

Introducing White Noise, French Oak Pattern Planks and Hirst woven wool carpets and engineered hardwood flooring

QUALITY WITHOUT COMPROMISE Judy Boitz, Territory Manager MD, DC, NO.VA jboitz@fabrica.com 410-717-8964 ASID Industry Partner

fabrica.com

Artful designs for a fully dressed window Add depth and dimension to any room with Design Studio™ Side Panels, Drapery and Shades. This stylish new collection creates a beautifully layered and finished look at the window. Visit hunterdouglas.com to learn more.

COLOR OF THE Y YEAR 2020 FIRST LIGHT 2102-70

©2019 Benjamin Moore & Co. Benjamin Moore and the triangle riangle “M” symbol are registered trademarks licensed to Benjamin Moor ore & Co. Color accuracy is ensured only when tinted in quality Benjamin Moore Moor paints. Color respresentations may differ slightly from actual p paint. 10/19

ASID WASHINGTON METRO AND VIRGINIA CHAPTERS | ISSUE 2 2020- 15 -


We design custom solutions for the stories of your life. Together with us, the space where you live becomes the place you love.

Find yourself at home California Closets

Š 2020 California Closet Company, Inc. All rights reserved. Franchises independently owned and operated.

with


Pantry custom designed by California Closets

Visit a Showroom | Free Design Consultation | californiaclosets.com | 800.274.6754 BALTIMORE

ANNAPOLIS

ELLICOTT CITY

WASHINGTON DC


CREATING EQUITY by Design Equity. Social Justice. What is it? How would you define it? And does Design have anything to do with it? By Lynne Wilkinson

I grew up as a military brat with a northern father and southern mother during the civil rights movement of the 1960s and as a young adult spent over a decade working in over 100 countries as a travel guide. As a result, I have been exposed to many different cultures, communities and viewpoints regarding race, equity and privilege and have experienced firsthand the effects on people and communities from war, poverty, and profound bias based on race, religion and gender.

started to wonder what causes such different outcomes? Why do some communities (and countries) implode while others evolve into societies where everyone can more equally experience Freedom, Dignity, Justice, Peace, Rule of Law, Hope, and Prosperity; the cornerstones of Social Justice?

I have seen communities that have been torn apart because of these issues. But I have also seen communities overcome these issues to become something better than they ever were before. And I

The old style of Police Stations – Maxwell Street Station in Chicago with bared lower windows housing the cells and three foot thick walls.

The old style of Police Stations – Maxwell Street Station in Chicago with bared lower windows housing the cells and three foot thick walls.

- 18 - ISSUE 2 2020| ASID WASHINGTON METRO AND VIRGINIA CHAPTERS

The newer style created by Architect Jeanne Gang is a “Polis” station – a play on the greek word “Polis” which means City-State or the body of citizens. Inside the building are a variety of community spaces and outside are green spaces and a community basketball court where kids can even play with off duty police officers.


As a professional Interior Designer for two decades, I started to wonder “can Design create social justice?” And then I started to look for the answer. The answer is Yes!!! What I found is that creative designers are doing just that both here and around the world. Thousands of projects are healing communities and creating more equitable societies. One timely example of this in the US is the redesigning of Police Stations in a number of communities. During this time when many US communities are facing more militarized police and an “us against them mentally” is growing, a few designers are creating police stations that reunite the police with communities and are creating trust. How? By designing buildings that are community centers instead of fortresses. Buildings that are open to the public and where police officers can interact with local citizens in positive situations. These new police stations include everything from barber shops and basketball courts to community rooms that can be used for birthday parties and local celebrations. These new community police centers were created by designers working with everyday local citizens and the police officers to gather information and insight. The result is a more unified community where both police and citizens are able to interact with each other and get to know and trust each other.

Or the newest LA police station with gardens and community services:

Other examples of design creating equity are some of the solutions for homelessness, redesigning courtrooms to reduce bias and confusion, redesigning schools, libraries and even medical centers. Design is literally creating change everywhere! Ghandi said “Be the change that you wish to see in the world.” And since we, the interior designers and architects, are the ones creating the built world and with the amazingly creative and talented designers out there, imagine the change we can build!

