Issuu on Google+

1

M lsslon ON THE FRASER DISTRICT OF

Regular Council Agenda April 20, 2009 - 6:30 p.m. Council Chambers 8645 Stave Lake Street, Mission, BC

1.

RESOLUTION TO RESOLVE INTO COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE

2.

PROCLAMATIONS (a)

May 1 to 7, 2009 as "Youth. Week" Youth Week Planning Committee

Page 5

(b)

May 4 to 8, 2009 as "Mental Health Week" Mission Mental Health Advisory Committee

Page 7

3. DELEGATIONS AND PRESENTATIONS

4.

(a)

Randy Heilbron, Fraser Health and Dirk Lewis, Morrow Bioscience Ltd. Re: 2009 Mosquito and West Nile Virus Control Programs

(b)

Bob O'Neal, Forestry Manager Re: Recreation Feasibility Schedule

FORESTRY (a)

5.

Tree Farm License 26 Recreational Opportunities Feasibility Analysis

Page 8

PLANNING (a)

Third Reading Report — 32625 Cherry Avenue (R07-010)

Page 16

(b)

Rezoning Application R07-030 (TGK Engineering) — 33769 and 33801 Knight Avenue

Page 27

(c)

Rezoning Application R08-001 and Development Variance Permit Application DV09-001 (Dinahan) — 33344 — 4 th Avenue

Page 40

(d)

Minor Amendment to Floodplain Management Bylaw 4027-2007

Page 53

(e)

Outcome from the Developer/Realtor Meeting held March 11, 2009

Page 54

(f)

Major Development Project Update

Page 68

(g)

Minutes of the Mission Community Heritage Commission Meeting held on October 1, 2008

Page 76

(h)

Minutes of the Mission Community Heritage Commission Meeting held on November 12, 2008

Page 80


2 Regular Council Agenda April 20, 2009

Minutes of the Mission Community Heritage Commission Meeting held on December 3, 2008

Page 82

(j)

Minutes of the Mission Community Heritage Commission Meeting held on December 16, 2008

Page 85

(k)

Minutes of the Mission Community Heritage Commission Meeting held on January 14, 2009

Page 87

Minutes of the Mission Community Heritage Commission Meeting held on February 4, 2009

Page 90

(i)

(I)

6.

7.

PUBLIC SAFETY AND HEALTH (a)

Mission Institution — March 2009 Report

(b)

Air Quality Station — verbal report (Councillor Horn)

Page 92

ADMINISTRATION AND FINANCE (a)

Business Improvement Area Establishment Bylaw 5015-2009

(b)

Fraser River Heritage Park Work Plan

Page 101

(c)

Council Remuneration and Expense Report

Page 113

(d)

Campaign Financing Disclosure Statements

Page 115

(e)

Mission Arts Council

Page 116

(f)

Fraser Valley Health Care Foundation Re: Council Appointment to Board of Trustees

Page 125

(g)

Page 99

Alternate Council Appointments to Transit Committee

8. ENGINEERING AND PUBLIC WORKS (a)

Increase Water Operational Expenditures

Page 126

(b)

Specific Curbside Collection Addresses on Dewdney Trunk Road

Page 127

(c)

Residential Metered Water Invoicing

Page 129

(d)

Promotion of Businesses that Collaborate with the District in Implementing Environmental Sustainability Initiatives

Page 163

(e)

Restricted Bottled Drinking Water Use in Municipal Facilities

Page 164

(f)

2009 — 2010 Flood Protection Program Application

Page 167

(g)

2008 Report — Leak Detection Program

Page 168

(h)

Mill Pond Compensation Plan Follow-up

Page 170

Earth Hour 2009 Results

Page 171

Update on Traffic Management Plan for Canada Day 2009

Page 174

(I)

(j)


3 Regular Council Agenda April 20, 2009 (k)

(I)

Fraser Valley Regional District Re: Update of the Strategic Review of Transit in the Fraser Valley

Page 176

Minutes of the Abbotsford/Mission Water & Sewer Commission meeting held on March 12, 2009

Page 192

9.

RESOLUTION TO RISE AND REPORT

10.

ADOPTION OF COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE REPORT

11. MINUTES (a)

Special Council Meeting (Administration and Finance) — March 9 and 12, 2009

Page 197

(b)

Joint Meeting of Council (Abbotsford and Mission) — April 7, 2009

Page 208

12. BUSINESS ARISING FROM THE MINUTES 13.

CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER'S REPORT

14.

MAYOR'S REPORT

15. COUNCILLOR'S REPORTS ON COMMITTEES, BOARDS, AND ACTIVITIES 16.

BYLAWS (a)

District of Mission Zoning Amending Bylaw 4075-20083143(308) (R07-010 - Sharma) — a bylaw to rezone property at 32625 Cherry Avenue from RS-2 One Unit Suburban Residential zone to RS-1 F One Unit Compact Residential Two zone

Third Reading

(b)

District of Mission Zoning Amending Bylaw 5012-20093143(321) (R07-030 — TGK Engineering) — a bylaw to rezone property at 33769 and 33801 Knight Avenue from RS-3 Low Density Rural Residential zone to RS-1 C Mixed One-Unit Urban and One Unit Small Lot Urban Residential zone

First and Second Readings

(c)

District of Mission Business Improvement Area Bylaw 50152009 — a bylaw to establish a specified area for the purposes of annually funding the Mission Downtown Business Association Business Improvement Area

Adoption

(d)

District of Mission Water Rates Amending Bylaw 5021-20092197(15) — a bylaw to establish water user rates for 2009, and to add subsection 5.4 (water metering)

First, Second and Third Readings

(e)

District of Mission Sewer Rates Amending Bylaw 5022-20091922(15) — a bylaw to establish sewer user rates for 2009

First, Second and Third Readings

(f)

District of Mission Floodplain Management Amending Bylaw 5024-2009-4027(1) — a bylaw to amend Schedule "A" by updating the floodplain boundary around Silvermere Lake

First, Second and Third Readings


4 Regular Council Agenda April 20, 2009 (g)

District of Mission Collection, Removal and Marketing of Recyclables Amending Bylaw 5025-2009-2639(13) — a bylaw to establish user rates

First, Second and Third Readings

(h)

District of Mission Subdivision Control Amending Bylaw 50262009-1500(32) — a bylaw to incorporate water metering provisions

First, Second and Third Readings

(i)

District of Mission Water Amending Bylaw 5027-2009-2196(15) — a bylaw to incorporate water metering provisions

First, Second and Third Readings

(j)

District of Mission Refuse Collection and Disposal Amending Bylaw 5028-2009-1387(44) — a bylaw to remove an address from the list receiving curbside collection

First, Second and Third Readings

17. CORRESPONDENCE (a)

Ministry of Public Safety and Solicitor General Re: News Release — New Rules of the Road Protect Emergency Workers' Safety

Page 215

(b)

BC Transmission Corporation Re: BC Utilities Commission Long-term Electricity Inquiry

Page 218

(c)

Mission Arts Council Re: District of Mission Arts Council Request for Cap of Utilities

Page 219

18. QUESTION PERIOD 19. ADJOURNMENT


April 8, 2009

To: Mayor and Council Re: Youth Week 2009 Youth Week is an international celebration of youth held annually from May 1-7. It is a week of fun, interaction and celebration intending to build a strong connection between young people and their communities and to profile the issues, accomplishments and diversity of youth across the province. Wherever Youth Week is celebrated, the idea behind it is the same: Young people are important and need to be recognized in a constructive and positive manner. Their contributions need to be acknowledged and celebrated. The theme for Youth Week is 'Events for Youth by Youth'. The key is to engage youth in the planning, implementation and evaluation of youth programs and services with active support, supervision and encouragement from staff and the entire community. Mission's Youth Week Planning Committee and Youth Lounge Staff have worked hard to prepare a variety of events and are excited to share the details with the youth and community members. The committee is writing to you today to ask for your support with Youth Week 2009 by officially proclaiming Youth Week as May 1-7 during the April 20 or 27 Council Meetings. Thank you in advance for your time and attention to the above. If you have further questions with regards to Youth Week please contact Amanda Tesluck, Program Coordinator or visit

vvww.bcvouthweek.com . Sincerely, Amanda Tesluck Program Coordinator Mission Leisure Centre

atesluckmission.ca 604-820-5369

Youth Week Planning Committee


Youth 1102

British Columbia • May 1 PROCLAMATION YOUTH WEEK May 1st — 7th, 2009 WHEREAS

Youth in the District of Mission are valued citizens in our community; and

WHEREAS

through their energy, involvement and enthusiasm youth are a resource contributing to the well being of community; and

WHEREAS

the promotion of youth activities sponsored by all segments of the community will encourage a greater understanding and acceptance of youth; and

WHEREAS

celebration of youth in the District of Mission, other British Columbian municipalities and across Canada during Youth Week will encourage youth participation in positive activities and strengthen the community;

NOW THEREFORE

I, James Atebe, Mayor of the District of Mission do hereby proclaim the week of May 1st - May 7th, 2009 as Youth Week in Mission.

James Atebe, MAYOR District of Mission


7

Request for Proclamation of Mental Health Week May 4-8, 2009

Dear As chair c District

Sample Proclamation: WHEREAS

the Canadian Mental Health Association has designated May 4 - 8, 2009 as Mental Health Week; and;

WHEREAS

the Mission Mental Health Advisory Committee (MMHAC) is holding a free community event on May 8, 2009 at Heritage Park in Mission to celebrate the successes of individuals with Mental Illness in our local community, and;

WHEREAS

the District of Mission supports community diversity and the inclusion of all groups in the spirit of community;

NOW THEREFORE, we do declare May 4 - 8, 2009 as

Mental Health Week In the District of

, British Columbia


8

Memo FORESTRY DEPARTMENT

FILE CATEGORY: FOR.INT.REC. File Folder: Stave Lake Recreation Project

To:

Chief Administrative Officer

From:

Director of Forest Management

Date:

April 14, 2008

Subject:

TFL 26 Recreational Opportunities Feasibility Analysis

Recommendations That staff presents the Recreation Opportunities Feasibility Analysis to various agencies and interested recreation user groups with the intent of obtaining their further financial and nonfinancial support; and That staff pursues a Recreation Site designation for the western part of TFL 26 on the understanding that this will not unreasonably affect the non-recreation values of the TFL and also allow the District of Mission to be able to charge user fees; and That staff pursues obtaining the permission of the Ministry of Forests District Manager for the maintenance of a closed gate near the start of the Florence Lake Forest Service Road; and That staff investigates what staff and financial resources (internal and external) are needed to complete any required Recreation Management Plan and Business Plans related to the furtherance of this project; and That staff investigates actual funding and grant programs that could help pay for project implementation; and That staff discuss interest and terms with BC Hydro as to the operation of their Stave Lake boat launch; and That staff further investigates and identifies opportunities to integrate commercial recreation in TFL 26. Background Attached is the Executive Summary of the TFL 26 Recreational Opportunities Feasibility Analysis by LEES + Associates Landscape Architects. This report was recently completed following extensive consultation with the District of Mission, various agencies and First Nations. Also considered were more than 400 user surveys completed by recreation users of that area. The Florence Lake Forest Service Road (FLFSR) area along the west side of Stave Lake has long been an area of significant concern to the Forestry Department due to continuing illegal and social disorder activities including vandalism to parked cars, dumping of stolen vehicles, PAGE 1 OF 3


9

degradation to the environment, rowdyism, improper discharge of firearms, untended campfires and littering. Many legitimate recreation users have identified safety concerns to themselves and their vehicles and do not use this area as a result. Staff feels that the status quo is not working due to the above issues. The present situation is not favourable for attracting investment from commercial, industrial or non-profit groups. However, staff recognizes that there is great recreation potential in this forested area including current uses such as camping (currently unregulated), hiking, site-seeing, off-road driving, boating, fishing, swimming and potential future commercial recreation activities. This area is within 1 1/2 hours driving time from an urban population base of about 2,000,000 people. If implemented, this project would also provide an opportunity to diversify the forestry operations and create employment in recreation based activities. The analysis identified the following major issues, conclusions and/or suggested actions; •

Past and current access to the FLFSR is uncontrolled, thereby allowing thousands of vehicles into this area annually. Monitoring control of access to the FLFSR would solve many problems related to illegal activities and unmanaged use of the land which is the current main reason discouraging use of the area by legitimate recreationalists. The Forest Service Road Regulation requires the permission of the Ministry of Forests District Manager to control access to a forest service road such as the FLFSR.

Regulated camping would enhance the area with the effect of reduced rowdyism and increased services and amenities.

DOM could enter an agreement with the Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Arts (MOTCA) for the entire west side of the TFL being declared a 'Recreation Site' or a Recreation Order could be created by the government for specific regulations regarding camping and parking in this area. If designated a Recreation Site, MOTCA's Recreation Regulations would apply. Initial indications are that this could be structured in a way that does not restrict the non-recreation activities of the TFL unreasonably. (On this basis, DOM staff plans to pursue the creation of a Recreation Site for the west side of the TFL).

There are no MOF precedents for charging fees for general access to large tracts of Crown Land. There are also no precedents where a large area of Crown Land has been designated as a Recreation Site. If TFL 26 were to be designated a Recreation Site and to charge a user fee, it would be a pilot project for addressing safe use of large tracts of Crown Land for recreational purposes.

Implement access control and enhance security and use of TFL 26 by: o

Installing a recreation gatehouse at the south end of the FLFSR;

o

Monitoring use and adherence to Regulations in the Recreation Site;

o

Developing campgrounds and enhanced recreational activities;

o

Consider a partnership agreement with BC Hydro for the operation of their Stave Lake boat launch, and Identify opportunities to integrate commercial recreation in the comprehensive Recreation Management Plan and as solicited and unsolicited proposals come forward.

A financial analysis was developed for the construction and operation of a gatehouse and campground facilities based on the assumption that the District will not borrow to finance capital costs and that total capital costs will be funded by grants. The Executive Summary of the analysis contains estimates of capital and operating costs and revenues over several years for both the gatehouse and campground related facilities. The PAGE 2 OF 3


10

analysis also discusses estimated losses, profits and break-even scenarios over time. The operating grants include contributions from government employment programs, community groups, non-profit organizations and trail building volunteers. •

The analysis says that the creation of a recreational destination in the TFL would be a viable initiative, based on the ability of the District to secure $1.4 million in capital cost grant funds, $670,000 in operating cost grants, and $175,000 in subsidies. Also, it is estimated by year 4 that the combined operations will generate net positive income.

•

Support for this project exists at the senior staff level in the provincial government, with elected officials, with the RCMP and with BC Hydro.

The analysis recommends the following actions in order to control access, reduce rowdyism, enhance wholesome forest recreation opportunities and assist in the diversification of Mission's economy: 1. Create a comprehensive Management Plan and Business Plans. 2. Secure funding through a range of government, non-profit and for-profit organizations. 3. Designate the west side of TFL 26 as a Recreation Site. 4. Enter in to a Partnership Agreement with the MOTCA. 5. Install a Recreation Gatehouse at the south end of Florence Road. 6. Develop campgrounds and a network of trails. 7. Enter in to a Partnership Agreement with BC Hydro for the operation of the Stave Lake boat launch. 8. Identify opportunities to integrate commercial recreation in the TFL. Overall, staff is very encouraged by the potential of changing the nature of the western side of Stave Lake to a controlled-access, secured-recreation model as envisioned by the report. However, staff realizes that significant funding will be required to make this happen and intends to pursue the initial recommendations in this memo and then come back to Council later with further recommendations based on the outcomes of the findings. At this time, there is not a request for further major financial funding on this project other than internal staff time and related expenses. The Executive Summary (attached) of the analysis is informative to read for a more comprehensive synopsis and the entire report is available in the Council Reading basket if full details are desired.

Kim Allan, RPF g:/Forestry/Kim/TFL 26 Recreational Opportunities Feasibility Analysis memo

PAGE 3 OF 3


11

District of Mission

TFL 26 Recreational Opportunities Feasibility Analysis April 14, 2009

Prepared by: LEES + Associates Landscape Architects with G.P. Rollo and Associates Land Economists Murray Management, Inc.


12 DRAFT

Mission Recreational Feasibility Analysis, TFL 26

April 14, 2009

1.0 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY PROJECT SCOPE The District of Mission is considering the enhancement of recreational opportunities available in the western portion of Tree Farm License (TFL) 26. The District wishes to provide the community with an area in which to recreate safely in a forested setting. In this study, two options for enhancing safety and recreation in .the TFL were assessed: 1.A Recreation Gatehouse that would monitor access to the area, and 2. The provision of campgrounds and related recreational activities. The feasibility study summarized here is the product of work completed by LEES + Associates Landscape Architects, with G.P. Rollo and Associates Land Economists and Murray Management Inc. The study included a critical review of background material, review of trends and precedents, evaluation of site opportunities and constraints, and the facilitation of an agency roundtable and public open house. Financial analyses of the proposed elements were conducted and the feasibility of a Recreation Gatehouse and Campground were determined. Recommendations were developed and next steps identified if the District decides to proceed.

TFL 26 CURRENT CONDITIONS TFL Site and Tenure Tree Farm License 26 is located in the District of Mission, in the Stave River watershed. As well as being a designated TFL, the area is commonly referred to as the 'Mission Municipal Forest.' TFL 26 is an active forest of second growth timber that generates an important component of the District's economy. The size of the area analyzed for this project was 5000 hectares (12,000 acres). TFL 26 is in the asserted traditional territories of several Fraser Valley First Nations. Coast Salish artifacts that date back 9,000 years are located in the reservoir drawdown zone and are sometimes exposed to damage by recreational vehicle use. The TFL is primarily Crown Land, owned by the Province of British Columbia. The tenure has been held continuously by the licensee, the 'Corporation of the District of Mission,' since it was first issued in 1958. Currently, the TFL agreement is in the process of being replaced for another 25 year term. Current Recreation Use TFL 26 is currently popular with recreational activities including: unregulated camping, off-road driving, motorized boating, fishing and swimming. Illegal activities occur in the TFL that discourage family recreational use. These activities include vandalism to parked cars, dumping of stolen vehicles, degradation to the environment, rowdyism, improper discharge of firearms, and littering. Users have identified concern for safety as their top priority for change in the TFL (District of Mission TFL 26 User Survey summary, 2008).

5


13 DRAFT

Mission Recreational Feasibility Analysis, TFL 26

April 14, 2009

Market Assessment The existing users of the TFL are estimated to be approximately 50 — 60,000 people, arriving in 30,000 vehicles per year. Based on the consultations undertaken to date, this volume of use is expected to increase. An analysis of other outdoor recreation and camping sites highlights an opportunity to meet the needs of campers because Rolley Lake, Golden Ears and BC Hydro campsites in the area are operating at or near capacity. In addition to camping, there is a market demand for other recreational activities in the Fraser Valley, including a managed area for ATV riding and beginner mountain biking trails. The majority of users would consider user fees in order to enjoy their recreational activities in an improved, maintained and safe recreation area. TFL 26 is well situated to provide easily accessible recreational activities in close proximity to the large population base of the Fraser Valley/ Lower Mainland. Recreation Use Governance Models Governance issues that need to be considered as recreation activity increases in the TFL include the role and function of Tree Farm Licenses, Partnership Agreements, Recreation Sites and Recreation Orders. A Tree Farm License allows a license holder to annually harvest a designated volume of timber while requiring the license holder to manage, protect and conserve the Crown Lands. Partnership Agreements can be struck between the Ministry of Forests and Range (MoFR) or the Ministry of Tourism, Culture and the Arts (MoTCA) with organized groups such as the District of Mission, for the purpose of managing Recreation Sites. Typically, a Recreation Site is either a campground or day use area, a trail or trail system. Once designated a Recreation Site, the Site is subject to the MoTCA's Recreation Regulations. Rules specific to the Site and the particular Site's issues can be written into the designation of a Recreation Site. Another tool for governance is the creation of a Recreation Order, which is typically used only if designation as a Recreation Site does not resolve all of the issues. An example of this is the Chilliwack River Valley, where a Recreation Order was created for specific regulations regarding camping and parking. There are no precedents within the Ministry of Forest & Range for charging fees for general access to large tracts of Crown Land. There are also no precedents where a large area of Crown Land has been designated as a Recreation Site. If TFL 26 were to be designated a Recreation Site and to charge a user fee, it would be a pilot project for addressing safe use of large tracts of Crown Land for recreational purposes.

MANAGING RECREATION USE IN THE TFL Monitoring control of access in to TFL 26 would solve problems related to illegal activities and unmanaged use of the land- the current condition that presently discourages use of the area by families. Regulated camping would enhance the area with reduced rowdyism and increased services and amenities.

6


14 DRAFT

Mission Recreational Feasibility Analysis, TFL 26

April 14, 2009

The feasibility of two potential actions that would address the issues in the TFL include the following "working" scenarios: • Develop a comprehensive Recreation Management Plan for the west side of TFL 26. • Designate the west side of TFL 26 as a Recreation Site with the District of Mission entering in to a Partnership Agreement with the MoTCA. Implement access control and enhance security and use of TFL 26 by: 1. Installing a Recreation Gatehouse at the south end of Florence Road; 2. Monitoring use and adherence to Regulations in the Recreation Site; 3. Developing Campgrounds and enhanced recreational activities; 4. Consider a Partnership Agreement with BC Hydro for the operation of the Stave Lake boat launch, and 5. Identify opportunities to integrate commercial recreation in the comprehensive Recreation Management Plan and as solicited and unsolicited proposals come forward.

FINANCIAL ANALYSES Financial analyses were developed for the construction and operation of a Gatehouse and Campground facilities. These were based on estimates of projected attendance, precedent studies, recorded vehicle visitor data to the area, and over 400 user surveys. Assumptions common to both analyses include: • The District will not borrow to finance capital costs, and that total capital costs will be funded by grants. • The District will not borrow to finance operating costs. Shortfalls in operating costs are assumed to be funded by grants or subsidized with no interest charges. Key findings of the analyses are that: • The Gatehouse will require $73,000 in grants for capital costs in Year 1. The Gatehouse will require $195,000 in operating cost grants over the 15 year period. The subsidy required to pay off the Gatehouse operating losses will be $199,187 over the course of the first five years. The Gatehouse will repay those losses by Year 9. • The Campground and related recreational facilities will require $1.3 million in grants for capital costs over a 10 year period. The Campground will require $475,000 in operating cost grants over the 15 year period. The operating grants include contributions from government employment programs, community groups, non-profit organizations, and trail building volunteers. The subsidy required to pay off the Campground operating losses will be $6000 in the first year. The Campground operations will repay that subsidy by Year 2. • The combined Gatehouse and Campground construction will require $1.4 million in grants for capital costs and $670,000 in grants for operating costs. The Gatehouse and Campgrounds will require $175,000 in operating subsidies for the first two years. By Year 4, the combined operations will generate net positive income.

7


15 DRAFT

Mission Recreational Feasibility Analysis, TFL 26

April 14, 2009

These analyses indicate that significant grants will be required to fund the TFL 26 Gatehouse and Campground capital costs. If the District was unable to obtain grants, the tax-based burden on this project would increase.

STATEMENT OF FEASIBILITY The creation of a recreational destination in the TFL would be a viable initiative, based on the ability of the District to secure $1.4 million in capital cost grant funds, $670,000 in operating cost grants, and $175,000 in subsidies. The provision of a manned Gatehouse and Campgrounds and related recreational opportunities in the TFL presents an opportunity for the District to offer an attractive resource for the broader Mission and Fraser Valley community.

RECOMMENDATIONS The following actions are recommended in order to control access, reduce rowdyism, enhance wholesome forest recreation opportunities and assist in the diversification of Mission's economy: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Create Comprehensive Management Plan and Business Plans. Secure funding through a range of government, non-profit and for-profit organizations. Designate the west side of TFL 26 as a Recreation Site. Enter in to a Partnership Agreement with the MoTCA. Install a Recreation Gatehouse at the south end of Florence Road. Develop campgrounds and a network of trails. Enter in to a Partnership Agreement with BC Hydro for the operation of the Stave Lake boat launch. 8. Identify opportunities to integrate commercial recreation in the TFL.

BENEFITS The provision of enhanced recreational activities in the TFL would complement existing logging practices and could have multiple economic, social and environmental benefits. Monitoring control to the site would enhance security, create jobs, strengthen the District's relationship with First Nations, improve habitat and create opportunities for community stewardship. Enhancing recreation in TFL 26 would create a ripple effect of economic benefits arising from increased visitors to Mission from across the Lower Mainland. Support for this project exists at the senior staff level in the provincial government, with elected officials, with the RCMP and with BC Hydro (Letters of support are included in the appendices). CONCLUSION The Recreation Gatehouse and Campground improvements will secure and enhance the area for the enjoyment of residents of Mission and the Lower Mainland. The TFL 26 Recreation Site has the potential to play an important long-term role in the economic, environmental and social aspects of the Mission community. It is timely to move forward with a recreational area in the TFL that will be a showpiece provincially and an attractive destination for both tourists and Mission residents.

8


16

Memo FILE: PRO.DEV.ZON R07-010

To:

Chief Administrative Officer

From:

Senior Planner

Date:

April 20, 2009

Subject:

Third Reading Report — 32625 Cherry Avenue (R07-010)

Recommendation That Zone Amending Bylaw 4075-2008-3143(308) for property located at 32625 Cherry Avenue (R07-010 Sharma) be considered for Third Reading.

Background An application was received by Sanjay and Sara Sharma to rezone the property located at 32625 Cherry Avenue (Map 1) from RS-2 One Unit Suburban Residential zone to RS-1F One Unit Compact Residential Two zone. The proposal is for a five lot subdivision consisting of two conventional single family lots fronting on Stokes Avenue and three compact single family lots fronting on Cherry Avenue (Map 2). Prior to the public hearing, a number of the owners along Stokes Avenue signed a petition stating that they wanted conventional lots along Stokes to fit the existing neighbourhood character. The developer thus amended the lot layout to show two conventional size lots (rather than three compact lots) on Stokes Avenue prior to the rezoning proceeding to public hearing. Therefore, the lots fronting on Stokes Avenue are significantly larger than the minimum required by the zoning bylaw. It is noted that the application also includes a Development Permit for design. This application went to Public Hearing on October 27, 2008 and at the March 16, 2009 Regular Council meeting Council requested a Third Reading report.

Issue The primary issue regarding this proposal is that residents who spoke at the Public Hearing did not support the two proposed house designs for Stokes Avenue as presented at the meeting. They requested house designs that were in character with the houses located on the north side of Stokes Avenue. They also said that the houses should have an attached garage. It is noted that staff spoke to residents after the public hearing regarding their concerns. Staff then requested the applicants' house designers to provide new house designs in keeping with the designs of the houses on the north side of Stokes Avenue. Staff forwarded photographs of these houses to the designers and new house designs for the two proposed lots on Stokes Avenue were prepared. The following information pertains to the revised house designs for proposed Lots 4 and 5: 1) Overall Design— similar to the houses across the Street on Stokes Avenue with prominent front windows, gables, pillars, rockwork, and front porches. 2) Materials— heritage style vinyl siding, board and batten and shakes. Also, stone accents. 3) Rooflines- similar to the sloping rooflines across the street on Stokes Avenue.

PAGE 1 OF 2


17

4) Scale — the scale is two storeys (as viewed from Stokes) which is the same as the houses across the street on Stokes Avenue. There is also a basement in each of the proposed houses (approx. 1500 sq. ft.) and it is noted that some of the houses on Stokes Avenue have basements. 5) Square Footage of Main Floor and Upper Floor: Lot 4 — Main floor 1530 sq. ft. and upper floor 1064 sq. ft. & Lot 5 — Main floor 1571 sq. ft. and upper floor 1046 sq. ft. and this is in keeping with the style of houses on Stokes Avenue. 6) Width of houses: 13.4 metres (44 ft.) wide. It is noted that the houses across the street on Stokes Avenue are approximately 38 feet wide to 50 feet wide. 7) Height of houses: Approximately 9.6 metres (31.5 feet) and is less than the maximum height within the zoning bylaw and is similar to the houses on Stokes Avenue. 8) Colours - beiges and browns for Lot 4 and tans and browns for Lot 5, similar to the colours in the neighbourhood. 9) Garage - the garage is a detached garage located behind each house and the design of the garages (including colours) matches the houses. Access to the garage is from the lane. Rather than an attached garage, staff asked for a large front window feature facing Stokes Avenue which is considerably more attractive than garage doors. The design drawings showing these changes are attached as Drawing A (Lot 4) and Drawing B (Lot 5). Also attached are photographs of the houses across the street from the proposal so that Council can see the existing houses in comparison (Drawings C, D, E, F and G). It is noted that the proposed house designs as shown in Drawings A and B have many of the features of the existing houses without being copycat designs. The only feature that has not been included in the proposed house designs is the attached garage. For a number of years Staff and Council have worked on a plan for the Cedar Valley area that allows for lanes and detached garages. Lanes provide two main advantages for developing good neighourhoods in that they take some of the traffic off the main roads as people in their vehicles utilize the lanes to go to and from their garages and lanes also provide for a more pedestrian friendly frontage. This development proposal has a lane that is an extension of previous development and will be extended to the west as further development occurs. It is staff's opinion that the detached garage is an important component of these types of developments.

Summary In summary, the proposed house designs provide similar designed houses to fit with the neighbourhood character of the existing houses on the north side of Stokes Avenue including the incorporation of tan and beige colours.

Dayle Reti G:COMDEV/Dayle/Sharma Third Reading Report (R07-010)

FILE:PRO.DEV.ZON R07-010

PAGE 2 OF 2


131 h.) I Co ih -44b1

facce

MILLER CRES. co c.o co

co

oo

co

co c.tt

co co N

CO

co cn to

CO

cc) cri

CO (.4

cn

8330

co

co

co

8320

O

8316

Ir1

ut

co

03

co rs.) ab

so

CO

N

32 4 71

32485 32484

rfi 32483

0 0 CA

32524

co

,

32538

O

cn

ALEXANDRA ST

32567 UI

32596

tn

32598 of

UI Co ()I O

ci)

03

03 ts)

tn)

oo

cr tr

co cri co

O

0

CO

s.

10

Ti co

K.1

03

co c.” to

co

tO

cr*

03

co

t.)

A

IV

IV IV

otc 326

262

32621 32631

326

32633 32641

Cri %.;

3264 9 3265

32653

co

as

co co o)

ID

co IV

32671 3267 11

---326 •

32691 , 3270 32699 32 7

32716

32 711

co

32 7 21 3272

K)

:

32 701

IV

3272 177

32638

32625

1

32553 32 552

co

32565 32566

ao

32573 32572

32577

32585 32588

rCO

%

32!

32585

32593 32 592 '

L

32593

co 0132594

32609 32606

32603

crt U 32600

rn 32E

McPHERSON ST

3:

32615 32612

32621 32626 32626 Cf) 32631 c) 32636 y 32633 32632 0 r%) to

8556

• 1s)

mak

co [ CO CO ao 1 w1.1 AU1 al

0) 4b CO CO

to

0)

03

co ill

tit

0 • 40 •

trl

ca

to

,(.4

325

(.11

co

CO 00 CO A A A t./1 Col A

325

10

t

32654

HARRIS ST

1

co

32593

Co Co

m'32654 32662 32673 oo tr" ) .°. .326 70 (-" ty1 n Z 32693 „ W gym ` 32663

326593266

32681

32620

32623

3262

1

32604

ear

32641 3264

TANAKA TERR. co

Lr

CO

lAFFNER TERR.

co oo tr to

cro

tn)

co

tr

32554

co

0 CO

32 502

32551

oo

0 CD 14

3 2 4 95/

32499 32496

cs

CO tol 0

tf1 0 0

324 73 324 72

32484

8314

ER CRES.

32465

ID

8326

10

to

Co

/32482 1 32469 32466 -

LA

co

CO

tT

(.,11

CO ts1

tsires,r4..uu 16]

i);

co

03 \

W to 0 co rn) 32 70 7 32702 32713 32708 32 717 3 271 2 32 723 32726 IL, 7 ‘7 Vrr

, co cn

OD

0)

co co co

03

tO 0

32 70 7

32 704

32713

32 714

32723

32 7 24

32663 32 6 7 7 32 681 32 699

32661

32663 32662 326 7 7 32676 32699

32661 326 7 5

-a

32693 32 702 3 2 712 .

—L.

OD


mar

19

DRAFT PLAN OF SUBDIVISION OF LOT 63 SECTION 29 TOWNSHIP 17 N.W.D. PLAN 67269 Scale

DISTRICT OF MISSION FILE: S07-010

: 500

An *dances aro in metros and deoinals thereof organs othervist indicated.

10

5

0

lao

25.0

18

17

16

15

14

13

64 PLAN 67269

11

12 PIAN

1G

I

8

BCP71066

OUIDING TO BE RONVED (APPROZLOGRON)

5

4 FUTURE POTENTIAL. LO7 LAYOUTS SHOW IN GRAYSCALE

5

851mZ

7

6

621ra2

PLAN

13CP11086

4 38 IZO5

1705

PLAN 81863

LANE

PLAN 51324

11.38

BU

PCL. D REF.PLAN 9259 of LOT 15 PLAN 665

TO BE REMOVED

3

55P0ROX .0CATION

2 458m2

?LA

Wade & Associates Land Surveying Ltd B.C. Land Surveyors Mission & Maple Ridge Phone: (604) 826-9561 or 463-4753 File: M3558-02 RI

LACERTE LANE 11.36

3 3

455,4

67269

1 PLAN 8CP11086

2

DRAWING Q47E: AUG.02, 2007


.1 Ph

H. i4i*Jit`4 4

;

-


P-X

1111111111111U 0


27

Memo FILE: PRO.DEV.ZON R07-030

To:

Chief Administrative Officer

From:

Planner

Date:

April 20, 2009

Subject:

Rezoning Application R07-030 (TGK Engineering) — 33769 & 33801 Knight Avenue

Recommendation

1. That, in accordance with Rezoning Application R07-030 (TGK Engineering), the Director of Corporate Administration prepare a bylaw to amend District of Mission Zoning Bylaw 31431998 by rezoning the properties located at 33769 and 33801 Knight Avenue and legally described as: Parcel Identifier: 011-074-680; Lot 6, Section 27, Township 17, NWD Plan 7020 011-074-671; Lot 5, Section 27, Township 17, NWD Plan 7020 from RS-3 Low Density Rural Residential zone to RS-1C Mixed One-Unit Urban and One Unit Small Lot Urban Residential zone; that the bylaw be considered for 1 20, 2009; and

st

and 2 nd reading at the Regular Council Meeting on April

that following such a reading, the bylaw be forwarded to Public Hearing on May 25, 2009. 2. That the five percent parkland provision in Section 941 of the Local Government Act be applied as cash-in-lieu of parkland to subdivision file S07-027. Proposal

The applicant is proposing to rezone the subject properties from RS-3 to RS-1 C to accommodate a future nine (9) lot subdivision. The RS-1C zone requires that a minimum of 70% of the proposed lots have an area not less than 558 square meters (6006.4 square feet) and no more than 30% of the proposed lots have an area not less than 465 square meters (5005.3 square feet). The proposed lots conform to this requirement as only two of the proposed lots are less than 558 square meters. Proposed lots 7 and 8 have areas of 556.92 square meters and 549.97 square meters respectively. The remaining 7 lots range from 558.04 square meters to 730.46 square meters. The application will include the extension of Kettley Place forming a cul-de-sac at the southern end of the existing Kettley Place road (Appendix 1). Site Description

The site slopes from north to south falling approximately 11 meters. The significance of the slope precludes Kettley Place connecting to Knight Avenue as a through road. No watercourses or environmentally sensitive areas (ESA's) encumber the property. There is an existing dwelling on the site that will be removed as part of the development. Neighbourhood Context

The subject property resides in an urban residential neighbourhood. Properties in the immediate vicinity are zoned RS-1 (One-Unit Urban Residential zone), RS-1A (One Unit Small Lot Urban PAGE 1 OF 13


28

Residential zone), and RS-3 (Low Density Rural Residential zone). The RS-1 zone allows for a minimum parcel size of 558 square meters (6006.4 square feet), the RS-1A zone allows for a minimum parcel size of 465 square meters (5005.3 square feet), and the RS-3 zone allows for a minimum parcel size of 1.2 hectares (2.96 acres). Rezoning to an RS-1C zone will create lots that are similar in size or slightly larger than the lots in the immediate neighbourhood. Official Community Plan Designation

The application is in conformance with the Official Community Plan and therefore does not require an Official Community Plan (OCP) amendment (Appendix 2). Zoning

The application is to rezone the properties at 33769 and 33801 Knight Avenue from RS-3 to RS1 C. The RS-1 C requires that a minimum of 70% of the proposed lots have an area not less than 558 square meters (6006.4 square feet) and no more than 30% of the proposed lots have an area not less than 465 square meters (5005.3 square feet). The proposal would result in nine (9) lots being created. Two (2) of the proposed lots are less than 558 square meters. Proposed lots 7 and 8 are 556.92 square meters (5,994.64 square feet) and 549.97 square meters (5,919.83 square feet) respectively. The remaining proposed lots (lots 1 to 6 and lot 9) range from 558.04 square meters (6,006.7 square feet) to 730.46 square meters (7,862.61 square feet) in area. Community Amenity

In accordance with Council Policy LAN. 40 — FINANCIAL CONTRIBUTIONS FOR COMMUNITY AMENITIES POLICY, the applicant has submitted a letter volunteering to contribute $1,000 per new lot with the amount of $7,000 payable prior to the adoption of the zone amending bylaw. It is noted that this application was made on November 15, 2007 prior to the changes to the Community Amenity Contribution amounts. As part of Council's consideration of the RS-1C Zone, the developer has also volunteered an additional public benefit of $6,000 for the additional lot achieved through the mixed density of the RS-1 C Zone. The contribution is to be put forward towards the embellishment of neighbourhood park facilities at the discretion of the Parks, Recreation and Culture Development. .

Tree Retention and Replanting

In accordance with Council Policy LAN. 32 — TREE RETENTION REPLANTING POLICY, the applicant is required to plant two (2) trees per lot, or cash-in lieu at the rate of $250.00 per tree. The submitted arborist report indicates that there twenty-eight (28) significant trees on the site, four (4) of which will remain. The applicant is planning to plant twenty-four (24) trees as part of the development (Appendix 3). As there are fewer than ten (10) proposed lots, the Director of Planning is granted the authority to approve Tree Retention/Replanting proposals. Parkland

As greater than 3 lots are being proposed, the owner of the lands is required to either provide, without compensation, parkland not exceeding 5% of the land proposed for subdivision, or pay to the municipality an amount that equals the amount of land required for parkland.

FILE: PRO.DEV.ZON R07-030

PAGE 2 OF 13


29

The development site is not identified in the Parks and Trails Master Plan as being in a location in which future park development is required; Knightview Park is located within close proximity to the proposed development. Subsequently, the applicant will provide cash-in-lieu of an amount that equals the requirement for parkland as per comments received from the Director of Parks and Recreation (Appendix 4). Please note that the existing parks referenced by the Director of Parks and Recreation are noted on the OCP Plan in Appendix 2. Pedestrian Circulation

The applicant is proposing nine (9) lots, seven (7) of which will front Knight Avenue and Barnett Street. Proposed lots 1 and 9 will front Kettley Place and will not have direct access to Knight Avenue. Pedestrian destinations in the immediate neighbourhood include schools, parks, and transit service. Please refer to the OCP Map in Appendix 2 — Maps for a visual on the following descriptions. Hillside Elementary School is located north-west of the subject property and can be accessed by proposed lots 1 and 9 via Kettley Place, Melburn Drive and Best Avenue. For the remainder of the proposed lots, access to the school will occur via Knight Avenue and a pedestrian walkway joining Knight Avenue and Dorothea Court. The main park in the neighbourhood, Knightview Park, is accessed via the following routes: ■

Lots 1 and 9 — via Kettely Place and a future extension on Melbourne Drive which will connect to Knight Avenue (currently under application), and

■ Lots 2 to 8 — via direct access by Knight Avenue. Existing transit service is available on Best Avenue with stops at the corner of Melburn Drive and at Hillside Elementary and is easily accessed within a 5 to 10 minute walking radius to all proposed lots. The applicant is not being required to extend Kettley Place to Knight Avenue as the associated slope is very steep, consequently precluding road development. Further, a proposed development directly to the east will provide direct access from Kettley Place to Knight Avenue (33811, 33835 Knight Avenue and 8135 Stave Lake Street). The grade of the proposed development to the immediate east provides viable access to Knight Avenue from Kettley Place. Internal Comments

The application was reviewed at the Development Review Committee meeting which has representation from Planning, Engineering, Inspection Services, Fire, RCMP, and Parks and Recreation. The Engineering Department has reviewed the proposal with comments outlined in the Engineering Department Rezoning Comments attached (Appendix 5). External Referrals

The usual referrals have been made to the various utility agencies as part of the subdivision process. Responses have been received from Terasen Gas and BC Hydro with no significant concerns.

FILE: PRO.DEV.ZON R07-030

PAGE 3 OF 13


30

Public Hearing Information Package In accordance with Council Policy LAN.50 — PRE-PUBLIC HEARING INFORMATION PACKAGES, a package will be produced containing material related to the development application.

Requirements Prior to Adoption of the Zone Amending Bylaw • Receipt of the Community Amenity contribution in the amount of $7,000 (the application was submitted on November 15, 2007, prior to the new Community Amenity Contribution Amounts); -

• Receipt of the public benefit contribution in the amount of $6,000; • A letter of credit or cash in the amount of $6,000 for installing and maintaining trees proposed in the Tree Plan letter; • Engineering requirements (see attached); and • Any other items that Council may require resulting from the Public Hearing or Council consideration of the application.

Summary In sum a fr.t.ff r ommend that the rezoning proposal proceed to Public Hearing on May 25, ,

Ryan

son

a \COMD V\RYAN \Development Files \Khangura - Knight Avenue\Reports\Khangura 1st and 2nd.doc

FILE: PRO.DEV.ZON R07-030

PAGE 4 OF 13


cc 0

.0

X ------MAL

LC T

FLA& ?D.2,,

6H t

E.111:irt2L ltrAMI-P

411*

TOR DEVELOPMENT ENGINEERING LTD.