Or West Anaheim, CA with an indoor gymnasium and youth center

ASID WASHINGTON METRO AND VIRGINIA CHAPTERS | ISSUE 2 2020- 19 -


Excellence in

residential

LAKE ANNA VIRGINIA Situated along one of the

largest freshwater reservoirs in Virginia lies a sparkling jewel

box that doubles as a modern

vacation home for a large

family and features sleek Snaidero cabinetry.

Channeling the spirit of Mies

van der Rohe, this treasure on

the lake is a culmination of the

homeowner’s desire to truly

balance architecture with its

natural surroundings. With its

simple geometries and clean

lines, it is no surprise that the

homeowner is also a talented architect who designed and

built this dream home, a labor

of love for his family to enjoy for generations.


Jeffrey Davenport, Architect Perkins + Will Architect/Interior Design Shawna Dillon, ASID, Snaidero DC Metro Cabinet Designer

Photography by Jennifer Hughes, Photographer LLC Sources: Cabinetry: Snaidero Appliances: Miele Counter-tops: Caesarstone Plumbing: Franke/Grohe Floors: Carlisle Wide Plank Flooring Furniture: Knoll Glass Cladding on Exterior: StoVentec Glass

“Less is more” was certainly the driving force for

this project. The interiors were designed to

complement and blend into the architecture,

allowing the serenity of the landscape beyond the

glass to remain the primary focus. Like most

successful projects, this home appears effortless,

though every meticulous detail was considered

while utilizing the best and most advanced mate-

rials.

The home showcases a Snaidero WAY kitchen in

Cinnamon Walnut and Reflect White High Gloss

Lacquer and boasts the professional-style precision

of Miele appliances. The Italian high gloss lacquer

finish on the cabinetry reflects the landscape back

into the home, marrying the balance between

nature and the built environment. Just off the

kitchen is an installation of InterlockingRock®

BLOCKS by modularArts®. The fully dimensional

double-sided wall enhances the modern focus and

serves as a clever divide between the main entry

and the living space.

Generous corridors allow the family to move

comfortably throughout with the kitchen serving as

the ultimate gathering place. The enlarged island

can accommodate all the grandchildren and is

equipped with everything one needs to prepare

and serve meals, while facing outward, open to the

public space of the house and the incredible view

beyond.

ASID WASHINGTON METRO AND VIRGINIA CHAPTERS | ISSUE 2 2020- 21 -


The main purpose of the project was to create a home for a busy family to

come together for ease and enjoyment. Thus, the function of the interior

had to remain uncomplicated and easily maintained. We worked with the

architect to provide an efficient and streamlined layout for the kitchen to

stand as an integral part of the formal living space, without feeling cluttered

or heavy. Using materials that are easy to maintain, such as the Caesarstone

counter-tops and backsplash, allows this area to endure a lot of worry-free

use while preserving its ‘newly installed’ appearance.

Enjoying this type of serenity and seclusion does come with one challenge...

you are miles away from grocery stores and restaurants. For a family that

entertains a lot, and for many different age groups, this meant that the

kitchen had to include ample food storage and a variety of appliances,

including a Miele coffee machine. Incorporating all these appliances,

adequate seating, and plentiful work and storage space to support this type

of living, with a ‘less is more’ mentality, proved to be quite a challenge.

The master suite and laundry room also feature Snaidero cabinetry in an

Arctic White Gloss and Ash Resin finish. The additional five bathrooms

showcase LIBERA hanging vanities in White Matte Lacquer.

As we worked closely with the homeowner to realize this halcyon house the

following quote kept coming to mind: "Nature, too, shall live its own life. We

must beware not to disrupt it with the color of our houses and interior

fittings. Yet we should attempt to bring nature, houses, and human beings

together into a higher unity." - Mies van der Rohe

- 22 - ISSUE 2 2020| ASID WASHINGTON METRO AND VIRGINIA CHAPTERS


AmericanEye is open and ready to assist you for your current and future projectss.

americaneyewdc.net


UNITY HEALTH CARE: EAST OF THE RIVER HEALTH CENTER TEAM: Tama Duffy Day FASID, FACHE, FIIDA Bonny Slater ASID, NCIDQ Alejandra Delgado Anthony Harris Summer Yu Lucy Arledge Pam Sams Karla Sepulveda

© Halkin Mason Photography

Unity Health Care brings equitable access to high-quality affordable health care with a new health center in Washington D.C.’s most underserved area. Historically, in Washington D.C.’s Wards 7 and 8 east of the Anacostia River, residents lack access to healthcare and are forced to travel outside of their community to meet their healthcare needs. This often results in forgoing or delaying treatment, and ultimately worsened health outcomes. A lack of convenient, quality healthcare is common in communities of color and is one of the underlying reasons these communities have been disproportionately impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.