IILHM1 3.1M3NT W. 6.sel

A.SekrIWT-fr) TEL b..3-21-11

BUTA KHAtsIGURA

DESEM:

PROPOSED 9 LOT :SUBDIVISION Citblo151' 33759 e4 3,350t KNIGHT AVENUE aiTE

4.515

TOIL MC-ELT NCALE' CCT 1121"-NI

NEVEM:

I

514


R07-030 S07-027

MAP 1 4 a 2 0 6 itt q EZZI APPS 13 7, 61 CZ'S7 /0 to824 " ° 4217 4)1* UO 33706 ,nen () 0 NUS 040-AVE. ‘213 lib c

s

IdL61); 82 ;) i

5621

Nov ulo3 co cr,per, -

N o 40% viiiit 70 8171 ;4 ausir4 30•07 4) ve) toIn ‘44611)1111 11 io`.:15 '1 o3 3 t9 81 ,) 61 COk F.: S01:150 33777 nzEy AltiPARK 1.41„) L4 8157 BIB 5 814 1144 8135 038 33769 8031801 0) )126 PARK N 018 33811 1 002 1 TOO : #4H88;84 4 0g G .44;4 * Nto 4' 0a) o03 ut -s ** 121111t "1 4 O 1

in M :

8195

4)

33745

of

N ut A k)

")

t,"

80408on

40

4 0

10

/47

0,.0

t9

SUBJECT PROPERTY

33895


33

FILE: PROD—V.ZON F ' R07-030 and S07-027

PAGE 7 OF 13


341

FILE PRODEV.ZON R07-030 and S07,027

PACE 8 OF 13


3r R07-030 507-027

WATERCOURSE TOPOI "7 '828810 /E)

_8268 1-i rime

its.37422157

(

1.8,21301 4 43769_i.. 874 4 co rte APP5 + 0) P. T8236 ID reW 6- -15`" 7.11s t• I j p. 3621 )

`a\ i14.(1-

i 8 1 )- 4 1 ,i: Ln8232 ,P4 in 0) J2-1 - BEV-AVEeV° -T-1419

a

_ I 8266 r 6`,,, s - -3 71 8260 L 82.-„, 82se 8250 824ai - 1 826

4-41)

II

82.Y6

Lt.? 8227

Ut222 1-

A

4 111.14.7, 1 13451 I 4-0 14' 11' t3!7.3

8161

242 -_ 12234 8220

5172 817 — -8170 8171

siol_..!3 xsi

331335 1 1" ' '') ItIzz 6 ; Es.

• C' ,' g ''■' 0 '' --h r% A "') '4:31:7 F ''.° '' r% '' CV .....

,,.,

a,

'' ■ t .—N)1 /4? 'N

SUBJECT PROPERTY

33895 y'

FILE: PRO.DEV.ZON R07 030 and S07-027 -

PAGE 0 OF 13


Central Valley free & Arborist Services • ' 4 .. .teltdi.i4_.11

-./

X 2 4 RerrOVed i ' CC:

•- . 1...*

.

.

AX

.

,-

• .-

)2 2 ,

I

tit ..E. _ :: g, ,

49, :ii i

1-. %

,.

rGK DEVELOPMENT ENONEERING LTD. !ce't77-.-.PortlArgt::"

-1

-iiGURA OU TAKt0I

PROPOSED 9 1_01 SUBOIVIS1ON 3769 & 33801 KNCHT AVENUE


Central VaLley Tree & Arbor ist Services

•

4/.

.0FCEZ:$ 9 LOT 9-1 1...'r'd,;13it k !,14.71 101114T ,viEht_ 4:_


38

Appendix 4 — Parks Referral Response DISTRICT. QF MISSION .

PP14.114/11PIMPINiiiiMili

PLANNING DEPARTMENT SUBDIVISION APPLICATION COMMENTS DISTRICT OF MIS ION PARKS RECREATI & CULTURE DEPARTMENT COMMENTS Referral Date: October 1, 200B

Subject Property: 33769 & 33801 Knight Avenue Legal Description: 33769 Knight Ave.: Parcel Identifier, O1l-0744SO; Lot 6 Section 27 Township 17 New Westminster District Plan 7020 33801 Knight Ave,; Parcel Identifier; 011-074-67i; Lot t Section 27 Township 17 New

Westminster District Plan 7020

Pile Number: PRO.DEV.SUB S137-027

it or Proposed Lots: 9 Please provide your written comments within 1 month from the rolorral date (ie. November 1, 20081 to Ryan Anderson, Planner, via inter-office mail, Referral Date: October 1, 2000

Subject Property: 33769 & 33601 Knognt Avenue Legal Description: 33769 Knight Ave.: Parcel Identifier: 011-074-680; Lot 5 Section 27 Township 17 New Westminster District Plan 7020 33801 knight Ave,: Parcel Identifier; 011-074-671; Lot S Section V Township 17 New Westminster District Plan 7020 Pile Numben PRO.DEV,,SLIB S07427 of Proposed Lots: 9 Please provide your written comments within 1 month from the referral date fie. November 1, 20081 to Ryan Anderson, Plannei via inIet-oltee mail_ .ø-

• 4,t AI

ke

.1

7

4

rt.;

44.7

Signed; Date: DISTRICT OF MISSION 00X 20 MISSION, BC 112Y 4LS FH.DP4 61348713-374KIFAX 61)4412A.7951

FILE: PRO.DEV.ZON R07-030 and S07-027

PAGE 12 OF 13


39

FILE: R07-030

Appendix 5 — Engineering Requirements

January 27, 2009. CIVIC ADDRESS:

33769 / 33801 Knight Avenue

1. DOMESTIC WATER REQUIREMENTS: Municipal water is available on Knight Avenue, Kettley Place and Barnett Street. No further upgrading required at this time. 2. SANITARY SEWER REQUIREMENTS: Municipal sanitary sewer is available on Barnett Street at the north property line and on Knight Avenue at Melburn Drive. The Developer is required to extend a sanitary sewer main west on Knight Avenue from Melburn Drive to the east boundary of 33801 Knight Avenue. Engineered design required. 3. STORM SEWER REQUIREMENTS: Municipal storm sewer is available on Barnett Street and on Knight Avenue, no further upgrading required at this time. 4. ROAD WORK REQUIREMENTS: Knight Avenue and Barnett Street provide paved access to the site, no further upgrading required at this time.

5. FEES: DESCRIPTION 100% CONSTRUCTION DEPOSIT 5% ADMINISTRATION FEE GOODS AND SERVICES TAX (GST)

QUANTITY

UNIT PRICE

AMOUNT

To be determined To be determined To be determined

RECOMMENDATION From an engineering point of view the rezoning application may proceed to third reading, the owner has volunteered to install all deficient works in connection with the rezoning. A secured development agreement for the above mentioned services must be in place prior to adoption of the zoning amendment bylaw. FILE: PRO.DEV.ZON R07-030 and S07-027

PAGE 13 OF 13


40

Memo FILE: PRO.DEV,ZON/PRO.DEV.DEV R08-001/DV09-001

To:

Chief Administrative Officer

From:

Planner

Date:

April 20, 2009

Subject:

Rezoning Application R08-001 & Development Variance Permit Application DV09-001 (Dinahan) - 33344 4 th Avenue

Recommendation

1. That Development Variance Permit Application DV09-001, in the name of Justin Lee (property owner), be amended to include the following: â–  Vary Section 310.7 Setbacks of District of Mission Zoning Bylaw 3143-1998 by reducing the minimum required rear yard setback from 7.5 meters (24.6 feet) to 6.08 meters (19.95 feet); And be forwarded to a public input meeting on May 25, 2009. 2. That zone amending Bylaw 5018-2009-3143(324) be forwarded to Public Hearing on May 25, 2009. Background

This proposal was originally considered for first and second reading by Council on March 16, 2009. At that time, Council granted the application first and second reading and directed Staff to proceed to Public Hearing. In further discussions with the applicant it was discovered that a proposed lot layout and building scheme were available. However, the proposed layout required an additional variance to the rear yard setback. This new information necessitated the rescinding of first and second reading, which was received on March 16, 2009, as the original report did not address the additional variance nor the new information. Proposal

The applicant is proposing to rezone a portion of the subject property from RT-1 to RS-1A to accommodate a two (2) lot subdivision (see Appendix 1). A single family dwelling currently straddles the lot line which separates the two legal parcels. Subsequently, this application constitutes a boundary change subdivision and Section 105.13 `Boundary Changes' of the Zoning Bylaw is applicable. A reduced width panhandle is being proposed, however properties must have road frontage, and cannot simply front a lane. The panhandle accommodates the requirement for frontage, but will not provide access. The applicant is also proposing a variance to the width requirement of the panhandle to alleviate setback variances associated with the location of the existing single family dwelling and the proposed location of the panhandle. Site Description

The subject site is comprised of two legal lots which front 4 th Avenue to the north and a lane to the south. Lot 6 lies to the west and has an approximate area of 567 square meters (6,103 square feet) and Lot 7, to the east, is approximately 284 square meters (3,057 square feet).

PAGE 1 OF 13


41

The subject site slopes sharply from the north to the south. An existing single family dwelling straddles the lot line separating Lots 6 and 7 in the northern portion of the subject site. No watercourses, significant trees, or environmentally sensitive areas exist on the subject site. While existing Lot 7 is non-conforming, it is a legal lot, and a single family dwelling could be built on this lot if a portion of the existing single family dwelling which straddles the lot line between Lots 6 and 7 is removed. Neighbourhood Context The subject site is located in a residential neighbourhood which is predominated by RT-1 (Two Unit Urban Residential Zone) lots, which have a minimum parcel size of 790 square meters (8,503.7 square feet) for a two-unit residential use and a minimum parcel size of 558 square meters for a one-unit residential use. Other properties in the vicinity of the subject site are zoned RS-1A (465 square meter minimum parcel size) with some multi-family and institutional zones interspersed as well. The subject site's neighbourhood is physically separated from neighbourhoods to the west by a significant slope in the form of a ravine associated with Lane Creek (see Appendix 2). Additionally, another slope prohibits access to some lots on the south side on 4 th Avenue. The four (4) lots east of the subject site front the lane and are accessed from the lane; consequently, proposed Lot B will fit with the form and character of the neighbourhood. Appendix 2 attached has zoning and a topographic map for reference. Official Community Plan Designation The application is in conformance with the Official Community Plan and therefore, does not require an Official Community Plan (OCP) amendment. The proposed development conforms with Section 2.4 Infill Residential of the District of Mission OCP. This section of the OCP encourages this style of small lot development, aims at combating urban sprawl, and provides a variety of housing forms while increasing density in existing neighbourhoods. Zoning The application is to rezone a portion of the site located at 33344 4 th Avenue from RT-1 to RS1A in order to create proposed Lot A. In addition, the applicant is proposing a boundary adjustment to the existing two (2) legal lots (see Appendix 3 attached). Proposed Lot A would have an area of approximately 465 square meters (5,005.2 square feet); the RS-1A zoning requires a minimum 465 square meter (5,005.2 square feet) lot area. Proposed Lot B would maintain its current RT-1 zoning and would have an approximate lot area of 346 square meters (3,724.3 square feet). The RT-1 zoning requires a minimum lot size of 558 square meters (6,006.3 square feet) for one unit residential development. However, Section 105.13 Boundary Changes of District of Mission Zoning Bylaw 3143-1998 allows for this type of subdivision that would otherwise not meet the conditions stipulated by the Zoning Bylaw.

Section 105.13 Boundary Changes Section 105.13 Boundary Changes from the District of Mission Zoning Bylaw 3143-1998 reads as follows: Where an application is made to subdivide two or more adjoining lots, any of which are less in area than the minimum area provided elsewhere in this bylaw, FILE: PRO.DEV.ZON/PRO.DEV.DEV R08-001/DV09-001

PAGE 2 OF 13


42

which subdivision relocates the common boundary or boundaries between the lots being subdivided, the subdivision may be approved by the Approving Officer, provided that: 1. None of the lots proposed to be created are less in area than the smallest of the lots being subdivided. 2. The number of lots proposed to be created is not greater than the number of lots being subdivided. 3. Such subdivision will not render any existing use or building(s) of the lots being subdivided non-conforming. 4. The lots proposed to be created will comply with all other applicable provisions of this bylaw. 5. No greater number of lots which do not comply with the minimum lot area requirements shall be created.

Items 1, 2, 3, and 5 of Section 105.13 are satisfied by the proposed development. However, variances are required to create lots which conform to the requirements of the associated zones. Variances and Rationale Urban Panhandle

The following variance to Section 105.14 of the District of Mission Zoning Bylaw 3143-1998 is required: ■ Vary Section 105.14 Panhandle Lots of District of Mission Zoning Bylaw 3143-1998 by reducing the minimum required Panhandle width from 6.0 meters (19.687 feet) to 1.76 meters (5.77 feet). Planning Staff support varying the required width of the panhandle as it is a technical requirement, and is not intended to provide access to proposed Lot B. Due to the slope associated with the site, access to proposed Lot B cannot be physically accomplished from 4 th Avenue. However, all legally created lots must have frontage on a highway, and not a lane. Therefore, although the panhandle will never be used to access proposed Lot B, it satisfies the requirement that each lot having frontage. Zoning Bylaw

The following variances to the District of Mission Zoning Bylaw 3143-1998 are required: ■ Vary Section 302.7 Setbacks of District of Mission Zoning Bylaw 3143-1998 by reducing the minimum required Front yard setback from 6.0 meters (19.68 feet) to 4.61 meters (15.12 feet); ■ Vary Section 302.3 Minimum Dimensions of District of Mission Zoning Bylaw 3143-1998 by reducing the minimum required Lot depth from 25.0 meters (82.0 feet) to 22.01 meters (72.51 feet); ■ Vary Section 310.3 Minimum Dimensions of District of Mission Zoning Bylaw 3143-1998 by reducing the minimum required Lot depth from 30.0 meters (98.42 feet) to 15.18 meters (49.80 feet); and

FILE: PRO.DEV.ZON/PRO.DEV.DEV R08-001/DV09-001

PAGE 3 OF 13


43

â–  Vary Section 310.7 Setbacks of District of Mission Zoning Bylaw 3143-1998 by reducing the minimum required rear yard setback from 7.5 meters (24.6 feet) to 6.08 meters (19.95 feet). The proposed front yard setback variance is in regards to an existing situation associated with the existing single family dwelling. Staff support the setback variance as it will create a legally conforming situation where a legally non-conforming situation exists. The proposed rear yard setback variance is in regards to providing an adequate building envelope for the proposed single family dwelling on proposed Lot B (see Appendix 4 attached). The applicant will be required to enter into restrictive covenants to ensure the proposed building envelope and building design are maintained and to ensure adequate amenity space is realized for the proposed Lot B, in this case a 6.7 meter x 15 meter (100.5 square meters or 1,081.8 square feet) spacwe located to the west of the proposed residence. Proposed Lots A and B will require variances to minimum lot requirements for depth. Staff support this variance as the natural grade of the site partially dictates the proposed lot configuration. Further, the proposed layout creates more privacy than the two existing lots could otherwise be afforded. .

Subdivision Control Bylaw

The following variance to the District of Mission Subdivision Control Bylaw 1500-1985 is required: â–  Vary Schedule B-1 Service Requirements of the Subdivision Control Bylaw 1500-1985 by waiving the requirement of a piped drainage system As no additional lots are being created, Engineering Staff support this proposed variance. Geotechnical Report

Two Geotechnical Reports from Fraser Valley Engineering Ltd. (FVEL) were submitted by the applicant dated January 30 th , 2008 and November 14 th , 2008. In addition a letter from FVEL was received August 19 th , 2008. The purpose of the January 2008 report was to identify subsurface conditions, determine the suitability of the site for the proposed development, and prepare geotechnical recommendations for structural design and construction of the project. The report submitted in November 2008 addressed drainage management and slope stability issues. The letter submitted from FVEL supplemented both reports and reiterated their findings. Engineering Staff have reviewed the aforementioned reports and letter from FVEL and have accepted the recommendations. In addition, they have requested that both reports be registered on title as restrictive covenants at the subdivision stage. Engineering comments have been attached as Appendix 5. Community Amenity

The applicant is proposing a rezoning to accommodate a boundary change subdivision. The subject site is currently two (2) legal lots, and the proposal is for two (2) legal lots. Consequently, the applicant is not proposing to create any new lots and no additional burdens are being placed upon the community.

FILE: PRO.DEV.ZON/PRO.DEV.DEV R08-001/DV09-001

PAGE 4 OF 13


44

Tree Retention and Replanting No trees are required to be removed for this application. Therefore the applicant is required only to plant two trees per lot or provide cash-in-lieu. The applicant will be planting two trees per lot (4 trees in total) as outlined in the District of Mission LAN. 32 Tree Retention Replanting Policy. Parkland Section 941 Provision of Parkland of the Local Government Act requires that an owner of land being subdivided must provide either parkland in an amount equal to 5% of the land being subdivided or cash-in-lieu for a comparable amount. However, this same section of the Local Government Act does not apply should the proposal be for fewer than three (3) additional lots. Therefore, as the applicant is proposing fewer than 3 additional lots, no parkland requirement is applicable to this application. Internal Comments The application was reviewed at the Development Review Committee meeting which has representation from Community Development, Engineering, Inspection Services, Fire, RCMP, and Parks and Recreation. The Engineering Department has reviewed the proposal with comments outlined in the Engineering Department Rezoning Comments attached (Appendix 5). External Referrals The usual referrals have been made to the various utility agencies as part of the subdivision process. Public Hearing Information Package In accordance with Council Policy LAN.50 — PRE-PUBLIC HEARING INFORMATION PACKAGES will be produced containing material related to the development application. ,

Requirements Prior to Adoption of the Zone Amending Bylaw • A letter of credit or cash in the amount of $1,000 to ensure the planting of 4 trees. • Engineering requirements (attached as Appendix 5). • Approval of Development Variance Permit DV09-001 will be considered as part of the same Council agenda as the Official Community Plan and Zone Amending Bylaws are considered. • Any other items that Council may require resulting from the Public Hearing or Council consideration of the application. • Restrictive Covenant for Building Design and Building Envelope. Summary taff recommend that the development variance permit application proceed to a ing a the rezoning proposal proceed to Public Hearing on April 27, 2009.

GACOMD RYAN \Development Files Dinahan - 33344 4th Ave\ Reports\ Dinahan 1st and 2nd.doc

FILE: P .DEV.ZON/PRO.DEV.DEV R08-001/1C/09-001

PAGE 5 OF 13


45

Appendix 1 - Site Plan I

4111 "Elia fff

MAO

17

A

r.

I.

If

MA 0.006'10 4' 00)1 t41504 at

.

g

AIN

gigigg au lit* grig

et

-

I

pirit memos mcligieti I I

U.

6

F1.Aii IROP

!rc

e 3u-

701 4 ,

41.

FILE: PRO.DEV.ZON/PRO.DEV.DEV R08-001 /DV09-001

MIR MOM

'1* VIP

PAGE 6 OF 13


46

Appendix 2

S08-002 R08-001

1

10

t-,L /1> L P

v

A

WWI 4

■••

Add

PL. L.

9

1

ni 1

Mlia 2

W

1

22

1

1.3 2 16

P-1 0 1:r

O

S

..:

_ RD AVE.

B,

...1

n

EASE.

41

■J

6

A

M

alp. 465 5

1 2

2Pe.,;464— ,, 1/4J

S

92 4 I,

PL.

mpg

. 2671 51

ISPNW

rt 11869

1

ER ■ p 1

3

3

262 to 16 263 t14., 264 --;

258 5•11 PL 54

Ill •■

1 ,7;2r..: 6

C

238

L, 703

5A257

• 463

II i 51

A

FILE: PRO.DEV.ZON/PRO.DEV.DEV R08-001/DV09-001

42

__

-

-....•

PL. 59002

c1;3: Mr IIIIII I 1 1

NORTH 0 ILWAY AVE -

MP

nom

--

512

c. 18.

4 9 7 31 LAP. 49659

17

1

Vro

5 71

immIE.

1

P I. A I1

,. -,. .!. .i i-fal alw . •i • ' .......- tag

1.. pcy■

1

LMS 942

1

I

rij .L, L. 34664

Emp

, 1.

12 rillEFIIIII11

I

LMP

MI I-: u,

.

'aS.ir" iI SPNW 1672 ul

A

'-- 1

I

q E.N

1,..: C/3

I

5 LMP M330

• Ir

.

g "

RIP,

I

1_661 S

,s,.": i---11

3

28 14 5/6 A

21

14330

3306 0 ,,0 8 610 9 19 262 'I.? 0 „1 306 — iNt w) w> c■ 3.„,.. 3 ij: ... J 2 A B ..____ 8 A 1 PL. 182 1", PL. 17340 -4 V)

13

9

22

5 CMP

2 7

224

main r 3506 kin ma ilr

PL. 6145

—z

12 13 C.C. ... 12 , ‘,,,... PL. 277 2 231 668 ,r3 '1•■ e& Z PL. 27 7 3 ErCI)11Eril 232 ...., IM r, NI I ri o, 16 / ',, ,i 235 giiii 15 I ol N ,..j 234 KW 7

PL. 1903

24

'''

9

226"

15

' '

12' -L.

474.* a

MP

8

9

4TH A

UBJECT SITE

27

I

5TH AVE. 1

]

E

L. 763

9

98

12

13

,,r, 473 0

i

NO ROAD

NO ROAD 11

I

15

22 21 20 31 332 16 PL 40984 24

15

24 p 763 P. 79 n

10

13 16

12

1

21

1

24

<

10

C./3 I.,

O () Cr 0 ,...

15

I

74557

22

13

wiMir

2

(I\ 1 I

ZONING

1 O.

R 694 --,

A 9

.,

D4

el, vA

FL. 664

1

I

153 PC II

154

A

ner111.11 il 1

LA i 1 II: 3■" i .41.1

i

Al

rn _ PAGE 7 OF 13


47

S08-002 R08-001 7584 ,7,1;

86

7580 ,c4 7572

7-7

N 40 40 N cs4

CO

/

I

n

CV,

4 4

nen

nn

'

MEM

61 185 87

///

4;410 33432 7581 7574 7575

(i) 25 19 17

7540 7534 7524

CO N N

03 4, 1 N P.)

CO

In N

N

0 to N

2

0

1.9 7520010000E ,,./. 0.)

(mo lir

1

74-66.6 I

52 8

I

\\

1 11 011 . //1/

7

7544

7541

7544

7

7534

7531

7522

7532°1

18

1

'1-31,3247

I//7

74W 7

4 41 21.0

lp MIN rim 411 M.I.4,1I1

a

REECE II= pluirviro

It

33.4 ak'D AVE. ----- --

__

7436 '‘ ,7430 ■, '7 7422

-

rn Pc) In 9

In in, .1,7

-

-

cc

3266

-

21.8 2IVP -

441

4, II`

g n '')

AVE:

7376

,

---

;

,49 .0

5

In

co to

• it

40 -

.1,`■

V`

en_ gIn

JO,

33351

5.6

t.t.„44

...N 11.1

co

7

v• - in ID 4r) \‘`) 7360 Nn nvv'S ,r) v tn 7350 1.2)

(0-

FILE: PRO.DEV.ZON/PRO.DEV.DEV R08-001/DV09-001

40.

441 4,1

WW1 1

7368

\33371 1,

\

cv

- CV\ V , 00 4IP

N

In 73733

-. ....

t r - ,i- - \

7364 _ -333491 2 $.8

-

ol In, 1m') "1 ..., ---

9

In

35.0 \

ca ,. co a ia7 393 4, r..„ to -c5 a.

'-' .-- =

//7

7

, ;74444

7386

111''

-

-

7470 '7466

-7-415 74it

0

7

7478- 7

7

/ 1I

In

. ' 7482

ii

Si

7

V — In In 3:

o74221

/%7/

04-

It )

N111

II

7

7522 03

N

s

7

7530

a

/ Sr/ ///:,

I \\\

z*IN

„,,

7 7552 N

I.

SUBJECT SITE 111

'7

7553

7486 33436

al

65

7566

59 SO /

----

75

7 7

7552

7512

8

7

7582

7560 \7557

133276

61.4

75 90 7574 \

7567

61.4

61.8

I

WATERCOURSE / TOPO

313 EL_

- -

,

,

1ST AVE -

-

1411.1/11 65

PAGE 8 OF 13


48

Appendix 3— Current and Proposed Zoning

DRAFT PLAN OF SUBDIVISION OF LOT 6 & W1/2 OF LOT 7 BLOCK 94, D.L.411, N.W.D. PLAN 1900 Score

LNSIRICT GE WSSION r:

1:250

Ai 4.tetonnle fl metees owl dooms row.' IMPSY Ow** iVxoted

lao

5S

Existing Lot Configuration — RT-1 Zoning

4th AVENUE (06

kaVJ =CU 114 PLAN 11.11)

AREA O XCONG LOT 6 = S67m7 AREA OF EMT= LOT 7 = 284m2

LANE r2c

LA

112411■IM W RAN me%

ARROGANT; OMAN PARCEL IDENDETER: Ot2-414-361, 0?2-414-.379 Mr. ADDRESS: .31.344 4th AVENUE, AliSS1ON COMM ACCORAWG TO DISTRICT OF MISSION WEIRD ELEVATIONS ARE 64 *lab - GEODETIC

LOT DfifEIGONS ORM FROM PLAN 1900 at at

Wade & Associates Lend Sumarng Ltd. 6.C, Land Surveyors Mopro Rrdge ekssrort Phone: (604) 826-956 or 463-475.3 File: 10371-02 RI

FILE: PRO.DEV.ZON/PRO.DEV.DEV R08-001/DV09-001

ORAWNG DAIE: MAY 14, 2031

PAGE 9 OF 13


49

DRAFT PlAN OF SUBDIVOON LOT 6 & W1/2 OF LOT 7 BLOCK 94, D1411, N. W. 0. PLAN 1 906

ftfiTZT

itti.:11.rtac

ginitue, eerr rees1^% mere,. CE.F.,` mall& g4544^4411 4X/44i4Ns...

0

Proposed Lot Configuration

Proposed Lot A — RS-1 A Zoning (Proposed) Proposed Lot B — RT-1 Zoning (Maintained) 100- ,09*. 0{11(0007, A!--V0

4th Avenue

Lot A

200

-

Lot B

Lane 40- Lk>00V:. LCIISM001 0.)00.Z9 1.1110Pttau—R.0'...„0,70 koz." car: Arz4.745 CR.T00.01C K.X1111007 AMC V &MX% 600-"01003 i010447474r •APT: Al• form= c&1A U°,`,". .4d'K .1M 0.20,10 d ittel"

tw .110110,

ATICTOM.:45 .:1151

WOW= 001.40: aiN0. lab"1-07

FILE: PRO.DEV.ZON/PRO.DEV.DEV R08-001/DV09-001

-

PAGE 10 OF 13


50

Appendix 4 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Proposed Site Layout and Building Design

yr,A

e 4o3 =

';r2.

160

Required Rear Yard Variance (from 7.5 meters to 6.08 meters) Note - The applicant will be required to enter into restrictive covenants to ensure the proposed building envelope and building design are maintained.

FILE: PRO.DEV.ZON/PRO.DEV.DEV R08-001/DV09-001

PAGE 11 OF 13


51

Appendix 5 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Engineering Comments Original Comments Prior to Acceptance of Geotechnical Engineer (FVEL) Recommendations ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT REZONIN FILE. R08-001 June 04, 2008. CIVIC ADDRESS:

33344 4 th Avenue

1.DOMESTIC WATER REQUIREMENTS: None. 2.SANITARY SEWER REQUIREMENTS: None. 3.STORM SEWER REQUIREMENTS: The Developer is required to extend a storm sewer main west from Murray Street to service the proposed development. The Developers engineering consultant is required to prove that the existing 200mm storm sewer main on Murray Street has the capacity to accommodate this proposed development. 4.ROAD WORK REQUIREMENTS: None. 5. FEES: DESCRIPTION 100% CONSTRUCTION DEPOSIT 5% ADMINISTRATION FEE GOODS AND SERVICES TAX (GST)

QUANTITY

UNIT PRICE

AMOUNT

To be determined To be determined To be determined

RECOMMENDATION From an engineering point of view the rezoning application shall be deferred. The owner's shall be advised of the above noted servicing deficiencies associated with the rezoning application. If the owner's wish to proceed with the rezoning application, a letter of volunteering to install all deficient works in connection with the rezoning is required in order to proceed to third reading. A secured development agreement for the above mentioned services must be in place prior to adoption of the zoning amendment bylaw.

FILE: PRO.DEV.ZON/PRO.DEV.DEV R08-001/DV09-001

PAGE 12 OF 13


52

Letter from Engineering Department to Planner indicating Acceptance of Geotechnical Engineer Recommendations and Amendment of Storm Sewer Requirements

Ryan, I spoke to Rick about the drainage report for Mr. Dinahan's subdivision from Fraser Valley Engineering dated November 14, 2008 and he is prepared to accept the recommendations of the report. This means that Mr. Dinahan will not be asked to volunteer the installation of offsite storm sewer as part of the rezoning and that engineering will support a variance at subdivision stage to waive the requirement for a piped drainage system. Normally we would not entertain such a variance; however, in this case, there are no additional lots being created. At subdivision stage, the November 14, 2008 drainage report along with the geotechnical report of January 30, 2008 should be registered on title as a restrictive covenant to ensure that the retaining wall necessary to stabilize the lots against seismic activity as well as the drainage disposal system and associated easements are provided and maintained. We should discuss with Inspections Services whether the installation of the drainage works should be a requirement of the subdivision. It would be more difficult to get the retaining wall done at subdivision stage since the January 2008 geotechnical report shows it as part of the house structure. -

Doug Riecken Deputy Director of Engineering District of Mission

FILE: PRO.DEV.ZON/PRO.DEV.DEV R08-001/DV09-001

PAGE 13 OF 13


53

sion

Distry

Memo

FILE:ADM.BYI.PRO FLOODPLAIN MANAGEMENT BYLAW

To:

Chief Administrative Officer

From:

Planner

Date:

April 6, 2009

Subject:

Minor Amendment to Floodplain Management Bylaw 4027-2007

Recommendation

1.

The Director of Corporate Administration prepare a bylaw to amend District of Mission Floodplain Management Bylaw 4027-2007 Section 6(c) Dyke Areas by adding the words "Hatzic Dyke" immediately following the words "Mission Dyke".

2.

The Director of Corporate Administration prepare a bylaw to amend District of Mission Floodplain Management Bylaw 4027-2007 Schedule "A" by updating the floodplain boundary around Silvermere Lake.

Background

The District of Mission Floodplain Management Bylaw was adopted in 2008 to ensure that the District of Mission had a bylaw which was consistent with the Provincial Flood Hazard Area Land Use Management Guidelines-May 2004 and Section 910 of the Local Government Act. Proposal To add the Hatzic Dyke to clause 6(c) Dyked Areas of the Floodplain Management Bylaw, which states; "No building or structure is permitted to be constructed in the designated floodplain of the Fraser River outside the area protected by the Mission Dyke or the Silverdale Dyke." Although Hatzic Dyke is identified on the Floodplain Bylaw map, Schedule "A", it was not referred to in Section 6(c) of the Bylaw.

Portions of Silvermere Lake that are within the Fraser River floodplain were inadvertently omitted from Schedule "A" of the Floodplain Management Bylaw. These areas adjacent to Silvermere Lake need to be included in the Fraser River floodplain on Schedule "A" of the Floodplain Management Bylaw. Summa ry

Staff recommends that the Floodplain Management Bylaw 4027-2007 be amended to include "Hatzic Dyke" and that the mapping error on Schedule "A" around Silvermere Lake be corrected. -

Th \ .b(NY) Marcy Bond (

.

a \COMDEV\MARCY\Floodplain information\Flooding Bylaw\staff report for Bylaw amendment April 2009.doc

PAGE 1 OF 1


54

Mission

.

Memo

ON THE FRASER

FILE: PRO.PLA.VAG Developers and Realtors Information Meeting March 11, 2009

To:

Chief Administrative Officer

From:

Director of Planning

Date:

April 20, 2009

Subject:

Outcome from the Developer/Realtor Meeting held on March 11, 2009

.Background The District of Mission has recently amended the Official Community Plan and has the final draft of the Zoning Bylaw almost ready for Council consideration. Both documents provide new development opportunities for developers and property owners as well as provide an affordable rental housing and mortgage helper option that has not been available in Mission in the past. In addition to the changes to the above bylaws, staff believe that changes to the Subdivision Control Bylaw and the development process will improve the development outcome in Mission. Given the current economic situation, Council requested that staff to organize a meeting with developers, realtors and contractors to share the new information. The meeting was held on March 11, 2009 and 30 people attended. The powerpoint presentation is attached as Appendix 1 and the minutes as Appendix 2. Topics raised at the meeting The following questions and comments resulted in further research and action:

■ Secondary Dwellings While the opportunity for new forms of secondary dwellings are very attractive, it was suggested that the District of Mission provide an affordable opportunity to property owners who have an existing un-authorized secondary suite that would enable them to bring the suite into compliance; This was offered in the past. Staff could research the success of the past process and bring a proposal forward for Council to consider. Any legalizing of an existing suite would require an assessment of deficiencies for fire safety and building code requirements, as a minimum. For suites created without a building permit, this can be costly.

■ Duplexes with basements It is felt by staff that duplexes can now have basements because duplexes have been defined as intensive residential in the new Official Community Plan, and therefore, require a Development Permit for form and character. This enables staff to review the design and ensure that the layout will not enable outside access to the basement area, which will prevent an un-authorized basement suite in one or both sides of a duplex. The requirement for a Development Permit will provide a tool for staff to ensure that the design and scale of a duplex will fit into an existing neighbourhood.

■ Development Process The new process includes a pre-application meeting between staff and the developer, and any consultant they may wish to bring, to discuss their proposal prior to submitting an application. The developer will receive a summary of expectations after the meeting in writing. It is felt that this will go a long way to: PAGE 1 OF 4


55

-

provide clarity at the beginning of the process, result in complete applications being submitted, and reduce the chance for unexpected costs late in the process.

The suggestion to let applications sit, while not something that is usually encouraged, is thought to be an approach that will let the applicant complete the time consuming portion of the process that includes the public hearing without undertaking the considerable cost of putting services into the ground and constructing roads. While this is likely not beneficial to seasoned developers, it may help smaller operations which are not well funded or those who already own the land. By having a Development Agreement drafted and ready to go, staff could forward the rezoning bylaw to Council within a couple of weeks for final consideration as soon as the applicant pays the final fees and approval of the subdivision immediately following adoption of the zone and completion of the Development Agreement. In this way the applicant would be able to market their lots while they are installing the hard services, and therefore, shorten the length of time that they are carrying the cost of hard services. They could also choose to install the hard services during a slow market while contactors are available and costs are reduced by the slower market. â&#x2013; 

Site Assessment

It is important to note that the Site Assessment is a proposed amendment to LAN 41 Guide to Land Development policy and will be forwarded to Council shortly. The information that will be required in the Site Assessment is currently required in all applications now; however, the Site Assessment will require the information sooner in the process. This will ensure that applications are complete when they are submitted and reduce the chance of an expensive late-hit for the developer late in the application process. The Site Assessment could also be an affective tool for developer to use when calculating the development potential of a site once all encumbrances have been indentified, and therefore, determine a more accurate land value. â&#x2013;  Defer payment of Development Cost Charges for residential development to the Building Permit stage; Development Cost Charges are currently collected for industrial, commercial and multifamily projects at building permit stage. Staff confirmed that Development Cost Charges for single family dwellings are not being collected at Building Permit stage in Chilliwack. Under the Local Government Act, Development Cost Charges can not be collected when there are fewer than 4 self-contained dwelling units (LGA s.933(4)(b)(i)). If we wait for building permit stage, it would be one single family dwelling, and would therefore be exempt. For this reason, Development Cost Charges for single family dwellings are collected prior to approval of the subdivision (LGA s.933(1)). A suggestion to reduce Development Cost Charges (DCC) could only be achieved by removing projects from the list or extending the time for collecting funds pushing construction farther into the future. These approaches for reducing DCC costs are not supported by staff at this time, since projects currently listed and timeframes are still required and removal would put the burden on individual developers. While fewer projects would reduce the amount of DCCs paid, the projects that are removed would still need to be undertaken. Those projects would become off-site FILE: PRO.PLA.VAG Developers and Realtors Information Meeting March 11, 2009

PAGE 2 OF 4


56

deficiencies that a developer would need to volunteer to do if they wanted to proceed with their project. In doing this they would be accepting the risk of being able to recover some of their costs at an unknown future date through latecomer's agreements assuming other development proceeded within the timeframe of the latecomer agreement. Council could consider removing an area from the DCC bylaw for all or some of the charges, in essence, exempting that area from DCC. For example a specific section of downtown could be exempted from DCC in an effort to encourage redevelopment to a more intense land use. With the potential increase in water and sewer DCCs, staff do not recommend a change at this time, and more work would be need to confirm that the reduced DCC would stimulate development. â&#x2013;  Age-in-place housing In response to comments regarding the need for age-in-place housing, the enabling policies are in place in the new OCP specifically under Policies 2.5.1 to 2.5.14 and Urban Compact/Multiple Family and Compact Cluster designations. Appendix 3 shows designated sites appropriate for age-in-place housing. The new Zoning changes that encourage main floor secondary suite, garden cottages and multi-family projects that result in smaller dwellings with ground floor master suites and laundry facilities as well as outside amenities could be applied to any of the eleven sites for age-in-place development. The difficulty with age-in-place housing is the inability to require developers to build it. Developers need to see that they are meeting a market demand that is currently not being met and take the risk and build it. â&#x2013;  Home Based-Business The proposed Zoning Bylaw increases the number of employees by 1 or 2 employees (provided there is sufficient parking on-site) with the number of employees connected to the size of the lot. A new activity on sites with a home-based business is 'limited retail sales' of products associated with the business.

go-. kn.:4ivabs -

Sharon Fletcher G:COMDEV/Sharon/COW report/Outcome from the Developer/Realtor meeting held on March 11, 2009. doc

FILE: PRO.PLA.VAG Developers and Realtors Information Meeting March 11, 2009

PAGE 3 OF 4


57

I APPENDIX 1 AGENDA • Official Community Plan policy changes Inc/eased housing cho ce • Mid Residential • Zoning changes Sublyisesn Control Bose

Noted Use Milne scale with residential or office abed) meal to irnersty IN land use

.

• Process and Implementation Secenthey Deellings Pre-appkttiOn Meeting •Site assessmett Deicsaticri of authority

Housing Choice and Quality Tcomxxisel. imth street CX‘danto and wises° roar wird Waren detichod garage

relr441°11::

1


Infill residential with purpose-built elements Mitet$uya. snnovatove ird llei 4c homeâ&#x20AC;˘basod Noisiomi of timondary sae

3


Infill and Market Affordability Setardsiry Dooms ursis Stvattrirstem so wow. to se othObasencrit

inn and Market Affordability Souwelary ()swing flails â&#x20AC;&#x201D; GatIon Gauge

4


Zoning Changes Reduce lot width for subdivisions with a mix of 5000 and 6000sf lots • reduce need for Development Variances • more flexibility in the shape of the lots

Side yard setback totals 4.5 metres

Zoning Change Decrease front yard setback for porch and living space with 6 metre setback for garage — •more ground floor space to compensate for increased side yard setback parting in front of garage •emphasize the entrance

• flexibility in the house location • enables access to rear yard • enables parking for secondary dwelling •reduces the mass of the dwelling

Zoning Change Not just allowed in Cedar Valley 5000sf infiii lot size expanded to Pie urban area • 4000sf and 3000sf compact single family in the urban compact area

Zoning Change Existing RT-1 Two Unit Urban Residential zone will allow Secondary Oweangs or Duplexes Single family and either: •a stole within the primary buikling •a coach house over a detached garage, or •a garden cottage Lot size reduced to 5000sf (465sm) Or a duplex Lot size has been reduced to a minimum of 6000sf (558 sm) from > 8000sf

5


Subdivision Control Bylaw Managing $10anin9lor east a nalirnivi Sheet

L

I

-1101 aw MC 1 11 ;111

P4W1,41•91gitiPAiififf'11:

Subdivision Control Bylaw Major policy review • More road standard options to reduce the need for Development Variance Permits: reduced the lAidlh ,Ixerceohon of narrower streets narrower Ow where eepicable

Process and Implementation Secondary Dwellings on an existing lot • No community amenity contribution • Savesi.911: • No development cost charges •ea,r ber•ren $1 4i;on

S?/X00

• No rezoning for RT-1 zoned area sa,e• SJSti • Rezoning sai$ ??:.? S$00 not 52600 • Requires a development permit ($2150)

6


(23

Site Assessment

Process and Implementation • Submit a Development Inquiry application • Pre-application Review meeting • Staff forward a pre-application follow-up letter •3 to 41 int.C.S .1•CcIts 0131114

• Submit a complete Development Applicatton with a complete site assessment • I St and 2 4 reading • Public Hearing rnasneaO,Karq. *paws** • 3 4 reading — •hat..vt•csan so•urnd dxsrnrrlitcnanf fssro, cu•tsneno Sons

• Staff forward the PLA to the applicant -

3 MOrMS oppro• mat ,/

tool submitted with a development application, that identifies: • waxy:tows (setbacks)

• • • • • • •

Troo inyorrory Floociplail anus Swop Sbpos Sat espebtly Wed fro insedace areas Kay %Wilde and podesoron inkageS to ailment neohbouthoods Aciacent torsi uee needs and (thornier

dear indication of development potential which is linked to land value

Summary

Process and Implementation Proposing a Bylaw to Delegate Authority for: • Industrial Development Permit Areas • Compact Single Family Dwellings • Secondary Dwellings • Infill Development

and flexible products • Infill on existing lots • Work through the process now and sit at 3rd reading with a PLA and a draft development agreement and wait for the right time

• Unique

7


64

I APPENDIX 2 I Summary of the DEVELOPER/REALTOR MEETING WITH STAFF held in the Conference Room at City Hall, on March 11, 2009 commencing at 4:00 p.m. Staff Members Present:

Glen Robertson, Chief Administrative Officer Sharon Fletcher, Director of Planning Barclay Pitkethly, Deputy Director of Planning Rick Bomhof, Director of Engineering Mike Younie, Manager of Environmental Services

The director of planning gave a power point presentation regarding the proposed Official Community Plan changes. The presentation outlined the increased housing choice, infill residential lots, zoning changes and subdivision control bylaw changes. The presentation further explained the new processes and implementation of the changes. Specifically information regarding, secondary dwellings, pre-application meetings, site assessment requirements and the delegation of authority, was provided in detail. Approximately 30 developers and realtors attended the meeting with a discussion ensuing regarding the following topics: Unauthorized Suites: There was a suggestion made that the District Of Mission look into the process that the City of Abbotsford uses for legalizing suites. It was stated that the process that Mission uses is expensive and difficult, and needs to be reviewed. There are a large number of unauthorized suites in Mission with little control over them. The director of planning stated that in order to legalize existing suites, they would need to be inspected to ensure that the suite meets building code and fire safety requirements.

Garden Cottages: There were questions regarding the size of the garden cottages and whether the maximum size on rural lots could be larger than on urban lots? The deputy director of planning explained the relation to the main dwelling and the size of the garden cottage. The intention is to have a garden cottage that is 40% of the size of the main dwelling to a maximum of 1182 square feet in a Rural and Rural Residential designated area, 40% or a maximum of 1023 square feet in a Suburban designated area and 50% of the primary dwelling or a maximum of 807 square feet in an Urban designated area.

Duplex zone: There was a discussion regarding lot coverage for a duplex and what is included in the square footage to estimate the size allowed. Will a duplex be allowed to have a basement in the new zoning bylaw? Duplexes will now be able to have basements. In addition other new requirements will include the ability to see both front doors from the road but do not need to be side by side. Duplexes are allowed on smaller lot than was previously allowed with a scale that fits the lot size. The units can be situated behind each other as well as side by side allowing duplexes on narrow existing lots.


65 Developer/Realtor Meeting with Staff Wednesday, March 11, 2009

Page 2 of 3

Site assessment: The deputy director of planning explained that the District will be looking for a snap shot of what is on a lot at the time an application is submitted for development. The actual legal survey would not be necessary at this stage but a reference document from a surveyor, which is what is normally required with an application, would provide a site plan with the requested items. The site assessment would include information that is required in all application now but would require it sooner.

Process: The director of planning explained the proposed process for development applications, outlining the pre-application review meeting with staff and the developer followed by a written letter outlining application requirements. This will reduce confusion around tasks and expectations. In addition it was suggested that developers could submit applications during the softer market time and complete the rezoning to the 3rd reading stage with a Preliminary Layout Approval for the subdivision and a draft development agreement, and wait for the right timing. She clarified that applications are valid for a one year period with the option of applying for an extension for a fee if the applicant did not want to process. The chief administrative officer clarified that the developer could get their application to the 3 rd reading stage and complete many of the soft cost requirements while the market is slow and they would be ready to complete the subdivision by installing the more expensive hard services when the market improves. As the district has fewer applications currently coming in for processing the ability to proceed to 3 rd reading in a timely manner is better. Development Cost Charges: It was stated that city halls in the Fraser Valley (Chilliwack) are not charging Development Cost Charges (DCCs) until after the subdivision is sold. The director of planning confirmed that the District of Mission allows industrial and commercial develops to pay DCCs at building permit stage. This policy does not include development for residential properties. There was a suggestion to allow the same policy for single family subdivisions. It was agreed that the District would research what other municipalities are doing for deferral of DCC's for subdivisions. Separate but related, the chief administrative officer stated that there are proposals to increase regional water and sewer DCCs. Council is contemplating an increase. There will be a separate meeting to present those proposals in the future. Neighbourhood Commercial Downtown: Questions focused on the ability to have a commercial building with a residence above such as the Abbotsford/Montrose area. The director of planning stated that the new Official Community Plan supports this mechanism for intensifying the use of the land and the social benefits of eye on a property and complete communities, and therefore, the district supports neighbourhood commercial in the downtown area. Neighbourhood commercial provides a walkable community, intensifies the uses, provides opportunities for densification and makes for a healthy downtown.


66

Developer/Realtor Meeting with Staff Wednesday, March 11, 2009

Page 3 of 3

Seniors â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Aging in Place: It was acknowledged that there are opportunities for developments to include properties for seniors. The director of planning stated that there are many requests for dwelling units that include laundry and master bedroom on the main floor. This may be creating a pent up demand for people that want to stay in Mission but the options are not there for them. She suggested smaller dwellings, such as small cluster housing developments with ground floor living space, that share common land could meet this demand, however developer do not seem willing to respond to this market. Another opportunity would be a secondary dwelling such as a ground floor secondary suite or a garden cottage. They will not be restricted to a relative as in the past with the mobile home as a second dwelling on rural properties. Live/Work Properties: There were questions as to whether the new regulations will provide for live/work opportunities. Currently home-based businesses can exist where they are totally enclosed in a building. Home-base business is a viable component for Mission's economy. The District is proposing to increase the number of employees allowed in a home-based business and allow a limited area to be used for retail sales of product produced by the home-based business. The challenge is to ensure that the changes to the home-based business section of the zoning bylaw are seamless to the neighbourhood and do not create unforeseen issues. It was stated that although home based businesses need business licenses we currently do not tax them as a commercial business. It is important to note that BC Assessment has assessed the building and land used for a business as commercial, separate from the residential component, when they know there is a business. Comments were received that the presentation was good and that the new policy changes are appealing to them. The public information meeting was adjourned at 5:15 p.m.


CC

CC

CC

C

CC

Co

CC

CO

o

CC

CC CC

DC

Co

cE'

8

IC CC DC

V

CC

CC

Co

CC

Co

CC

Co

Co Co

CO

CC CC

8

CC

CC

CO CC

Co

g

C

Co

0

C

CC

CO

aC

CC

V CC

CC

CC C

CC

z

2

Co

0.

CC

DC

LU

8

g

CC CC

5

E.

C

Co

'2 0

Ui

0 0

C

0

Ci CC CC

CO 0

E 2

0

0

CC CC

2

2

k>

CC

0

CC

2 2

0

Ci CC Co Ci

g

S Co — CD

Ci

411 fill! Ii

CO 0

N 03

g

C '?. 00

CC t

NCcsj csi I

Co 0 0

Co

CC

CC 0 0 0 0 0 N 0 0

'2 3 CC Co

3

CC

<I-.U

.E.„0

CC

,_, 0 0 0. (4 a;

N

- in

CC

IC

0

0

c';

CD

Co

to

CCCo

So

CD

CC CC

CC

a_

CC

T5, a,

0

N

CC

ICC

Si

Co

=

V

0

CO

Co

Th. Co

0

CC

0

a

ON

Co

)

CC

Co

Co

izt LE

CC

0

CD

1

Z N

.Z

15 0

Co

w

CO

12

0

C

CC l


68

Memo FILE: ADM.REP.COM Development Projects

To:

Chief Administrative Officer

From:

Planning Technician

Date:

April 20, 2009

Subject:

Major Development Project Update

Attached is the Major Development Project Update dated April 20, 2009. The information contained in the update includes commercial, industrial, institutional and residential development in the District of Mission. Additional details regarding any of these development applications may be obtained from the Planning Department.

\COMDEV\DONNA-LEE\COW Peports\2009 Reports\Major Development Project Update Cover Memo April 20, 2009.doc

PAGE 1 OF 1


DISTRICT OF MISSION Major Deve opment Project Upd ate April 20, 2009


Major Development Project Update - April 20, 2009 TYPE OF DEVELOPMENT

FILE NUMBER & APPLICANT'S NAME

CIVIC ADDRESS OR LOCATION

1.

Commercial

DP07-001 Mission Western Developments Ltd./Harvey Weiss

32471 Lougheed Highway

2.

Commercial

DP06-006 Jo-Anne Chadwick

7057 Mershon Street

3.

Commercial

DP05-002 & R05-005 Jerry Dhillon

4.

Commercial

5.

Industrial

DENSITY OF DEVELOPMENT Approx. 35,000 square foot commercial development with office space.

PROJECT FEATURES & CHARACTERISTICS Prominent 'gateway' commercial project.

STATUS OF DEVELOPMENT Approved (with conditions) on December 10, 2007. A letter requesting an update was recently sent to the applicant.

3 commercial units on Wood, shingles and rock materials are proposed, and the first floor above articulate the structure with the under building large windows, decks and parking layer and 5 residential units above dormer windows in a way the commercial floor. that capitalizes on the view of the Fraser River.

Application is on hold pending waterfront planning.

33420 & 33430 Dewdney Trunk Road (ie. northeast corner of Cade Barr St. & Dewdney Trunk Rd.)

2,085 square foot convenience store and gas pumps. Also 782 square feet of other commercial space.

Convenience store, gas pumps and commercial space with a residence (1,607 square feet) above the store.

Third reading granted September 6, 2005. Developer has been granted a third 1-year extension to finalize outstanding rezoning requirements.

DPO4-012 All Shamei

33888 Dewdney Trunk Road (ie. northeast corner of Stave Lake St. & Dewdney Trunk Rd.)

Approx. 1,409 square foot convenience store with residence above, and gas pumps.

Convenience store and gas pumps with a residence (1,127 square feet) above the store.

Development Permit approved April 7, 2008. The site is currently for sale.

DP08-007 Krahn Engineering

7266 River Place

0.783 acre site

1,367.4 square metre (14,719 sq. ft.) multi-tenant building.

The applicant has advised that the site plan and design may be changing. A report to council is forthcoming once the geotechnical report has been reviewed and accepted.


FILE NUMBER & CIVIC ADDRESS TYPE OF DEVELOPMENT APPLICANT'S NAME OR LOCATION 6. Industrial

7.

Industrial

DP08-003 31510 Gill Avenue & Silvercreek Investments Lot 8 Gill Avenue (to be consolidated) Ltd.

-D08-001 Teck Construction

31413 Gill Avenue

DENSITY OF DEVELOPMENT 1.41 acre & 1.49 acres

1.94 acre site

PROJECT FEATURES & CHARACTERISTICS 3 tilt-up concrete buildings with a total footprint of 4,582.85 square metres (49,331 sq. ft.) & an additional 845 square metres (9,100 sq. ft.) of office space on a 2" ° mezzanine floor.

Approved September 29, 2008. A building permit is forthcoming.

3,492.85 square metre

Approved June 23, 2008. A building permit has been applied for.

(37,59R Aci ft multi - tenant

building (approx. 2,885.2m 2 of industrial space & 607.66m 2 of office space). 8.

Industrial

R07-022 District of Mission

10100 Shaw Street (Shaw Pit)

9.

Industrial

DP07-004 Krahn Engineering Ltd.

7252 River Place

10. Industrial

DP07-002 33433 Railway PJ Lovick Architect Ltd. Avenue

11. Industrial

DP06-013 BEP Engineering Services

7282 Fraserview Place

12. Industrial

DP06-009 Keystone Architecture

7261 River Place

Approx. 43 acres

0.765 acre site

Approx. 103,500 square foot ministorage warehouse building. 0.98 acre site

1.8 acre site

STATUS OF DEVELOPMENT

Rezone the Shaw Pit to Bylaw adopted October 6, allow the District of Mission 2008. A request for proposals to extract and process gravel (RFP) will be issued shortly. from the property. Approx. 15,727 square foot multi-tenant building.

Development Permit approved February 25, 2008. Construction is 75% complete.

Two phases of development. Development Permit approved Includes individual storage November 19, 2007. units and office space for the Construction is 98% complete. operation of the facility. 26,000 square foot building for rebar manufacturing and office space.

Development Permit approved October 30, 2006. A building permit application is forthcoming.

Two multi-tenant Development Permit approved warehouses; Building #1 — August 28, 2006. Construction approx. 22,956 sq. ft. and is complete. Building #2 — approx. 14,839 sq. ft.


CIVIC ADDRESS FILE NUMBER & TYPE OF DEVELOPMENT APPLICANT'S NAME OR LOCATION 13. Institutional

14. Institutional

15. Institutional

R08-005 & DP08-002 Ida Castro R08-018 Mission Community Services R08-027 LJOILI I

y

u

v

V. III

33043 2 nd Avenue

32646 Logan Avenue

33038 Dewdney Trunk Flod

DENSITY OF DEVELOPMENT 0.14 acre site

Existing 10,000 square foot, twostorey building.

17. Multi-unit Residential

18. Multi-unit Residential

19. Mixed Use Development

7251 Cedar Valley R08-029 Slade Dyer/Points West Connector Architecture

15-bed specialized care facility.

STATUS OF DEVELOPMENT Public Hearing held January 26, 2009. A 3 rd reading report to Council is forthcoming.

Rezoning adopted October 14, Homeless and emergency shelter; a food bank; general 2008. A building permit has counselling and life skills been issued. training.

4.76 acre site

Approximate 1497.1 square A report to Council is metre (1R,116 SC1 ft) Church forthcoming. of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints.

2.28 acre site

84-unit multi-family apartment.

Architect 16. Multi-unit Residential

PROJECT FEATURES & CHARACTERISTICS

Rezoning application has been deferred pending the submission of a development permit application.

A report to Council is Three apartment buildings including amenity space and forthcoming. commercial space on the ground floor of buildings A & C.

R08-010 & DP08-006 Perspective Investments Ltd.

7260 & 7290 Maple 154 units with 1,017.3 Street, 32848 & 32852 square metres 1 st Avenue, 32851, (10,950 square feet) 32853 & 32859 View of commercial space. Avenue

R07-003/DP07003/DV07-002 Points West Architecture

32501 Fraser Crescent 26 townhouse units Five wood-framed buildings including an amenity building. Situated adjacent to the Cedar Valley Connector.

R08-016 & R08-017 Jorden Cook Assoc.

Portion of Silverdale Neighbourhood One area owned by Genstar & Madison

Rezoning adopted and Development Permit approved September 17, 2007. Construction is complete.

365 acres with density Country-estate lots, singleBylaws adopted March 2, 2009. Off-site service planning is clustered around a family lots, townhouse, village and densities apartments, commercial and underway. determined by the institutional land uses. topography of the hillside.


DENSITY OF DEVELOPMENT

PROJECT FEATURES & CHARACTERISTICS

8977 Edwards Street 109 bare land strata West & 8980 Edwards lots (plus one 17.9 Street East acre ALR farm land parcel).

Proposed suburban residential cluster development with overall average density of approx. 1 dwelling per 0.88 acres. Lots range in size from 10,961 sq. ft. to 25,523 sq. ft.

Second and Third readings were granted on July 12, 2007. The applicant has been granted a 1-year extension to complete the outstanding rezoning requirements.

138 unit congregate apartment facility for seniors.

Market sales. Semiindependent apartment residential units that contain kitchenettes with a common dining room and social/recreational rooms.

Development Permit approved February 7, 2005. Construction is complete.

15 compact singlefamily lots

Intensive Singleâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;family tall Residential development. The proposed lots range in size from 280 square metres (3,000 sq. ft.) for lots with lane access and 372 square metres (4,000 sq. ft.) for lots with direct street access.

Third reading was granted December 8, 2008. Staff will issue preliminary layout approval soon.

FILE NUMBER & CIVIC ADDRESS TYPE OF DEVELOPMENT APPLICANT'S NAME OR LOCATION 20. Comprehensive Development

21. :Comprehensive Development

R06-023 & S08-001 Lyle Holman

32331 7th Avenue R97-019 & DPO4-011 (DPM06-005 & DPM07002) Patrick Cotter Architect .

STATUS OF DEVELOPMENT

22. Comprehensive Development

R08-007/S08-009/ DP08-005 Worthy Construction

7655 Peterson Street & 32477 7 th Avenue

23. Single Family Residential

R08-022 & S08-019 Darren Hall

33764, 33782 & 33790 Dewdney Trunk Road

15 lots

Urban residential lots (min. 5,005 sq. ft.).

Third reading granted January 5, 2009. Applicant is working to complete outstanding rezoning and subdivision requirements.

24. Single Family Residential

S08-014 Peter Haffner

32691 Best Avenue

11 lots

Urban residential lots (min. 6,006 sq. ft.).

Applicant is working to complete outstanding subdivision requirements.

25. Single Family Residential

R07-032/S07029/DV07-016 S&S Titan Development Group

8556 Alexandra Street & 32578 Egglestone Avenue

14 lots

Urban residential lots (min. 5,005 sq. ft.)

Third reading granted July 7, 2008. Applicant is working to complete outstanding rezoning and subdivision requirements.


TYPE OF DEVELOPMENT

FILE NUMBER & APPLICANT'S NAME

CIVIC ADDRESS OR LOCATION

DENSITY OF DEVELOPMENT

PROJECT FEATURES & CHARACTERISTICS

STATUS OF DEVELOPMENT

14 lots

Urban residential lots (min. 5,005 sq. ft.)

Third reading granted December 22, 2008. Applicant is working to complete outstanding rezoning and subdivision requirements.

2009 proposal is for 94 units combined of free-hold and strata ownership

71 single-family lots, 5 duplex lots (10 units) and 2 multi-family lots (13 units).

Council directed staff to prepare a i s ` reading report and report on the feasibility of preparing a local area plan for the Hatzic/North Hatzic area.

8414, 8434, 8478 Stave Lake Street & 33940 Cherry Avenue

26 lots

Urban residential lots (min. 5,005 sq. ft.)

A report to Council is forthcoming.

R07-017/D PO7006/DV07-010/ S07-015 Gary Toor

32603, 32621, 32643 Egglestone Avenue

33 lots

Subdivision has been Compact single family residential lots (min. 4,004.3 completed and houses are under construction. sq. ft.).

30. Single Family Residential

R06-038/DP06015/SO6-036 Gary Toor

33000, 33090, 33126 & 33144 Tunbridge Avenue

65 lots

Compact single family residential lots (min. 4,004.3 sq. ft.). Gaudin Creek realignment continuation.

Rezoning adopted November 17, 2008. The subdivision is nearing completion.

31. Single Family Residential

R07-009 & S07-009 Gary Toor & G. Dhaliwal

8589, 8571 & 8526 Nottman Street; 8488, 8510, 8464 & 8547 Judith Street

37 lots

Urban residential lots (min. 5,005 sq. ft.)

A report to Council is forthcoming. Applicant has been requested to submit additional information.

32. Single Family Residential

R06-026 & S06-024 Brian Sharp

32705 & 32689 Tunbridge Avenue

10 lots

Urban residential lots (min. 5,005 sq. ft.)

Subdivision has been completed; building permits are forthcoming.

33. Single Family Residential

R06-025 & S06-023 Jason Tiegen

8521, 8539 & 8569 Alexandra Street

17 lots

Urban residential lots (min. 5,005 sq. ft.)

Subdivision has been completed and houses are under construction.

26. Single Family Residential

R07-024 & S07-021 555891 BC Ltd Inc. No. BCO555891 (Roger Gill)

32663 & 32673 Tunbridge Avenue

27. Single Family Residential

R07-021 & S07-019 Rex.Blane

34059, 34081, 34097 Dewdney. Trunk Road; 34051, 34058, 34069, (previous applicant was 34085, 34072, 34088, 34112 York Avenue; Paul Regnier) 8738 Stave Lake Street

28. Single Family Residential

R08-031 /S08-025 Carson Noftle

29. Single Family Residential


TYPE OF DEVELOPMENT

FILE NUMBER & APPLICANT'S NAME

CIVIC ADDRESS OR LOCATION

DENSITY OF DEVELOPMENT

PROJECT FEATURES & CHARACTERISTICS

STATUS OF DEVELOPMENT

Urban residential lots (min. 7,201.3 sq. ft.).

Rezoning adopted December 15, 2008. Subdivision is nearing completion.

Multi-family development

Third reading granted March 3, 2008. Applicant has been granted a 1-year extension to complete the outstanding rezoning requirements.

8 urban residential lots (min. 6,006 sq. ft.) 3 compact single family lots (min. 4,004 sq. ft.) 25 townhouse units

The final remaining townhouse units are nearing completion.

22 lots

Minimum 0.88 acre lots.

Third reading granted March 2, 2009. Staff will issue preliminary layout approval soon.

8973 Manzer Street

26 lots

2 fee simple .88 acre lots. 24 bare land strata lots (min. 0.67 acre size).

Rezoning adopted June 5, 2006. Applicant is working to complete subdivision requirements.

30932 Dewdney Trunk Road

26 lots

Twenty-five 1.98 acre size lots and one 18 acre remainder parcel.

Public Hearing held March 26, 2007. Staff will be providing additional information to Council prior to consideration of Third reading.

34. Single Family ReSidential

R06-018 & S06-019 Cartwright Development Corp.

8289 Manson Street

35. Single Family Residential

R06-035 & DP06-014 Robert Ciccozzi Architecture Inc.

34048, 34054 & 34142 Parr Avenue

36. Single Family Residential

SO4-041 & R04-040 KC McPherson

8511 & 8531 Cedar Street

37. Suburban Residential

R08-019 & S08-018 Daren Alary

Lot 7 Silverdale Avenue (68.71 acres)

38. Suburban Residential

SO4-038 & R04-031 Mission Contractors

39. Rural Residential

R03-024 & S03-037 Elaine Cheung

a \COMDEV\DONNA-LEE\COW Reports\2009 Reports \Major Development Project Update April 20, 2009.doc

11 bare land strata lots 297 townhouse units & one 36-unit apartment

11 lots & 25 unit townhouse


76

Minutes The Minutes for the Mission Community Heritage Commission (MCHC) meeting held in the Conference Room at the Municipal Hall on October 1 st , 2008 commencing at 6:30 p.m. Present: Val Billesberger, Chair Chris Gibson Kim Kokoszka Shirley Mitchell Mike Scudder Sieglinde Stieda Mildred Vollick Guy Zecchini Absent: Heather Stewart, Council Liaison Jenny Stevens, Alternate Council Liaison 1. PRESENTATION The meeting was called to order at 6.30 p.m. Val Billesberger asked for a volunteer to take the minutes. Sieglinde Stieda agreed to do so. Bob Parliament, Regional Heritage Planner, BC Government, presented in lieu of Don Brown, Manager of the Mission Heritage Association (MHA), which operates the Heritage River Park. The presentation focused on the short-cut process for creating a Community Heritage Register, adding the Heritage Park as the first register record, a need for a value statement, and the importance of looking at the West Vancouver Heritage Commission as a model. ACTIONS: Val will ask Don Brown to prepare a three-sentence value statement. Then Val will take the MCHC's recommendation and MHA's value statement to Council. 2. INTRODUCTION of newly appointed MCHC members: Kim Kokoszka, student of fashion design has . roots in Mission; Shirley Mitchell is active in the community including the Mission Museum; Sieglinde Stieda, retired teacher & librarian is working on a bibliography of Mission; Guy Zecchini is retired from 42 years of construction and collects old tools. 3. MINUTES (a) The minutes of the Mission Community Heritage Commission held on September 3 rd , 2008. Corrections: Don Brown is the "administrator", not chair of the MHA. Moved by Shirley Mitchell and seconded by Chris Gibson that the minutes be adopted as amended. CARRIED

FILE: ADM.COM .ADV Mission Community Heritage Commission

Minutes Page 1 of 4


77 V.'s. - :1 Community HeritageMinutes

1, 2008

4. BUSINESS ARISING FROM THE MINUTES (a) Celebration of Community Report by Chris Gibson: slow attendance, mostly a meet and greet, and review of photograph album of Mission. The Chair thanked Chris Gibson, Mike Scudder, Shirley Mitchell and Kim Kokoszka for volunteering their time at the event. 5. TASK GROUPS: (a) Public Awareness & Education Task Group: Members: Chris Gibson, Shirley Mitchell, & Val Billesberger. Chris Gibson resigned from this task group as well as from the Commission. The Chair accepted his resignation with regret, noting the many contributions he has made to the Commission during the past year and a half. Val Billesberger outlined program for November 29 th , 2008 Networking mini-conference, at Mission Heritage Park Centre Cafetorium, which we are hosting. Members of the Mission community and other BC heritage commissions will be invited. The six speakers for Networking Conference are: Lisa Codd, Curator, Burnaby Museum will speak about a collaborative online heritage project. Other speakers include Sue Morhun, Heritage Consultant and former Langley Township Heritage Manager; Stephen Mikicich, West Vancouver Senior Community Planner; Denise Cook, Denise Cook Design Consulting or Connie Halbert of the Fraser Valley Regional District; and Don Luxton, Heritage Consultant. The program will also include an interactive open community forum facilitated by Bob Parliament. The following MCHC members volunteered for the various tasks of putting together the conference: Mike Scudder volunteered to introduce the speakers, to frame the door prize consisting of an old photo, and to check the cost and source of project binders. Sieglinde Stieda agreed to liaise with the Mission Chamber of Commerce to prepare 35+ Mission Information packages. Kim Kokoszka is looking after the registration by email and agreed to keep Sieglinde informed as to the number of registrants. Fee remains $20.00 at the door. If a cheque is received, it should be made out to the District of Mission. Bob Parliament is willing to provide HPI folders. The Commission's budget for the conference is $1,000. Expenses for the conference comprise the honoria and travel expenses for the speakers (@ 52 cents per kilometre); refreshments; sundries (such as name tags); and the services of a professional photographer, Margaret Peake. The cut-off day for registration will be November 15 th , 2008; however, we will allow for a certain leeway. Moved by Mike Scudder and seconded by Mildred Vollick that the members of the Public Awareness and Education Task Group be authorized to spend up to $1,000 on the November 29 th , 2008 mini-conference. CARRIED.

FILE: ADM.COM .ADV Mission Community Heritage Commission

Minutes Page 2 of 4


78

Mission Co, unity Heritage Commission Minutes October I, 2 Moved by Kim Kokoszka and seconded by Shirley Mitchell that all members of the Mission Community Heritage Commission have their registration fees, of $20 each, come out of the MCHC $2,000 Professional Development fund. CARRIED. (b)Recognition and Incentives Task Group: The Chair provided a brief overview of the activities undertaken during the past year and stated that new members were required for the group. Guy Zecchini and Kim Kokoszka volunteered to serve on this task group along with current members Mike Scudder and Val Billesberger. (c) Heritage Register Task Group: All members of the MCHC are members of this task group. Bob Parliament informed us that our grant application to the BC Heritage Branch "Community Heritage Planning Program" had been approved. He will work on the contract next week. Bob is our contact person in the provincial government, for this project. Val thanked Bob Parliament for his involvement in this project. Moved by Mike Scudder and seconded by Sieglinde Stieda that the MCHC hire Sharon Syrette as the project manager for establishing the Mission Community Heritage Register. CARRIED. ACTION: Val Billesberger will inform Sharon Syrette that she's been awarded the contract for the project management of the Mission Heritage Register. 6. NEW BUSINESS: (a) Revisions to Terms of Reference: The Chair reported on behalf of Councillor Heather Stewart that Heather will be working with commission members to revise the Terms of Reference for the Heritage Commission to include working with the Planning department on bylaws etc., identifying and prioritizing the heritage registry issue, and defining quorum for the commission. Val Billesberger initiated a discussion regarding the size of the MCH Commission. Bob Parliament strongly recommended that we not reduce the size, as we might be sorry later on. It's more difficult to increase the size of a heritage commission. ACTION: Val Billesberger will meet with Mission Councillors, Heather Stewart and Jenny Stevens. (b)Heritage Commission Chair: The terms of reference require the Commission to elect a chair in January of each year. Val Billesberger informed the group that she would not put her name forward next year. (c) Commission Website: Members discussed an email from Jenn Murray that was distributed prior to the meeting which provided a link to a draft home page for a MCHC

FILE: ADM.COM .ADV Mission Community Heritage Commission

Minutes Page 3 of 4


79 Mission October 1

--unit}' Heritage COMMiSSI017 Minutes â&#x20AC;˘,

website and a quotation: "For $500, includes up to 10 pages; 5 hours of graphic work if necessary (i.e. photo editing, image creation, etc.) and three months of text updates to website to be performed on a bi-weekly basis. Also available...layout redesign amounting to no more than 5 hours of additional labour." Members reviewed the draft home page on a laptop computer. Moved by Sieglinde Stieda and seconded by Kim Kokoszka that Jenn Murray be paid $500 to design and maintain the MCHC website as specified in her email dated October 1, 2008. CARRIED ACTION: Val Billesberger will meet with Jenn Murray to get her started on the website. (d) 2009 Work Plan and Budget: Similar to last year, members agreed to hold a special meeting on October 15 th at 6:30 p.m. at the Mission Community Archives to draft the annual work plan and budget that must be submitted to Council in November. 7. ADJOURNMENT The meeting adjourned at 8:55 p.m. The next regular Commission meeting will take place on Wednesday, November 5 th , 2008. [A special meeting will be held on Wednesday, October 15 th , 2008 at 6: 30 p.m. at the Mission Community Archives.]

FILE: ADM.COM .ADV Mission Community Heritage Commission

Minutes Page 4 of 4


80

Abssion

Minutes

The Minutes for the Mission Community Heritage Commission (MCHC) meeting held in the Mission Community Archives on November 12, 2008 commencing at 6:30 p.m. Present: Val Billesberger, Chair Kim Kokoszka Shirley Mitchell Mike Scudder Sieglinde Stieda Mildred Vollick Guy Zecchini Absent: Heather Stewart, Council Liaison Jenny Stevens, Alternate Council Liaison 1. MINUTES The meeting was called to order at 6:30 p.m. (a) The minutes of the Mission Community Heritage Commission held on October 1, 2008 Moved by Mike Scudder and seconded by Shirley Mitchell that the minutes be approved. CARRIED 2. BUSINESS ARISING FROM THE MINUTES (a) Mission Heritage Association - A draft recommendation to establish a Community Heritage Register and include the former OMI lands consisting of Fraser River Heritage Park at 7494 Mary Street was presented. Moved by Mike Scudder and seconded by Kim Kokoszka that the draft recommendation be forwarded to Council for their consideration. CARRIED (b) Revisions to Terms of Reference — Councillors Heather Stewart and Jenny Stevens met with Val Billesberger to review the terms of reference. A draft of the revisions will be distributed to members in December for comment. Members discussed ideas on how appointments are made to the Commission. (c) Commission Website — The website design and framework will be completed for members to review prior to the next meeting. Once established, the website will be one of the responsibilities of the Public Awareness and Education Task Group. (d) 2009 Work Plan and Budget — The draft 2009 Work Plan and Budget distributed prior to the meeting was discussed. A sentence in paragraph one was amended to read: "We are in the process of establishing a website and organizing a mini-conference where members of other Heritage Commissions in B.C. can attend educational seminars on heritage conservation and meet to share their recent successes and projects." Moved by Mike Scudder and seconded by Guy Zecchini that the amended 2009 Work Plan and Budget be approved and forwarded to Council for their consideration. CARRIED

FILE: Mission Community Heritage Commission

Minutes

Page 1 of 2


81 Mission Comm November

e Commission

Funds remaining from the 2008 budget were discussed. Since the budget for the upcoming year has not yet been approved by Council, $3,000 will need to be earmarked for the Community Heritage Register project. These are the matching funds required for the provincial grant recently approved to undertake the project. Moved by Shirley Mitchell and seconded by Kim Kokoszka that $3,000 be carried over to 2009 for the Community Heritage Register project. CARRIED Members discussed outstanding expenses and the use of any remaining funds. Moved by Mike Scudder and seconded by Guy Zecchini that any other remaining funds be carried over to 2009 for purchasing a laptop. CARRIED ACTION: Once all 2008 expenditures have been identified, Val Billesberger will contact Sharon Fletcher, Director of Planning to advise her of the amount to be carried over to 2009.

3. TASK GROUPS (a) Public Awareness & Education — Sieglinde Stieda volunteered to serve on the task group along with Shirley Mitchell and Val Billesberger. A special meeting of the task group will be held on November 18 m at 7:00 pm at the Mission Community Archives to finalize plans for the Networking Conference on November 29 th . (b) Recognition and Incentives — The task group is currently comprised of Mike Scudder, Kim Kokoszka, Guy Zecchini and Val Billesberger. A meeting of the group will be organized following the Networking Conference. (c) Heritage Register — Project Manager Sharon Syrette distributed handouts and presented an overview of the project, including the roles and responsibilities of the Commission, the Heritage Consultant and Project Manager. ACTION: Sharon Syrette will amend the timeline and work plan for the Community Heritage Register to ensure the project is completed by the beginning of March. Draft terms of reference for the Project Manager and the preparation of terms of reference for the Heritage Consultant were discussed. ACTION: Val Billesberger will consult with District staff concerning the approval of the terms of reference and contact Bob Parliament about Heritage Consultants

4. NEW BUSINESS (a) Membership of Commission — The terms of reference require the Commission to have 10 voting members and at present there are 7 members. Members discussed ideas for inviting people to join the Commission. ACTION: Sieglinde Stieda, Guy Zecchini and Val Billesberger will jointly work on a recruitment strategy for the Commission.

5. OTHER BUSINESS None 6. ADJOURNMENT The meeting adjourned at 9:05 p.m. Next meeting to be held on December 3, 2008 in the Conference Room at the Municipal Hall at 7:30 pm. FILE: Mission Community Heritage Commission

Minutes

Page 2 of 2


82

Minutes The Minutes for the Mission Community Heritage Commission (MCHC) meeting held in the *Mission Municipal Hall, Conference Room on December 03, 2008 commencing at 7:30 p.m. Present: Val Billesberger, Chair Shirley Mitchell Sieglinde Stieda Mildred Vollick Guy Zecchini Jenn Murray Absent: Kim Kokoszka Mike Scudder, Council Liaison 1. MINUTES The meeting was called to order at 7:35 p.m. (a) The minutes of the Mission Community Heritage Commission held on November 12, 2008. Moved by Shirley Mitchell and seconded by Guy Zecchini that the minutes be approved. CARRIED 2. BUSINESS ARISING FROM THE MINUTES (a) Commission Website — The website was previewed online. Page configuration, preliminary `Links', and viability of purchasing a .ca domain name were discussed through Internic.ca . ACTION: More information regarding .ca domains will be gathered by Jenn Murray and distributed to members as soon as possible. Moved by Mildred Vollick and seconded by Sieglinde Stieda that funds be expended this year to commit to the creation and upkeep of the website.. CARRIED (b) 2009 Work Plan and Budget — The 2009 Work Plan and Budget approved at the last meeting was briefly discussed. ACTION: Val Billesberger will forward the 2009 Work Plan and Budget to Sharon Fletcher to take to Council for their consideration. (c) Membership of Commission — The resignation of Mike Scudder from the Commission, his election to Mission Council and appointment as the Commission's Council liaison were acknowledged. Further discussion regarding the need for four more members to join the Commission will recommence in January 2009. Action item 4(a) from last meeting (recruitment strategy) postponed until a later date: to be determined outside of present meeting. 3. TASK GROUPS (a) Public Awareness & Education — The success of the recent Heritage Conference was discussed. The Chair recognized the outstanding contributions by individual members of the Commission: Kim Kokoszka for managing registrations; Shirley Mitchell for organizing

FILE: Mission Community Heritage Commission

Minutes

Page 1 of 3


83 Mission Community Heritage Corn sion Aileen December 3,,2008 arrangements for the venue and the refreshments; Mike Scudder for serving as the facilitator at the conference; Sieglinde Stieda for preparing the press release about the conference and the conference packages; Guy Zecchini for setting up the signage and assisting with the conference set up; and Mildred Vollick for assisting other members of the Commission at the conference. Revenue funds are in the possession of District staff and information as to the total revenues will be forthcoming. The conference revenues include a $1000.00 grant from the Heritage Society of British Columbia. Expense claims were presented. Moved by Guy Zecchini and seconded by Sieglinde Stieda that grant monies be paid out to all speakers as stipulated and that all revenue generated be used to cover the additional expenses. CARRIED Moved by Mildred Vollick and seconded by Guy Zecchini that the following expenses be paid out for the conference: Shirley Mitchell $519.63; Val Billesberger $87.34 and Gerhard von Rosen, photographer $200. CARRIED Evaluation of the strengths and possible improvements to future conferences were discussed. The need for more time to network with conference attendees and acquire print or electronic copies of seminar presentations was suggested. A follow-up evaluation form will be sent to conference attendees to inquire about improvements and to convey thanks. ACTION: Val Billesberger will consult with Rick Goodacre at Heritage BC about developing the evaluation form and then email it to participants for their feedback. (b) Recognition and Incentives — Val Billesberger, Guy Zecchini and Kim Kokoszka will arrange to meet before January 07, 2009 to discuss possible candidates for recognition. Guy Zecchini agreed to serve as Chair of the Task Group. ACTION: Guy Zecchini to contact Bob Parliament and set up a meeting in January. ACTION: Val Billesberger agreed to coordinate the compilation of a preliminary list of potential honourees. (c) Heritage Register — Draft outline of job description for Project Manager Sharon Syrette was discussed. The term of the contract changed to October 2008 to February 28th , 2009 so in compliance with grant requirements. Outlined payment schedule modified from "November 7 th , 2008" to 'December 8 th , 2008' and expense claim approval modified from "pre-approved by the HC Chair" to preapproval by 'the Commission'. Moved by Shirley Mitchell and seconded by Mildred Vollick that the revised contract for the Project Manager be adopted. CARRIED 4. NEW BUSINESS (a) Membership Renewals — Tabled until next meeting. (b) 2009 Meeting Schedule — Meeting schedule for 2009 reviewed. Shirley Mitchell moved and Guy Zecchini seconded that meeting schedule be adopted; however scheduling of July and August meetings will be subject to revision at the discretion of the Chair. CARRIED FILE: Mission Community Heritage Commission

Minutes Page 2 of 3


84 Miss ,

unity Hera e C ?'.ber 3, 2008

meeting

(c) Commission Clerk â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Draft job description for Commission Clerk distributed for review and later discussion.

5. OTHER BUSINESS

None

6. ADJOURNMENT

The meeting adjourned at 8:45 p.m.

FILE: Mission Community Heritage Commission

Minutes Page 3 of 3


85

Dim

Minutes

The Minutes for the Mission Community Heritage Commission (MCHC) special meeting held in the Mission Community Archives on December 16, 2008 commencing at 7:00 p.m. Present: Val Billesberger, Chair Kim Kokoszka Shirley Mitchell Sieglinde Stieda Guy Zecchini Sharon Fletcher, Director of Planning Absent:

Mike Scudder, Council Liaison Mildred Vo{lick

1. HERITAGE REGISTER PROJECT (a) Professional Heritage Consultant Sharon Fletcher reviewed district policy regarding the awarding of contracts. A discussion was held regarding hiring Julie MacDonald to be the Professional Heritage Consultant for the District of Mission Heritage Register Project. Moved by Guy Zecchini and seconded by Kim Kokoszka that Julie MacDonald be hired as the Professional Heritage Consultant. CARRIED Sieglinde Stieda opposed ACTION: Val Billesberger will inform Julie MacDonald that she's been awarded the contract. The draft terms of reference for the Professional Heritage Consultant were reviewed and discussed by members. It was recommended by Sharon Fletcher that item 5 under the work plan be amended as follows: "All deliverables and invoices from this project will be given to the Mission Community Heritage Commission who will be responsible for forwarding them to Sharon Fletcher, Director of Planning for the District of Mission. All invoices to be made out to: Planning Department of the District of Mission." Moved by Kim Kokoszka, seconded by Guy Zecchini that the Terms of Reference for the Professional Heritage Consultant be approved as amended. CARRIED ACTION: Val Billesberger will make the amendments and arrange for them to be signed.

FILE: ADM.COM .ADV Mission Community Heritage Commission

Minutes Page 1 of 2


86

Mission Community Heritage Commission Minutes December 16, 2008

2. COMMISSION WEBSITE

Discussion held on naming of the Mission Community Heritage Commission web site. Moved by Guy Zecchini and seconded by Kim Kokoszka to adopt the domain name HeritageMission.ca. CARRIED ACTION: Val Billesberger and Sharon Fletcher will arrange for Jenn Murray to register the name through Internic.ca. 3. ADJOURNMENT

The meeting adjourned at 8:00 p.m.

FILE: ADM.COM .ADV Mission Community Heritage Commission

Minutes Page 2 of 2


87

The Minutes for the Mission Community Heritage Commission (MCHC) meeting held in the Mission City Hall, Council Chambers on January 14, 2009 commencing at 6:30 p.m. Present: Val Billesberger, Chair Linda Fornal Kim Kokoszka Shirley Mitchell Janis Schultz Sieglinde Stieda Mildred Vollick Guy Zecchini Mike Scudder, Council Liaison Sharon Fletcher, Director of Planning Sharon Syrette, Project Manager, Heritage Register (Arrived 7:45PM) Jenn Murray, Clerical Support 1. WELCOME Janis Schultz and Linda Fornal, newly appointed members to the Commission, introduced themselves and were welcomed by other members. Councillor Scudder also acknowledged the new members and thanked the Commission for their accomplishments thus far. 2. MINUTES The meeting was called to order at 6:40 p.m. (a) The minutes of the Mission Community Heritage Commission held on December 3, 2008. Moved by Guy Zecchini and seconded by Kim Kokoszka that the minutes be approved. CARRIED 3. ANNUAL ELECTIONS (a) Shirley Mitchell nominated Guy Zecchini for the position of Alternate Chair; seconded by Kim Kokoszka. There being no further nominations, the nominations were closed and Guy Zecchini was elected. Val Billesberger turned the chair over to Guy Zecchini. (b) Kim Kokoszka nominated Val Billesberger for the position of Chair; seconded by Janis Schultz. There being no further nominations, the nominations were closed and Val Billesberger was elected. 4. BUSINESS ARISING FROM THE MINUTES (a) Commission Website Website manager Jenn Murray presented an update on the Commission website status and reported that hosting and registration of the URL http://www.heritagemission.ca through Internic.ca was completed successfully. Draft content will be uploaded over the coming weeks and a version for members to review should be ready soon. Search engine optimization (SEO) will also be performed in order to maximize the presence of heritagemission.ca over the â&#x20AC;˘ Internet. FILE: Mission Community Heritage Commission

Minutes

Page 1 of 3


88 MissionCommunity Heritage Commission Meeting January 14, 2009 (b)2009 Work Plan and Budget Sharon Fletcher presented information regarding the availability of district funding to the Commission for the 2009 fiscal year. She stated that Council is in the process of reviewing the budget and therefore, the Commission's funding for 2009 is still subject to revision. A determination of the Commission's total income and expenditures for 2008 is currently being prepared and will be available soon. Members discussed the expenditure of funds and approved the following. Val Billesberger, Sieglinde Stieda and Mildred Vollick expressed interest in attending the seminar 'Conservation Planning: A Values Based Approach' being held at SFU Harbour Centre campus on February 20, 2009. Moved by Shirley Mitchell and seconded by Kim Kokoszka that Commission members interested in attending the upcoming seminar 'Conservation Planning: A Values Based Approach' being held at SFU Harbour Centre campus on February 20, 2009 be reimbursed the registration fee of $100 if sufficient funds are available. CARRIED Moved by Sieglinde Stieda and seconded by Linda Fornal to pay Sharon Syrette $800 as part of her contract wages as the Project Manager of the Heritage Register Project. CARRIED Moved by Kim Kokoszka and seconded by Mildred Vollick to renew the Heritage Society of BC membership. CARRIED ACTION: Linda Fornal will provide space in the Mission Library for keeping any hardcopy material sent by the Heritage Society of BC and other groups so that all members have access to the information. (c) Networking Conference Sharon Fletcher reported that income from the conference totalled approximately $870.00. Val Billesberger reported that she had conducted a post-conference evaluation via email and that although the results were very positive there was a low response rate (22%). Thank you letters were prepared and sent to all speakers. ACTION: Val Billesberger was asked to send out a reminder email to conference participants who have not yet responded to post-conference evaluation. 5.TASK GROUPS (a) Recognition and Incentives Guy Zecchini presented ideas as to what criteria may be applied to selecting award recipients. There was discussion of the West Vancouver Heritage Achievement categories and criteria which were used by the Commission last year. It was agreed that suggestions for nominations and awards criteria be emailed to Kim Kokoszka who will forward them to Guy. A report will be provided by Guy at the next meeting. ACTION: Sharon Fletcher agreed to try and set up a special meeting for February 9 2009, or as a second choice, February 16, 2009 so the Mayor and Council could attend a reception following the awards presentations.

FILE: Mission Community Heritage Commission

Minutes Page 2 of 3


89 Mission Comm January 14,

Heritage Comissio

(b) Heritage Register The Heritage Consultant, Julie McDonald met with Val Billesberger and Planning Department staff, Sharon Fletcher and Marcy Bond, to identify the remaining tasks to be completed within the remaining timeframe and the assignment of responsibilities for each one. Sharon Syrette was unable to attend the meeting. The timeline and tasks for the Project Manager, Heritage Commission, and Professional Heritage Consultant were updated. In addition, the responsibilities of the Planning Department were added. Sharon Syrette presented her report on the progress of the Heritage Register project and chaired a discussion of the heritage value(s) from a local perspective associated with three of the six sites: the Power House at Stave Falls, Fraser River Heritage Park, and Mission Museum. She has arranged open houses for some of the sites and will email updates to Commission members. Due to the tight timeframe for completing the project, members agreed to hold a special meeting on January 21s t for purposes of discussing the remaining three sites. 6. NEW BUSINESS (a) Orientation for New Members Item tabled to next meeting. 7. OTHER BUSINESS (a) Membership of Commission â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Recommendations for Recruitment Strategies Item tabled to next meeting. 8. ADJOURNMENT The meeting adjourned at 8:45 p.m.

FILE: Mission Community Heritage Commission

Minutes Page 3 of 3


90

Minutes The Minutes for the Mission Community Heritage Commission (MCHC) meeting held in the Mission Community Archives on February 4, 2009 commencing at 6:30 p.m. Present: Val Billesberger, Chair Guy Zecchini, Alternate Kim Kokoszka Shirley Mitchell Janis Schultz Sieglinde Stieda Mildred Vollick Mike Scudder, Council Liaison Jenn Murray, Clerical Support Sharon Syrette, Project Manager, Heritage Register Kim Allen, Guest Absent: Linda Fornal 1. MINUTES The meeting was called to order at 6:30 p.m. (a) The minutes of the Mission Community Heritage Commission held on January 14, 2009. Moved by Shirley Mitchell and seconded by Guy Zecchini that the minutes as corrected be approved. CARRIED 2. BUSINESS ARISING FROM THE MINUTES (a) Commission Website — Jenn Murray updated members as to website design progress. She requested information from the Education & Incentives Task Group for the Advocacy / Public Awareness and Education web page content, and informed members that the link to the temporary test website will be provided. (b) 2009 Work Plan and Budget — Jenn Murray submitted invoice for payment of clerical services rendered. Moved by Shirley Mitchell and seconded by Kim Kokoszka that the invoice presented by Jenn Murray totalling $160.00 be paid. CARRIED Mike Scudder informed the Commission that the funding amount from the District should be determined by the end of February 2009. (c) Orientation for New Members — Orientation binder was presented to new member Janis Schultz. Remaining orientation binder to be presented to Linda Fornal at later date. Updated materials were distributed for members' orientation binders.

FILE: Mission Community Heritage Commission

Minutes

Page 1 of 2


91 Mission Community Heritage Commission Meeting February 2009 .

Members discussed requirements for an Orientation meeting. Meeting time and date set for the next regular meeting of Commission on March 4, 2009 at 6:30 p.m. in the Municipal Hall conference room. Members are to submit questions to speakers in advance. ACTION: Shirley Mitchell will contact potential speakers for orientation meeting. (d) Membership of Commission: Recommendations for Recruitment Strategies — Ideas and challenges with regards to recruitment and promotion were discussed. It was suggested that agencies and organizations identified in the Commission's Terms of Reference be contacted about appointing a representative to the Commission. ACTION: Val Billesberger will speak to Sharon Fletcher about preparing a letter to invite agencies and organizations to appoint a representative to the Commission. 3. TASK GROUPS (a) Recognition and Incentives — Guy Zecchini presented a report on nominations for recognition. Moved by Guy Zecchini and seconded by Sieglinde Stieda that Dorothy Crosby and Cathie Marcellus each be presented with a Heritage Achievement Award on February 16, 2009 in the Municipal Council chambers. CARRIED ACTION: Shirley Mitchell will book conference room for a reception after awards presentation. ACTION: Val Billesberger will contact Dorothy Crosby and Cathie Marcellus. ACTION: Jenn Murray will attend awards and reception as photographer of events. ACTION: Sieglinde Stieda will submit a press release to the newspaper by February 9, 2009. Guy suggested guidelines and criteria be affirmed for the 2010 awards. He provided members with materials to review for consideration regarding possible future awards nomination criteria. Mike Scudder encouraged the Commission to include its own ideas regarding criteria and to retain a distinct 'Mission' quality in the nominations process. Guest Kim Allen expressed interest in joining the Recognition and Incentives Task Group for planning 2010 awards. ACTION: Val Billesberger will provide access to the Maple Ridge nomination form read from at meeting. (b) Heritage Register — Val Billesberger reviewed some of the challenges communicated by the professional Heritage Consultant. Sharon Syrette presented her report and reminded the Commission that she had to submit their feedback on the draft statements of significance to Julie McDonald on Friday, February 5th. Members were asked to send their comments to her as soon as possible. She then facilitated a discussion on the open houses at each site. A date and time for an open house at Stave Falls Power Dam was discussed and Janis Schultz suggested it be set for Wednesday, February 11 from 2:00 to 4:00 p.m. Sharon also informed the Commission of a need to determine what information to provide for the district website and that she expects the project deadlines to be met. 4. OTHER BUSINESS (a) Terms of Reference — TABLED. 5. ADJOURNMENT The meeting adjourned at 8:15 p.m. Next meeting to be held on March 4, 2008 in the Conference Room at the Municipal Hall at 6:30 pm. FILE: Mission Community Heritage Commission

Minutes

Page 2 of 2


04/02/2009 14:01

6048264319

MMSI WARDEN

DISTRICT OF MISSION REPORT MARCH, 2009 Enclosures: •

District of Mission of Mission Public Safety Committee Report

Definitions

Major Offence Profile

Institutional Programming and Community Involvement

i/case

ragt/privatekcm-clic/District of Mission Report Enclosures

PAGE 02/08

92


CORRECTIONAL SERVICE OF CANADA MISSION INSTITUTION DISTRICT OF MISSION PUBLIC SAFETY COMMITTEE REPORT 2009 STATISTICAL INFORMATION UP TO AND INCLUDING THE LAST DAY OF EACH MONTH

TE, ._A.SVA._-__..t..__..Ft, ; AISSIMAN - 11 -,y?7414 ti:.nrtjf ...0:13R-;: ,1"..- MA :1,:' k;5APR WM:: MAY.::? f -:',13-' Ajmer:: fr outy1F.,? te; Atm ?4,,t:.:1 stpri*, riovms: K .;:;. Am( - .,-, 41:, :. - • 7 tri ij#GIfr' '-' SIVARJ AN M ' :..;'qfI:t42!M-._..__„.W.--

.

,

.

Inside institutional Count Number of Inmates at Outside Court Number of Inmates at Outside Hospital Number of inmates on Bail Number of Inmates U.A.L. (1 since 1973) Number of Inmates on Temporary Absence

272 0 0 0 I 0

Total Number of Inmates at Mission

273

Transfer Out to Mediu rn Security Transfer Out to Minimum Security Transfer Out to Other (Provincial, etc.) Transfer In from Maximum Security Transfer In from Medium Security Transfer In from Minimum Securtly Transfer in from Oilier (Provincial, etc) Transfer in from Mufti-level - Security Transfer In from RRAG Admitted by Suspension Revocation ,,----:,.--......-e 1: %a2-.:..5.-.1 ,, -

-

, - -

,

. -*:._''' .

-,....., {-1

X1=

UMB

0 0 1 0 278

123

123

1

V.CitirlAt

IME:

NO

W.

. .

f

2

0

6 0

6 0 2 5 0 0 5 5 7 1

2 0 1 5 0 0 B 2 2 3

0 11 2 0 0 0 0

0 9 2 0 0 0 0

0 5 2 0 0 0 0

1 0 3 0

0 0 3 0

1

4 2 0 8 3 5 2

,

276

..- ,

--..7-,.

5FiCii iMT: Day Parole

Full Parole Statutory Release Warrant Expiry Death Bail U.A.L. Court Ordered Release

. .: 4.-.1i

274 0 0 0 f 0 275

-

.

-

-

-

murzfox zuf.ird;titteimigRamia ecur

CID

e..V 4T

-

4M:17 --:.!;.,

Number of individual Escorted Temporary Absences* for the month. Number of inmates on an Unescorted Temporary Absence during the month. Number participating in the Perimeter Work Clearance Program for the month. Number of Inmates participating in the Work Release Program for the month.

:-=i-n' -M,

, 2 0 1 0

.Tir...,„

....

,_:.

tA, ;;

l .. '-e.fra, --


04/02/2009 14:01

6048264319

MMSI WARDEN

['AGE t14/ IOU

DEFINITIONS BAIL Bail Is an option for the courts or police to consider, in some cases, where an offender may be able to be released on conditions, rather than being detained in custody prior to court appearance. Bail is also known as Judicial Interim Release.

TEMPORARY ABSENCES AND DAY PAROLE Temporary Absences (TAs) and Day Paroles allow the temporary release of offenders from institutions in order to access programs and services available in the community. All provinceslterritories operate TA programs, and TAs may be granted for personal development, medical, compassionate, employment, administrative, parental or family-related reasons. In most cases, TA's are utilized for pre-parole preparation and planning. TA's are either escorted (ETAs) or unescorted (UTAs). Typically, ETAs are not longer than eight hours and UTAs may run from 8 hours to 60 days. The type of offence and sentence length determines whether the Correctional Service of Canada or the National Parole Board has authority to issue TAs. In simplistic form, the National Parole Board determines all TAs for offenders serving Life sentences and for other violent offences that resulted in serious harm to the victims. The Warden, as the head of the releasing institution, retains complete responsibility for the final clearance of offenders being released on TAs and provides a written recommendation to the N.P.B. when they possess the legal authority. As a general rule, all offenders are eligible for E.T.A.s the moment they commence their federal sentences. In practice however, very few offenders will receive authorization for TAs early within their sentence, with the exception of TAs for medical and compassionate purposes. As a general rule, medical and compassionate TAs are escorted by what is determined as a security escort (two officers who possess and utilize restraint equipment). However, for other types of ETAs, the offender is usually escorted by one officer only. Variations in the level of security exist and is determined by assessing the level of risk the offender poses to the public. In terms of offender's eligibility for UTAs, this is determined by legal calculations of eligibility and varies from one offender to another depending on their sentence length. In the case of offenders serving a Life sentence, UTA eligibility is calculated as three years before their full parole eligibility date. Federal offenders may qualify to participate in work release programs outside of the correctional institution for a specified period of time. These type of releases could see a single offender going out to work as well as groups of offenders. However, they are usually escorted by at least one officer. In addition, UTAs may be. granted to allow offenders to participate in personal development programs or community service projects. UTAs are generally granted for a maximum period of 15 days, although if the UTA is for participation in a personal development program, it may be extended to 60 days, renewable. Day Parole is a flexible form of release that provides an opportunity for correctional officials to employ gradual release, preparing the inmate for release on full parole and allowing the inmate the opportunity to participate in community-based programs and become readjusted to life outside the institution, Federal offenders, with the exception of those inmates in preventive detention or serving indeterminate sentences, are eligible for day parole six months prior to their parole eligibility date or after having served six months of their sentence, whichever is longer. The majority of the inmates on day parole reside in community-based facilities operated by the provincial and federal corrections services or by private agencies on contract with the Correctional Service.

FULL PAROLE Full Parole is a program of conditional release that allows inmates to serve a portion of their sentence in the community under supervision. Inmates are generally eligible for full parole after serving one-third of their sentence or seven years, whichever Is shorter. Under the Corrections and Conditional Release Act enacted in 1992, however, sentencing judges have the authority to set the parole eligibility for offenders convicted of violent and serious drug offences at one-half rather than one-third of the sentence. In such cases, the period until parole eligibility cannot exceed ten years. Federal inmates serving Life sentences are eligible for parole consideration after seven years in confinement, dated from the day the offender was arrested and taken into custody. The exception to this are situations in which an offender is serving a Life sentence with a mandatory minimum sentence. For example, a First Degree Murder conviction carries a mandatory 25 years confinement before parole eligibility.

STATUTORY RELEASE Statutory Release has its origins in an amendment to the Parole Act in 1970, which created a mechanism to provide assistance and control during the offenders readjustment to life in the community for inmates who had been denied parole. In contrast to parole, statutory release involves the release of offenders from the institution after serving two-thirds of their sentence, with the remaining one-third being served under supervision of the National Parole Board in the community. Inmates released under statutory release are supervised by parole officers and must abide by mandatory and any additional conditions set by the NPB that are deemed necessary to successfully manage the offender's risk in the community. A violation of the conditions can result in suspension and revocation and return to the institution where the offender may have to serve the remainder of his sentence, Inmates can be Detained by the NPB and thus not released on statutory release. However, it has been determined in law that offenders have the right to be released after serving two thirds of their sentences and thus, to detain an offender, there must be significant grounds to establish that the offender would constitute a grievous threat to the community, or any member thereof, if released. Following completion of their sentence, (Warrant Expiry Date), these inmates are released into the community without any supervision or assistance. However, recent changes in the Corrections and Conditional Release Act have made provisions to allow for the supervision of some offenders beyond their Warrant Expiry dates. However, the changes in this law are not retroactive to offenders currently serving sentences and will-likely involve a very small group of offenders determined to be extremely dangerous.

94


04/02/2009 14:01

6048264319

PAGE 05/08

MMSI WARDEN

Correctional Service of Canada PROTECTED B

Major Offence Profile Offenders profile at the specified site and proportion for each major offence MISSION INSTITUTION FAIL TO ATTEND COURT - UNDER/RECOG

1

0.37%

FAIL TO ATTEND COURT - UNDER/RECOG

1

0.37%

RAPE

2

0.73%

ESCAPE LAWFUL CUSTODY

1

0.37%

FAIL TO ATTEND COURT - JUDGE'S ORDER

1

0.37%

FAIL TO COMPLY W/COND OF UNDER/RECOG

1

0.37%

FAIL TO COMPLY W/COND OF UNDER/RECOG

4

1.47%

INDECENT ASSAULT FEMALE

1

0.37%

SEXUAL EXPLOITATION - TOUCH

1

0.37%

ANAL INTERCOURSE

1

0.37%

NON CAPITAL MURDER

2

0.73%

FIRST DEGREE MURDER

9

3.30%

SECOND DEGREE MURDER

6

220%

MANSLAUGHTER

1

0.37%

CAUSE BODILY HARM BY CRIM NEG

1

0.37%

FIRST DEGREE MURDER

25

9.18%

SECOND DEGREE MURDER

52

19.05%

MANSLAUGHTER

1

0.37%

ATTEMPT MURDER

2

0.73%

OVERCOME RESISTANCE - CHOKE

1

0.37%

KIDNAP - HOLD FOR RANSOM

1

0.37%

DANGEROUS OPERATION OF MOTOR VEHICLE

1

0.37%

FAIL TO PROVIDE BREATH SAMPLE

2

0,73%

IMPAIRED DRIVING - CBH

1

0.37%

OPERATE MV WHILE DISQUALIFIED

1

0.37%

UTTER THREAT TO CAUSE DEATH/HARM

2

0.73%

ASSAULT - USE OF FORCE

3

1.10%

ASSAULT WITH A WEAPON

2

0.73%

ASSAULT CAUSING BODILY HARM

1

0.37%

AGGRAVATED ASSAULT

5

1.83%

Date and time extracted; 2009/04/01 4:25:10PM EST Print Date: 2009/04/01 4:25:49PM EST

Page 1 of 3

95


04/02/2009 14:01

6048264319

PAGE 06/08

MMSI WARDEN

ASSAULT PEACE OFFICER

1

0.37%

SEXUAL ASSAULT

a

2.93%

SEXUAL ASSAULT WITH WEAPON

1

0.37%

SEXUAL ASSAULT CAUSING BODILY HARM

2

0.73%

AGGRAVATED SEXUAL ASSAULT

2

0.73%

FORCIBLE CONFINEMENT

3

1.10째/0

ROBBERY

2

0.73%

BREAK ENTER AND COMMIT

1

0.37%

THEFT UNDER

1

0.37%

THEFT UNDER

2

0.73%

ARMED ROBBERY

1

0.37%

BREAK ENTER W/INTENT

2

0.73%

BREAK ENTER AND COMMIT

9

3.30%

DISGUISE WITH INTENT

1

0.37%

POSS PROP OBT BY CRIME-OVER

5

1,83%

POSS PROPERTY OBTAINED BY CRIME - UNDER

1

0.37%

FRAUD UNDER

1

0.37%

ATTEMPT

1

0.37%

MISCHIEF IN RELATION TO PROPERTY - OVER

1

0.37%

ARSON - DAMAGE TO PROPERTY

1

0.37%

ATTEMPT IND OFFENCE

1

0.37%

ATTEMPT SUM CONV OFF

1

0.37%

'CONSPIRE TO COMMIT MURDER

2

0.73%

CONSPIRE TO COMMIT IND OFF

2

0.73%

FAIL TO COMPLY W/PROB ORDER

1

0.37%

PROVINCIAL STATUTES

1

0.37%

OFFENCE UNDER PROV STATUTES OF ONTARIO

1

0.37%

OFFENCE UNDER MOTOR VEHICLE ACT - B.C.

1

0.37%

CAUSE DEATH BY CRIM NEGL - ALL OTHERS

1

0.37%

MANSLAUGHTER - ALL OTHERS

8

2.93%

ATT MURDER - USE FIREARM

1

0.37%

ATT MURDER - ALL OTHERS

2

0.73%

CBH W/INT TO WOUND - AIR GUN OR PISTOL

1

0.37%

SEXUAL ASSAULT WNVEAPON - ALL OTHERS

1

0.37%

SEXUAL ASSAULT CBH - ALL OTHERS

3

1.10%

AGG. SEXUAL ASSAULT - ALL OTHERS

1

0.37%

KIDNAP - UNLAWFULLY CONFINE - FIREARM

1

0.37%

Date and time extracted: 2009/04/01 4:25:10PM EST Print Date: 2009/04/01 4:25:49FM EST

Page 1 of 3

96


04/02/2009

14:01

6048264319

MMSI WARDEN

PAGE

KIDNAP - UNLAWFULLY CONFINE - ALL OTHERS

4

1.47%

KIDNAP - HOLD FOR RANSOM - ALL OTHERS

2

0.73%

ROBBERY - USE FIREARM

2

0.73%

ROBBERY - ALL OTHERS

37

13.55%

FAIL TO COMPLY WI PROBATION ORDER

3

1.10%

POSS. SCHEDULE I SUBSTANCE

1

0.37%

POSS SCHEDULE II SUBSTANCE

2

0.73%

TRAFFIC IN SCHEDULE1/11 SUBSTANCE

1

0.37%

POSS SCHEDULE I/Il SUBST FOR PURP TRAFF

6

2.20%

UNLAWFULLY IN DWELLING HOUSE

1

0.37%

UNAUTH POSS IN MN

1

0.37%

B E & COMMIT - NOT DWELLING HOUSE

1

0.37%

B E W/INTENT - NOT DWELLING HOUSE

1

0.37%

FAIL TO STOP MVA - ANOTHER VEHICLE

1

0.37%

OPERATE MV - FLIGHT

1

0.37%

UTTER THREAT TO CAUSE DEATH/HARM

1

0.37%

Total Number of Offenders:

07/08

273

Date and time extracted: 2009/04/01 4:25:10PM EST Print Date: 2009/04/01 4:25:49PM EST

Page 1 of 3

97


04/02/2009 14:01

6048264319

MMSI WARDEN

In March of 2009 Mission Institution completed or was involved in the following:

Special Initiatives - Art & Word Contest for offenders. 38 Offenders enrolled in the event which is aimed at Harm Reduction amongst offenders by raising awareness of the issues through written stories/prose or art. Celebration of Black History Month - Mayor of Mission came to speak to our staff and a group of offenders about the significance of Black History Month. M2 Night was very well attended this month. This group of volunteers attends the institution the 3rd Friday of every month to meet with members of our offender population. We added a new Aboriginal Correctional Program Officer to our ranks. This is significant as it will now permit us to run the In Search of Your Warrior Program for our Aboriginal Offenders. This program is the equivalent to the High Intensity Violence Prevention Program offered to non-Aboriginals. This program will begin in two weeks on April 15, 2009 with 13 offenders. In March, we had one Aboriginal Correctional Program Officer away on training for the Aboriginal Basic Healing Program. This also contributes to maximizing access to correctional programs for our offenders. April 1 we will be starting the long awaited Family Violence Prevention Program with 12 offenders.

PAGE 08/08

98


99

fission DISTRICT OF

Corporate Administration Memorandum

ON THE FRASER TO:

Mayor and Councillors

FROM:

Deputy Director of Corporate Administration

DATE:

April 15, 2009

SUBJECT: BUSINESS IMPROVEMENT AREA ESTABLISHMENT BYLAW 5015-2009 RECOMMENDATION: That the District of Mission Business Improvement Area Establishment Bylaw 5015-2009 be considered for adoption on April 20, 2009. BACKGROUND: Based on a request from the Mission Downtown Business Association (MDBA) for a renewal of funding and a subsequent staff report, Council gave first three readings to the District of Mission Business Improvement Area Establishment Bylaw 5015-2009 on March 2, 2009. Section 215 of the Community Charter states Council may grant money to a corporation or other organization that has, as one of its aims, functions or purposes, the planning and implementing of a business promotion scheme. The process for the implementation of the above noted bylaw involved the following: •

Bylaw received first three readings on March 2, 2009

First newspaper advertisement Mission City Record — March 5, 2009

Letters go out to 110 property owners advising them what the additional tax levy would be to their property taxes for the next 5 years as well as outlining the process for opposing the program, and the period of opposition being 30 days after the second newspaper publication of the notice — March 5, 2009

Second newspaper advertisement Mission City Record — March 12, 2009

Period of opposition ends — April 11, 2009

Successful opposition to the adoption of the bylaw must include a majority of the property owners, representing at least 50% of the 110 parcels subject to the Business Improvement Area Service tax registering their opposition. As well, these owners would need to represent at least 50% of the assessed value of land and improvements, which has been valued at $42,994,600. Based on these numbers, a successful opposition to the adoption of the bylaw would require valid petition(s) signed by at least 55 owners, representing a total parcel value of $21,497,300. The attached table illustrates the number of owners who submitted petitions by the required deadline are 11 or 10% of all owners. The value of the parcels owned by these individuals is $3,385,900 or 7.9% of the total value of the affected parcels. Based on these figures, the valid petitions opposed to the adoption of the bylaw are clearly insufficient. Based on the lack of sufficient opposition to the adoption of the District of Mission Business Improvement Area Establishment Bylaw 5015-2009, staff recommends the adoption of the bylaw on April 20, 2009 Kelly Ridley

g:\clerk\kelly\2004\reports to council\bia bylaw - request for final reading.doc

FILE: ADM.BYL.BYL.

Bylaw 5015-2009

PAGE 1 OF 2


100

SUMMARY OF LETTERS RECEIVED Valid Petitions Submitted in Opposition to the Adoption of Bylaw 5015-2009 Roll Number 850664100 850849000 850755000 850624000 831383001 850645000 850700100 850700200 850700300 850700400 850700500

FILE: ADM.BYL.BYL

Bylaw 5015-2009

Property Owner 0803552 BC Ltd. David Jang 471222 BC Ltd. 585226 BC Ltd. Bellevue Hotel Ltd 0784790 BC Ltd. Imperial Oil Ltd. Imperial Oil Ltd. Imperial Oil Ltd. Imperial Oil Ltd. Imperial Oil Ltd. 11 owners

Address 7282 Home Street 33065 1 st Avenue 33276 2 nd Avenue 33128 1 st Avenue 32988 1 st Avenue 33232 1 st Avenue 33321 1 st Avenue 33321 1 st Avenue 33321 1 st Avenue 33321 1 st Avenue 33321 1 st Avenue

Assessment 349,000 209,000 964,000 473,000 821,000 257,400 62,500 62,500 62,500 62,500 62,500 Total $3,385,900

PAGE 2 OF 2


101

M ON THE FRASER

DISTRICT OF

iss

File Category: File Folder:

Corporate Administration INFORMATION Memorandum

FIN.CON.VAG Fraser River Heritage Park

To:

Chief Administrative Officer

From:

Director of Corporate Administration

Date:

March 20, 2009

Subject:

Fraser River Heritage Park Work Plan

Attached is a copy of the 2009 work plan for Fraser River Heritage Park. The plan has been reviewed by the director of parks recreation and culture, and received his approval.

nnis Clar g: \cow \2009\april

rhp 2009 workplan.doc

Page 1 of 1


102

0/4 Htli.

co0

),

FRASER RIVER HERITAGE PARK P.O. Box 3341, Mission, British Columbia, Canada. V2V 4J5 Phone: (604) 826-0277 Fax: (604) 826-0333 E-mail: mhaacimin le Web site: www.heritagepark-mission.ca

Cl2 February 16, 2009 Mr. Dennis Clark, Director of Corporate Administration, District of Mission. Re: 2009 Work Plan Dear Dennis: Our maintenance contract with the District calls for a work plan to be submitted for the current year. I have divided this report into two sections: the first deals with the work to be done under the contract itself for which we receive funding from the District (the required work plan); and the second covers the projects that the MHA is undertaking as part of its charitable mandate in the park and for which we receive no funding from the District.

Work to be Performed under Maintenance Contract in 2009 1) Building Maintenance a) Maintain and repair all structures as needed i) Norma Kenney House ii) Administration Building iii) Washrooms iv) Maintenance shed v) Bandstand vi) Bell tower vii) Gateways (large and small) viii) Caretaker suite in the NKH 2) Equipment Maintenance and Repair a) Maintain and repair all equipment necessary for the maintenance of the grounds, gardens, structures and furniture. 3) Park Maintenance a) This year we hope to find the resources in the budget to perform needed work on the rhododendron beds. In my years at the park, beginning with the FVRD, there has been no funds targeted for these beds. They have always been a volunteer project that has not been popular with our regular garden volunteers. We hope to be able to find money for materials only, mainly soil enrichment, since we will use our Ferndale volunteers to perfoini the labour.


103

4) Maintain the park grounds to an acceptable level. a) Mow grass in pre-determined areas. b) Clear snow from pathways and parking lot. c) Edge pathways, paint or seal all structures, reclaim overgrown land, power wash concrete areas. d) Collect and dispose of all refuse. e) Conduct regular, random security checks. f) Perfonn routine maintenance of garden areas. 5) Ensure the park is a welcoming and accessible venue for a wide range of community events and individuals.


104 2009 Work Plan, and Planned Projects of the Mission Heritage Association At Fraser River Heritage Park In addition to the work undertaken in accordance with our Maintenance Contract with the District of Mission, the MHA, as part of its charitable mandate at Fraser River Heritage Park, has committed to several projects relating to the historical and cultural significance of the site, as well as to making the park a more welcoming venue for the enjoyment of our community. It should be noted that, although the cost of these improvements is high, the MHA is committed to raise the money through fundraising and donations, and that no new funds will be requested from the District of Mission to complete the projects. We may approach the District for donations in kind where appropriate, such as timber, but there will be no additional burden placed on the tax rolls. The estimated value of the various projects underway is: Perimeter Trail Old Orchard to date 44

G4

Heritage Walk Landscaping

with lighting $225,000 to completion $ 9,800 developer contribution to date $ 75,000 to be determined

$375,000 $ 40,000 (estimate) $ 60,000


105

raser River Heritage Park MiSSIOTI

Heritage Association Planned Projects Map scale: 112000 Ortho rnap supplied byThstricttif Map produced byloutiouse

LEGEND & STORYBOARD INDEX Perimeter Trail will citcumventthe boundaries of the park. Heritage Walk D'Herbomm Creek named afterBishcp D'Herbomez.,O.M.I. Connecting Path between Hentade Walk &PerirneterTrall Boulevard sidewalk

. 71stPTJtarP Ltist1L.flgypit ,

iNDEX TO STORYBOARDS A Entry Gate Mechanin Shop CG Horseshoe Pit D Bell Tower & Peggy Staber Memorial Garden E Mart Kenney Memorial Bandstand (presented July 1, 2007j F Geographic Features

• G Boys Dormitoryfoundation H Heritage Garden I Girl's Dormitoryfotmdation & ONLI. Cemetery

• J Bakery and'Classroomsfoundations `. .1: Gymnasium •

L Milking Barn and Orchard Grotto and -frail Network

. •

• " ,Oblertos dee*

• vAt arcellus )Z, Rhododendron Poplars will provide s ' on the walk up to the:Gro Decoratme deciduous trees win provrdeseckumn. :

th Dpe7iniTrefedr eaat'lliriragnalriv e w'illere°vfe

t

`Small cops will acid siradealond rix Heritage

Aj Possiblyoan entranced pond area WM suitable natural tau Potential site tor specimen nem replacmd memo biackbeniek; Theoki orchard' is bemd re!laimed & will be a IttlktforlOng&-77.17S .., newly planted heritage fruit trees Six majestic chermut meet line the procession to the cemetery.

IF1,,,4 e antio tcaxrhouse the original SuMary's Mission Bell eloriared by the Stodo Menvorial benches& storyboarcls will provide a Ilistory of the nark. --."%.5cxne of the 'foundations of the otioinal St Mary's Indian Residential '3‹ ac 1892 a nd may be enhanced bytandscaped gardens

—1


106 Concession Stand Last year, in order to maximize use of existing space and to better serve the visitors to our events, we converted the shed that previously held our tractor into a concession stand. We brought the concession area up to health standards by pouring a concrete floor, installing sinks, and acquiring more equipment. We will be finishing this area over the winter by installing insulation and gyprock.

Perimeter Trail One of the most requested improvements to the Park is more walking/jogging trails or paths. We are currently fundraising to create a path around the entire boundary of the Park â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 2.3 kilometers or 1.4 miles (see map, red line). Our proposed path will be 3 meters (10 feet) wide with a surface of crushed gravel. The trail will be installed in stages as funding allows, with the first stage running up Mary Street from the open field, along 7 th Avenue from Mary Street to the end of the cul de sac, on the south (park) side of the street. The area along 7 th Avenue was cleared in 2006 with cooperation from the developer at no cost to the District (estimated value $60,000). The estimated cost of the completed trail is $225,000. If we add lighting at 50-meter intervals, the cost will increase by an additional $150,000. These are construction costs only and do not include electrical connection for the lights or annual maintenance of the trail. They also do not include garbage receptacles or any signage or benches. $12,000 has been included in the estimate for drainage control, but this may not be enough for the steeper slopes. The morning Rotary Club has donated $5,000, as has the Mission Foundation, and individuals from the community an additional $8,100. The MHA has added another $4,000 for a total of $22,100. With this seed money we have engaged a project manager. 2009 There is a strong possibility that the entire trail will be completed under a LocalMotion grant that has been submitted by Parks and Recreation. If the grant is again unsuccessful, we will try to complete as much as possible of the first phase that runs up Mary Street and along 7 th Avenue. This will require backhoe work on the Mary Street section and likely the removal of some weed trees. However, we will not remove any of the heritage fruit trees that are plentiful on this side (west) of the hill (see following).

Old Orchard Restoration On the slope that lies on the north side of FRHP, between our open field and our 7 th Avenue boundary. one will find the remains of the original fruit orchard which was maintained by and served the needs of

St. Mary's School. Starting, in 2004, the MHA has endeavoured to clear and reclaim this old orchard


107 area running from Mary Street east to the foundation of the milking barn. When finished, the project will have replanted the orchard with heritage species of fruit covering the area bounded by Mary Street, 7 th Avenue, and the large field used for overflow parking (see map) Each year we have put whatever resources we could find into this reclamation project which consists of clearing the great blackberry forests that had taken over the slope, and stabilizing the remaining fruit and nut trees. To date we have spent $10,800 that has been raised through fundraising/grants, and several hundred hours of volunteer labour. 2009 During the last year, with improved maintenance services and with the help of volunteers from the corrections system and from arbourists, we have made great progress on this project and have added several acres of usable area to the park. We have cleared the easternmost side of the hill and will begin replanting this area with either grafts from the original trees or purchased heritage species. We have been in contact with Tree Canada who seems eager that we submit our application to their carbon offset program. In conversation with this non-profit agency, it seems likely that we can secure $10,000 in funding in each of the next several years. Furtheimore, last year we were able to begin our landscaping plans by planting six mulberry trees along the eastern crest of the hill. Not only will these trees provide an attractive addition to the park, but they will also provide habitat for birds and small animals. As this project progresses, we will clear the scrub alders from the central portion of the hill and then the westernmost side. However, the order of our replanting/reclamation may change since the western side of the hill contains the majority of the original fruit trees extant, and we may decide that preserving these is the highest priority. In this case, we will work on restoration from west to east. In February, we continued clearing the blackberries from the area around the existing fruit and nut trees. Several of these trees are now so decayed that it is not possible to save them. We will be taking grafts from them and, unfortunately, cutting them down. We will replant, possibly with the grafts.

Heritage Walk One project that began two years ago is our "Heritage Walk" (see map with yellow station indicators). This project envisions a rambling pathway through and around the park which will include at least 15 resting points (stations). Each resting point (station) will include a bench and a storyboard. The anticipated cost of each station is about $5,000. It is our expectation that each bench will be a memorial bench provided by a sponsor and each storyboard will feature the nearby historic, cultural or geographic highlights of the area. We hope to find sponsors for each storyboard through individual, corporate or club sponsorships. The first station, unveiled on Canada Day 2007, was a Mart Kenney memorial bench with adjacent storyboard, placed facing the bandstand. The storyboard features the bandstand and its history, and a brief biography of this prominent citizen of our city. Also on that day, the bandstand was officially renamed the "Mission Kinsmen Club's Mart Kenney Memorial Bandstand". Last year we added three memorial benches to the park. They were deliberately placed at one of the "stations" we had previously identified: the Girls' Dormitory, the "view', and the "history" stations.


108

2009 We will continue to produce the text and graphics for each storyboard (drafts attached). As they are completed, we will be able to add them to our walk as soon as sponsors are found for the bases. Similarly benches will be purchased as donors come forward requesting a suitable memorial for loved ones. Since we have identified the locations for the storyboards and benches, we can place either or both at any time depending on the donor. There is a possibility that paths connecting the stations and linking to the Perimeter Trail will be completed under the LocalMotion grant mentioned above, or with funds from the District's capital reserves.

Facilities The park is growing in usage, complexity, and the demands placed on us by the public. It is becoming apparent that more indoor space is needed for various purposes such as maintenance, washrooms (particularly women's), the kitchen, the caretaker, offices and meeting areas. The MHA will strive to complete as much of these facilities as possible for the lowest cost possible, but the District will have to earmark some of its capital reserves for one or more of these projects.

Landscaping Plan While this taskforce, which is charged with looking to the long term landscaping needs of the park, is also in its early stages, it may hold greater long term impact on the physical aspects of the park than any of the other projects mentioned. A concept plan emerged in December 2007: I. Seventh Ave running east from Mary St. - screening trees north of old orchard. • Eastern end of area is now cleared entirely, western end contains soil and gravel berms covered with native deciduous trees • Mixed deciduous trees Will be removed and the berets levelled. Area to be planted with Douglas Fir as screening trees south of perimeter path. Plant other low growing native vegetation between path and firs.

2.

Old Orchard restoration. • Deadwood existing orchard trees (to be done prior to bud break in spring, 2008). (work to be done by tree committee), then leave untouched for remainder of season. • Start remedial pruning in winter 2008/09 (tree committee to do work) • Take cuttings (bud and/or hardwood grafts). Find experienced personnel to do work. Alternately locate heritage apple species and plant new stock.

3. Hillsides east of Condo development leading up to Grotto area. 1. Islands of native species plantings (ie. D.Fir, G Fir and aspen with under plantings of saial, sword fern etc.) 4

.

Riparian /pond area northeast of top road access


109 •

Concept is to enlarge and deepen pond area. Line area with clay to hold water. Save existing plant material from wetland and use for replanting.

5. Horseshoe Arboretum, west of access road at east end of park • Tree committee to select species (non native specimen trees), ie. Liquidamber, oak, beech etc. 6. East and South of access road up to but not including bank leading to Lougheed Hwy, southeast portion of park • Due to condition of trees, remove existing cottonwoods • Deadwood existing large heritage aged trees (maples etc.) 7. Bank leading to Lougheed • Concept: Remove blackberries, trail access construction and bank stabilization (geotechnical experts need to be involved). Plant specimen trees on hillside if reasonable conditions exist. Native planting may work better in this area. 8. Perimeter trail planting • Ongoing as the trail is developed. Note funding may be available through grants based on wheelchair accessibility.

2009 We have begun the landscaping as resources allow. Late last year nine trees were planted along our boundary with the new development on 7 th Avenue, and another six along the eastern crest of Orchard Hill. Such plantings will continue this year. At least part of any grant we receive from Tree Canada will be used to begin the landscaping of the park based on the preceding concept. If the funding is sufficient, we will begin by planting trees along the crest of the hill south of 7 th Avenue (part of the area that was cleared last year). At the east end of the park stands a large dirt pile that was dropped there about 15 years ago by the Regional District as a potential fundraiser. Since then nothing has been done and the pile has become overgrown by scrub trees, mostly alders. As time and funds permit, we will remove the trees and the pile to return the park to its original condition and drainage. Similarly, another dirt pile was dumped by 7 th Avenue, and we will remove it and the scrub trees as we are able.

Conclusion It is the MHA's hope that Council will see the park as a viable, ever expanding, ever improving and changing entity. It is our further hope that Mission District Council will share our vision of the park, and will support our efforts to make it the envy of other municipalities and the pride of the citizens of Mission.


THE H EA RT & SOUL OF THE MISSION COMMUNITY

F

- raser River Heritage. Pal k is a 50-acre parcel of land situated on a flat bench overlooking the Fraser River. In addition to its natural beauty, this park is one of the most culturally, geographically arid historically significant sites in the entire Fraser Valley.

During your visit to our park, we invite you to stop at the many stations and storyboards you will see throughOut the area Each of these stations provides a memorial bench and a storyboard which highlights one or more interesting ceatures or facts about the park.

Finally, and most important, our park is a place for rest, relaxation and reflection. The beatitiful setting and the peaceful surroundings provide, for: the residents of Mission and other visitors, an island of tranquility in an ever more stressful world: a place Where people can run, or walk, or sit where they can picnic with their children or walk with their dogs.

This park hosts many of the major events in our community including: The Mission Folk MUsic Festival • Mission's Canada Day Celebration s Old Car Fathers' Day Sunday • Celebration Of Community & Illuminaria_ • 26 Twilight Concerts from June through Aug List ♦ The annual Pilgrimage to the Grotto Many other community fundraising events. -

Many lower key activities also take place in our park. If you come on a regular basis you will no doubt, encounter some of the following activities: • Exercise groups + An annual easter egg hunt sponsored by the Mission ElkS Club 4i■ WeddingS in the gazebo o Santa In The Park • Lure Field Trials ▪ Horseshoes * Society For Creative Anachronism (Medieval Jousting) -^ o Dog walking, people walking, picnicking etc. 7tet,,tk- //eie

kr Ly. -

We invite you to enjoy our park and We ask only that you respect it and that you leave it at least as well as you found it

(/// //7 6 dlle6(0--

Mission Heritage Association The non-profit Society that manages and operates this Park on behalf of the District of Mission


1 11 44PPO DS1 I I " 41. Room allS 51141.1 41 I

iklig!inttitett#44 Air 641WMPir. d i"rti*" '4.0411 111,7

r

170..1

1.106,1f.001' l',f1944 4C:40 40.-.411V0.-0 45 JI.J 411-04`47600 A1;4; 0144:kiit411$164 00: . Iii.f.4.0t4N3 . 404:: )140111P100044:110L•

t

IPPI-114914,PW a 101(1° wigig

.„

141 Hrg

plip.opkelki4

AlfIffIltOkimot fkititii0i,to#140ocp. . *,1-1#10010114:16eAri.''' 9),„,, oritticifkRA#040.401,4to.t...MoittlY0- 4) tnfiltanfp wait igtOk Akigt-41111, afita.

M 1H‘'''Acici r t-i gA ri l Q.n sapf45.

.*.7*

`;',1141to

'

•••35y.•

a,r

4


I n the late 1940 s a young (loctor,, James Ma litis, . . piaitmed. tc) start a ilierlical j)laclice iri Niission. liile touring the Mission area with his wi re, Catherine,

1) r. M-arcellus was very impressed with the 1)eautiftrl rhododendron bushes he saw in various tarts of the connnunity. The young cioetor bougirt a house on 3' Avenue and, ito 1947 started his own rhododendron garden. Planting and caring for this extensive, garcleti_Was to 1)ee()irie a life avocation for Jim,

lu "1986 he donated 55 diodos to aser River II

Park, at id- in 2000 he donated ano r 14.

addition to eStablishing ati. env tat51e khododendron rden ofhiS o*ti, Di Marcellus also became intrigued SpC010S of rhodos aeular::and perfect p ti'hi ated in his greatest he dendron -

â&#x20AC;˘ dodeitdron Walk nol,v featUies Tile fatties 411uredius 5 large' Rhode 'beds gp d over a A.acre area: The walk provides a secluded area of serenity and tranquility whet e visitors can escape the noise aid bustle oftito ern life.

-

.7'

egistered as su

cial floral ettibi

enetogity otivilgsio _ flan the aft â&#x20AC;˘ was moved fromits h to its new home at Praser Myer Iletitage Part.

such a large and mature. Olant is nd easy task.


M lsslon ON THE FRASER DISTRICT OF

FILE: ADM.COU.MEM

Remuneration

To:

Chief Administrative Officer

From:

Deputy Treasurer/Collector

Date:

March 24, 2009

Subject:

Council Remuneration and Expense Report

Report The attached 2008 Council Remuneration and Expense Report have been prepared pursuant to Section 168 of the Community Charter. Each Councillor has received a copy of their Remuneration and Expenses prior to the report going to a public meeting.

Kerri Onken, C.G.A. Deputy Treasurer/Collector

G:\FINANCE\Accounts Payable \SOF' REPORT \ SOFI Report 2007\councilremunerationmemol.doc

113


2008 COUNCIL REMUNERATION and EXPENSE REPORT For the period January 1 to December 31, 2008

Remuneration Elected Officials

Indemnity (2/3 taxable portion)

Expense . Allowance (1/3 I non-taxable portion)

Subtotal

Water & Sewer Commission Stipends

Total Remuneration

Expense Payments (Net of GST Rebate)

Grand Total

MAYOR James Atebe

$42,789.76

$19,995.13

i

$62,784.89

$1,122.00

$63,906.89

$7,211.09

$71,117.98

COUNCILLORS Scott Etches

$13,619.48

$6,342.58

i

$19,962.06

$306.00

$20,268.06

$2,599.80

$22,867.86

Terry Gidda

$14,930.34

$6,919.18

j

$21,849.52

$1,224.00

$23,073.52

$1,077.00

$24,150.52

Paul Horn

$14,930.34

$6,919.18

$21,849.52

$0.00

$21,849.52

$82.00

$21,931.52

John. Pearson

$13,619.48

$6,342.58

i

$19,962.06

$2,039.93

$22,001.99

$94.11

$22,096.10

Daniel Plecas

$1,310.86

$576.60

j

$1,887.46

$0.00

$1,887.46

$0.00

$1,887.46

Mike Scudder

$1,310.86

$576.60

$1,887.46

$0.00

$1,887.46

$0.00

$1,887.46

Jenny Stevens

$14,930.34

$6,919.18

i

$21,849.52

$0.00

$21,849.52

$901.33

$22,750.85

Heather Stewart

$14,930.34

$6,919.18

j

$21,849.52

$0.00

$21,849.52

$1,771.35

$23,620.87

$193,882.01

$4,691.93

$198,573.94

$13,736.68

$212,310.62

Totals:

$132,371.80

$61,510.21

* The District of Mission has a contract with.one council member whose company manages rental properties on behalf of the municipality (Disclosure required as per Sections 107 & 168 of the Community Charter)

GAFINANCEAccounts Payable \SOFI REPORT\SOFI Report 2008\AGENDA SUBMISSION - council remuneration.xls

4/8/2009 11:22 AM


115 DISTRICT OF

TO:

Chief Administrative Officer

FROM:

Deputy Director of Corporate Administration

DATE:

April 16, 2009

Corporate Administration Memorandum

SUBJECT: Campaign Financing Disclosure Statements As Council is aware, all candidates that ran for office in the 2008 General Local Government Election were required to file the necessary financial disclosure statements of campaign contributions and election expenses with the Director of Corporate Administration no later than March 16, 2009. If the disclosure statement is filed between March 17 and April 15, 2009, the candidate must pay to the District of Mission a late filing penalty of $500. Under Section 92 of the Local Government Act â&#x20AC;&#x201D; "Candidate disqualification for failure to file Disclosure Statement" failure to file a statement by the deadline results in the candidate being disqualified from being nominated for, elected to or holding office on a local government, Vancouver City Council, board of school trustees, or as a local trustee of the Islands Trust, until after the next general local election. In addition, a public statement that the candidate failed to provide the financial disclosure must be made. This is to advise that Mr. Scott Etches, a candidate for the position of Councillor in the 2008 General Election has not complied with the requirements of the Act. Therefore in accordance with the legislation, I am required to advise Council and the Inspector of Municipalities of these circumstances. Mr. Etches name will be added to the list of people disqualified from running in the next local government election.

t Kelly Ridley g:\clerk \confidential \kelly\2009 \report to counciffiling financial disclosure forms.doc

PAGE 1 OF 1


116

ission DISTRICT OF

Finance Department Memorandum

ON THE FRASER ;Pp File Category: File Folder:

FIN.BUD.DOM 2009 Budget

To:

Chief Administrative Officer

From:

Deputy Treasurer/Collector

Date:

April 16, 2009

Subject:

Mission Arts Council

Report Attached are e-mails between District staff and BC Assessment on available options to reduce the property tax for the location currently occupied by the Mission Arts Council. Currently, council assists the Mission Arts Council with a grant to offset the increase in municipal property taxes (includes property taxes identified for RCMP and Library) that has occurred since 2004. The Mission Arts Council pays a base amount of $2,103 and a grant is provided for the balance. The grant for 2009 is $6,056.28 (based on an estimated 8% increases in the 2008 property taxes). There is no assistance for increases in user fees for utilities (water, sewer, garbage & recycling) or for increases from other agencies (School Tax, FV Regional Health, FV Region District, BC Assessment or Municipal Finance Authority). Summary of 2008 property taxes listed by address: 33529 1 st Ave

9,476.15

33535 1 st Ave

3 368.99

Total 2008

12,845.14

Summary of 2008 property taxes listed by type: Municipal & RCMP taxes

7,241.11

Municipal utilities

718.56

FV Regional Library

338.78

Collected for other agencies Total 2008

4,546.69 12,845.14

BC Assessment did contact their legal department for an interpretation on an annual permissive tax exemption for an eligible organization that leases property from a taxable owner. This could be an option starting in 2010 and the grant assistance would be eliminated. The core impact would be a savings of $6,056.28 in 2010.

Kerri Onken, CGA G:\FINANCE\BUDGET\Budget 2009\Memo - Mission Arts Council.doc

Page 1 of 1


117 Kerri Onken Paul Horn & Tracy Irwin [bootstrapconsulting@telus.net ] Tuesday, March 17, 2009 1:45 PM Kerri Onken; James Atebe; Jenny Stevens [External]; Heather Stewart [External]; Mike Scudder; Danny Plecas [External]; Terry Gidda Glen Robertson; Dennis Clark; Ken Bjorgaard RE: taxation - Mission Art Centre

From: Sent: To: Cc: Subject:

Thanks Kerri. Can we please have this added to an upcoming CoW agenda then? Paul From: Kerri Onken [mailto:konken@mission.ca] Sent: Monday, March 16, 2009 4:27 PM To: James Atebe; Jenny Stevens [External]; Heather Stewart [External]; Paul Horn [External]; Mike Scudder; Danny Plecas [External]; Terry Gidda

Cc: Glen Robertson; Dennis Clark; Ken Bjorgaard Subject: FW: taxation - Mission Art Centre See below for response from BC Assessment on the first ave property.

Kerri Onken, CGA Deputy Treasurer/Collector 604-820.3720

From: Green, John A BCA:EX [mailto:john.green@bcassessment.ca] Sent: Monday, March 16, 2009 3:59 PM To: Kerri Onken Cc: Knight, Bonnie C BCA:EX Subject: RE: taxation - Mission Art Centre

Hi Kerri, For the 2009 roll there will be no changes. For the 2010 roll it is possible that the land may be classified as class 8 (I still have concerns about this that I will have to investigate as I am not confident that an art gallery can be considered a museum), this will in no way impact the valuation of the land or improvements, only the classification of the land. Thanks. John Greg Senior Appraiser 1 Fraser Valley R.eg on BC Assessment I #240 S. Fraser Way ;' )botsfo BC V2T 5N7 T 604.650.5900 x 287 or 1,800 .393.1.32 F 604.650.1394 .

l'www.bcassessment.ca

From: Kerri Onken [mailto:konken@mission.ca] Sent: March 16, 2009 3:55 PM To: Green, John A BCA:EX Subject: RE: taxation - Mission Art Centre Hi John, I believe the Mission Arts Council will be suspending the services provided by the tea house and the gift shop (may have ceased activities already). Would that be enough to have the land classified as class 8? 1


118 If yes, what would happen to the value of the land? (2009 land assessed at $327,000, improvements assessed at

$253,800)

Kerri Onken, CGA Deputy Treasurer/Collector 604-820.3720

From: Green, John A BCA:EX [mailto:john.green@bcassessment.ca] Sent: Monday, March 16, 2009 9:13 AM To: Kern Onken Subject: RE: taxation - Mission Art Centre Hi Kern, The property would need to be used exclusively as a museum and even then only the land portion would

qualify for class 8. Currently the Arts Council Building is used as an art gallery, tea house and gift shop so there is no exclusive use as a museum. Additionally the intent is for outdoor recreational facilities to be in class 8, in my mind Heritage Park is a great example of the intent of this section of the legislation. It fosters a deeper understanding and promotes the enjoyment and sharing of authentic cultural and natural heritage in the Mission area. I hope this helps. John Green, AAC1,PAppi Senior Appraiser I Fraser Valley Region C Assessment #240 - 31935 S. Fraser Way Abbotsford BC V2T 5N7 T 604.850.5900 x 287 or 1 00 93.13321 F 604.850.1394

I www.bcassessment.ca

From: Kern Onken [mailto:konken@mission.ca] Sent: March 11, 2009 5:04 PM To: Green, John A BCA:EX Subject: RE: taxation - Mission Art Centre Hi John, Council would like to know why the Mission Arts Council could not come under the museums criteria - (xii) below? Do you have a definition of museum? Are there certain activities or target groups or any criteria they should stop doing or start performing to become eligible?

Kerri Onken, CGA Deputy Treasurer/Collector 604.820-3720

From: Green, John A BCA:EX [mailto:john.greenŠbcassessment.ca] Sent: Tuesday, November 25, 2008 10:52 AM To: Kerri Onken Cc: Knight, Bonnie C BCA:EX; Brown, Trevor BCA:EX Subject: RE: taxation - Mission Art Centre Hi Kern,

It is unlikely that this particular zoning change would have a negative impact on the assessed value. The P2 zone allows for some fairly desirable uses including personal care and private hospital facilities, so market demand is high and may even result in an increase in value. As far as classification goes, the property would remain in class 6, business and other, unless it met the following criteria: 2


119

(b)

land, but not improvements on that land, used solely as an outdoor (a) recreational facility for the following activities or uses: (i) golf; (ii) skiing; tennis; (iii) (iv) ball games of any kind; (v) lawn bowling; (vi) public swimming pool; (vii) motor car racing; (viii) trap shooting; (ix) archery; ice skating; (x) (xi) waterslides; (xii) rnuseiuns; (xiii) amusement parks; (xiv) horse racing; (xv) rifle shooting; (xvi) pistol shooting; (xvii) horse back riding; (xviii) roller skating; (xix) marinas; (xx) parks and gardens open to the public; (xxi) hang gliding; (xxii) bicycling in addition to, or as part of, one of the activities or uses set out in subparagraphs (i) to (xxi); (xxiii) camping; that part of any land and improvements used or set aside for use as a place of public worship or as a meeting hall for a non-profit fraternal organization of persons of either or both sexes, together with the facilities necessarily incidental to that use, for at least 150 days in the year ending on June 30, of the calendar year preceding the calendar year for which the assessment roll is being prepared, not counting any day in which the land and improvements so used or set aside are also used for any purpose by an organization that is neither a religious organization nor (i) a non-profit fraternal organization, (ii) entertainment where there is an admission charge, or (iii) the sale or consumption, or both, of alcoholic beverages.

Hope this helps.

John Green, AACI, P.Appl Sen77. S. Fraser Way Abbotsford BC V2T 5 â&#x20AC;˘ . www.bcassessment.ca

I Fraser Valley Region BC Assessment I #240 - 31935 604,850.5900 x 287 or 1.800.393.13321 F 604,850.1394

From: Kerni Onken [mailto:konkenŠmission.ca] Sent: November 24, 2008 8:42 AM To: Green, John A BCA:EX Subject: FW: taxation - Mission Art Centre Hi John,

3


120 It looks like the property at 33529 1st ave, (870 357 001) currently owned by Clifford Rock and leased to the Mission Arts Centre, is looking at closing the Tea Room and Gift Shop (the money generating operations) and going for an application to be re-zoned to P2. There are looking at options to decrease their property taxes. If this property was rezoned to P2 in 2008, 1. would the assessment remain at $415,000, and 2. would the property be assessed as class 8, recreational/non-profit?

Kerri Onken, CGA Deputy Treasurer/Collector 604-820.3720

From: Dennis Clark Sent: Sunday, November 23, 2008 10:54 AM To: Kern Onken Subject: taxation - Mission Art Centre

Hi Kerri. The Mission Art Centre is located at 33529 1 st Avenue. The property is currently zoned as a commercial use. Can you tell me what the 2008 taxes were; and what they would have been if the property were zoned P2? Thanks. Dennis dennis clark director of corporate administration district of mission

AN ACT OF KINDNESS IS NOT FULLY REALIZED UNTIL WE PAY IT FORWARD TO SOMEONE ELSE email dclark@mission.ca ph. 604.820.3706 fax 604.826.1363

4


121 Kerri Onken Green, John A BCA:EX [john.green@bcassessment.ca ] Monday, March 30, 2009 8:16 AM Kern Onken Knight, Bonnie C BCA:EX FW: Mission Arts Council

From: Sent: To: Cc: Subject:

Hi Kerri, We would not take the position that the ownership by a taxable owner is a stumbling block to a permissive exemption. It would be for an automatic (statutory) exemption, but we will give effect to permissive exemptions granted by a taxing jurisdiction for property owned by a taxable owner if the occupier would have been entitled to the exemption, and the wording of the exemption applies to property that is "held by" the occupier. This position is supported by Property Assessment Appeal Board in some of their previous decisions. So if the District wishes to pass a permissive exemption for the Mission Arts Council in their current location, BC Assessment would reflect that exemption on the roll. If you are concerned that the Arts Council may relocate or simply close down leaving the owner with an exempt property, perhaps a permissive exemption for a duration of one year could be issued and then renewed annually as needed. Hope this helps. Thanks.

--

.en,

Senior Appra'

rtaser Way /.1)Dotsforcl BC V21 5N7 -

I www.bcassessment.ca

j Fraser Valley Region BC Assessment j #240 - 31935

T 60 -.350.5900 x 246 or 1.800.393.1332j F 604.850.1394

From: Green, John A BCA:EX Sent: March 25, 2009 9:39 AM To: 'Kern Onken' Subject: Mission Arts Council

Hi Kerri, Unfortunately my contact in the legal department is out of the office for the day so I won't be able to respond to you until tomorrow at the earliest. Thanks. Fraser P,Appl Senior S. Fraser Way bbotsford BC V2T 5N7 j T 604.850.5900 x ,

John GreE

www.bcassessment.ca

ment #2' 0 3193 I F 604.850,1.394


122

DISTRICT OF MISSION

2008 PROPERTY TAX NOTICE

DUE DATE

8645 STAVE LAKE ST. BOX 20, MISSION, B.C. V2V 4L9 PHONE: 604-820-3717 www.mission.ca

SEE INSTRUCTIONS TO TAXPAYER ON REVERSE

WEDNESDAY JULY 2 ND 10% PENALTY AFTER DUE DATE

PLEASE QUOTE

870 354 000

THIS # WHEN ENQUIRING

ROLL NUMBER

TAXABLE ASSESSMENTS CLASS

IMPROVEMENTS

LAND

Business/Ot

ROCK CLIFFORD A ROCK MARJORIE J M111111111111.1111111

147000

TOTAL

8800

155800

336.90

336.90

LEGAL DESCRIPTION

011-081-902 1 Group Group 3. CIVIC ADDRESS 33535 1ST AVE

MISSION BC UMW

336.90

PREAUTHORIZED MONTHLY INSTALLMENTS FOR 2009 TAXES ARE:

NO GRANT

RATE

School Taxes Collected on Behalf of Province of B.C. Basic School Total School Net School

B '-'

BASIC GRANT UNDER AGE 65

C ADDITIONAL GRANT OVER AGE 65 & OTHER

6.8000

1,059.44 1,059.44 1,059.44

1,059.44 1,059.44 1,059.44

1,059.44 1,059.44 1,059.44

Taxes and Other Levied by District of Mission Municipal - General Municipal - Policing

8.6320 4.2801

1,344.87 666.84

1,344.87 666.84

1,344.87 666.84

Levies Collected on Behalf of Other Agencies Municipal Finance Authority Tax Fraser Valley Regional District Tax Fraser Valley Regional Hospital Tax B.C. Assessment Authority Tax Fraser Valley Regional Library

0.0001 0.4985 0.6145 0.1944 0.6041

0.02 77.67 95.74 30.29 94.12

0.02 77.67 95.74 30.29 94.12

0.02 77.67 95.74 30.29 94.12

3,368.99 0.00 0.00 0.00 3,368.99 0.00 0.00

3,368.99 0.00 0.00 0.00 3,368.99 0.00 0.00

3,368.99 0.00 0.00 0.00 3,368.99 0.00 0.00

3,368.99

3,368.99

3.368.99

2.c'0

g

Sc.) of\ 5

c__i

(...)-Vt

-

116.51,

4 5 (46 69 3 38.18

CD Octi2..e -

co-kr_5

121 8 415 . \* CURRENT 2008 DUE

ELINQUENT TAXES IF TAXES ARE DELINQUENT THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD FOR TAXES

N SEPTEMBER 29th, 2008 UNLESS THE DELINQUENT TAXES WITH INTEREST ARE PAID BEFORE THAT DATE. NTEREST ON ARREARS AND DELINQUENT TAXES IS CALCULATED FROM JANUARY 1, 2008 AT A RATE RET BY THE PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT. NTEREST ON ARREARS AND DELINQUENT TAXES WILL BE CALCULATED AT TIME OF PAYMENT. =OR FURTHER INFORMATION REGARDING SCHOOL TAXES CONTACT THE SCHOOL TAX \DMINISTRATOR AT 250-356-0907. JTILITY CHARGES ON THIS NOTICE REFLECT THE USE OF THESE LANDS FROM A UTILITY CONSUMPHON STANDPOINT ONLY. IT MAY BE THAT THE USE OF THE LANDS BREACHES OTHER BYLAWS OF FHE DISTRICT OF MISSION (e.g. BUILDING BYLAW OR ZONING BYLAW.) THE DISTRICT RESERVES THE RIGHT TO ENFORCE THOSE BYLAWS.

PREPAYMENT 2007 ARREARS 2006 DELINQUENT GROSS BALANCE INTEREST 2007 ARREARS INTEREST 2006 DELINQUENT PENALTY TOTAL DUE PAYMENT BALANCE DUE

A

NO GRANT

BASIC GRANT BUNDER AGE 65

Web ID: rock1027 Password: rock9031

IF ELIGIBLE FOR HOME OWNER GRANT, COMPLETE THE APPLICATION ON REVERSE BY THE DUE DATE. PAYMENT IS NOT REQUIRED TO OBTAIN THE GRANT. V DETACH AND RETURN LOWER PORTION V

C ADDITIONAL GRANT OVER AGE 65 & OTHER


123

DISTRICT OF MISSION

5645 STAVE LAKE ST. BOX 20, MISSION, B.C. V2V 4L9 PHONE: 604-820-3717 www.mission.ca

SEE INSTRUCTIONS TO TAXPAYER ON REVERSE

2008 PROPERTY TAX NOTICE

DUE DATE

WEDNESDAY JULY 2ND 10% PENALTY AFTER DUE DATE

PLEASE QUOTE

870 357 001

THIS # WHEN ENQUIRING

ROLL NUMBER

TAXABLE ASSESSMENTS LAND

CLASS

Business/Ot

ROCK CLIFFORD A ROCK MARJORIE J

TOTAL

IMPROVEMENTS

180000

225000

405000

947.62

947.62

LEGAL DESCRIPTION

002-430-045 1 Group Group 3. CIVIC ADDRESS 33529 1ST AVE

MISSION BC

947.62

PREAUTHORIZED MONTHLY INSTALLMENTS FOR 2009 TAXES ARE:

RATE

School Taxes Collected on Behalf of Province of B.C. Basic School Total School Net School Taxes and Other Levied by District of Mission Municipal - General Municipal - Policing Utilities - Sewer Utilities - Water Utilities - Garbage Utilities - Recycling

eio 351 oof B-lo 35 1+ oce) --F0A-cA- 2-DO

D

NO GRANT

pct

BASIC GRANT UNDER AGE 65

C

ADDITIONAL GRANT OVER AGE 65 & OTHER

6.8000

2,754.00 2,754.00 2,754.00

2,754.00 2,754.00 2,754.00

2,754.00 2,754.00 2,754.00

8.6320 4.2801

3,495.96 1,733.44 244.68 282.00 135.60 56.28

3,495.96 1,733.44 244.68 282.00 135.60 56.28

3,495.96 1,733.44 244.68 282.00 135.60 56.28

0.04 201.89 248.87 78.73 244.66

0.04 201.89 248.87 78.73 244.66

0.04 201.89 248.87 78.73 244.66

9,476.15 0.00 0.00 0.00 9,476.15 0.00 0.00

9,476.15 0.00 0.00 0.00 9,476.15 0.00 0.00

9,476.15 0.00 0.00 0.00 9,476.15 0.00 0.00

9 476.15

9,476.15

9,476.15

,

61° 118.

Levies Collected on Behalf of Other Agencies Municipal Finance Authority Tax Fraser Valley Regional District Tax Fraser Valley Regional Hospital Tax B.C. Assessment Authority Tax Fraser Valley Regional Library

A

0.0001 0.4985 0.6145 0.1944 0.6041

ckti-76.15 s3LB.99 2

. 9-

CURRENT 2008 DUE

1ELINQUENT TAXES IF TAXES ARE DELINQUENT THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD FOR TAXES

N SEPTEMBER 29th, 2008 UNLESS THE DELINQUENT TAXES WITH INTEREST ARE PAID BEFORE THAT DATE.

NTEREST ON ARREARS AND DELINQUENT TAXES IS CALCULATED FROM JANUARY 1, 2008 AT A RATE ;ET BY THE PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT.

PREPAYMENT 2007 ARREARS 2006 DELINQUENT GROSS BALANCE INTEREST 2007 ARREARS INTEREST 2006 DELINQUENT PENALTY

NTEREST ON ARREARS AND DELINQUENT TAXES WILL BE CALCULATED AT TIME OF PAYMENT. DR FURTHER INFORMATION REGARDING SCHOOL TAXES CONTACT THE SCHOOL TAX kDMINISTRATOR AT 250-356-0907. JTILITY CHARGES ON THIS NOTICE REFLECT THE USE OF THESE LANDS FROM A UTILITY CONSUMP- ION

STANDPOINT ONLY. IT MAY BE THAT THE USE OF THE LANDS BREACHES OTHER BYLAWS OF HE DISTRICT OF MISSION (e.g. BUILDING BYLAW OR ZONING BYLAW.) THE DISTRICT RESERVES THE SIGHT TO ENFORCE THOSE BYLAWS.

TOTAL DUE PAYMENT BALANCE DUE

NO GRANT

BASIC GRANT UNDER AGE 65

D 0"

Web ID: rock1027 Password: rock9031

IF ELIGIBLE FOR HOME OWNER GRANT, COMPLETE THE APPLICATION ON REVERSE BY THE DUE DATE. PAYMENT IS NOT REQUIRED TO OBTAIN THE GRANT. V DETACH AND RETURN LOWER PORTION V

rs ADDITIONAL GRANT s-• OVER AGE 65 & OTHER


rn

33477 33472

33475

33491

33488

33493

33501

33500

33492

33506

33508

33508

33511

33478 33482

33514

33521 33526

CA cA

ND N)

33534

cu CATHERWOOD ST.

7310 33553

33545 33547

33546

33563A 33565

33564

0

ciA

01

0

33565 33575

01

03

96G CC

33566 33568 33570

33583

33582

33591

33592

33601

33600 33602

33573 33575 33583 33585 33593 33595

O

33582 33590 33594 33598 33614

O


125

FRASER VALLEY HEALTH CARE FOUNDATION

fvhc_foundation@fraserhealth.ca toll free 1.877.661.0314

DISTRICT OF MISSION Date Ackd 4itteDistdA.Date Scanned

March 17, 2009

File Folder Name

Mayor James Atebe District of Mission Box 20 Mission, BC V2V 4L9

ch I

Fi e Category

Toilyayor 0Cauncillog 0 MayoiRB,DI

Other

AMU_ h

For: DReport to COW Requested By CH r

Exempt

Lje(.

COW

°Information OReply for Mayors Sig

P.Pponse to Council Follow Lip

Dear Mayor Atebe, On behalf of the Fraser Valley Health Care Foundation, I would like to thank you and Mr. Robertson for taking the time to meet with me and members of my Board of Trustees on March 5 th , 2009. It was exciting for us to learn that the strategic planning report identifying the health care needs of Mission had been received. We welcome the opportunity to be involved in the next steps and look forward to working with you to develop a case for support once a fundraising goal has been identified. As per our discussion, we truly see value in partnering with the District and kindly request that you consider appointing a member of Council to our Board of Trustees. The time commitment is fairly small as this Board only meets once every other month. Perhaps the best link to our Board of Trustees is the current Chair of your Health Care Committee however, should you have a more suitable candidate in mind, we would also appreciate the opportunity for myself or one of my Board members to join your Health Care Committee. I look forward to a positive response to these requests. Sincerely, ' 11 (Litz,/ ) Vicki Raw Executive Director

Abbotsford Office

Chilliwack Office

32900 Marshall Road, Abbotsford, BC V2S 0C2 T: 604.851.4890 F: 604.851.4898

45600 Menholm Road, Chilliwack, BC V2P 1P7 T: 604.701.4051 F:604.701.4050

Mission Office 7324 Hurd Street, Mission, BC V2V 3H5 T: 604.814.5190 F: 604.814.5191

U


126

Engineering and Public Works Memorandum

File Category: FIN.BUD.DOM File Folder: 2009 Budget

To:

Chief Administrative Officer

From:

Director of Engineering and Public Works

Date:

March 12, 2009

Subject:

Increase Water Operational Expenditures

Recommendation That Water Utility Operating Budget is increased by $29,991.74, by a reduction in the transfer to reserves with the financial plan being amended accordingly, to fund works not completed in 2008. The specific accounts and works are: 1. Health and Safety Account Number 91310 for Confined Space Rescue equipment and training as required by the Worksafe BC regulations. 2. Pressure Reducing Station, Account Number 91100 for installation of automated shelf-flushing screen board to reduce staff maintenance time. Background At the end of 2008, staff requested the carry forward of some unexpended operational funds in the water utilities; unfortunately at the time of finalizing the 2009 budget staff anticipated there would be insufficient unexpended funds to accommodate any carry forward of unexpended funds. Subsequent to finalizing the budget staff has been advised by the City of Abbotsford staff that the operating costs for the Joint Water System is less then anticipated and there is sufficient unexpended funding to accommodate the original proposed for carry forward. With the budget having been finalized staff is now requesting an increase to the two accounts equal to the original proposed carry forward. The two accounts are: 1. Health and Safety - Account Number 91310; Confined Space Rescue equipment and training as required by the Worksafe BC regulations. This work was not completed in 2008 due to a delay by the consultant in carrying out his assigned work. 2. Pressure Reducing Station - Account Number 91100; Installation of automated shelf flushing screen board to reduce staff maintenance time. This work was not completed in 2008 as Utilities staff was preoccupied with installing the many service connections requested by the various land developments that occurred last year.

Source of Funding '; 9,991.7 twill come from a reduction in transfers the Water Capital Reserve Fund.

p Ken Bjorgaard, I have reviewed the financial aspects of this report. File g:pworks/greg/greg 2009/Memo Water Operations Funding.doc

Page 1 of 1


127

District of Mission File Category: File Folder:

Memo

INF.WAS.WAS Changes to Collection List 2009

To:

Chief Administrative Officer

From:

Environmental Coordinator

Date:

March 25 th , 2009

Subject:

Specific Curbside Collection Addresses on Dewdney Trunk Road

Recommendation

THAT Section 4 of the Refuse Collection and Disposal Bylaw 1387-1984 be amended to exclude 10256 Dewdney Trunk Road from the specific address list receiving curbside collection along the access corridor to the landfill; and THAT the owner of the property at 10256 Dewdney Trunk Road be reimbursed for curbside collection fees charged on his tax notice since 1999, and instead be charged the rural recycling rate for those years. Background

A staff report, dated February 11 th , 2009, recommended to amend Section 4 of the Refuse Collection and Disposal Bylaw 1387-1984 to reflect the curbside collection preferences of property owners living along the access road to the landfill. In light of the significant rate increases for curbside collection, staff had polled individual property owners to confirm their preferences for being included in or excluded from the curbside collection service. No feedback was received initially from the owner of the property at 10256 Dewdney Trunk Road, so staff recommended to continue including this address in the curbside collection service. A recent phone call from the owner of the property at 10256 Dewdney Trunk Road to staff revealed that the resident had been out of the country for an extended period of time, and therefore did not receive staff's letter until now, but wished to be excluded from the curbside collection service. The property owner also stated that he had not ever received curbside collection service at 10256 Dewdney Trunk Road, and is requesting a reimbursement of the charges dating back to 1999.

Jennifer Meier Environmental Coordinator F:\ENGINEER\J Meier\Memos\Specific Curbside Collection Addresses on Dewdney Trunk Road, Additional Change.doc

PAGE 1 OF 1


128 Jennifer Meier From: Sent: To: Subject:

Wednesday, March 25, 2009 9:22 AM Jennifer Meier Curbside Collection of Waste

In regards to our conversation of March 23, 2009, I wish to opt out of the curbside collection of waste, as per your letter dated November 18, 2008. Also, as per the conversation with Glen Robertson, I wish to be reimbursed for the recycle fees I have paid since 1999 for a service I did not recieve nor ask for. Thank-you for your time Rod Sims Mission,

1


129

M fission ON THE FRASER DISTRICT OF

Engineering and Public Works Memorandum

File Category: INF.WAT.MET File Folder: Residential. Metered Water—Report to Council

To:

Chief Administrative Officer

From:

Director of Engineering and Public Works

Date:

March 26, 2009

Subject:

Residential Metered Water invoicing

Recommendation

That Water Bylaw 2196 -1990, Water Rates Bylaw 2197-1990, and Subdivision Control Bylaw 1500-1985 be amended as follows to incorporate water metering provisions: That Water Bylaw 2196-1990 as amended be further amended as follows:

In Section 3.2 (b) add a subsection as follows: " (iii) A meter prepayment fee described in Schedule A, if applicable."

Delete Section 3.5 Location of Meters in its entirety and replace it with the following: 3.5

Metered Services (a) All new service connections for one and two family residential developments shall incorporate a meter box, meter setter, and spool piece at property line in accordance with the standards and specifications in attached schedule D. Fees and charges for installation of the service connection and prepaying the meter are set out in attached Schedule A. (b) All new service connections for triplex, fourplex and other multi-family developments shall incorporate a meter chamber and meter at property line supplied and installed by the property owner in accordance with the standards and specifications in attached schedule D. (c) All industrial, commercial and institutional developments shall incorporate water meter(s) supplied and installed by the property owner in accordance with the standards and specifications in attached schedule D.

In section 3.11 insert the word "existing" before the words "residential unit"

In Section 4.2 insert the following between the word "use;" and the word "provided": "No person shall obtain water from the works other than from a metered service for the purpose of serving any triplex, fourplex or other multi-family use where a meter has been installed in a new service in accordance with the standards and specifications of attached Schedule D;"

in Schedule "A" replace the $530 fee for the first meter or less of 19 mm service with $860;• replace the $557.50 fee for the first meter or less of 25 mm service with $1 029.59 and add the following: "METER PREPAYMENT FEE 19 mm service

$254.85


130

25 mm service

$335.56

38 mm service

$ 739.04

50 mm service

$ 638.77

Add the attached Schedule "D"

and;

That Water Rates Bylaw 2197-1990 as amended be further amended as follows: Add a subsection 5.4 as follows:

"5.4 Where a metered water service has been installed in accordance with the provisions of Water Bylaw 2196-1990 as amended, the consumer shall pay the quarterly metered rates as set out in Schedule "A" herein. For existing unmetered services the consumer shall pay the flat rate water utility fees of Schedule A." and;

That Subdivision Control Bylaw 1500-1985 as amended be further amended as follows: •

In Section. 3.14 (g) Service Connections in Schedule C Part 1Design Criteria Manual Section 3 — Water Distribution System; Replace "20 mm" with "19 mm" in the first sentence and insert the words "meter box, meter setter with spool piece" between the words "Corporation Stop" and "and" at the beginning of the second sentence. Delete the second and third paragraphs.

In Schedule C Part 11 Construction Specifications Waterworks; In Section 2.4.8 "Brass Goods" add sub section (c) Meter Setters as follows: "(c) Meter Setters Approved setters are Ford, Cambridge Brass or Mueller complete with dual check valves" Add Section 2.4.2.11 Meter Boxes as follows: "2.4.2.11 Meter Boxes Meter boxes on 19 mm to 25 mm diameter service connections shall be Brooks #37 concrete boxes or approved equivalent complete with cast iron traffic cover having a 45 mm diameter countersunk hole and plug. Meter boxes on 38 mm to 50 mm diameter service connections shall be A.E. Concrete model 5686 or approved equivalent boxes complete with cast iron cover having a 45 mm diameter countersunk hole and plug." Re-number Sections 2.4.2.11 Concrete, 2.4.2.12 Asphalt Materials and 2.4.2.13 Granular and Fill Materials as 2.4.2.12 Concrete, 2.4.2.13 Asphalt Materials, and 2.4.2.14 Granular and Fill Materials.

in Schedule "D" Subdivision Fees add the following" "WATER METER PREPAYMENT $254.85 19 mm service $335.56 25 mm service $ 739.04 38 mm service


131

50 mm service

$ 638.77"

Replace Standard Drawing W-3 Typical Water Service with the attached revised drawing W-3

Add the attached Standard Drawings CS-W-11, CS-W-21, and CS-W 21A

and; That an interest earning fund be established for all payments received for the future purchase of one and two family residential water meters; and; That meters be installed at the one and two family residential lots which have a meter box at property line once a program to install water meters on the 8,500 existing residential services begins; with this recommendation being reviewed in five years if either: • •

A program to install meters on existing service has not begun. If more than 1,500 new lots with meter boxes at property line have been created.

Background The purpose of the above recommendations is to accomplish the following: a. The construction of water meter boxes at the property line on all new water service connections for one and two family residential developments to accommodate the installation of a water meter at a later date, . b. An increase in the Service Connection Charges for the first meter of length from $530.00 to $860.00 for 19 mm services and from $557.50 to $1,029.59 for 25 mm services to cover the additional cost to install water meter boxes complete with meter setters an a spool piece in place of the meter on all newl 9mm and 25mm water services. c. Impose a new charge of $255.00 for each new 19mm and $335.56 for each new 25mm water service connection to cover the future purchase and installation of a meter with radio read technology for these services. d. The installation of water meter chambers with water meters at property line on all new multifamily residential developments at the developer's expense and requiring these new developments to pay the applicable metered water rates rather than be afforded the option of paying the annual user rate established per unit. e. Maintain the current practice of installing water meters within the building for all new industrial, commercial and institutional developments but require the supply and installation of the meter to by the property owner at his expense. A meter rental rate would continue to be charged to cover maintenance and replacement costs. f.

All existing multifamily residential and commercial developments with water meters paying the applicable metered water rates rather than the annual user rate established per unit and existing multifamily developments without water meters continuing to pay the annual user rate per unit until water meters are installed in each of these developments.

g. Amendment of the Subdivision Control Bylaw to require: i.

The installation of water meter boxes at property line to accommodate the installation of a water meter at a late date on all one and two family residential lots.

ii.

Payment of a charge of $255.00 for each new 19mm and $335.56 for each new 25mm


132

water service connection installed in residential lots for the future purchase and installation of a meter with radio read technology. h. Establishing an interest bearing fund to accumulate monies for future installation of meters in all service connections where meter boxes have been installed. Council has directed staff to require all new developments to install water meters at property line; however the transition from a flat rate residential utilities bill to metered rate charges raises a number of key questions that should be resolved for one and two family residential services before metered billing is implemented. Some of the basic questions to be answered prior to beginning a full water meter reading program are: 1. What type of water meters should be installed? Currently there is the touch read, drive-by radio read and recently introduced fixed-site radio read meters. 2. How often will the water meters be read and invoices sent to residents? Reads could be done bimonthly, quarterly semiannually or annually. Existing meters on industrial, commercial and institutional services are read quarterly. 3. What water usage rate structure will be applied? There is declining (more you use less you pay), flat line (rate per cubic meter is constant) and inclining (more you use more you pay) rate structures. Usage Ex. 2008 declining rate Flat Rate Example inclining Rate Example Up to 300 cubic meters $0.6139 $0.4561 $0.6139 Next 300 cubic meters $0.5034 $0.4561 $0.6500 Next 300 cubic meters $0.4561 $0.4561 $0.7000 Next 300 cubic meters $0.4092 $0.4561 $0.7500 On balance $0.3145 $0.4561 $0.8000 These are not recommended rates just examples of the 3 types (declining, flat line and inclining) rate structures.

4. Will there be a different rate structure for one and two residential, multifamily, commercial, industrial and institutional water users? 5. Will there be a fixed minimum charge or rate structure based strictly on volume used? With the resolution of the above questions, there still remains the basic question; when to start reading and invoicing residences based on metered usage? The basic choices are: a. Start now with installation of the first meter; unfortunately this would be very costly due to the limited number of meters in very sporadic locations, growth projections suggest only 50 meter would be install this year and another 50 for a total of 100 by the end of 2010 year scattered across the municipality. b. Start once a significant new area (Cedar Valley or South West Mission) has developed with approximately 1,500 service connections; unfortunately there can be still significant costs due to limited number of meters in some what scatter locations. c. Start when a program to meter the 9,000 existing water services in the Municipality is approved; there would be a shorter timeline to meter reading efficiencies with more meters being installed. d. Start when all existing water service in the Municipality are metered; this would maximize meter reading efficiencies and reduce potential inequalities between fiat rate and meter residents. There can be significantly lower water usaae in new homes with low flow plumbing fixtures and enhanced low water demand soils when compared to older homes without out these features; some studies


133

suggest the usage in a new home could half of an existing pre-2000 home. The variances in water usage can create problems in establishing sustainably utility rates and inequities for residents when comparing metered and flat rates utility bills. Water meters have a limited service life typically 15 to 20 years; therefore installing meters now without an intention to read them for some time would result in unnecessary wear and reduce the potential to take advantage of newer technologies coming in the near future. If Council accepts staff recommendations; amendments to the Water and Subdivision Control Bylaws will address the various specifications for the installation of water meters for the variety water service sizes and land uses that will occur.

Conclusion There are a number of issues that need to be resolved before meter reading should begin on one and two family water services including; A. Develop new residential and commercial meter water rates to encourage conservation. B. Provide time to implement a progressive change in commercial/industrial/institutional rate structure from the existing declining to a future inclining rate structure. C. Analyze the budget revenue impact of new residential rates on the water and sewer funds. D. Evaluate the costs and benefits of annual versus quarterly versus bi-monthly reading frequency of invoicing. E. Allow time to evaluate the potential benefits and reduction in costs of the new fixed radio meter technology as it becomes more readily available. F. Avoid public pressure to proceed with metering existing residential services until adequate funding has been secured for the program. Staff is recommending that we proceed with the installation of a meter box and spool piece on each new one and two family water services immediately but postpone actual installation and reading of the water meters until we have a program and sufficient funding in place to begin the installation of water meters on the approximate 9,000 existing services. Staff proposes that we review the recommendation to postpone the installation of water meter on one and two family residential developments, if either occur with in the next 5 years: â&#x20AC;˘ A program to install meters on existing service has not begun. â&#x20AC;˘ If more than 1,500 new lots with meter boxes at property line have been created. Staff is also recommending that we immediately begin meter reading all new multifamily residential developments using current meter water rates and that any existing multifamily residential developments with water meters that are currently being charge flat rate user charges be charged metered rates. Staff is further recommending all new water meters servicing multifamily developments be installed in a chamber at property line rather than in the building, which is currently the practice fOr multifamiiy residential, but that the commercial, industrial and institutional water users continue with our current practice of meters being installed With in the building. The basis for these recommendations are: i.

Commercial, industrial and institutional metering within the building will not impose the significant additional costs and the'loss of usable lot area because the large water meter chambers required


134

ii.

for these larger services that often include separate fire suppression lines. Multifamily metering at property line because of the space available at property line, this will help identify water leaks between the building and property line and to reduce the potential water users taking off water connections before the meter for sprinkler systems.

Ri k

BOrnh( FAENGINEER\DRIECKTMemo Timing Water Meter Installations Rev4.doc

Encl

I have reviewed the financial aspects of this report.

Ken Bjorgaard


135

Consolidated Water Bylaw 2196-1990 Page of BYLAW NO.2196-1990 SCHEDULE "D" WATER METER INSTALLATION STANDARDS AND SPECIFICATIONS 1. Introduction

These specifications detail the District's requirements for the installation of coldwater meters on municipal water services. 1.1. Definitions "Applicant"

Refers to a property owner, developer, or authorized agent who makes an application for connection to a water service.

"Applicant's Engineer"

Refers to a professional engineer hired by the Applicant to design the installation of the meter.

"ASTM"

Refers to the American Society for Testing and Materials.

"AWWA"

Refers to the American Water Works Association.

"CSA"

Means the Canadian Standards Association.

"Developer"

Means person(s) or organization(s) developing property as per District guidelines.

"District"

Means the District of Mission

"District Engineer"

"Owner"

Means the Director of Engineering & Public Works for the District of Mission and such other persons authorized by the Director of Engineering & Public Works to administer this bylaw or parts there of. Means the property owner.

2. Metering Requirements

The District of Mission Water Bylaw No. 2196-1990 (as amended) identifies that all new service connections require water meters. For new connections, the installation of a meter is triggered by an application for building or plumbing permit. This requirement for a meter applies to: • • •

Connection to a new or existing service; Temporary service connections; Connections that include an underground irrigation system.

F:\ENGINEER\blaws\ByiEiv. : 21:: :990 :..-::,:Ttecue ,


136 Consolidated Water Bylaw 2196-1990 Page of For all new connections regulated under this bylaw, the applicant must pay for the supply and installation of all piping and fittings to install the service connection plus: • For one and two family residential service connections pay for the supply and installation of a meter chamber plus the future installation of a water meter. • For multifamily residential service connections, supply and install a meter chamber and meter at property line in accordance with this bylaw. • For commercial, industrial and institutional land uses service connections, supply and install a meter and fittings in the building in accordance with this bylaw. Table 1 — Supply of Meters, Chamber and Accessories and Meter Location Supply and installation of Supply and Installation of Chamber & Type of Type of House Accessories / Building Size of Meter Meter Properties Single Family or Meter size District at District at Owner's Residential Two Family 50mm and Owner's Cost cost below Triplex, Fourplex, Multifamily Industrial, Commercial & Institutional Mixed

See Note 1

All Sizes

Owner

Owner

All Sizes

Owner

Within Building

All Sizes

Owner

Within Building

All Sizes District at Temporary Owner Owner's cost Connection Note 1: Sites with mixed, residential plus either industrial commercial or institutional land uses shall have a meter in the building. 3. Meter Selection In cases where Applicant is expected to supply and install the meter, the Applicant's Engineer must determine the connection size, and select the appropriate meter type and size for the intended use according to this bylaw. Plans submitted as part of the plumbing permit application, must indicate the meter size, type, and chamber/vault location. The plans for the proposed installation must indicate the expected range of flows (high and low consumptions), average expected flow, and the peak flow. The submission should also include the pressure loss through the meter assembly. For non-typical meter installations, and meters 50mm (2 inches) diameter or larger, the Applicant's Engineer must provide detailed drawings of the installation and relevant calculations, to demonstrate the appropriateness of the sizing of the meter. In cases where there is a requirement of a submission, installation of the meter should not begin prior to the approval of the submission.


137 Consolidated Water Bylaw 2196-1990 Page of

The District will inspect the meter installation to ensure conformance to this Bylaw, the approved plan â&#x20AC;&#x201D; if any, and the B.C. Plumbing Code. 3.1

Domestic Service

The type or combination of types of meters selected for recording water consumption from a service must accurately record consumption for the expected range of flow. The size selection should not compromise the operating range of the meter, must ensure pressure losses are within acceptable limits (based on the existing District's pressure zones), and consider longer meter life. The Applicant's Engineer must ensure that the meter selection and installation requirements are appropriate for the designed application. A meter may be smaller than the connection size but should meet the size selection criteria stated above. 3.2

Fire Services

Fire services must be metered to detect unauthorized use of water in accordance with AWWA C703, and the Plumbing Code. Unless installed with a CSA approved double check detector valve assembly, all fire services must be installed with an appropriately sized remote digital read displacement type meter (typically a regular 3/4 inch meter) on a bypass (refer drawing CS-WIV1-6) to check on any unauthorized water usage. The wiring of the detector meter in the by-pass should be installed as per Sections 4.3 and 5.2. The receptacle must clearly be marked "TATTLE-TALE" with a weather resistant tag/label. The location where the receptacle is mounted should freely be accessible by the meter reader / District staff. Double check detector valve assemblies shall be installed as a complete unit. Refer to Section 4.4.2 for details. 4. Water Meter and Fittings 4.1. Water Meters

Unless a variation is justified, the District will only accept positive displacement or compound meters. In all cases of variation, approval must be obtained from the District Engineer to use different types of meters. All meters must be new. Used or reconditioned meters are not acceptable. Displacement meters must either be nutating disk or oscillating piston conforming to AWWA C700. Meters must have bronze case. Base plates for inside applications will be bronze. BaSe plates for outside installations may be plastic or cast iron. Meters 38mm (1 1/2 inches) and larger in diameter must have bolt flanged ends. Compound meters must conform to AWWA 0702. All compound meters must have a bronze case and flanged ends.

Table 2 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Acceptable Meters

F-1.ENGII , FIEP,SylawsIsvev; 21 C 4 -1C

E.cne.du â&#x153;&#x201C; .:co


138 Consolidated Water Bylaw 2196-1990 Page of Positive Displacement

Meters 50mm or smaller Compound

Meters 50 mm or larger

NOTE:

invensys SR II Neptune T-10 ABB C-700 invensys SHR Neptune Tru/Flo ABB C-3000

Alternate meters may be accepted but must be approve by the District Engineer. The use of turbine meter may be considered if supported by detailed calculations to justify its use.

4.2. Registers

Meters must have encoder-type remote-registration conforming to the latest version of AWWA C707. Registers using generator pulses or low voltage conversions are not permitted. Power requirement for data transmission must be supplied by an interrogation device. Registers must be compatible with various brands of interrogation equipment. The register must provide at least six-digit visual registration at the meter. The units must be registered in cubic meters (m 3 ). The units, the month and year of manufacture, and other identification information must clearly be printed o the face of the register. The register must also have a full test sweep hand or dial. The register must, in a digital format, simultaneously encode at least six significant digits of the meter reading for transmission through the remotely located receptacle. A meter identification number must also be provided with each reading. For the purposes of billing, electronic registration must return registration (meter read) to the nearest cubic meter. Registers must easily be upgradeabie to Drive-by or Fixed Radio Meter Reading by substituting the remote receptacle with a Meter Interface Unit (MIU) or placing the MIU in series with the remote receptacle. Materials used in construction of the register must be compatible with the normal water meter environment. The unit must be sealed to prevent tampering. All registers must be provided with moisture protection for internal components when operating in flooded or humid pit/chamber conditions. The reaister and mounting base must be integral components preventing disassembly. The register must be attached to the meter case by a bayonet attachment. A tamper-proof plastic seal pin or other means must be used to secure the register to the main case. The register must be removable from the meter without disassembling the meter body, and must permit field installation or removal without taking the meter out of service. Terminal screws (three screws) must be available on the register for transmission wire connection to the remote receptacle. The materials used for contacts and the connectors must inhibit corrosion and must suffer minimal effect from environmental conditions to which they are exposed. The number wheels used in the reaister assembly must be provided with spring-type or

-':\EN:GINEER ,,:7..;vows\Eyviav,

:r Doneduie. D.cc:â&#x20AC;˘


Consolidated Water Bylaw 2196- 1990 Page of magnetic sensing type contacts to ensure a high probability of data transmission. A port cover must be provided to cover the terminals after they have been wired. 4.3. Remote Receptacles Remote receptacles must either be wall or pit mount style. No identity number storage is permitted at the remote receptacle. There must be no data storage or power source in the remote receptacle. Color coded wire terminals (red, green and black) must be provided. The materials employed must be corrosion resistant, resistant to ultraviolet degradation, unaffected by rain or condensation, and compatible with rugged service and expected life. Wall mounted receptacles must be designed for terminal screw connection after being fastened to the wall. The receptacle construction must incorporate the function of a cable clamp or strain relief coupling. Design of the unit must be such that it provides for mechanical and electrical connection between the receptacle and interrogation equipment. Interrogation must be achieved by inductive coupling without physical connection of the reading device. 4.4. Pipes and Fittings Connections greater than 50mm (2 inches) in diameter should be restrained to the District water main. For installation of meters larger than 75 mm (3 inches). All pipes, pipe fittings, and jointing methods for installation of meters larger than 75 mm (3 inches) should comply with the latest requirements of the District's Subdivision Control Bylaw. For installation of meters 75 mm (3 inches) and below. All pipes, pipe fittings, and jointing methods for installation of meters 75 mm (3inches) and smaller should comply with the latest requirements of the B.C. Plumbing Code and AWWA Standards. 4.4.1. Valves: Valves up to 50 mm (2 inches) in diameter must meet AWWA C800, and must.have brOnze case with National Pipe Threaded (NPT), soldered compression type or flange connections. Valves may be ball or cylinder type using rubber 0-ring seals. Actuation is to be by a curb-stop-style operating nut. All bypass valves must have a lock wing on the operating nut and the case.

\ENC2,11 =_:7-R \E ,

avn;'.B riay.. "_19 1 ,

D.oc--

139


140 Consolidated Water Bylaw 2196-1990 Page of

Valves over 50 mm in diameter must be ductile iron, resilient seat, with nonrising stem (NRS), gate valves with flanged ends, and must meet AWWA C509. Stem seal to be o-ring type. Actuation of valves, accessible by a valve key from the surface must be by a standard 50 mm square-operating nut. Valves inaccessible from the surface and within chambers must be operated by a hand wheel, to be supplied by installer. In all possible and appropriate instances a Nelson style valve box must be installed over buried valves. 4.4.2. Double check Valve Assembly and Double Check Detector Valve Assembly Double check and Double Check detector valves must comply with AWWA C510.They must consist of two internally loaded and independently operating check valves located between two tightly closing resilient-seated shutoff valves, with four properly placed resilient-seated test cocks. They must have ductile iron cases with flange ends. Double check or Double check detector valves must be installed in drainable chambers/vaults. Vaults should be the District approved ones. In case of variations, a design should be submitted for District approval. Lids of vaults should be large enough to service and remove the valve assembly. A minimum distance of 600 mm on test ports side and a minimum distance of 300 mm on opposite side must be available between valve assembly and inside wall of the vault (refer Drawing CS-WM-4). 4.4.3.Fiange Adapters Flange adapters for 38 mm (1 1/2 inches) to 200 mm (8 inches) sizes must conform to AWWA C219. 4.4.4. Bolts and Nuts Bolts and nuts must be stainless steel â&#x20AC;&#x201D; to ASTM F-599 or F-731 for bolts, and ASTM F-574 or F-836 for heavy hex nuts. Threads, fit, and dimension must conform to AWWA C111. 4.4.5. Meter Chambers Meter boxes and vaults must be pre-cast concrete to about the dimensions provided in Table 3. Variations are permitted where the dimensions are impractical due to site conditions, but will subject to the approval of the District Engineer. Above ground heated stainless steel or fiberglass enclosures on concrete pads may be approved at the discretion of the District Engineer. Lids/covers must be capable of withstanding 1-1-20.loading and to the size indicated (where practical) in Table 3. Lids/covers must have one predrilled 45 mm (1 inches) hole for mounting the remote receptacles as specified in Section 5.2. The hole must be plugged in until the installation of receptaties.

F

219â&#x201A;Ź-199C ScneciLpe


141 Consolidated Water Bylaw 2196-1990 Page of

Exterior of all vaults must be damp proofed by applying grout and an asphalt emulsion coating to all exterior surfaces. Construction joints must be made water tight with an appropriate sealant. All pipe entrances on the vault must be sealed. Access lids, latches and ladders must comply with the most current requirements of WorkSafe B.C.

5. installation Standards 5.1. Meter Installation Location

For one and two family residential service connections the meter chamber will be installed by District Staff within the road allowance or municipal right-of-way approximately 300mm from the property line unless approved by the District Engineer. For multifamily residential service connections the meter chamber and meter will be installed by the Developer within the property approximately 300mm from the road allowance or municipal right of way, unless approved by the District Engineer. If a meter is installed at another location with in the property or inside a building under special approval, the location must be accessible to District Staff, in the case of any servicing of the meter or inspection. An area at least 300mm distance around the meter vault shall be free of major landscaping or other objects, including trees, shrubs, walls etc., to accommodate the future maintenance work of the meter. The meter vault installation should be out of driveway and parking areas. For commercial, industrial and institutional land use service connections or a mix of these with residential, the meter and fittings will be installed by the developer inside a building, unless under special approval it is installed in a chamber elsewhere on the property. The meter must be accessible to District Staff, in the case of any servicing of the meter or inspection. installation reqUirements are summarized in Table 3 and illustrated on the attached typical drawings. Table 3 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Meter Installation Details Type

By-pass Requirement

Strainer Requirement

16X19 19

PD PD

No No

No No

25 38 50 50

PD PD PD Compound

No No No Yes'

No No â&#x20AC;˘ No Yes

Size (mm)

199.

D.acc

1

Chamber Type

Chamber' Size (mm)

Lid4

Meter Box Meter Box

300X500 300X500

Steel Steel

Meter Box 425X750 600X900 Meter Box 600X900 Meter Box Vault' 11200X2000

Steel Steel Steel Galvanized Steel

1 i

Lid size' (mm)

i

Std'' Std

Std Std' I Stc.. 11200X1200 1


142 Consolidated Water Bylaw 2196-1990 Page of 75

Compound

Yes 2

Yes

Vault3

1200X2500

100

Compound

Yes2

Yes

Vault'

1500X3000

150

Compound

Yes`

Yes

Vault'

2200X3400

200

Compound

Yes

2

Yes

Vault'

2500X4700

Galvanized Steel Galvanized Steel Galvanized Steel Galvanized Steel

1200X1200 1200X1200 1500X1500 2000X1500

Note 1: ChambersNaults are only required for residential and uses. Note 2: Bypass size must be the same size as the incoming line. Note 3: In all cases vaults or chambers must be per CS-WM-2, CS-WM-3 or CSWM-4. Note 4: The chamber/vault sizes are for indication only and actual sizes should be to fit the distance requirement specified for the installation of required components. Similarly the lids/covers/hatch openings should be sized sufficient enough to move materials and equipment in and out of the vault and should also meet the WCB requirements. Note 5: 'Std.' refers to the standard lid sizes manufactured by A.E. Concrete to suit its precasted meter boxes. However, 'approved equal' lids can be used. When a meter is installed in the utility room or elsewhere inside the building, the installation should be within reasonable distance of a floor drain. Under no circumstances is a meter to be installed in a bathroom or a bedroom. The area of 600 mm distance in front of the meter shall be free of obstruction, to allow for convenient reading and servicing of the meter. The meter installed-area should have a minimum headroom clearance of 2 meters. No electronic, electrical, mechanical, and water sensitive equipment or machinery should be placed or installed under the meter installation, or in an area where splash or flow from the meter settings or pipes could occur during the servicing of the meter. Meters should be installed horizontally with register casings plumb, facing upward. When a meter is installed in a chamber at the property line, the meter should be centered as much as possible in the chamber. Unless otherwise specified by the manufacturer, for meters greater than 50 mm (2 inches) in diameter â&#x20AC;&#x201D; including 50 mm dia. compound meter, a straight run of pipe with a minimum length equivalent of ten pipe diameters (100) should be installed upstream from the meter to full open components: tees, bends, and concentric reducers -1 nominal reduction only. Where possible, the minimum distance between the meter and the upstream gate valve should be equivalent to eight pipe diameters (80). Similarly, five pipe diameters (50) of straight run pipe is required downstream of the meter. The distance between the meter and the downstream check valve should not be smaller than five pipe diameters (50). Plumbed â&#x20AC;&#x201D;in meter test port, if any, shouid not be closer than three pipe diameters (30) from the meter. For meters 50 mm (2 inches) and larger in diameter (except for 50 mm positive displacement meter - which will be on a meter setter), a flanged coupling must be provided on the downstream side of the meter for flexibility in case of meter removal.

at

ScHedui:-


143 Consolidated Water Bylaw 2196-1990 Page of Meters, valves, and bypasses should be supported with appropriate steel pipe stands. Meter installations must be checked for leakage at completion of the installation. Assembly should be flushed and air must be eliminated from the system. By running water through the meter and performing a visual check of the low-flow indicator, the proper operation of the meter should be established. For all temporary connections, meters must be installed at the upstream end of the connection.

Strainer Where required, as noted in Table 3, strainers should be installed immediately upstream of the meter using a flanged connection. Manufacturer's specification can be adopted in terms of distance between the meter and the strainer. Strainers must be straight type and of the same size as the meter. Strainer mesh material should be corrosion-resistant (such as stainless steel). Strainer should have an effective straining area of at least twice the bore diameter of the meter.

Isolation Valves (Inlet and Outlet Valves) isolation valves must be provided, at specified distances, upstream and downstream of the meter assembly to facilitate the removal of meter and strainer cases without the wasteful flow of water. Valves should comply with the requirements stated in Section 4.4.1 above. BV-Dass

By-pass should be of the same size and material as the meter setter or main line. A gate valve should be installed on the bypass. A lock wing should be available on the operating nut of the bypass valve. After testing the installation, the by-pass valve must be closed and sealed by the installer.

Test Port A test point (port) must be provided for all meters 50 mm (2 inches) and larger in diameter. in the absence of a test port in the meter case, a test tee or plug must be installed with a 50 mm threaded lateral and plug on the meter piping, at a distance of minimum three pipe diameters (30) downstream of the meter. 5.2. Receptacle installation Wall mounted remote receptacles must be located near the gas or electric meter approximately 1.2 meters above grade (ground) and easily accessible for reading. The communication cable (wire) from the meter to the receptacle must be installed in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions and must not exceed 30 meters in length. Cable must be run neatly in horizontal or vertical directions only, in an approved casing or duct. Buried casing/duct should be at least 600 mm deep. A drilled 10 mm (3/8 inch) diameter hole, sealed with sealing compound, at external face of the receptacle must be provided.

:GINEER', ..Es ,- - ., ,,ms\E,

21.9,:-19C.

Son, :dile


144 Consolidated Water Bylaw 2196-1990 Page of

For meters installed at the property line, remote register receptacles must be mounted in the meter box or chamber lid according to the manufacturer's instructions. Pit (chamber) mounted receptacles must be mounted to the meter box lid in a single 45 mm (1 3/4 inches) hole. Compound meters with two registers will require two holes in the meter lid. The pit-mounted receptacle(s) must be provided with a minimum length of 1800 mm (6 feet) of 22-gauge three-color (red, green, black) wire, connected and sealed at the receptacle without terminal exposure. Remote wiring connections must either be factory or field sealed to ensure waterproof connections.

Applicable Standard Drawings

CS-WM-1 CS-WM-2 CS-WM-3 CS-W M-4 CS-WM-5 CS-W M-6 CS-W M-7 CS-WM-8 CS-W M-9 CS-W-21 CS-W-21A

El

! 990 ;)oneouie D.oc:


145

Standard Drawings For Schedule D


146 FIRE LINE DOMESTIC LINE DOUBLE CHECK VALVE

PROPERTY LINE

lf,

DOMESTIC LINE

ALTERNATE METER CHAMBER ARRANGEMENTS WHERE SPACE RESTRICTED, REFER TO DETAIL DRAWINGS

PROPERTY LINE

DISTRICT WATER MAIN

DOMESTIC SERVICE CONNECTION SEE DWG.'s CS-W-21, CS-W-21A, CS-WM-2

DOMESTIC SERVICE AND FIRE SERVICE CONNECTION -

SEE DWG.'s CS-WM-3, CS-WM-4

FLANGE JOINT OVER 50 DIAL CURB STOP - UP TO 50 DIA. OR. GATE VALVE.- OVER 50 DIA. BRASS, SCREW TYPE CHECK. VALVE - UP TO 50 DIA. =4. OR SWING TYPE CHECK VALVE - OVER 50 DIA.

(1D CD ,

NOTES

,

METER TATTLE TALE METER

i. THIS DRAWING SHOULD BE REVIEWED IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE DOCUMENT, "WATER METER INSTALLATION STANDARDS AND SPECIFICATIONS." IN SCHEDULE OF BYLAW 2196-1990

FOR SUPPLY. OF METERS REFER TO TABLE 1 OF THE "WATER METER INSTALLATION STANDARDS AND SPECIFICATIONS." 3.

CONNECTIONS GREATER THAN 50 SHALL BE

4.

ALL FITTINGS OVER. 50 DIAMETER SHALL HAVE FLANGE OR HUB JOINTS. .

TO THE DISTRICT WATER MAIN

5, CHAMBERS AND VAULTS SIZED AS SPECIFIED IN TABLE 3 OF "WATER METER INSTALLATION STANDARDS AND SPECIFICATIONS." 5. FOR INSTALLATIONS INSIDE BUILDING, SEE DWG.'s CS-WM-5, CS-WM-6. AND CS-WM-7 75mm SERVICE LINES ARE NOT ALLOWED.

DRAWN Jan. 2009

GENERAL LAYOUT h/1 7-7 7 . 7- ' _!RE

1REVISED DISTRIC7

S 1C 11

SD-LE.

NTs.

)

---

RA 77 T.

-


147

ROAD

I PRIVATE r

R.O.W. j PROPERTY

BYPASS VALVE CLOSED AND SEALED

300

COUPLING

I

II

0

A •

INLET VALVE

III

II

0

OUTLET VALVE

STRAINER

)-CHECK VALVE

MIN. 5 TIMES PIPE DIA.

METER LA A MINIMUM 5 TIMES PIPE DIAMETER

MINIMUM 10 TIMES PIPE DIAMETER

MIN. I.D. VAULT DIMENSION

METER SIZE

B

A

50mm Compound] 75mm 100mm 150mm I 200mm

1200mm 1200mm 1200mm 1500mm 2000mm

1200mm . 1200mm 1200mm 1500mm 1500mm

NOTES 1. THIS DRAWING SHOULD BE REVIEWED IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE DOCUMENT, "WATER METER INSTALLATION STANDARDS AND SPECIFICATIONS. IN SCHEDULED' OF BYLAW 2196-1990 2. THIS DRAWING SHOULD ONLY BE ADOPTED IN CASE OF SPACE CONSTRAINTS AND MUST BE APPROVED BY THE GENERAL MANAGER OF ENGINEERING. 3. FOR SUPPLY OF METERS REFER TO TABLE 1 OF THE WATER METER INSTALLATION STANDARDS AND SPECIFICATIONS." —

4. ANCHOR PIPE TO WALL ( TO BE DESIGNED AND CERTIFIED BY A PROFESSIONAL ENGINEER ) 5. PROVIDE 10 DIAMETER LENGTHS OF STRAIGHT PIPE UPSTREAM OF METER. REFER TO SECTION 5.1 OF THE DOCUMENT " WATER METER INSTALLATION STANDARDS AND SPECIFICATIONS." 6. FLOOR • TO CENTER LINE OF PIPE DIMENSION TO BE MINIMUM 300mm. 7. THE BY-PASS PIPING SHALL BE THE SAME SIZE AND MATERIAL AS THE MAIN LINE. 8. THE LID/HATCH OPENING SHOULD BE POSITIONED OVER THE METER. REFER TO TABLE 3 OF THE " WATER METER INSTALLATION STANDARDS AND SPECIFICATIONS"

1DRAWN Jon. 2009

INSTALLATION OF 50mm DIA. COMPOUND METER AND METERS

REVISED DtSTR1CT

1)!

C9

F

IS S '1.

N F,7

SCALE

-

-


148

TATTLE-TALE ASSEMBLY COUPLING DOUBLE CHECK VALVE

MIN. 300

/Th

FIRE LINE BYPASS VALVE, CLOSED AND SEALED

\ --MAIN

VALVE

MIN. 600 HATCH OPENING COUPLING

500 to 1000

-STRAINER

CHECK VALVE

COUPLING

FLOW

E3— DOMESTIC LINE

-OUTL METER V AL V

MAIN VALVE

-'

300

lao

a0000a

2. 4/-

rr I

MINIMUM 10 TIMES PIPE DIAMETER

MINIMUM 5 TIMES PIPE DIAMETER

a.' 01 ,

DOMESTIC METER ASSEMBLY PER SSD-WM4 OR SSD-WM4,1

a-

ROAD R.O.W.

PRIVATE PROPERTY

SUMP C/W SUMP GRATING'

NOTES • 1. THIS DRAWING SHOULD BE REVIEWED IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE DOCUMENT, 'WATER METER . INSTALLATION STANDARDS AND SPECIFICATIONS." IN SCHEDULE 'D' OF BYLAW 2196 1990 -

2. THIS DRAWING SHOULD ONLY BE ADOPTED IN CASE OF SPACE 'CONSTRAINTS 3. FOR SUPPLY OF METERS REFER TO TABLE 1 OF THE "WATER METER INSTALLATION STANDARDS AND SPECIFICATIONS." 4. THE HATCH OPENING SHOULD BE APPROPRIATELY SIZED AND POSITIONED ABOVE THE METER. REFER TO TABLE 3 OF THE DOCUMENT, "WATER. METER INSTALLATION . STANDARDS AND SPEC,FICATIONS." 5. TOUCH READ .SENSOR(S) SHALL BE LOCATED AT THE TOP (HATCH OPENING). THE 45mm DIAMETER OPENING SHALL BE PLUGGED UNTIL METER 15 INSTALLED. 6. THE RECEPTACLE OF THE TATTLE-TALE METER SHOULD BE CLEARLY LABELLED AS "TATTLE-TALE."

INSTALLATION OF 50mm DIA. COMPOUND METER AND METERS 50mm I 6,,,Prz= 7- _ =IR.=

DRAWN Jar., 2009

/1^

REVISED DISTRIC.-.7

OF

Liss-Ion -

^

SCALE

1\7;


149

FLANGED SPOOL LENGTH SUFFICIENT TO INSTALL FUTURE FLOW METER AND STRAINER IN COMPLIANCE WITH FIRE UNDERWRITERS AND ULC

DOUBLE CHECK VALVE —\

SUMP C/W SUMP GRATING —

TATTLE-TALE METER COUPLING

300

MAIN VALVE

300 MINIMum FIRE LINE

METER (NOTE2)

600 MINIMUM 500 to 1000

INLET VALVE

01=1110111M FLOW MAIN , DOMESTIC VALVE LINE

STRAINER -

BYPASS VALVE, CLOSED AND SEALED

ROAD R.O.W.

I

25 DIA.—/

MINIMUM 5 TIMES PIPE DIAMETER

OUTLET VALVE

=too oil

7

MINIMUM 10 TIMES PIPE DIAMETER

CHECK VALVE

COUPLING

MINIMUM 5 TIMES PIPE DIAMETER

PRIVATE PROPERTY

NOTES 1. THIS DRAWING SHOULD BE REVIEWED IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE DOCUMENT, "WATER METER INSTALLATION STANDARDS AND SPECIFICATIONS." IN SCHEDULED' OF BYLAW 2196-1990 FOR SUPPLY OF METERS REFER TO TABLE 1 OF THE ."WATER METER INSTALLATION STANDARDS. AND SPECIFICATIONS." 3.

THE HATCH OPENING SHOULD BE APPROPRIATELY SIZED AND POSITIONED, ABOVE THE METER. REFER TO TABLE 3 OF THE DOCUMENT, "WATER METER INSTALLATION STANDARDS AND SPECIFICATION'S."

4.

TOUCH READ SENSOR(S) SHALL BE LOCATED AT THE TOP (HATCH OPENING). THE 4 5mrp DIAMETER OPENING SHALL BE PLUGGED UNTIL METER IS INSTALLED.

INSTALLATION OF 50mm DIA. COMPOUND METER AND METERS 3=.7 7-AN 51irriSE":- 1 1:EE ,

DRAWN

E

Jan. 2009

REVISED DISTRI , C7 C:AF

SCALE

NTS


150

RECEPTACLE APPROVED LOW VOLTAGE CABLE

' ALTERNATE ENTRY FLOW

E

FLOW

E

OUTLET VALVE

METER MAIN VALVE

0 o ■-n

CHECK

VALVE

FLOOR

TYPICAL METER SETTING METER SIZE

'A' mm

y

16mmx19mm

191 229 273

I

19mm 25mm

" mm

325 363 413

I 4

NOTES: 1.

THIS DRAWING SHOULD BE REVIEWED IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE DOCUMENT , "WATER METER INSTALLATION STANDARDS AND SPECIFICATIONS." IN SCHEDULE OF BYLAW 2196-1990

2.

FOR SUPPLY OF METERS REFER TO TABLE 1 OF THE

3.

PIPING FOR METER MUST BE ON A HORIZONTAL PLANE.

4.

MINIMUM DISTANCE BETWEEN ANY WALL AND A METER SHOULD BE 300mm.

"WATER METER INSTALLATION STANDARDS AND SPECIFICATIONS."

5. METER INSTALLATION MUST BE WITHIN REASONABLE DISTANCE OF •A FLOOR DRAIN.' 6.

THE AREA FOR 600mm IN FRONT OF THE METER SHALL BE FREE OF OBSTRUCTION,

TO ALLOW FOR CONVENIENT READING AND SERVICING OF THE METER.

!DRAWN Jan. 2009

UTILITY ROOM INSTALLATION =OR. METERS 3& mm SIVAL` = 7-7' DN_

REVISED D 'S T RA CT OF

!SCALE

NTs


TATTLE -TALE METER TO BE LABELLED "TATTLE - TALE"

25 DIA.

RECEPTACLE FIRE LINE

s BY-PASS VALVE CLOSED AND SEALED

DOUBLE CHECK VALVE LENGTH SUFFICIENT TO INSTALL FUTURE FLOW METER AND RAINER IN COMPLIANCE WITH FIRE UNDERWRITERS AND ULC STRAINER DOMESTIC LINE

FLOW ----

—11-

i I-

OUTLET VALVE --\\

cc) Q 0 _, c 1— 0 z

CHECK VALVE

01

LI

( )

\

FLOW

111,,,,___

-

I3EZZI

1

CI)

FLOW ----INLET VALVE ALTERNATE ENTRY

MAIN VALVE.

METER (NOTE 2)

3 E z >`

TYPICAL METER SETTING a • .

FLOOR

NOTES: 1. THIS DRAWING SHOULD BE REVIEWED IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE DOCUMENT, "WATER METER INSTALLATION STANDARDS AND SPECIFICATIONS." IN SCHEDULE 'D' OF BYLAW 2196-1990 2. FOR SUPPLY OF METERS REFER TO TABLE 1 OF THE "WATER METER INSTALLATION STANDARDS AND SPECIFICATIONS." 3. PIPING FOR METER MUST BE ON A HORIZONTAL PLANE. 4. MINIMUM DISTANCE BETWEEN ANY WALL AND A METER SHOULD BE 300mm. 5. INSTALLATION MUST BE WITHIN A REASONABLE DISTANCE OF A FLOOR DRAIN. 6, THE AREA FOR 600mm IN FRONT OF THE ME TER SHALL BE FREE OF OBSTRUCTION 10 ALLOW FOR CONVENIENT READING AND SERVICING OF THE METER.


152

FLANGED SPOOL LENGTH SUFFICIENT TO INSTALL FUTURE FLOW METER AND STRAINER IN COMPLIANCE WITH FIRE UNDERWRITERS AND ULC

TATTLE-TALE METER

,-- DOUBLE CHECK VALVE

RECEPTACLE

FIRE LINE

/— BY-PASS / VALVE CLOSED AND SEALED

MAIN VALVE

7— COUPLING CHECK 1. VALVE

DOMESTIC LINE

INLET VALVE

O U-

COUPLING

Do

(

E - FLOW-0C O 0

rn co zx \--STRAINER

2

FLOOR :I .

MIN 5 TIMES PIPE DIAMETER NOTES

MIN 5 TIMES PIPE DIAMETER

MINIMUM 10 TIMES PIPE DIAMETER

1. THIS DRAWING SHOULD BE REVIEWED IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE DOCUMENT , "WATER METER INSTALLATION STANDARDS AND SPECIFICATIONS." IN SCHEDULE 'DI OF BYLAW 2196-1990 2. FOR SUPPLY OF METERS REFER TO TABLE 1 OF THE "WATER METER INSTALLATION STANDARDS AND SPECIFICATIONS." 3. THE BY-PASS PIPE SHALL BE THE SAME SIZE AS THE MAIN PIPE.

UTILITY ROOM INSTALLATION OR INTF-T=P,,S 50mr L1/4.:

DISTRICT OF

-

7 77


153 150 x 150 PRESSURE TREATED WOOD POST SET IN CONC. 100 STYROFOAM INSULATION CUT TO FIT METER BOX OPENING

ROAD PRIVATE R.O.W. PROPERTY COVER PER SPECIFICATIONS

DIGITAL READOUT 45 DIA. OPENING FOR REMOTE. METER RECEPTACLE, PLUGGED UNTIL METER IS INSTALLED 25 PVC CONDUIT

z 0 11")

U)

c

INLET BALL VALVE (PART OF SETTER)

OUTLET CHECK VALVE (PART OF SETTER)

METER BOX CONCRETE SECTIONS I TO SUIT

T

-

— -14– -

FLOW MAIN

FLOW —

VALVE

6)0

v VC" r METER SETTER .

METER SIZE 38mm 50mrn

positive displacement positive displocement

• G

ft

V vivA A

25mm BRACE PIPE (TYP) CONCRETE BASE SECTION IN TRAVELLED AREAS, GRAVEL TO 150 DEPTH, ELSEWHERE,

' D '

330mm 432mm

NOTES: 1.THIS DRAWING SHOULD BE REviEWED IN CONJUCTION WITH THE DOCUMENT "WATER METER INSTALLATION STANDARDS AND SPECIFICATIONS." IN SCHEDULED' IN BYLAW 2196-1990 2. FOR SUPPLY OF METERS REFER TO TABLE 1 OF THE "WATER METER INSTALLATION STANDARDS AND SPECIFICATIONS."

METER INSTALLATION FOR 38mm & 50mm 3!\` SEP\ T:,`=- CONN= J[ 7 Lthil -


154 100 STYROFOAM INSULATION CUT TO FIT METER BOX OPENING

METER SIZE 16x19 19 25

150 x 150 PRESSURE TREATED WOOD POST SET IN CONC.

"D" 191 229 273

NOTES: 1. THIS DRAWING SHOULD BE REVIEWED IN CONJUCTION WITH THE DOCUMENT, "WATER METER INSTALLATION STANDARDS AND SPECIFICATIONS" IN SCHEDULED' OF BYLAW 2196-1990. 2. FOR SUPPLY OF METERS REFER TO TABLE 1 OF THE "WATER METER INSTALLATION STANDARDS AND SPECIFICATIONS."

METER INSTALLATION FOR 25mm & SMALLER —1 DK 3-7 7\4/1::.,‘F

(1 1Lf_Ti ,

.

DRAWN Jan. 2009

REVISED !SCALE

rrs

r,dl 1 -


155 PRIVATE PROPERTY

ROAD R.O.W.

100 STYROFOAM .INSULATION CUT TO FIT METER

BOX OPENING

COVER PER • SPECIFICATIONS

45 DIAMETER OPENING FOR REMOTE METER RECEPTACLE, PLUGGED UNTIL METER IS INSTALLED

4 APA/

Amor

,07/4

ROPZ, /.

Hit

wA A

SPOOL FOR FUTURE METER

OUTLET CHECK VALVE (PART OF SETTER)

METER BOX CONCRETE SECTIONS TO SUIT

SOO

150 150

CD CD

MAIN VALVE

0 ,,,0 - -II\ ' ,2/ •\: c 6 a .0 ' .° . a c z., a. :;‘''‘,/,/ °' ' 0 \;.„. 2- p 2 15pm 0 E m TyBCE pRA • .0\ c.--., -r; <,. 0 0 "0 ' • a 0 0 ••,./ .0 • •

,

• i

-

DO NOT GROUT OPENING (TYP)

,

\ AVV/q/X\ VNK \ A'

\ A \ A •

' A\ \

\

\\ \

\

METER SETTER (FORD SERIES 70 OR APPROVED EQUAL)

, \o / , \ ' CONCRETE BASE SECTION IN TRAVELLED AREAS, GRAVEL TO 150 DEPTH, ELSEWHERE. 100mm CRUSHED GRAVEL

5Dmm DRAIN HOLE METER SIZE 38mm 50mm

' D '

positive displacement Positive displacement I

330mm

432mm

NOTES: 1. THIS DRAWING SHOULD BE REVIEWED IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE DOCUMENT, "WATER METER INSTALLATION STANDARDS AND SPECIFICATIONS." IN SCHEDULED' OF BYLAW 2196-1990 2. FOR SUPPLY OF METERS REFER TO TABLE I DF THE "WATER METER INSTALLATION STANDARDS AND SPECIFICATIONS."

METER INSTALLATION FOR 38mm & 50mm sEERvrE cjIhNE-:7 7 0K \`' DNF

DRAWN r< ISTRICT OF

Jan. 2009

REVISED SCALE

NTT

1SS

- -

ti■


156 45 DIA. OPENING FOR REMOTE METER RECEPTACLE, PLUGGED UNTIL METER IS INSTALLED 100 STYROFOAM INSULATION CUT TO FIT METER BOX OPENING

ROAD R.O.W.

PRIVATE PROPERTY

LID PER SPECIFICATIONS

1'

VhalkY/A

AV

HI I HI

•< Z 0

0

300

SPOOL FOR ' FUTURE METER !NLFT BALL VALVE (PART OF SETTER)

150

T

ION

cc 0

0

150

SIM

h•

Lfl

V

.•■

°

0

:. •

-

• ••

FLOW

0■1 •

.

'

MAIN VALVE (CURB STOP w/ RISER) SERVICE CONNECTION PIPE 19rnm CLEAR CRUSHED DRAIN ROCK

METER SETTER (FORD 70 SERIES, OR ARPROVED EQUAL)

1 METER SIZE • 16x19 19

25

191 229

1

273

NOTES: 1. THIS DRAWING SHOULD BE REVIEWED IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE DOCUMENT, "WATER METER INSTALLATION STANDARDS AND SPECIF;(..',ATIC.).NS" IN SCHEDULED' OF BYLAW 2196-1990 7. FOR SUPRLY DF METERS REFER TO TABLR TABLE 1 OF THE • "WATER METER INSTALLATION STANDARDS SPECIFICATIONS."

• METER INSTALLATION FOR 25mm & SMALLER SEVPCE ook41,\E:70!,,, (3N FAk4iL t

DRAWN

Jar.. 2009

REVISED /ID/STRIT OF

NT.E

.

-


157

Standard Drawings For Subdivision Control Bylaw


158 P/L

38mm x 89mm MARKER POST TOP 600mm PAINTED BLUE

300/ .---..... _L_

7

E

\ 30°

...1..

SERVICE - LINE

MAIN

PLUG

BLUE 'WATER SERVICE TAG

SERVICE BOX TO HAVE 300mm ADJUSTMENT UP AND DOWN FROM FINISHED GRADE

SIDEWALK

150

1.0 m

150 -

AS

METER CHAMBER & FITTINGS AS PER DWG's CS-W-21 and CS-W-21A

BLUE MAGNETIC MARKER TAPE MARKED ' WATER

2 0 Lc)

CORP. STOP

SINGLE STRAP SERVICE CLAMP TO BE USED ON ALL D.I. PIPE .

N

ka•

WATERMA IN 300 x 300 x 50 BRICK

ALL DIMENSIONS ARE IN MILLIMETRES UNLESS OTHERWISE - INDICATED .

P" ""." -

1

DISTRICT OF MISSION! DAT - MAR. 200? WLT E F

= _

,

ML

i


159

400mm METER SENSOR BODY

298mm

45mm DIA. OPENING FOR REMOTE

254mm

1111111 11111111111111 11E11 1111111111111111111111111111 1111111 III I HIMMUMB In 3

3

I I 11111 MIME

cn op 3

.1111

WATER IIMM

11111 I METER !MUM III IMMMIMMIMM III MOMMMiii HUM 11111111111111111111111111111 11111111111111111111111111111 IIIIIIIIIItIHHhIIIIIlUhIHl

4.

B 3

285mm

PLAN VIEW WATER METER BOX

LID DETAIL

92mm x 79mm OPENING (BOTH ENDS)

25mm

DRAWN Jan, 2009

WATER METER BOX TYPCk

REVISED SCALE NTS


160 PRIVATE PROPERTY

ROAD R.O.W.

100 STYROFOAM INSULATION CUT TO FIT METER — BOX OPENING

COVER PER • SPECIFICATIONS

,-- 45 DIAMETER OPENING / FOR REMOTE METER RECEPTACLE, PLUGGED UNTIL / METER IS INSTALLED

\

r

</a SPOOL FOR FUTURE METER

300

00 ,r)

INLET BALL VALVE (PART OF SETTER)

OUTLET CHECK VALVE (PART OF SETTER)

METER BOX CONCRETE SECTIONS TO SUIT

CD

0

150 150 m

b --FLOW MAIN VALVE 4 0

1

0

6

\

,

0 p

o. 0 • 0 0 .

a I \ VI "s \• \

1 •1>>.

DO NOT GROUT OPENING (TYP)

. . 0 0

.()

\,

METER SETTER (FORD SERIES 70 OR APPROVED EQUAL) — 1

•6 \ 0 a 25mm BRACE 0 • \ o 0\. •po PIPE FT YP) •

//x\x\ pi /A \ y \ -

/

\\\\,

CONCRETE BASE SECTION IN TRAVELLED AREA.S, GRAVEL TO 150 DPFTI-1, ELSEWHERE.

100mm CRUSHED' GRAVEL

\\\

50mm DRAIN HOLE METER SIZE

'D'

330mm • I 38mm positive displacement 50mm Positive displacement ■ 432mm NOTES; 1. THIS DRAWING SHOULD BE REVIEWED IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE DOCUMENT, "WATER METER INSTALLATION STANDARDS AND SPECIFICATIONS." IN SCHEDULE

D' OF BYLAW 2196 - 1990

2. FOR SUPPLY OF METERS REFER TO TABLE 1 OF THE "WATER METER INSTALLATION STANDARDS AND SPECIFICATIONS."

METER INSTALLATION FOR 35mrrt 50mrit cry,,N=771co, DMA

DRAWN DISTRICT OF

(7 7

E

-

Jar. 2009


161 45 DIA. OPENING FOR REMOTE METER RECEPTACLE. PLUGGED UNTIL METER IS INSTALLED 100 STYROFOAM INSULATION CUT TO FIT METER BOX OPENING

PRIVATE ROAD R.O.W. I PROPERTY

LID PER SPECIFICATIONS

;NI PT RA....L

VALVE (PART OF SETTER)

X

<

C C C C

r"-

\ MAIN VALVE (CURB STOP w/ RISER)

SEP.ViCE CONNECTION PIPE / 19mm CLEAR CRUSHED DRAIN ROCK

METER SETTER (FORD 70 SERIES, OR APPROVED EQUAL) I METER SIZE iGx19 I 19 I 25 I

191 279 273

NOTES; THIS DRAWINC. SHOULD BE REVIEWED IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE DOCUMENT, "WATER METER INSTALLATION STANDARDS AND SPECIFICATIONS" IN SCHEDULED' OF BYLAW 219E-1990 2. FOR SUPPLY D: METERS REFER TO TABLE 1 OF THE "WATER METER INSTALLATION STANDARDS AND SPECIFICATIONS."

METER INSTALLATION OR 25mm & SMALLER E OD!qN=7......7rY\

I

so

ยงT

R

CT

DRAWN Jan, 2009 of

'

REVISED CA_

_

"


162


163

M lssion ON THE FRASER DISTRICT OF

)1â&#x20AC;˘00,0e

:

Engineering and Public Works Memorandum -40

File Category: INF.ENV.ENV File Folder: Environmental Charter

To:

Chief Administrative Officer

From:

Manager of Environmental Services

Date:

March 30, 2009

Subject:

Promotion of Businesses that Collaborate with the District in Implementing Environmental Sustainability Initiatives

Recommendation That staff be permitted to publicly promote those businesses within and outside the District that fully collaborate with the District to implement environmental sustainability initiatives. Background Questions arose from the recent Finance and Administration meetings regarding the best way to encourage businesses to collaborate with the District and support environmental sustainability initiatives. An example would be how the District can ensure that the correct type of sprinklers are available at local stores â&#x20AC;&#x201D; is a bylaw required or is there adequate interest already? It is clear that the majority of businesses within Mission are open to working with the District to support environmental initiatives. This has become apparent in the case of switching to the new bags for curbside compostables. In some cases, local businesses are leading the way and promoting initiatives that the District has not yet considered. In some other cases, local businesses are not particularly concerned with environmental initiatives and it has been a struggle to get buy in. In some situations it has helped by involving the head offices of these businesses. Staff believes there is no need to regulate local businesses to support environmental initiatives. They would, however, appreciate the ability to publicly promote businesses that fully collaborate with the District in delivering these initiatives. Promotion could take the form of verbal support, posting links on the District's website, having District displays inside the businesses etc.

Mike Younie Manager of Environmental Services F:\ENGINEER\MYOUNIE\Memos\Business Env support.docx

Page 1 of 1


164 Engineering and Public Works Memorandum

File Category: INF.ENV.ENV File Folder: Environmental Charter

To:

Chief Administrative Officer

From:

Manager of Environmental Services

Date:

March 30, 2009

Subject:

Restricting Bottled Drinking Water Use in Municipal Facilities

Recommendation That bottled drinking water, not including water sold in vending machines, is no longer provided at functions within municipal facilities where potable tap water is available. Background The Federation of Canadian Municipalities passed the attached resolution and released the attached press release on March 7, 2009. The resolution urges municipalities to consider phasing out the sale and purchase of bottled water at municipal facilities. Staff recommends that bottled drinking water no longer be made available for consumption at functions (meetings, dinners, staff lunches etc) occurring within municipal facilities. Rather, drinking water should be made available in pitchers and served in re-usable containers. Other environmental initiatives such as banning the purchase of Styrofoam cups & plates and using 100% recycled paper are being examined by staff and will come forward as a separate report.

Mike Younie Manager of Environmental Services F:\ENGINEER\MYOUNIE\Memos\Bottled Water Ban.docx

Page 1 of 3


165

CommuniquĂŠ

THE FEDERATION OF CANADIAN MUNICIPALITIES ENCOURAGES REDUCED BOTTLED WATER USE AT MUNICIPAL FACILITIES Resolution urging tap water over bottled water where appropriate at municipal facilities passed at FCM "s national board meeting

VICTORIA, March 7, 2009 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Canada 's national municipal organization is encouraging local governments to reduce the use of bottled water in their own facilities where other options are available. Meeting today in Victoria, B.C., the National Board of Directors of the Federation of Canadian Municipalities (FCM) passed a resolution encouraging municipalities to "phase out the sale and purchase of bottled water at their own facilities where appropriate and where potable water is available." "Today's action is another illustration of how municipalities are leading by example to encourage environmentally sustainable water choices," said FCM president Jean Perrault, mayor of Sherbrooke, Que. The resolution does not call for a ban on the sale of bottled water to consumers. "Regulating bottled water for public consumption falls under provincial and federal jurisdiction," said Perrault. "All orders of government must work together to reduce reliance on a product that produces more waste, costs more and uses more energy than simple, dependable municipal tap water." "This cooperation among governments must extend to investments in local water systems. The most economical and reliable source of drinking water is a first-rate municipal water system. Where these systems are lacking, all orders of government must help fund the necessary infrastructure." FCM 's resolution also calls on municipalities to develop awareness campaigns about the positive benefits and quality of municipal water supplies. Municipalities will determine their local course of action. The resolution was put forward by the cities of Toronto and London, Ont., over growing concerns for environmental impacts related to the production of bottled water, the energy requirements for the production and transport of bottled water, as well as the disposal and/or recycling of water bottles. Bottled water containers may be recyclable but they still have to be manufactured and transported, which uses significant energy. Between 40 and 80 per cent end up in the local landfill. That is a burden on the environment and a cost for municipal taxpayers.

About the Federation of Canadian Municipalities (FCM): FCM is the national voice of municipal governments, established in 1901, representing the interests of municipalities on policy and program matters that fall within federal jurisdiction. With more than 1,775 members representing 90 per cent of Canadians, FCM members include Canada"s largest cities, small urban and rural communities, and 18 provincial and territorial municipal associations. - 30 For further information or to arrange interviews, contact Wendy Cumming: (613) 9076356 / wcumming@frm.ca

Page 2 of 3


166

FCM RESOLUTION â&#x20AC;&#x201D; NATIONAL BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING â&#x20AC;&#x201D; MARCH 7, 2009 ENV09.1.02 BOTTLED WATER WHEREAS bottled water consumes significant amounts of non-renewable fossil fuels to extract, package and transport water creating unnecessary air quality and climate change impacts; WHEREAS it takes about three litres of water to manufacture a one litre plastic bottle of water; WHEREAS bottled water companies use municipal water and groundwater sources when a growing percentage of Canadian municipalities have faced water shortages in recent years; WHEREAS although bottled water creates a container that can be recycled, between 40% and 80% of empty bottles end up as litter and/or are placed directly into the garbage and take up unnecessary space in landfills; WHEREAS tap water is safe, healthy, highly regulated and accessible to residents, employers, employees and visitors to Canadian municipalities and substantially more sustainable than bottled water; and WHEREAS some municipalities have enacted by-laws to restrict the sale and purchase of water bottles within their own operations; BE IT RESOLVED that the Federation of Canadian Municipalities urge all municipalities to phase out the sale and purchase of bottled water at their own facilities where appropriate and where potable water is available; and BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that municipalities be urged to develop awareness campaigns about the positive benefits and quality of municipal water supplies. City of London and City of Toronto, Ontario

Page 3 of 3


167

M

DISTRICT OF issio

ON. THE FRASER

File Category: File Folder:

IN F.STO.DYK 2009-2010 Flood Protection Program

To:

Chief Administrative Officer

From:

Manager of Environmental Services

Date:

April 15, 2009

Subject:

2009-2010 Flood Protection Program Application

Engineering and Public Works Memorandum

Recommendation That a resolution be passed in support of staff making an application for 2009-2010 Flood Protection Program funds to complete dike upgrades to the Mission Dike along Harbour Ave. Background The provincial and federal governments have recently released the 2009-2010 Flood Protection Program call for applications. The program is different this year in that the diking authority will have to fund one third of any project. Staff recommend that an application be submitted (by April 24) to complete the upgrade to the Mission Dike along Harbour Ave west of the spirit square to the CPR tracks and east of the spirit square to the old Meeker properties. Staff will not have the estimated costs for this work until early next week but the application must be accompanied by a Council resolution stating their support for the application. Funds for the District's share are available depending on cost and will be sourced from reserve funds to be confirmed once the costs are known. Should the funds not be available due to elevated costs, the District can decline to sign the Agreement if one is offered.

Mike Younie Manager of Environmental Services F:\ENGINEER\MYOUNIE\Memos\Flood Hazard General\FPP Application 2009 2010.docx

Page 1 of 1


168

fission !DISTRICT OF

File Category: File Folder:

Director of Engineering and Public Works Memorandum

INF.WAT.DIS Water Management Leak Detection

To:

Chief Administrative Officer

From:

Superintendent of Utilities

Date:

March 4, 2009

Subject:

2008 Report â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Leak Detection Program

Summary The following summarizes the progress to the 2008 year end for the Leak Detection Program and will provide the basis for our Provincial Infrastructure Grant claim: 1. Original budget $105,096 which included a $10,000 Provincial Government Infrastructure Grant. With $49,900.16 being expended in 2008; $32,332.68 on leak detection equipment and training (copies of the invoices are attached) with the balance $17,567.48 as expenses to locate and repair leaks plus administration. 2. The type of leak detection equipment purchased is acoustic, which is a modern computer-based instrument that has a simple field setup and works by measuring leak signals (sound or vibration) at two points that bracket a suspected leak. The position of the leak is then determined automatically based on the time shift between the leak signals. Prior to excavation the location is confirm by use of a powerful ground microphone. All excavations have found a leak; no dry hole dug. 3. Leak detection survey work was carried out on 8.43 kilometers of water main. The District of Mission has approximately 170 kilometers of water main; therefore approximately 5 % was surveyed. 4. The survey work in 2008 found 6 leaks, 4 with in the road allowance and 2 on private property; all have been repaired. Copies of each of the 6 job orders are attached. The total annual estimated water saving is 13,140 cubic meters. A copy of the summary of located leaks for 2008 is also attached.

Background The Drought Management and Water Conservation Study completed in February 2006 for the Abbotsford/Mission Water & Sewer Commission, states "the given statistics suggest that leakage/UFW (UFW - unaccounted for water loss) is much higher in Mission than in Abbotsford, likely over 2 5 % " . As part of the reports many recommendations, number 48 states: "Similarly, water losses cannot be directly calculated. The given statistics, however, suggests that leakage and losses are much higher in Mission than in Abbotsford, likely over 25%. This could be quantified by further analysis, but an implied conclusion is that accelerated leak detection should be considered".

It is noted that UFW is normally around 10 - 15 % in typical municipal water systems accounting for water main flushing, fire flows and leakage. Based on the concerns raised in the report the District of Mission chose to undertake a leak detection program and sought grant assistance from the Provincial Government, which was approved in 2008. Page 1 of 2


169

2009 The survey work is continuing and as of the beginning of March another 4,000 meters has been completed with 1 leak found and repaired; estimated annual savings of 525 cubic meters. Significantly more of the system will be surveyed in 2009 because of the demand on staff, to service new developments, has reduced significantly. Projections Based on the information collected in 2008 (note only 5% of the system has been surveyed) the following projections have been prepared: a. The total costs to complete the survey repairs to water services will be 'in the order of ($17,567.4815%) $350,000; therefore approximately $300,000 needs to be budget in the next few years. b. The total annual water saving could be in the order of (13,140 cubic meters/5%) 262,000 cubic meters or 1 mega liter per day. c. As a portion of our current average daily flow which is approximately 19 mega liters per day that would represent a 5% reduction. d. Based on a total system (combined Abbotsford and Mission) average daily flow of 80 mega liters per day the District of Mission portion of the overall operating cost could be reduced by 1.25%.

CC Director of Engineering and Public Works CC Director of Finance

File g:pworks/greg/2009/Memo Leak Detection Status Report 2008 Year End.doc


170 MDISTRICT OF

-1'

;.-,/ issionio"° ON THE

Engineering and Public Works Memorandum

FRASER

File Category: PUB.DOM.LAN File Folder: Engineered Wetland

To:

Chief Administrative Officer

From:

Manager of Environmental Services

Date:

March 30, 2009

Subject:

Mill Pond Compensation Plan Follow-up

Recommendation

That this report be accepted as information. Background

At the February 9, 2009 Council meeting, staff was asked to follow-up on two items associated with the Mill Pond Habitat Compensation proposal: • Naming of Mill Pond as Hammer's Mill Pond in the past • Opportunity to stock Mill Pond with fish Staff contacted the Mission Archives who responded that they could not find any evidence that Mill Pond was known as Hammer's Mill Pond in the past. This was further substantiated by Mr. Don Hammer whose uncle operated the mill in that area who also did not recollect the area being called Hammer's Mill Pond Staff contacted Freshwater Fisheries BC whose mandate it is to develop local urban fisheries to support angling opportunities. Freshwater Fisheries BC indicated they are very supportive of the restocking and establishment of an urban fishery — particularly one such as this that could be wheelchair accessible. Ministry of Environment approval is required and they have indicated that they are willing to assist by carrying out some water quality and current fish use assessments later this summer. Restocking could occur in 2010 if the MoE support restocking. A species at risk assessment is also required of the area which will be completed in April as part of the compensation planning. Staff has also volunteered to meet with the Steelhead Community Association to discuss the Environmental Charter and Mill Pond restoration and is awaiting a date to be chosen by the Association.

Mike Younie Manager of Environmental Services FAENGINEER\MYOUNIE\Memos\Mill Pond Compensation.docx

Page 1 of 1


171

M ission ON THE FRASER ",011 DISTRICT

Engineering and Public Works Memorandum

File Category: I NF.ENV.ENV File Folder: 3 rd Party Initiatives

To:

Chief Administrative Officer

From:

Manager of Environmental Services

Date:

April 1, 2009

Subject:

Earth Hour 2009 Results

Recommendation That this report be accepted as information. Background Earth Hour 2009 occurred from 8:30PM to 9:30 PM on Saturday March 28, 2009. The District participated for the second year and advertised the event via its website, posters at the Leisure Centre and advertising coupons handed out at City Hall and the Leisure Centre. The Leisure Centre also dimmed its lights during the hour. The attached BC Hydro news release indicated that BC Hydro measured an average reduction of 1.1% or the equivalent of 1.5 million lights. The reductions ranged from a high of 4.60% in Pemberton to a low of 0.1% in New Westminster. While Mission's results were not provided in the summary, BC Hydro staff indicated to District staff that Mission's reduction was measured at 2.9%. BC Hydro's interpretation of the results is also provided below.

Mike Younie Manager of Environmental Services F:\ENGINEER\MYOUNIE\Memos\Earth Hour 2009 results.docx

Page 1 of 3


172

BC Hydro Interpretation How did B.C. do? Last night, during Earth Hour, we saw an average decrease in our provincial load of 1.1 per cent. We are quite pleased with this result — it is the equivalent of turning off 1.5 million lights. Aren't the results lower than last year? This year's results are lower than last year and we think that's because of the weather. To measure the decrease we compared our data last night to last Saturday (March 21) and the temperatures were much cooler in the hours preceding Earth Hour throughout the province than they were last week. Also, many businesses and individuals took steps to save electricity throughout the entire day so the drop during Earth Hour was less noticeable, but for the entire day, we saved 1.8 per cent. Are you disappointed that you didn't see an increase? Earth Hour is a symbolic event and we think any time there is this much awareness of energy conservation in communities and in the media, it's really a good thing. In fact, we had 84 communities throughout the province sign up to participate this year - that's 32 more communities than last year.

March 29, 2009

B.C. Saves for Earth Hour VANCOUVER — Electricity consumption in B.C. dropped by 1.1 per cent during Earth Hour last night. British Columbians saved 72.67 megawatts of electricity from 8:30 to 9:30 p.m., the equivalent of turning off 1.5 million lights. The highest drop in consumption — 4.6 per cent — was recorded in Pemberton. Eighty four communities throughout the province participated in Earth Hour this year. In 2008, the overall reduction in load during Earth Hour was two per cent throughout the entire hour. Organized by WWF and sponsored locally in part by BC Hydro, Earth Hour is an annual global effort to address climate change that emphasizes the importance of understanding that individual participation and simple changes can make a big difference to the planet. If British Columbians implemented the same conservation measures just one hour every evening, the combined savings would be enough power more than 2,400 homes for an entire year. Although Earth Hour is over, BC Hydro reminds British Columbians to keep conservation top of mind and to practice energy efficient behaviours. By joining Team Power Smart, individuals

Page 2 of 3


173

can set an electricity conservation target of 10 per cent and get access to tools, tips and resources. Savings in individual communities:

Abbotsford 3.8%

Colwood 4.1%

New Westminster 0.1%

Burnaby 1.4%

Langford 4.1%

North Vancouver District 2.7%

Coquitlam 2.9%

Parksville 4.1%

Port Coquitlam 3.1%

Delta 1.2%

Bowen Island 3.1%

Prince George 1.5%

Kamloops 1.1%

Revelstoke 2.6%

Richmond 0.3%

Langley Township 2.1%

Oak Bay 3.3%

Saanich 3.7%

Maple Ridge 3.1%

View Royal 3.9%

Surrey 1.5%

Vernon 0.9%

Pemberton 4.6%

Vancouver 1.3%

Victoria 3.1% Contact:

Simi Heer BC Hydro Media Relations Phone: 604 623 3963

Page 3 of 3


174

Engineering and Public Works Memorandum

File Category: File Folder:

INF.TRA.TMP Heritage Park Events

To:

Chief Administrative Officer

From:

Director of Engineering and Public Works

Date:

April 6, 2009

Subject:

Update on Traffic Management Plan For Canada Day 2009

Further to the traffic management plan which was presented to Council on March 16, 2009, Jason Roufosse of Parks Recreation and Culture who is the District's representative on the Canada Day Committee has reviewed the plan and noted some adjustments he plans to make for the 2009 event: •

The barricade suggested for Mary Street south of 5 th Avenue will be placed instead on 3 rd Avenue at Riverview Street to allow some traffic to exit directly onto the Lougheed Highway westbound. The barricade would still achieve the objective of keeping this stream of traffic from trying to access Stave Lake Street south of 5th Avenue. The Canada Day event does not have sufficient funds to pay for flag persons on Stave Lake Street at 5 th Avenue and at 7 th Avenue this year. It is intended to monitor the traffic flow this year to determine if the flag persons are required in subsequent years. Eastbound traffic on 5 th Avenue will be restricted while traffic exits the park after the fireworks are over. This will help reduce congestion at the intersection of 5 th and Mary.

Jason has suggested that the construction of a second gate from the grass field where parking takes place next to Mary Street just north of the existing gate would help reduce the bottleneck at 5 th and Mary. Traffic from the new gate would be directed north on Mary; Traffic from the existing gate would be directed to 5th Avenue. Vehicles parked on Mary and in the gravel parking area to the south could exit south along Mary Street. Don Brown, Heritage Park Manager, estimates that the cost of constructing a second gate and providing the necessary asphalt aprons at the gate will be $3,000. Neither Mr. Brown nor Parks, Recreation and Culture have funds available to construct the gate. Both have suggested that they can make do with the existing gate this year provided that some traffic control personnel are available at the end of the fireworks to manage the traffic flow out of the gate. An assessment can be made at this year's event whether a second gate is really needed. However, if Council wishes to have the gate installed this year, funds could be allocated from contingency.

FAENGINEER \DRIECKEN \Traffic\Report Re 2009 Canada Day Traffic Management.doc

Encl I have revi wed the financial aspects of this report Ken Bjorgaard Page 1 of 1


62175

FLAGPERSON 7TH AVE.

VE

BARRICADE PREVENTING SIB TRAFFIC

OPEN GATE ON MARY STREET

6TH AVE

5A AVE.

FLAGPERSON

l llllllll I

TRAFFIC CONTROL BY HERITAGE PARK VOLUNTEERS

-

5TH AVE.

rrrm

i

BARRICADE PREVENTING SIB 4TH AV

TRAFFIC CONTROL

barrf

TRAFFIC -Lt

.

3RD AVE

RCMP OFFICER FOR

ARC.

11111111b

TRAFFIC CONTROL PLAN FOR EXIT FROM CANADA DAY FIREWORKS EVENT


176

Fraser Valley Regional District 45950 Cheam Ave, Chilliwack, BC V2P 1N6 Phone: 1-800-528-0061 or (604) 702-5000 Fax: (604) 792-9684

MEMORANDUM To:

The Chair and Members of the Executive Committee

From:

Alison Stewart, Senior Planner

Subject:

Update of the Strategic Review of Transit in the Fraser Valley

Date:

March 5, 2009

File No.:

8330-21-006

RECOMMENDATION:

THAT this update of the Strategic Review of Transit in the Fraser Valley be received for information. ISSUE: The Fraser Valley Regional District is currently undertaking a Strategic Review of Transit in the Fraser Valley in partnership with the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure (MoTI), BC Transit, and TransLink. BACKGROUND: On November 14, 2008 Urban Systems Ltd. was selected as the project consultant and subsequently met with the Project Steering Committee and Project Technical Committee, consisting of representatives from MoTI, BC Transit, FVRD and TransLink. During December and January, Urban Systems Ltd. also met with local government engineering and planning representatives to discuss the project and give local government staff an opportunity to provide an overview of current local transit systems as well as outline community objectives and plans in their respective communities with regards to transit. Local government staff were also provided with copies of the draft Public Advisory Committee (PAC) Terms of Reference for review and were asked to provide the project manager with feed back and an appropriate time-frame as to when respective FVRD Councils would be able to forward nominations for the Committee. The project team is awaiting the final nominations for the PAC and will be conducting the first PAC meeting in mid-March. Communications The purpose of this memo is to outline the communications initiatives undertaken to date and other initiatives planned to make sure there is a good information flow to local

Page 1 of 2


177

governments, the general public and other stakeholders in the strategic review. Communication initiatives include: 1.

Project web site: http://www.th.qov.bc.ca/FraserValIevTransit/ ;

2.

Project newsletter (Appendix A), which is available from the project web site under "publications";

3.

A communication strategy as outlined in Appendix B;

4.

Regular project update reports from staff to the FVRD Executive Committee and Board; and

5.

Regular staff meetings with the Transportation and Transit Working Group consisting of local government engineering and planning staff tasked by their local governments to provide input and feedback to the project (Appendix C â&#x20AC;&#x201D; draft meeting notes).

Progress As shown in Figure 1, the project work plan consists of 6 phases. Although the PAC is still under development, the project is moving forward to Phase 2: "Building the Foundation". The work in Phase 2 provides the background information necessary for informed discussions and decisions to take place as the project moves forward.

The Work Plan

Project ThRiation :20e&

oneeenten

COST:

3. Regional Vision 2009

(X.-W.9er

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

5 Phases

Monmpal

Vision

2[111 October

5. Transit Concept Ptiln

6 Document the Strategy

.2131,1 ZRaura

Album

201e

There is no fee associated with this update.

COMMENT BY DEPARTMENT HEAD: Reviewed and supported COMMENT BY DIRECTOR OF FINANCE:

No requirement for comment

COMMENT BY CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER: Reviewed and supported

Page 2 of 2


3trinegic

A.eview oi i rcuisn in uie r raser v

overview

APPENDIX A BRITISH 01141101 COLUMBIA The Best Place as ,' ACINMESEMINEEMEMEME=6"...

B.C. Home

a

All B.C. Government

C

Transportation and Infrastructure

CI

Search I B.C. Home

rage oi 178

Transportation and Infrastructure

Main index Contact Us

Strategic Review of Transit in the Fraser Valley

Help 0 . Printer rai l Version

Transportation and Infrastructure Home Strategic Review of Transit in the Fraser Valley Overview

Overview

Strategic Review of Transit in the Fraser Valley

+ Publications -I) Public Participation -) Your Views + Project Partners â&#x20AC;˘ Contacts

Overview The Fraser Valley is one of the fastest growing regions in British Columbia and the need for efficient transit services is growing along with the population. Transit Vision for the Fraser Valley

.4 B.C. Legislation In November 2008 Transportation and Infrastructure Minister Kevin Falcon announced a

B.C.Acts and Statutes -) Transportation Acts and Statutes

comprehensive study of the transit needs of the Fraser Valley. It will identify and assess options for transit services within the Fraser Valley and how to best provide transit service between the Fraser Valley and Metro Vancouver. The Fraser Valley Transit Study will explore all options available to address future demand, including the viability of using the Southern Rail Corridor (Interurban Line, Chilliwack to Surrey) for commuter rail, This study encompasses the communities within the boundary of the Fraser Valley Regional District (Mission, Abbotsford, Chilliwack, Kent, Harrison Hot Springs, and Hope). The result of this study will be a series of working papers that will shape the future of transit in the valley as we approach the benchmark years of 2020 and 2030 identified in the province's Provincial Transit Plan. The working papers will focus on establishing a foundation for future transit services at both the municipal and regional scales and a final concept plan will outline an implementation strategy to deliver effective and reliable transit in the Fraser Valley. The Fraser Valley Transit Study is largely funded by the Province and is being developed in partnership with the Fraser Valley Regional District, BC Transit and TransLink. The $400,000 study was awarded to Urban Systems. An initial assessment of transit demand will be completed by April 2009 with stakeholder and public consultation to follow. A final report is expected in early 2010. ,

Top

B C. falNiSTR

F TRANSPOPTATIou, : -.ND INFR., ,STRUCTuRE

httnâ&#x20AC;˘//www th o-nv hp r.a/Frace.rVallmiTrancit/

DISCLAIMER

PRIVACY

ACCES'SiBiL;

(19/(11/111(19


179 BRITISH OWN COLUMBIA 1he

Pate on 1.4rth

STRATEGIC REVIEW OF TRANSIT IN THE FRASER VALLEY Project Status Update: February 7009 BACKGROUND

Building the Foundation

March

The Fraser Valley is one of the fastest growing regions in British Columbia and the need for efficient transit services is growing along with the population. In November 2008 Transportation and Infrastructure Minister Kevin Falcon announced a comprehensive study of the transit needs of the Fraser Valley. This study will identify and assess options for transit services within the various communities throughout the Valley and also determine how to best provide transit services between the Fraser Valley and Metro Vancouver. This study will explore all transit options to address future demands including the viability of the old Interurban line between Chilliwack and Surrey as a commuter route. This review is largely funded by the Province and is being developed in partnership with the Fraser Valley Regional District, BC Transit and TransLink. The $400,000 study was awarded to Urban Systems which expects to deliver a final report in early 2010. This final report will consist of a series of working papers that will shape the future of transit in the Fraser Valley to meet the objectives set out in the Province's $14 billion Provincial Transit Plan.

PROJECT COMMITTEES Success of this review relies heavily on stakeholder engagement throughout the project's lifespan. A number of committees have been identified to liaise with the project team to provide valuable input and feedback on a number of key deliverables. These committees include:

Steering Committee: comprised of representatives from each of the partner agencies and is responsible for directing the project and approving the final strategy reports.

Technical Committee: each of the project partners will assign experts to this committee to provide input on technical matters.

Transportation & Transit Working Group: comprised of municipal representatives from each of the communities in the Fraser Valley, including the regional district, to provide input into the review

Public Advisory Committee (PAC): comprised of members of the public representing all areas in the Fraser Valley. This group will represent present and future transit users and will be consulted on a regular basis throughout the project. The project will also be consulting neighbouring communities, transit experts and organizations with an interest in Fraser Valley transit. The general public will be engaged through a series of open houses. The dates and locations of the open houses are to be determined.

ar77 ansit -

TRANS

1 .INK

(- --

(IM

BRITISH COLUMBIA Ih Bts:P.ne

SRTFV Project Status Update (Newsletter 1, February 2009)


180

PHASE 1 - PROJECT INITIATION

PHASE 2 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; BUILDING THE FOUNDATION

The first phase of this project is now complete as the partner agencies have met and have set the course to drive this strategic review forward. The project team has consulted neighbouring municipalities to further understand the impacts the review will have on transit services outside the Fraser Valley.

Phase 2 is now underway with an expected completion date at the end of March. Through this phase, the project team will gain a better understanding of the local and regional context underpinning this study.

During the project initiation, background information has been collected and analyzed, including: relevant community plans; transit and transportation documentation and data; transit plans and financial information and other relevant data such as land use information and census data. Information gaps have also been identified and the project team is currently in the process of collecting additional information pertinent to this study. The project has, for example, expanded the scope of the study's data needs to include a survey of West Coast Express users.

The project team has also commenced the market analysis focusing on existing transit services in the region and on transit and travel nodes that affect current and future transit services. Current market research is focusing on a community based phone survey and one-on-one interviews with employment attraction centres. Through this research the project team will ascertain best practices by identifying different ranges of transit services, integrating fixed and flexible services, fare comparisons and accessible transit options. The result of this phase will be a series of technical working papers that will provide the foundation for the next two phases in the study: the municipal transit vision and the regional transit vision.

UPDATE ON THE COMMUNICATIONS AND CONSULTATION PLAN The project team is currently anticipating the final nominations for the Public Advisory Committee (PAC.) and will be conducting the first PAC session mid-March. A final Communications and Consultation Plan will be finalized in March.

For more information and to provide feedback on this project, please visit our website:

www.srtfv.ca

TRANS

BRITISH

COLUMBIA. Placc

SRTFV Project Status Update (Newsletter 1, February 2009)


APPENDIX B

.

Who's Involved?

'

Project Coordination

Agency Stakeholders

Community Public Stakeholders

Other Agency Stakeholders

Project Manager

Executive Council of the FVRD

Public Advisory Committee

Farwest Transit Services Inc.

Project Steering Committee

Transportation Et Transit Working Group of FVRD

Coast Mountain Bus Company

Technical

Councils of Councils for FVRD

Key Local Community Generators (e.g. hospitals, schools, airport, BIA, etc.) General Public Interest Groups (eg. Valley Rail, Heritage Rail, etc.)

Neighbouring Municipalities

Committee

Peer Review Committee

West Coast Express

Transit Operators BC Transit'

f.

FVRD

04/40 cot t

nsti

Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure

TRANS INK

Co


rri

r,

-

,1 1

c .4 ,

1.1

'

I

I

H

rI

1

.-!"

!•;.L (7. .j- : '1 0 ril.)

(..- •

.

How are stakeholders involved? di

tot; ry,. O - .2 L

O

A

to ti

4-i c C 1,0 a .c tI..) t..1 t tiJ 0)

mt.

0

at

tn

L. 4_, ... ,...

vi

t

a) .1--al al a sei 0 ii, ?.

0 1,.. ta. , al) u 4.4 = 'M -0 15 M

ID CL

''' AB

Z.

Project Coolndination Project Manager

NI

Project Steering Committee

4

Technical Committee Peer Review Committee

4

4 Agency Stakeholderi

Executive Council of FVRD FVRD Transportation I Transit Technical Working Group Council of Councils for FVRD

NI

lit

NI

4

Ni

Ministry of Oft. l" 6 Trinporration • M...., 1 0,

and Initastructurt•

q

TRAPISIK


• [

I.;

1:1 r

•.,

,

!

tr--)

r

How are stakeholders involved? d:1 ...-

u

vl

vt CJ vi

84

o

u 0

vs s-

0

n

t c

t 43) Iv CO 44 c a eti

o.c

X t.) Ili el

til

=r-

a- iv

CL

tit

d:i C c VT 0

> -,-- 0 t

0

b u 4d =

71 '1:1 -11

.., r0

Lj

Public Advisory Committee

4

Key Local Community Generators

V

NI

E.-

4

General Public

V

01

,

L7') ce tti Community Public Stakeholders 4 0

0 tu.

s...

0)

3

0)

z

8

Nil

V

V

Other Agency II Public Stakeholders Far-west Transit Services Inc. -

4

4'

Coast Mountain Bus Co

V

V

West Coast Express

4

4 4

Neighbouring Municipalities

BC Transit"'

4

V

0141110 mu trot

(At t'NlIti

Ministri. of Trankportanon and Infrastructure

TRANSAIK

.


184

Fraser Valley Regional District Transportation & Transit Technical Working Group February 27, 2009 @ 10:00 a.m. FVRD Boardroom, 45950 Cheam Avenue, Chilliwack, B.C.

MEETING NOTES Committee Members Present:

Hugh Sloan, FVRD Sid Bertelsen, FVRD Alison Stewart, FVRD Corey Newcomb, FVRD Gerald Kingston, FVRD Rod Sanderson, City of Chilliwack Karen Stanton, City of Chilliwack Elvis Riou, City of Abbotsford Russ Mammel, City of Abbotsford Carl Johannsen, City of Abbotsford Kerry Hilts, District of Kent Darcey Kohuch, District of Kent Rick Bomhof, District of Mission

Barclay Pitkethly, District of Mission Peter Klitz, Translink Jim Prokop, Translink Jim Hester, Min. of Transportation & Infrastructure Ashok Bhatti, Min. of Transportation & Infrastructure Michael Braun, Min. of Transportation & Infrastructure John Steiner, Urban Systems Lorraine Martens, FVRD (Recording Secretary) Regrets:

Larry Burk, Village of Harrison Hot Springs Basse Clement, Urban Systems

Delegations representatives also present:

Joe Zaccaria, South Fraser OnTrax Bill Taylor, South Fraser OnTrax Jordan Bateman, South Fraser OnTrax/Township of Langley Michelle Sparrow, South Fraser On Trax Myrtle Macdonald, Rail for the Valley Donald Bellamy, Rail for the Valley Susan Blye, Rail for the Valley John Vissers, Rail for the Valley Peter Holt, VALTAC (Valley Transportation Advisory Committee) Lee Lockwood, VALTAC (Valley Transportation Advisory Committee) 1

OPENING REMARKS

Hugh Sloan opened the meeting at 10:05 a.m. Round Table introductions were conducted for the benefit of the delegation guests.

CAUsers\astewart\AppData\Local\Microsoft\Windows\Temporary Internet Files\OLKF9BR2009 02 27 Meeting Notes Transportation Transit Working Group.doc


185 Transportation & Transit Working Group February 27, 2009

Page 2

DELEGATIONS

2.

Hugh Sloan advised that representatives from groups advocating the return for passenger rail had been invited to the meeting as an opportunity to present and discuss their perspective and vision on rail. South Fraser OnTrax Joe Zaccaria and Jordan Bateman spoke for the South Fraser OnTrax presentation The South Fraser is a unique sub-region within southern BC and the Lower Mainland. South Fraser OnTrax is an advocate for smart growth development and transit options. Transit issues: • • • • • • • •

Transit Deficit in the South Fraser region. Current focus is on getting people to Vancouver. Translink numbers show the need for South of Fraser community connections — there is no LRT or Streetcars — only roads and buses. Need for South Fraser community connections. The need for long-term and sustainable living, working and transportation solutions. Lack of progressive alternatives (water, rail and roads) that are now required to move goods. The need for innovative strategies that connect walking, cycling and overall people movement within our communities and beyond. We have roads but most don't have bike lanes.

Suggested Solutions: • • • • • • • • • •

Reactivate Light Rail Transit from Abbotsford to Surrey. Eventually connect to Chilliwack. Local streetcar systems — Abbotsford, the Langleys and Surrey. Frequent LRT service with connection to Abbotsford Airport. Community Shuttle Service — connect to LRT. Land use and transportation planning fit together. Build complete communities (Metro Vancouver Liveable Region). Build complete roads. Install rail lines with all complete roads. Coordinate all new underground utilities to facilitate LRT.

Friends of Rail for the Valley Society Myrtle Macdonald, Don Bellamy, and John Vissers spoke for the Rail for the Valley Society. The Mission of Friends of Rail for the Valley Society is to advocate for the creation of a comprehensive passenger rail and transit network for the entire Fraser Valley, from Vancouver to Hope. Issues:


186 Transportation & Transit Working Group February 27, 2009

• •

• • • • •

Page 3

In the Upper Fraser Valley there is a strong support for Interurban passenger Rail, but not for Rapid Transit Buses. In 2007 a petition for Rail for the Valley got over 900 signatures and recently an online petition already has more than 600 names emphasizing the urgency for light railway service south of the Fraser River. Seniors very frequently express dislike for the high speed, fumes and inconvenience of buses. Everyone in Chilliwack complains about traffic jams and the increasing number of huge trucks. The long, flat, windy strip of highway between Abbotsford and Chilliwack lacks services, amenities and safety. The Upper Fraser Valley is no longer a tourist haven. No amount of bridge building, fast buses and road widening will correct traffic congestion and smog. Travel by light railway is relaxing, scenic, safe and rapid.

Solutions: • It is timely and inexpensive to reopen Interurban Rail Service using the Southern Railway line. • The Southern Railway route is convenient for students, the elderly, tourists and commuters. • The Southern Railway right-of-way is owned by the Provincial Government. The track is owned by Southern Railway. • The line would be popular for Chilliwack students, seniors, tourist and commuter passengers bound for Sumas. John Vissers added: • • • •

The role of transportation planning must anticipate future needs of the community. There is an increasing growth in single occupancy vehicle (SOV) traffic. The cost of moving people and goods around the Fraser Valley will dramatically increase. Light rail, or regional rail, could provide an alternative to SOV and become the "leverage" need to aid in the transition to a more sustainable future.

Don Bellamy mentioned that he had provided the constituency office of John Les, MLA with a copy of his presentation for a demonstration project with respect to the work of the Rail for the Valley — Heritage Rail. Unfortunately that copy was Mr. Bellamy's only copy and although he has made a request for return of the copy he has had no response. FVRD staff agreed to assist Mr. Bellamy to find that presentation.ACTION

VALTAC (Valley Transportation Advisory Committee) Peter Holt spoke to the VALTAC presentation. VALTAC represents a South of Fraser (SoF) Regional perspective focusing on transportation and transit opportunities. • • •

SoF municipalities are groupings of smaller communities synonymous to metropolitan neighbourhoods. There is a need for better transit network to connect SoF communities based on current reality and projected growth. VALTAC urges a detailed review of the feasibility of a passenger service using part or the entire BC Hydro rail corridor. o Phase 1: Scott Road Sky Train to Langley City /Trinity Western University (TWU)


187 Transportation & Transit Working Group February 27, 2009

• • • •

Page 4

o Phase 2: Langley City/TWU to Abbotsford o Phase 3: Abbotsford to Chilliwack New technologies are making rail options more attractive to passengers. "Streetcar-Trains"-LRT are an environmentally friendly way of efficiently moving large numbers of people. Modern LRT systems attract new transit ridership. They do not need to be "rapid transit". Early development in the Fraser Valley followed the interurban rail corridor. Many employment centres and town centres are still on the line.

Summary of conclusions: • • •

The provincially owned BC Electric Rail Corridor needs to be incorporated in future transit plans. The Community Rail Partnerships currently being adopted in the UK could be a model that works for the Fraser Valley. The reintroduction of passenger service can be phased in so that it services the entire Fraser Valley.

Hugh Sloan thanked the delegations for their presentations noting that this was a great first contact and that they had given the committee passionate, provocative and informative perspectives on the issue of rail transportation. He asked for time for the Committee to think through and digest what was seen and heard. The delegations left the meeting at this time. (12:12 p.m.)

3

MEETING NOTES

3.1

Meeting Notes of January 19, 2009

Hugh Sloan asked if there were any errors or omissions in the Meeting Notes and hearing none he declared the Meeting Notes of January 19, 2009 accepted as circulated.

4

MATTERS ARISING

Rick Bomhof advised of a concern expressed at the recent Mission/Abbotsford Transit Committee meeting. Their concern was what is this study going to accomplish, what is it going to achieve, and what are the goals. He noted there was a sense of disconnection and frustration with the level of communication between the Project team and municipal councils. Discussion ensued. •

It was noted that there is an FVRD Board resolution to have a Council of Councils meeting and that at the last meeting of this committee it was agreed that Urban Systems would determine when the study is at a proper state for this meeting (most likely after the first phase of the study is completed). There is a need for clarity in any discussion/communication with councils on the process of this study. The process must be clearly defined and explained how this study links, overlaps and dovetails with other process such as the BC Transit five-year plan.


188 Transportation & Transit Working Group February 27, 2009

• • • • •

• •

• • • •

Page 5

Ongoing news items regarding TransLink are creating a diversion contributing to some of the confusion. BC Transit has just decided to place their bus service expansion plan for Mission on hold and also delayed work on the 5-year Business Plan for Abbotsford/Mission. At the Mission/Abbotsford Transit Committee and in the light of the BC Transit decision, a need for more public consultation is necessary (over and above the PAC). It was agreed that the newsletter (previously distributed at the FVRD Executive Committee) will be ACTION distributed more broadly, i.e, to all municipal CAOs and council members. The framework for this study provides that the engagement with councils and mayors would be through the FVRD Executive Committee and Regional Board as well as the _Council of Council mechanisms. However this does not preclude one-on-one council presentations. The website for the project will be up and running shortly which will help ease in the communication problems. It will include the Terms of Reference and the newsletter. There is a need to have some direct communication with both mayor and councils which spells out what we are about and the kinds of next steps we envision between now and the next few months to remove some of the concern that is occurring. It was agreed that a representative from the Project team will attend the next Mission/Abbotsford ACTION Transit Committee meeting. One of the real functions of this group is to make sure we are connected with the councils to ensure they know their input is important to this exercise. It is important to understand what the travel demands are, what the issues are in the Valley, between Valley communities, and between Valley Communities and Metro Vancouver. This issue of communication and connection to the councils will be discussed at the Project Steering ACTION Committee.

5

COMMUNICATIONS & CONSULTATION STRATEGY

5.1

Update on Public Advisory Committee (PAC)

Ashok Bhatti reported he had received correspondence from City of Abbotsford, District of Hope, and District of Kent but had not as yet received anything from the other three member municipalities. Representatives from the City of Chilliwack and the Village of Harrison Hot Springs were not present at ACTION this time to comment. Project team staff will follow up with them to move things forward. Barclay Pitkethly spoke for the District of Mission. He advised that they did not get any applications through a 2-week advertising campaign. They have reached out to some members of the community and they have possibly three people to put their names forward. They are planning to take this to council on Monday, March 3, and move forward from there. Hugh Sloan advised that one of the things discussed at the FVRD Executive meeting was the arbitrary split of membership on the PAC. Collectively the mayors felt that wasn't necessary to be bound to a certain number of members for a certain community. The key thing is that nominees/appointees are what is needed. It was noted that to enhance the process any barriers that may arise to prevent a person from volunteering on the committee should be identified as there may be a way to deal with them. Discussion ensued:


189 Transportation & Transit Working Group February 27, 2009

• •

Page 6

PAC Membership of elected officials would open up more avenues for the District of Mission. The University of the Fraser Valley (UFV) is very interested in participating on the Public Advisory Committee. UFV serves at least three different communities and could possibly be a member at large rather than representing just one community. The importance of the PAC was stressed as an integral part of the overall study.

John Steiner spoke about communication to councils. To underline the urgency of the situation, he suggested giving them a deadline for appointing members for PAC and give an approximate date for the first meeting of the PAC. Hugh Sloan added that communication is just as much about letting people know what is going to happen as it is about specific transit issues. Encourage councils to be part of the process. Ensure confidence that they will be part of the process. There is value in that apart from discussing transit issues right now.

6

MEETINGS WITH METRO STAFF (Update)

Meetings were held with staff of the neighbouring municipalities of Maple Ridge (February 11), Langley Township (February 3), City of Langley (January 29), and the City of Surrey (January 27). In his memo dated 2009 02 24, John Steiner provided a summary of comments and requests from these communities in relation to the Fraser Valley Transit study. Highlights: • • •

• •

There was generally a strong interest in the study. Known demand patterns between specific areas in the Fraser Valley and the neighbouring communities were discussed and will be explored through the study. South of Fraser communities confirmed their current long-term transit priorities are reflected in the TransLink Area Transit Plan and they expect this could be augmented with the findings from the Fraser Valley transit review in terms of future inter-regional connections to the east. Municipal staff will report to their councils any information generated from the Fraser Valley study. Municipal staff would appreciate specific information and potential involvement in developing a vision for inter-regional services that extend into Metro Vancouver.

Ashok Bhatti added that one of the consistent themes heard was that travel patterns have changed dramatically over the last 10-15 years with the emergence of the City of Abbotsford as a central hub for employment and for attractions such as the malls and the big box stores. The focus of the study should be on the challenges in the Fraser Valley first and then on the linkages with Metro Vancouver municipalities.

7

WEST COAST EXPRESS AND THE FVRD TRANSIT STRATEGY

A concern was raised as to the West Coast Express being a broader regional service rather than a municipal facility. Discussion ensued.


190 Transportation & Transit Working Group February 27, 2009

• • • • • • • • •

8

Page 7

There have been discussions at the FVRD Executive Committee for sometime with respect to this issue. Similarly, the same perspective would apply to connections to the Abbotsford Airport and in particular road connections to the Airport which are currently viewed in a municipal sense. This issue will have to be carefully looked at in the study. Construction of the Evergreen Line through to Coquitlam will not affect the West Coast Express. They are two different markets. There is a proposal for the development of a 10-year plan for the West Coast Express itself. Through the study there will be an enhanced survey for the West Coast Express to provide perspective on the ridership in terms of origins and destinations. There is already some of this information out there and the study survey will add to that. The study is not looking to provide specific commentary as to the cost sharing formula. Everyone has to have the same vision of what transit is going to be doing in the Fraser Valley and our first commitment is to get the information and bring it forward in a manner that allows discussion to occur. The information will be handed back for a political approach and decision from the FVRD Board.

PROJECT STATUS

John Steiner reported: • • • •

9

The working papers are coming together. Market research is being conducted over the next two weeks. Background information is being collected. PAC appointments are urgently needed.

DISCUSSION

With respect to the presentations from the delegations, it was noted that the study should not ignore the rail links and concerns that were presented by the delegations but the main focus as a region should be on what is needed in terms of transit internally in the Fraser Valley, to ensure we can continue to create strong and self sustaining communities. There is a need to set up some dialogue with the rail groups to ensure they receive information. In addition, through PAC, perhaps someone who is centered in one of our communities in the Valley will become involved and make sure all interests are represented on that group. The application proposed by Greyhound Canada to reduce/cut service from the Fraser Valley to Vancouver was briefly discussed. Hugh Sloan advised that this issue was addressed at the FVRD Board. The Board is concerned that as Greyhound is an exclusively licensed carrier, this proposal will put the economically challenged people in the Canyon at risk. A letter will be written to Greyhound requesting the service to be continued. The issue of appointing elected officials to the PAC was discussed. The following was noted: •

The role of PAC is to provide an independent sounding board to vet the process.


191 Transportation & Transit Working Group February 27, 2009

9

Page 8

The PAC was intended to include people who represent transit needs - seniors, youth, students, employees of specific generators, people with disabilities, cultural groups, Chamber of Commerce members — people who see transit as part of an economic development vision for the Valley. Improved communication with the elected officials must be addressed to ensure that they understand that they will be making decisions regarding the process and will be intimately involved in whatever the outcome. ADJOURNMENT

The meeting adjourned at 1:07 p.m.


WSC

192

Minutes of the Abbotsford/Mission Water & Sewer Commission meeting held March 12, 2009, at 9:02 a.m. in Room 530 of Abbotsford City Hall WSC Members Present: Mayor Atebe (Vice Chair) (Mission); Councillor Gibson (Abbotsford); Councillor Gidda (Mission); Councillor Gill (Abbotsford); Councillor Piecas (Mission); and Councillor Ross (Abbotsford) UMC Members Present: General Manager Engineering, Regional Utilities — J. Gordon (Abbotsford); Acting Director, Corporate Services J. Lewis (Abbotsford); Director of Finance — K. Bjorgaard (Mission); and Director of Engineering and Public Works - R. Bomhof (Mission) Other Staff Present: Manager of Utility Operations — L. Stein (Abbotsford); Wastewater & Asset Engineering Manager — R. Isaac (Abbotsford); Water & Solid Waste Engineering Manager — T. Kyle (Abbotsford); Utility Construction and Source Control Engineering Manager - M. Mayfield (Abbotsford); and Recording Secretary — R. Brar (Abbotsford) 1.

CALL TO ORDER

The meeting was called to order at 9:02 a.m. Moved by Councillor Gill, seconded by Councillor Gidda, that the agenda be amended to add Report No. UMC 23-2009, dated March 9, 2009, from the Manager of Utility Operations, regarding Dickson Snow Pack Equivalent .

29-2009 2.

CARRIED.

ADOPTION OF MINUTES Minutes of the February 12, 2009 Meeting Moved by Councillor Gibson, seconded by Councillor Ross, that the minutes of the Abbotsford/Mission Water & Sewer Commission meeting held February 12. 2009, be adopted. WSC 30-2009

3. None.

DELEGATIONS

CARRIED.


193

Minutes of the Abbotsford/Mission Water & Sewer Commission meeting held Page 2 March 12, 2009. at 9:02 a.m. in Room 530 of Abbotsford City Hall 4.

BUSINESS OUT OF MINUTES

.1

Monthly Follow-up Report Moved by Councillor Gibson, seconded by Councillor Gill, that staff organize a meeting with the Members of Legislative Assembly, Members of Parliament, Fraser Valley Regional Chair, Mayor Peary, Mayor Atebe and all WSC members to discuss the Sub-Regional System. WSC 31-2009

CARRIED.

Moved by Councillor Gibson, seconded by Councillor Gill, that the monthly follow-up report be received. WSC 32-2009 .2

CARRIED.

JAMES Plant Monthly Report — February 2009 (5700-02) Moved by Councillor Gidda, seconded by Councillor Ross, that Report No. UMC 17-2009, dated March 2, 2009, from the Manager of Utility Operations, regarding JAMES Plant Monthly Report — February 2009, be received. WSC 33-2009

.3

CARRIED.

Monthly Water Report — February 2009 (5720-02) Moved by Councillor Gibson, seconded by Councillor Ross, that Report No. UMC 20-2009, dated March 4, 2009, from the Manager of Utility Operations, regarding the Monthly Water Report — February 2009, be received. WSC 34-2009

.4

CARRIED.

Financial Statements — January 2009 (5700-01) Moved by Councillor Ross, seconded by Councillor Gidda, that Report No. UMC 18 2009, dated March 3, 2009, from -

the Acting Director, Corporate Service (Abbotsford), regarding Financial Statements — January 2009, be received. WSC 35-2008

CARRIED.


194

Minutes of the Abbotsford/Mission Water & Sewer Commission meeting held Page 3 March 12, 2009. at 9:02 a.m. in Room 530 of Abbotsford City Hall 5.

REPORTS

.1

Sewer Use Bylaw Revisions -- Stakeholder Meetings Update (5750-07) Moved by Councillor Gill, seconded by Councillor Ross, that Report No. UMC 14-2009, dated March 6, 2009, from the Utility Construction & Source Control Engineering Manager, regarding the Sewer Use Bylaw Revisions - Stakeholder Meetings Update, be received; and staff revise Mission and Abbotsford Sewer Use Bylaws to reflect the recommended action items in this report and bring the completed Sewer Use Bylaws back to the WSC for endorsement. WSC 36-2008

.2

CARRIED.

Norrish Creek Road Update (5710-04) Moved by Councillor Pieces, seconded by Councillor Ross, that Report No. UMC 16-2009, dated February 24, 2009, from the Water & Solid Waste Engineering Manager, regarding the Norrish Creek Road, be received. WSC 37-2009

.3

CARRIED.

Water Shortage Response Plan and Water Conservation 2009 (5710-40) Moved by Councillor Pieces. seconded by Councillor Gill, that Report No. UMC 15-2009, dated February 23, 2009, from the Water & Solid Waste Engineering Manager, regarding Water Shortage Response Plan and Water Conservation 2009, be received; .and: (1) the Water Shortage Response Plan be approved; and (2) the Abbotsford/Mission Water and Sewer Services recommend the City of Abbotsford and District of Mission Councils adopt the Water Shortage Response Plan in their bylaws. WSC 38-2009 CARRIED.


195

Minutes of the Abbotsford/Mission Water & Sewer Commission meeting held Page 4 March 12. 2009, at 9:02 a.m. in Room 530 of Abbotsford City Hall .4

Amended Capital Financial Plans Moved by Councillor Gidda, seconded by Councillor Ross, that Report No. UMC 19-2009, dated March 4, 2009, from the Budget Manager, regarding the Amended Capital Financial Plans, be received; and it be recommended to the City of Abbotsford and District of Mission Councils that the amended twenty-year capital financial plans for the Abbotsford/Mission Water and Sewer Services, be approved. WSC 39-2009

.5

CARRIED.

"Gas Tax" Grant Applications by the Abbotsford/Mission Water & Sewer Commission and Securing Safe and Sustainable Drinking Water in the Abbotsford-Mission Region Moved by Councillor Gill, seconded by Councillor Plecas, that the Policy Discussion Paper on "Gas Tax" Grant Applications by the Abbotsford/Mission Water & Sewer Commission and Securing Safe and Briefing Paper on Sustainable Drinking Water in the Abbotsford-Mission Region, be received. WSC 40-2009

CARRIED.

.6

NEW BUSINESS

.1

Correspondence from Matsqui First Nation, Regarding the Proposed Expansion of the Bevan Wells Project Moved by Councillor Ross, seconded by Councillor Gidda, that the correspondence from Matsqui First Nation, regarding the proposed expansion of the Bevan Wells a letter be cant to Matsqui project. be received.* and .â&#x20AC;˘

e

-,e

resolution for the City of Abbotsford and District of Mission tc forward to the Union of Britich Columbia Municipalities

and Lower Mainland LOC3f, Government Accociation, regarding concultation with Firct Nation.s. WSC 41-2009

CARRIED.

mended by Resolution No. WSC 45 2009, April 9. 2009 -


196

Minutes of the Abbotsford/Mission Water & Sewer Commission meeting held March 12, 2009. at 9:02 a.m. in Room 530 of Abbotsford City Hall Page 5 .2

Dickson Snow Pack Equivalent Moved by Councillor Ross, seconded by Councillor Gill, that Report No. UMC 23-2009, dated March 9, 2009, from the Manager of Utility Operations, regarding Dickson Snow Pack Equivalent, be received. WSC 42-2009

7.

CARRIED.

MOTION TO CLOSE Moved by Councillor Gibson, seconded by Councillor Ross, that the March 12, 2009, WSC meeting, be adjourned (10:13 a.m.). WSC 43-2009

CARRIED. Certified Correct:


197

Minutes of the SPECIAL MEETING (Administration .& Finance) of the DISTRICT OF MISSION COUNCIL held in the Conference Room at the Municipal Hall at 8645 Stave Lake Street, Mission, British Columbia, on Monday, March 9, 2009 commencing at 6:00 pm and continuing on Thursday, March 12, 2009, commencing at 5:40 pm. Committee Members Present:

Mayor James Atebe Councillor Terry Gidda Councillor Paul Horn Councillor Danny Plecas Councillor Mike Scudder Councillor Jenny Stevens Councillor Heather Stewart

Staff Members Present:

Glen Robertson, chief administrative officer Dennis Clark, director of corporate administration Ken Bjorgaard, director of finance Rick Bomhof, director of engineering and public works Kerri Onken, deputy treasurer/collector Debi Decker, administrative clerk

March 9, 2009 - Staff members Ray Herman, director of parks, recreation and culture present for part of the meeting Mike Younie, environmental services manager

1. COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE RESOLUTION TO RESOLVE INTO COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE AF 09/56

Moved by Councillor Stevens, seconded by Councillor Plecas and, RESOLVED: That council now resolve itself into committee of the whole. CARRIED

ADMINISTRATION & FINANCE Councillor Stevens assumed the chair. AF 09/57

Carry-Forwards The director of finance referred to the report dated March 5, 2009, and the listing of projects requesting to be carried forward. Discussion ensued around the electronic ice detection at Dewdney Truck Road and Stave Lake Street and Stave Lake Street North and playground equipment/landscaping, and whether these projects had been started. Staff confirmed that they had not been started, and council questioned if this money could better be spent on other capital projects or parks. Council requested that these three carry-forward line item requests be deferred until staff could investigate further and advise at the March 12, 2009, special council (administration and finance) meeting.

File: ADM.COU.REG Minutes 2009


Special Council Meeting (Administration and Finance) March 9, 2009 & March 12, 2009

Page 2 of 11

Moved by Councillor Horn, and, RECOMMENDED: That the projects identified below, be approved for inclusion in the 2009 Financial Plan (final dollar amounts of carry-forwards will depend on year-end balances). PROJECT DESCRIPTION 2008 Operating Carry-Forward Requests Community Health Planning - Recovery IT Systems Security Audit IT Systems Security Audit — Funded by Stabilization OCP Project — Funded by Surplus Mission Community Heritage Commission Community Health Planning Feasibility Study — Water to Triple Creek 2008 General Capital Carry Forward Request Works Adjacent to Subdivision Hatzic Railway Crossing Cedar Street Design — Cherry to Egglestone Minor Capital Signals - Stave Lake Street at Cherry Avenue GIS Equipment Fiber Optics — Taulbut Street Corporate Printer Replacement Repair - Dewdney Trunk Road at Wiebe Street Mgmt Information Systems Enhancements West Coast Express Sandblast and Paint Information Services Misc Capital Transportation Study Web Content Management Signal Preemption — 7 th Avenue at Grand Street University Endowment Lands Culvert Lining — 7 th Avenue and Murray Street Identix Livescan Fingerprint Station Culvert Lining — 7 th Avenue and Home Street Urban Trails (Master Plan) Burm at Ruskin Trailer Park Public Works Roof Rainfall Monitoring Program Child Care Grant Mission Dike Upgrades Fairbanks Street Landscaping Cedar Valley Detention Pond D1 Leisure Centre Roof Equipment Shed Expansion RCMP Facility Analysis Road Salt Storage Expansion Phase I Waterfront Planning Transit Shelter Spirit Square 2008 Water Capital Carry Forward Requests Development of Backflow Prevention Hydrant Program Bulk Supply to Wren / Highway #7 In-Line Valve Program Telemetry Blow-off Valve Installation Leak Detection Program Pressure Reducing Station Upgrade Fairbanks PRV Replacement 2008 Sewer Capital Carry Forward Requests Capital Equipment Additions Odour Control Unit Scada Monitoring of Pumps Hwy #7 Sewer Main Replacement SLS/Mary Sewer Modeling Software Wren East Trunk Main Study Lift Station Upgrading Heritage Register Heritage Register — Funded by Provincial Grant OCP Project

-

-

-

File: ADM.COU.REG Minutes 2009

198


Special Council Meeting (Administration and Finance)

Page

3 ofll

March 9, 2009 & March 12, 2009

2008 Equipment Capital Carry-Forward Requests Purchase alternate to 5342 18ft Trailer 5187 '87 Ford Pumper 5195 Single Axle Dump Truck 5345 '93 Trailer 5351 '94 Mikasa Plate Tamper Replace 5364 Sander for 5195 Replace 5374 Belly Plow for 5195 5361 '03 Big Shot Boring Machine 5384 '96 John Deere Mower Deck Sale of 5345 '93 trailer Teca L27 5401 Hero Paint Machine Sale of 5187 '87 Ford pumper 5689 Fuel System Sale of 5351 '94 Mikasa plate tamper CARRIED AF 09/58

Gaming Reserve Projections The director of finance stated that council had requested at the last special council (administration and finance) meeting (March 3, 2009) that staff show the projected gaming revenue and the projects, along with costs, that are utilizing these funds. He referred to the spreadsheet that shows the District projecting to receive $550,000 of gaming funds per year, and that the District's portion of the Spirit Square costs, restorative resolutions and social development operating costs, and waterfront planning costs will be funded through this account.

AF 09/59

Status of 2009, 2010, and 2011 Provisional Budget/Tax Increases, including Provisional Spending Packages The director of finance advised, that staff had included all the priority spending packages discussed at the last special council (administration and finance) meeting (March 3, 2009) in each of the three scenarios. Staff noted that regarding the RCMP guards moving to a 24/7 coverage, the dollar amount being requested was incorrect, and that the new amount was $24,416 for each of 2009 and 2010. Staff pointed out that it was discovered that $5,000 for the Oyama delegation trip budgeted for 2009 was approved in December of 2007 as a core budget increase. Staff would be removing the $6,000 spending package and removing the $5,000 on-going core budget increase, but would be including the $5,000 as a one-time expense.

AF 09/60

Late Item #5 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Parks, Recreation and Culture Follow-up Items The director of parks, recreation and culture referred to his late report that itemized the various follow-up requests council had from the last special council (administration and finance) meeting (March 3, 2009).

File: ADM.COU.REG Minutes 2009

199


Special Council Meeting (Administration and Finance) March 9, 2009 & March 12, 2009

Page 4 of /1

Discussion ensued around the hand railing at the north arena and while having no hand railing meets the building code it was felt that this should be reassessed as it could be a potential risk and should be addressed in next year's budget discussions. Discussion 'continued around removing the "senior rate" for leisure centre programs, with staff advising that a drop off in senior participation would be expected. Staff noted that if seniors had paid the adult price in 2008, an additional $43,100 in revenue would have been realized.

AF 09/61

Late Item #2 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Funding for Hedge Replacement

The director of parks, recreation and culture referred to the second of his late reports requesting funding to replace the cedar hedges along Stave Lake Street (along residences on Herar Lane). Staff clarified that only the most southern six or seven houses would receive new cedar trees, and that 8' trees would be planted. Moved by Councillor Horn, and, RECOMMENDED: That funding of $8,400.00 be approved from the 2009 Contingency Account for partial replacement of the cedar hedge along Stave Lake Street in front of residences on Herar Lane. CARRIED

AF 09/62

Late Item #4 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Silverdale Avenue Soils Investigation and Remediation Design

The director of engineering and public works referred to his late report, responding to council's request for information on the phasing of the remedial work on Silverdale Avenue. Moved by Councillor Horn, and, RECOMMENDED: 1. That Valley Geotechnical Engineering Services Ltd. is retained at a cost of $8,000.00 to complete a geotechnical soils investigation, design and updated cost estimate to remediate Silverdale Avenue to a two lane cross-section; and 2. That funding comes from the Arterial Road Reserve. OPPOSED: Councillor Stevens CARRIED

File: ADM.COUREG Minutes 2009

200


Special Council Meeting (Administration and Finance) March 9, 2009 & March 12, 2009

AF

09/63

Page 5 of

11

Council Follow-ups — March 3, 2009 The environmental services manager stated that at the March 3, 2009, special council (administration and finance) meeting, council requested that he be present to discuss his Environmental Charter spending package. He continued by advising that the District receives a Carbon Tax Credit which could be used to fund the charter projects. When questioned, the environmental services manager replied that he would like to go ahead with the low-flow toilets program as the City of Abbotsford was initiating a similar program this year. He explained that there would be a limit, per year, on the number of lowflow toilets that the District would provide a credit towards. He further explained that the old toilets could be crushed and used as cover at the landfill. The environment services manager confirmed that under the Environmental Charter, he is to provide an update to council each year. Moved by Councillor Horn, and, RECOMMENDED: That $20,000 worth of Environmental Charter initiatives be funded through the Carbon Tax Credits that the District of Mission receives. CARRIED Discussion continued around the 7 th Avenue and Cedar Street/Cedar Connector intersection, and a left-turn signal (when travelling east-west on 7 th. Avenue). Staff advised that this intersection is monitored on a continual basis, and that part of the problem might be a "sight distance issue", and not a left-turn signal issue. Council requested that this topic be brought forward to a Traffic Safety Committee meeting, with recommendations brought back to council.

AF 09/64

Status of 2009, 2010, and 2011 Provisional Budget/Tax Increases, including Provisional Spending Packages (continued) Discussion continued on the public budget presentation document, and it was agreed that only three scenarios would be presented. It was discussed whether or not to defer the composite fire department by one year, and for staff to include the Fraser River Heritage Park — gardening services spending package on the budget/tax increase scenario list.

AF 09/65

Late Item #1 — Cancellation of Business Licence and Kennel Licence The director of corporate administration referred to his late report. Council had a few confidential questions regarding this item, and requested that it be brought up at the closed council meeting.

File: ADM.COU.REG Minutes 2009

201


Special Council Meeting (Administration and Finance)

Page 6 of 1 1

March 9, 2009 & March 12, 2009

Moved by Mayor Atebe, and, RECOMMENDED: That council advise Pawsative Pet Services, located at 34380 Kirkpatrick Avenue, Mission, British Columbia, that: 1. In accordance with the Community Charter council will, at its regular meeting of council held on March 16, 2009, consider the cancellation of business licence number 00007643 issued to Pawsative Pet Services; 2. The business owner may attend at that meeting to be heard on this matter; and 3. If, following any presentation by the owner, council determines to cancel the business licence that council further direct staff to not issue a business licence to Dalene Chysyk in the future for any activities related to animals. CARRIED AF 09/66

Late Item #3 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Job Description for the Administrative Clerk - Governance

Discussion ensued around the late item regarding a draft job description for the administrative clerk - governance, and council requested that staff provide dollar amounts for this position at the next special council (administration and finance) meeting. RESOLUTION TO RISE AND REPORT

Mayor Atebe resumed the chair. AF 09/67

Moved by Councillor Horn, seconded by Councillor Stewart and, RESOLVED: That the Committee of the Whole now rise and report. CARRIED 2. ADOPTION OF COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE

AF 09/68

Moved by Councillor Plecas, seconded by Councillor Scudder and, RESOLVED: That the recommendations of the committee of the whole, as contained in items AF09/56 to AF09/67, except item AF09/62, Silverdale Avenue Soils Investigation and Remediation Design, be adopted. CARRIED

File: ADM.COU.REG Minutes 2009

202


Page 7 of 11

Special Council Meeting (Administration and Finance) March 9, 2009 & March 12, 2009

AF

09/69

Moved by Councillor Gidda, seconded by Councillor Scudder and, RESOLVED: That the recommendation of the committee of the whole, as contained in item AF09/62, Silverdale Avenue Soils Investigation and Remediation Design, be adopted. CARRIED

Moved by Councillor Stewart, seconded by Councillor Gidda and, RESOLVED: The meeting be recessed until Thursday, March 12, 2009, at approximately 4:30 pm in the Conference Room. CARRIED The meeting was recessed at 8:40 pm. The meeting reconvened on Thursday, March 12, 2009, at 5:40 pm in the Conference Room. Councillor Stevens resumed the chair. AF 09/70

Communicating Municipal Utility Rate Increases

The director of finance referred to his report dated. February 26, 2009, and discussion ensued around communicating the utility rate increases, and it was agreed that staff would detail the aspects for each utility service. Discussion continued around the large increase for recycling user rates and staff confirmed that this was partly due to the fact that these costs were not visible or broken down in the old contract, but that with the new contract, the break-down of the costs was clear. AF 09/71

Council Follow-ups

The council follow-ups for January 29 th , February 9 th , February were provided for council's information. AF 09/72

23 rd ,

and March 3, 2009

Late Item #6 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Carry Forward of Anti-Icing Budget Funds The director of engineering and public works referred to the late report dated March 10, 2009, and advised council that staff had reviewed the estimate costs and the carry-forward request could be reduced from $65,561 to $51,000. Staff explained that this system was not for forecasted snowfall, but more for when the weather is cold enough to potentially create icy conditions, and that this would save staff from manually going out to check the road conditions in other areas.

File: ADM.COU.REG Minutes 2009

203


Special Council Meeting (Administration and Finance) March 9, 2009 & March 12, 2009

Page 8 of 11

Moved by Councillor Plecas, and, RECOMMENDED: That the lower capital carry-forward request amount of $51,000 for electronic ice detection for the Dewdney Trunk Road at Stave Lake Street and Stave Lake Street North projects be approved. CARRIED AF 09/73

Late Item #4 — Carry Forward of Playground Equipment/Landscaping Funds

The director of parks, recreation and culture referred to his late report dated March 12, 2009, and commented that the funds for the playground equipment/landscaping came from community amenities, which are regulated in their use. Moved by Mayor Atebe, and, RECOMMENDED: That the capital carry forward request of $69,689 for installing playground equipment at Bailey park, Tunbridge park and the Sports Park be approved. CARRIED

AF 09/74

Late Item #2 — New Employee — Part-time Administrative Clerk - Governance

Discussion ensued around the new part-time administrative clerk - governance position with staff pointing out that there was a $20,000 capital component attached to this operating request. It was agreed to include this line item in the budget scenarios for discussion later in the meeting.

AF 09/75

Late Item #3 — Mission Arts Council — Budgeted Core Increase

Staff advised council that the Mission Arts Council were awaiting a response from council regarding their earlier presentation and request for additional funding. Staff referred to the late item that detailed what assistance was being provided to the Mission Arts Council. Moved by Councillor Horn, and, RECOMMENDED: That council communicate to the Mission Arts Council that the District of Mission has a standing motion to assist them financially, above the base amount of $2,130.13, with the yearly increase in municipal property taxes. CARRIED

File: ADM.COU.REG Minutes 2009

204


Special Council Meeting (Administration and Finance) March 9, 2009 & March 12, 2009

AF 09/76

Page 9 of 11

Late Item #5 — General. Cost per Hectare data to Maintain Municipal Parks This item was provided for council's information.

AF 09/77

Late Item #7 — Human Resources Exempt Staff Position Discussion ensued around the human resources exempt staff position, and it was agreed to include this line item in the budget scenarios for discussion later in the meeting.

AF 09/78

Late Item #8 — Private Security Downtown Service Discussion ensued around the private security service in the downtown area, and it was agreed to include this line item in the budget scenarios for discussion later in the meeting.

AF 09/79

Late Item #1 — Provisional Budgets/Tax Increases Scenarios Discussion ensued around the public budget consultation document and how to present the information to the public. It was agreed to present one scenario, and to include the three revenue sources in this option. Discussion continued around: utilizing the new construction revenues from the industrial subdivision, utilizing a portion of the 2008 excess development revenue, and continuing to fund social development and restorative resolutions with gaming revenue. The director of finance confirmed that there are risks associated with utilizing each of the three above listed revenue sources. After further discussion council agreed: 1. that the following budget items were to be included within the budget scenario: Composite Fire Department ($205,321) Staff Recruitment costs ($50,000) Professional Development for Planners ($4,400) Software IT Support Staff (RCMP & Municipal Hall) ($13,068) Fire Emergency Vehicle Operators course ($12,500) Fire Emergency Turnout Gear ($12,000) Small Building Maintenance Projects ($10,000) Fraser River Heritage Park — Gardening Services ($10,851) RCMP Guards Moving to a 24/7 Coveiage ($24,416 Full-time Maintenance Worker ($31,634) Part-time Administrative Clerk ($15,450) 2. that the following budget items were to be included within the budget scenario, with specific public feedback requested: One additional RCMP Officer in 2009 ($120,000) Private Security Service in the Downtown area ($40,320)

File: ADM.COU.REG Minutes 2009

205


Special Council Meeting (Administration and Finance) March 9, 2009 & March 12, 2009

Page 1 0 of 9 1

3. that the following one-time funded budget items were to be included within the budget scenarios, with a note that these items do not affect the budget/tax increase: Full day Exercise for Emergency Response Plan ($5,000) — 2009 Oyama Sister City visit ($5,000) — 2009 Environmental Charter Implementation ($20,000) — 2009 Refurbish Squash Court floors ($8,000) — 2010 Relamping Field Lights at the Sports Park ($6,000) — 2011

Moved by Councillor Horn, and, RECOMMENDED: 1. That council present 7.33% as a basic budget presentation at the public consultation meeting, asking for public feedback on the budget as a whole, but particularly on the private security service in the downtown area and the additional RCMP officer for 2009; and 2. That staff present the composite fire department expenses as a separate line item in the budget presentation. CARRIED

AF 09/80

Late Item #9 — 2009 Budget Planning Schedule The director of finance referred to the 2009 budget planning schedule and discussion ensued around a day for the public budget presentation. It was agreed to hold this meeting prior to the regular meeting of council to be held on Monday, April 6, 2009, starting at 6:00 pm.

RESOLUTION TO RISE AND REPORT Mayor Atebe resumed the chair. AF 09/81

Moved by Councillor Stevens, seconded by Councillor Horn and, RESOLVED: That the Committee of the Whole now rise and report. CARRIED

File: ADM.COU.REG Minutes 2009

206


Special Council Meeting (Administration and Finance) March 9, 2009 & March 12, 2009

3. AF 09/82

Page 11 of 11

ADOPTION OF COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE

Moved by Councillor Scudder, seconded by Councillor Stewart and, RESOLVED: That the recommendations of the committee of the whole, as contained in items AF09/70 to AF09/81, be adopted. CARRIED

4.

OTHER BUSINESS

There was no further business.

5. ADJOURNMENT Moved by Councillor Stevens, seconded by Councillor Gidda, and RESOLVED: That the meeting be adjourned. CARRIED. The meeting was adjourned at 8:45 pm.

JAMES ATEBE, MAYOR G:\finance\minutes\sc 090309-090312.doc

File: ADM.COU.REG Minutes 2009

DENNIS CLARK, DIRECTOR OF CORPORATE ADMINISTRATION

207


208

Minutes of a JOINT MEETING between DISTRICT OF MISSION COUNCIL and CITY OF ABBOTSFORD COUNCIL held in the conference room at the municipal hall at 8645 Stave Lake Street, Mission, British Columbia, on Tuesday, April 7, 2009 commencing at 3:30 pm. District of Mission Council Members Present: Mayor James Atebe Councillor Terry Gidda (arrived at 4:40 pm) Councillor Paul Horn Councillor Danny Plecas Councillor Mike Scudder Councillor Heather Stewart District of Mission Council Members Absent: Councillor Jenny Stevens City of Abbotsford Council Members Present: Mayor George Peary Councillor Les Barkman Councillor Simon Gibson Councillor Moe Gill Councillor Lynne Harris Councillor Dave Loewen Councillor Bill Macgregor Councillor Patricia Ross Councillor John Smith District of Mission Staff Present: Glen Robertson, chief administrative officer Dennis Clark, director of corporate administration Ken Bjorgaard, director of finance Rick Bomhof, director of engineering and public works Debi Decker, administrative assistant (recording secretary) City of Abbotsford Staff Present: Frank Pizzuto, city manager Jim Gordon, director of engineering Russ Mammel, manager of transportation Elvis Riou, manager of engineering services

File: ADM.COU.REG Minutes 2009


Joint Council Meeting â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Mission/Abbotsford April 7, 2009

1.

Page 2 0 f 7

WELCOMING REMARKS â&#x20AC;&#x201D; MAYOR JAMES ATEBE Mayor Atebe welcomed everyone to the meeting, noting that these meetings are very beneficial as both municipalities jointly fund a number of infrastructure initiatives a well as sharing common concerns. Mayor Peary thanked Mayor Atebe for inviting City of Abbotsford council to meet and agreed that there are many common issues between the two communities. He also acknowledged the very long friendship and excellent working relationship between Abbotsford and Mission

2.

REGIONAL TRANSPORTATION STUDY (Mayor Atebe) Elvis Riou, Abbotsford's manager of engineering services, gave a brief overview of the current regional transportation study that is being funded by the Ministry of Transportation and the Fraser Valley Regional District. He indicated that the study is expected to be completed and delivered by January 2010. After general discussion around the regional transportation study versus local transit planning and how the delay in receiving the regional study could impede local planning, it was agreed that direction be given to the Mission Abbotsford Transit Committee that both District of Mission and City of Abbotsford councils want to continue with local transit/transportation planning, and to not wait until the regional transportation study has been completed in 2010. Moved by Councillor Horn, and seconded by Councillor Scudder, RESOLVED: That each mayor and council send a letter to the BC Transit and the Minister of Trabsportation expressing their desire that the regional planning process is to be a good faith process and that local planning is to be allowed to continue until each council specifically resolves to make regional planning their first priority. CARRIED

3. BC TRANSIT BUS EXPANSION (a) Letter dated March 2, 2009 from Mayor Atebe to Dave Burns, Director Municipal Systems, BC Transit Rick Bomhof, Mission's director of engineering and public works, informed both councils that the letter provided was for information purposes. Concerns surrounding BC Transit's decision to postpone transit expansion plans were discussed. It was noted that a decision from BC Transit is expected by the end of April.

File: ADM.COU.REG Minutes 2009

209


Joint Council Meeting â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Mission/Abbotsford April 7, 2009

Page 3 of 7

4. ABBOTSFORD/MISSION WATER & SEWER UTILTIES

(a)Grant "Gas Tax" Application (b) Securing Safe and Sustainable Drinking Water â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Cannell Lake Treatment Facility Mayor Atebe thanked Abbotsford for the comprehensive background report. He continued by suggesting that the Abbotsford/Mission Water & Sewer Commission be able to apply directly for Federal-Provincial infrastructure grants under the "Gas Tax Agreement" as a stand alone entity. Mayor Peary advised that he was extending invitations to the local Members of Parliament (MP) and the Members of Legislative Assembly (MLA) to tour the Cannell Lake/Norrish Creek water sheds/systems. He reiterated that the water treatment project was the number one priority for Abbotsford. Mayor Peary also confirmed that he and other City of Abbotsford representatives had delivered prepared binders of information to a number of ministries, including the Ministry of Community Development. He said that a response is expected from the province and that a follow-up will occur after the provincial election has taken place. General discussion occurred regarding: the Ministry of Health drinking water requirements; Stave Lake as a second water source; the water and sewer master plans; and how First Nation Bands are asking for payment for "consultation" when there is a statutory requirement to consult with them. Councillor Ross stated that legal advice had been sought regarding the First Nation payment for consultation requests, and it was agreed that Abbotsford would request a legal opinion stating that municipalities are not required to pay First Nation Bands for consultation. 5. CENSUS METROPOLITAN AREA (a) Letter dated July 17, 2006 from Mayor Atebe to the Honourable Maxime Bernier, Statistics Canada (b) Letter dated February 7, 2007 from Mayor Atebe to the Honourable Maxime Bernier, Statistics Canada (c) Letter dated March 7, 2007 from the Honourable Maxime Bernier, Statistics Canada (d) Letter dated January 30, 2009 from Joseph Kresovic, Director Statistics Canada Mayor Atebe commented that Mission had been trying to have the Census Metropolitan area name changed for a number of years, and that any support Abbotsford could provide would be helpful and appreciated.

File: ADM.COU.REG Minutes 2009

210


Joint Council Meeting â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Mission/Abbotsford April 7, 2009

Page 4 of 7

Moved by Councillor Harris, and seconded by Councillor Loewen, RESOLVED: That a joint letter be forwarded to the Minister responsible for Statistics Canada advising the agreement between the two municipalities to have the current Abbotsford Census Metropolitan Area renamed as "Abbotsford-Mission Census Metropolitan Area". CARRIED Councillor Horn pointed out in the letter from J. Kresovic, Director of Statistics Canada, that the consultation period ends on April 30, 2009, and comments needed to be received by that date.

6.

REGIONAL HOSPITAL FACILITIES MISSION HEALTH STUDY UPDATED Glen Robertson, Mission's chief administrative officer noted that a Health Care study had been completed by Price Waterhouse and approved by a steering committee comprised of Fraser Health and council members. He said that as the Regional Hospital District funded the study, the study would be presented to the Regional Hospital District board at their April 28 th meeting prior to it being released to the public. Councillor Horn said that this study was really a report to explore ways to leverage capital dollars, obtaining operating dollars, along with policies and procedures. General discussion continued around the lower per capita funding that the Fraser Health Authority receives versus what the Vancouver Coastal Health Authority receives, and that both councils should be lobbying for equitable funding.

7.

AIR QUALITY STATION IN MISSION Mayor Atebe advised that Mission was requesting Abbotsford's support in obtaining an air monitoring system in our community. Councillor Ross confirmed that the FVRD Air Quality Committee had been trying for years to obtain more air monitoring systems in the Kent/Mission areas. She informed the councils that the province pays the monitoring costs (approximately $50,000/year) in other areas of the province, but that the Fraser Valley Regional District pays for the systems in this area. She advised that a study was being conducted to determine the best locations and requested that Mission provide a letter that states "We propose a site (location) because (reason)" and forward it to Abbotsford. Councillor Horn requested that this item be placed on the next regular meeting of council for Mission.

File: ADM.COU.REG Minutes 2009

211


Joint Council Meeting — Mission/Abbotsford April 7, 2009

Page 5 of 7

Moved by Councillor Horn, and seconded by Councillor Scudder, RESOLVED: That a letter be written to the appropriate Minister, advising that there is joint council support by the City of Abbotsford and District of Mission for an air monitoring station to be placed in the same location as the private weather station (Mt. Mary-Ann/Westminster Abby) in Mission, and that the province provide funding for this air monitoring station. CARRIED

8. NEW GAS TAX PROGRAM (Mayor Peary) Mayor Peary advised that Abbotsford was seeking new revenues other than property taxes and is considering instituting a 1 or 2 cent per liter fuel tax that would be used exclusively for transit and road improvements/upkeep. He stated that joining Metro Vancouver would raise gas prices by 6 cents per liter, but that Abbotsford may receive only marginal services from such a decision. He further noted that he had made this potential funding source at a recent public council meeting, and expected that Abbotsford would proceed with a decision sometime in the early fall of 2010. Mayor Atebe agreed that Mission should also consider the fuel tax concurrently with Abbotsford, and that BC Transit could be approached to provide a business case that could be submitted with a request to the Minister. General discussion took place and the following points were brought forward: a. Governance/constitution — jointly or individually; Mission/Abbotsford Transit b. If jointly, how will the funds be allocated c. How will the funds be spent — transit and roads only d. Strict guidelines need to be agreed upon first — a joint strategy

Moved by Councillor Smith, and seconded by Councillor Horn, RESOLVED: That the City of Abbotsford and District of Mission councils give their staff direction to commence the studies and consultations with BC Transit with respect to having a "2 cent per liter" tax added to all fuel purchased within their municipalities. CARRIED

File: ADM. COU. REG Minutes 2009

212


Joint Council Meeting â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Mission/Abbotsford April 7, 2009

Page

6 of 7

9. LOCAL CALLING AREA EXPANSION â&#x20AC;&#x201D; TELUS PROPOSAL (a) Letter dated June 30, 2008 from Abbotsford/Mission to CRTC (b) Letter dated August 11, 2008 from Telus Glen Robertson advised that to-date, no further information has been received from Telus regarding the local calling area expansion. Moved by Councillor Horn, and seconded by Councillor Gibson RESOLVED: That a letter be written to Telus and the Canadian Radio-television Telecommunications Commission (CRTC), with a copy to the local Members of Parliament and each councillor, requesting the status of the local telephone calling area expansion, and to request that consultation with the City of Abbotsford and the District of Mission begin on expanding the local calling area as soon as possible. CARRIED

10. GUNS AND GANGS IN THE LOWER MAINLAND Mayor Peary noted that the recent gang related arrests in Abbotsford were a positive step, however there is much left to do to address this growing problem. He noted that he has recently formed a crime [prevention task force, to advise council on a variety of related topics. He commented that when Abbotsford police officers worked with the RCMP Integrated teams, the Province provides funding for the back-fill of the officers. He did note, that since uniformed police officers were used during the recent surveillance, the City was responsible for all costs. Moved by Councillor Smith, and seconded by Councillor Horn, RESOLVED: That a joint public letter be written to the Solicitor General, requesting financial support to the City of Abbotsford in regards to the recent surveillance of suspected gang members, as this situation was not exclusively a City of Abbotsford issue. CARRIED Councillor Scudder referred to the crime prevention task force that had been set-up in Abbotsford, requesting additional information be made available at the next joint council meeting.

11. OTHER BUSINESS Mayor Peary requested those council members who would be attending the upcoming File: ADM.COU.REG Minutes 2009

213


Page

Joint Council Meeting â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Mission/Abbotsford April 7, 2009

7 of 7

Lower Mainland Government Association (LMGA) conference, to speak out and vote against allowing free-range chickens in urban areas. 12. ADJOURNMENT

Mayor Atebe concluded the meeting by thanking Abbotsford council and staff for this opportunity to meet and work together. It was agreed that another joint meeting would be held in September, to be hosted in Abbotsford. Moved by Councillor Gidda, seconded by Councillor Gibson, and RESOLVED: That the meeting be adjourned. CARRIED. The meeting was adjourned at 6:25 pm.

MAYOR

DIRECTOR OF CORPORATE ADMINISTRATION

g:\cow\2009\april 20\sc minutes joint abby-mission mtg 090407.doc

File: ADM.COU.REG Minutes 2009

214


215

BRITISH Earth

For Immediate Release 2009PS SG0041-000675 April 6, 2009

NEWS RELEASE Ministry of Public Safety and Solicitor General

NEW RULES OF THE ROAD PROTECT EMERGENCY WORKERS' SAFETY VANCOUVER — The Province will enhance the safety of emergency workers by requiring drivers to slow down and move over when passing parked emergency vehicles that have their lights flashing, Minister of Public Safety and Solicitor General John van Dongen and Transportation and Infrastructure Minister Kevin Falcon announced today. "We're doing this for emergency workers who are out there, working to save lives on our roads in all kinds of conditions," said van Dongen. "Too often, these workers face near-misses, injury or even death — directly due to the carelessness of passing drivers." "Between 2001 and 2007, 21 emergency workers were injured or killed on B.C. roads — 12 of them at the roadside," said Falcon. "We're joining other jurisdictions by fining those who don't slow down and, where they safely can, move over, so emergency workers don't pay with their lives for doing their jobs." Beginning June 1, drivers must slow to 70 km/h on highways where the speed limit is 80 km/h or higher, and to 40 km/h where the limit is below 80 km/h, when approaching a stopped emergency vehicle that has its lights flashing. If there is another lane going in the same direction, drivers must also move into that lane if it is safe to do so. "My colleagues and I want motorists to consider not only the new penalty, but the safety of all emergency workers as they drive past an incident," said Supt. Norm Gaumont, RCMP B.C. Traffic Services. "In situations where every second counts, everyone benefits from safe, focused emergency services personnel." The requirements will apply to drivers passing police, fire, ambulance and towing vehicles, as well as vehicles used by commercial vehicle safety and enforcement personnel, passenger vehicle inspectors. conservation officers, park rangers, and special provincial constables employed in the Ministry of Forests and Range.


216 2 Those found in contravention will face a fine and three penalty points against their licence. The fine, including a 15 per cent victim surcharge, is $148 if paid within 30 days or $173 thereafter. Currently, five provinces and 40 U.S. states have similar requirements. An existing penalty remains in place for failing to yield to a moving emergency vehicle. 1 backgrounder(s) attached. Media contact:

-30-

Cindy Rose Media Relations Ministry of Public Safety and Solicitor General 250 356-6961

For more information on government services or to subscribe to the Province's news feeds using RSS, visit the Province's website at wwm7.gov.bc.ca.


217 BRITISH COLUMBIA Besz Face on Earth

2009PSSG0041-000675 April 6, 2009

BACKGROUNDER

Ministry of Public Safety and Solicitor General

REGULATION PROTECTS EMERGENCY WORKERS' SAFETY A new regulation under the Motor Vehicle Act will better protect the safety of police officers, fire and ambulance personnel tow truck operators, special provincial constables, conservation officers and park rangers who are working outside their emergency vehicles on B.C. roads. The act already requires drivers to yield the right of way to approaching emergency vehicles that have their lights and siren on. Drivers who fail to yield to a moving emergency vehicle face a fine and three penalty points. The fine, including a 15 per cent victim surcharge, is $84 if paid within 30 days or $109 if paid thereafter. Beginning June 1, the act will also require drivers to slow to prescribed maximum speeds when approaching, from either direction, a stopped emergency vehicle that's on or beside an undivided highway and has its lights flashing. (If the highway is divided â&#x20AC;&#x201D; for example, by a concrete median â&#x20AC;&#x201D; vehicles travelling in the opposite direction are not required to slow.) In addition, drivers travelling in a lane containing or adjacent to a stopped emergency vehicle must move into another lane to pass, if it is safe to do so and a police officer has not directed them to do otherwise. This will give emergency workers as much space as possible. The penalty for not slowing to the designated speed, not moving over if it is safe to do so, or both, will be a fine and three penalty points. The higher fine for the new infraction reflects the greater risk of injury or death for emergency personnel who may be working outside their vehicle. This change was requested and is strongly supported by many stakeholders, who were consulted over more than two years. They include the Office of the Fire Commissioner and Fire Chiefs' Association of B.C., BC Ambulance Service, BC Association of Chiefs of Police, ICBC, BCAA, the Ministry of Transportation's Commercial Vehicle Safety Enforcement Branch and the Police Services Branch, Ministry of Public Safety and Solicitor General. To build driver awareness of the new regulation, the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure has designed a strategy to identify the best locations for "slow down, move over" signs. Existing electronic signs that currently display road conditions may also be used. Five other provinces have passed "slow down, move over" laws. Most don't specify a speed, but require drivers to slow and proceed with caution. -30-

Media contact:

Cindy Rose Media Relations Ministry of Public Safety and Solicitor General 250 356-6961

For more information on government services or to subscribe to the Province's news feeds using RSS, visit the Province's website at WWW.20V.bc.ca.


218

From: Tugade, Kanako [mailto:kanako.tugade©bctc.corn] Sent: Tuesday, April 07, 2009 6:17 PM To: Tugade, Kanako Subject: BC Utilities Commission Long-term Electricity Inquiry

BCTransinission April 7, 2009 RE: BC Utilities Commission Long-term Electricity Inquiry Under the recently amended Utilities Commission Act, the British Columbia Utilities Commission (Commission) is directed to conduct an inquiry to make determinations with respect to British Columbia's infrastructure and capacity needs for electricity transmission. On December 11, 2008, the Minister of Energy, Mines and Petroleum Resources issued Terms of Reference to the Commission for the inquiry. On March 24, 2009, the Commission issued an Order launching the Long-term Electricity Transmission Inquiry (Inquiry). As the primary transmission planner in the province, BCTC is excited by the opportunity to work together with British Columbians as we look ahead 30 years — to the beginning of 2040 — to determine our province's long-term transmission needs. As a first step, the Commission will host a workshop on April 17 th on the Terms of Reference and Inquiry issues and processes. The workshop will be followed by an initial Procedural Conference on April 27 th to discuss Inquiry timing and procedures. For your convenience, a copy of the Commission's Notice of Preliminary Workshop and Procedural Conference is enclosed. During the Inquiry, the Commission will make assessments on a wide range of electricity related topics including: • • • •

assessment of generation resource potential in the province by region; projected demand for electricity (including potential implications of climate change and fuel switching); economic development opportunities; and opportunities for trade in electric power with neighbouring jurisdictions.

Based on this information, BCTC will provide transmission planning expertise to assist the Commission in determining transmission capacity and infrastructure needs. To learn more about BCTC, please visit our website at www.bctc.com . For additional information on the Inquiry, to view the Terms of Reference or to learn about BCTC's transmission planning activities, please visit BCTC's new website www.bctransmission2040.ca . In the meantime, if you have any questions about BCTC's long-term planning activities, please call 604.699.7456 or toll-free 1.866.647.3334. Yours truly,

Doug Little Vice President Customer & Strategy Development BC Transmission Corporation


219

33529 1 st Ave, Mission, BC, V2V 1H1

April 14th , 2009

District of Mission ATTENTION: Dennis Clark - Director of Corporate Administration 8645 Stave Lake Street Mission, BC V2V 4L9 RE:

District of Mission Arts Council request for cap of Utilities.

Dear Mr. Clark, On behalf of the Mission Arts Council, I would like to thank you for your continued support and your guidance in the matters of taxes, zoning and fee for service inquiries from the Arts Council. At this time I would like to request that Council approve a cap on our Municipal Utility taxes (water, sewer, garbage and recycling) at the 2005 rate. This would assist in our ability to maintain our tenancy at the Center located at 33529 1" Ave. If you have further questions, please feel free to contact me @ 604-826-0029, Monday through Friday 9 am to 2 pm. I thank you in advance fro this consideration, and look forward to your reply. With regards,

Nancy Arcand Executive Director Mission Arts Council

Page 1 of 1


http://www.mission.ca/wp-content/uploads/April-20-2009