- 24 - ISSUE 2 2020| ASID WASHINGTON METRO AND VIRGINIA CHAPTERS


Dedicated to eradicating health disparities in D.C.’s most vulnerable communities, Unity Health Care—a Federally Qualified Health Center— partnered with Howard University Hospital to bring essential healthcare services east of the river. The center offers comprehensive wellness, primary and specialty medical care, behavioral health, dental, urgent care, as well as WIC, laboratory and pharmacy services. The stateof-the-art health center is located in a mixed-use building developed and operated by local nonprofit So Others Might Eat (SOME) who hosts affordable housing and low-income job training programs. Gensler was chosen to design the new health center based on a long-running relationship with Unity that includes Gensler’s research at Unity’s Brentwood clinic (Winner of an ASID Outcome of Design Award). In a space largely devoid of daylight, the design team explored how a bright, joyful and welcoming place for the community could be created on a truly minimal budget. Using a modest palette of paint, linoleum, and plastic laminate, Gensler looked to the bold use of color as a strategy for creating the maximum impact on experience.

ASID WASHINGTON METRO AND VIRGINIA CHAPTERS | ISSUE 2 2020- 25 -


The clever pops of color define functional zones and provide clear wayfinding throughout the space. Upon entry, a central reception area pinwheels out to each department, including six clinic pods. Each color-coded pod is supported by a multidisciplinary care team. As a Patient-Centered Medical Home, Unity’s care model focuses on whole-person health and education to improve community health and address the endemic health issues of the community: heart disease, diabetes, and asthma. As their importance as a critical part of a resilient public health infrastructure is becoming known, this project’s flexible design allowed it to operate as the first free COVID testing site in the center of the District’s hot spot (available to anyone, regardless of symptoms). They are removing common obstacles to care and bringing equitable services east of the river to D.C.’s most vulnerable residents.

- 26 - ISSUE 2 2020| ASID WASHINGTON METRO AND VIRGINIA CHAPTERS


PHOTO FEATURES JASPER GREY AND RESILIENCE™ VITALITY WHITE.

BREATHTAKING VIEWS. ENDLESS POSSIBILITIES. ™ Set the stage for luxury with extra-large porcelain slabs. LEARN MORE ABOUT THIS JAW-DROPPING DESIGN AT DALTILE.COM

ASID WASHINGTON METRO AND VIRGINIA CHAPTERS | ISSUE 2 2020- 27 -


2020 Events Please bookmark these chapter web pages and reference regularly for upcoming

networking and CEU events. dcmetro.asid.org/events va.asid.org/events

Best and Largest Selection in the Metro Area 5,000 sq ft Showroom Kitchen and Bath Showroom We work with architects, designers, contractors and customers.

We Have All the Top Brands and the Experience to Help You Choose! Established in 1987 with over 30 Years Experience!

Plumbing Parts Plus FIXTURES + FAUCETS + PARTS & SUPPLIES

12172 NEBEL ST. | ROCKVILLE, MD 20852 | 301.881.1001 | www.plumbingpartsplus.com

- 28 - ISSUE 2 2020| ASID WASHINGTON METRO AND VIRGINIA CHAPTERS


©2020 The Container Store Inc. 47125

You’ve made it your job to help clients make the most of their home. We’ve made it our job to help. Get exclusive discounts every day across our line of custom closets and organization products, track your purchases and take advantage of expert project support. Join today at containerstore.com/trade-program


Profile for DSA Publishing

DC Metro / VA Vol 2, 2020  

DC Metro / VA Vol 2, 2020  

Profile for dsapubs

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded