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THE GALLERY DURHAM SCHOOL OF THE ARTS STUDENT NEWSPAPER

WINTER EDITION 2019


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The Gallery

THE GALLERY DSA’s newspaper 400 N. Duke Street Durham, NC 27701 dsagallery.com

STAFF EDITORS-IN-CHIEF Caroline Batten Oyinda Ajasa LEAD REPORTERS N’Saun Gentry Stephany Guzman Lezi Truesdale Blaze Wang Oliver Weaver REPORTERS Sam Bartlett Haleigh Champagne Jessie Foday Srikar Kaligotla Thomas MacDougall Emily Parker Jack Williams STAFF ADVISER Patrick Ritchie COVER ART James Lyons

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Editorial: Durham Public Schools needs alternatives to suspensions BY OYINDA AJASA The history of Durham Public Schools and suspension is a long and treacherous one. Many years ago, a complaint was filed by the Civil Rights Project of UCLA against Durham Public Schools regarding how their out-of-school suspension policy, harms disabled students and black students at much higher rates, and PHOTO COURTESY OF THE CAROLINA REVIEW also affects their mental health. Durham Public Schools has one of the largest obEven though about servable disparities in North Carolina. In 2016, half of DPS students are there were 106 White male short-term suspensions, black, they make up more compared to 2,116 for Black males across DPS than three-quarters of K-12. Black males are also over-represented in DPS short-term suspensions. in-school suspensions. In 2016, 11.14% of all Black In contrast, 19 percent of males in the system received in-school suspensions, DPS students are white while only 2.99% of their White male counterparts but they comprise only did. four percent of that type health services would help to understand of suspension. In the why the student is doing whatever action 2015-2016 school year, 81.5 percent of DPS suspensions were received by black repeatedly. It helps to understand what students, even though they made up just is going on in the minds of students, and if there is anything beyond their control. 46.7 percent of the district’s population. Mentoring as an alternative allows for This data shows the disproportionate people to have someone to talk through effect that suspensions have on students their actions with them. The people of color. Recently, DPS enforced a restortalking to them should be someone that ative justice program in all high schools. can understand and relate to their strugThis is a good first step, but more action gles. Mentoring could also reveal issues needs to be taken. The student should be that might call for external control, and the focus and not the suspension itself. it could help the student not feel alone. The question is then raised of what alterEnforcing these alternatives before stunatives could be proposed? dents are suspended could eliminate core When students are suspended, nothing issues that allow for repeat infractions. is gained, they are being put out of the Now, how exactly could this work? classroom, and losing valuable learning Suspension shouldn’t just be completely time. There is no motivation for them to outlawed at first, but instead mentoring not repeat the action again, and due to and mental health services should be that notion, those students are more likeenforced along with the suspensions. ly to be suspended over and over again. Students should be disciplined for their Instead of suspending students, the disactions, but also have resources that help trict should do more to understand the to stop the action from happening again. core root of the suspension, which is why If the resources are able to help students, an alternative need to be discussed. Two alternatives that would be benefi- and the district is able to see a decrease cial instead of suspensions are mentoring in suspensions, then maybe mentoring either with a peer or an adult, and refer- and mental health services could be ral to community mental health services. the first stop, and if the situation isn’t resolved, then maybe suspension is the Instead of just putting students in answer. ISS and OSS, there should be enforced Suspending students instead of trying conversations about the action. Mental

to understand the issue strengthens the school-to- prison pipeline, because students are being disciplined over and over again, but no one is trying to figure out why they are doing that action over and over again. Then in the future, they are doing these same actions in the real world, with real consequences which follow them the rest of their lives. The proposed alternatives would help to decrease suspensions in an effective way, by putting the student’s needs first, and helps to understand what exactly goes on in the teenage mind.

EDITORIAL POLICY The Gallery is an open forum for the free expression of student thought that fairly represents the voice of the students. Our mission is to inform the student body by exposing issues to the majority, allowing the minority a voice to be heard, and helping to connect to DSA’s community through the paper. The Gallery staff will determine the stories and material to be covered in an issue and reserve the right to accept or decline material for each issue. The decision for advertising relies on the discretion of the editorial staff of The Gallery. The Gallery staff will hold itself to the highest professional journalistic standard of honesty and integrity as guided by the Student Press Law Center. It is not the policy of this newsmagazine to downgrade or tarnish the reputation of an individual or group. The Gallery is a student edited and managed publication. The school assumes no responsibility for the content of The Gallery. The news magazine editorial staff urges all journalists to recognize that with student editorial control comes responsibility to follow journalism standards and ethics each school year. As a forum of free expression, The Gallery will welcome all letters submitted to the editor, provided they contain the writer’s name and grade. The Gallery does not accept anonymous letters, but will print letters using “name withheld,” provided the editor knows the author’s identity.


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The last text could be the last breath: the impacts of texting and driving BY LEZI TRUESDALE Text message from: Bestie, Snapchat from: Alexi… the notification list goes on. Regardless of how important these notifications may seem, they’re not worth a life, and behind the wheel isn’t the place that they should be checked. Statistics show that driver distraction, involving texting are the cause of over fifty percent of teen related crashes. Why is this the case? How can these numbers be lowered? Apple has recently introduced a separate Do Not Disturb section used when driving. This tool blocks out notifications and calls from all people, except those included on the favorites list. This uses motion detection to figure out when the user begins driving, and if enabled, automatically turns on. “I always use Do Not Disturb when I’m driving. If a friend tries to text or call me, my phone will automatically respond and let them know that I will get the message when I reach my destination, “ Wesley Mills, senior, stated. While the statistics provide data for

the wheel. In 2016, sources show that approximately forty-nine percent admit to texting and driving even though they are clearly aware as the effects and dangers of doing it. In efforts to decrease the death rates that result from distractions behind the wheel, specifically texting and driving, big companies such as AT&T and Verizon have made informative commercials that show the realities and sadness that are the result of distracted driving. “I think the video is pretty crazy. Now that I think about it, I do find myself checking my phone behind the wheel. While these commercials accurately depict what goes on behind the wheel, I don’t think everyone will really gain PHOTO COURTESY OF CESAR MANUEL a lesson from it, people are gonna do what they want to do,” Sullyman InThe hood crushed, as the DSA parkgram, junior, stated. ing pass hangs in the rear-view mirror. As depicted through commercials and While the car was totaled, the lives of ads, crashes caused from lack of attenthe DSA seniors were saved. tion to the road can happen anywhere, teen related crashes, teenagers aren’t even in one’s own neighborhood. As far the only ones who are distracted behind as the DSA community is concerned, ac-

cidents, whether faulted by a student or not have proved that any and everyone can be affected by these dangers. While most accidents are commonly associated with texting and phone distractions, other factors such as blind spots and speeding play a role in the dangers of driving. “Visibility issues were the root cause of my accident. I do not believe that the other driver was distracted, but they were definitely speeding. As a result, I couldn’t drive for about a month due to anxiety. When I share my story with others, it allows them to be more cautious,” Taniya Clemons, senior, said. Accidents can be life changing events and cause different reactions for different people. The main goal for everyone should be to stay safe. “After the car accident I experienced, I recovered fairly quickly and I wasn’t too afraid to drive. From then forward, I tried to move in a more aware and alert manner,” Cesar Manuel, senior, concluded.

The future is female: Important landslides for women in politics BY STEPHANY GUZMAN As of 2018, this year’s midterm elections in the United States have marked a historical surge for women in political power. On November 9th, a record number of women won their races, with at least 98 headed to Congress, 12 to the Senate and nine to the governor’s houses. This also includes Congress’s first Muslim, Native American, and youngest female. Together, with other victorious candidates from underrepresented communities, this new class of representatives illustrates a more diverse America. Women such as Ilhan Omar, Angie Craig, Deb Haaland, and Veronica Escobar are some of the many candidates running for office for the very first time. This changes how society sees a new America, and marks progress in breaking down ungrounded stereotypes that women cannot hold political office and high positions in society. This historical only brings new faces to the table, but new ideas, goals and perspectives as well. Jacson Lowe, Minority Studies teacher at DSA, has used this new change to implement the importance to his students.

“It was as Mexico such a huge and Great moment Britain-are in history, far ahead due we paused to gender our usual quotas. curriculum These quotas on Wednesare positive day after the measurement election to instruments talk about aimed at it. Roughly accelerating one-fourth the achieveof the memPHOTO COURTESY OF GLAMOUR MAGAZINE ment of genbers of the Deb Haaland speaks out and meets potential vot- der-balanced House are ers. She is one of the first Native American repre- participation women, so to reflect sentatives in American history to be elected. to see this, the actual especially around the time that many population. things are changing for the generations Nida Allam, third Vice Chair Officer that are eligible to vote, gives a perfect from the governing body of the North example of how far things have come Carolina Democratic Party, agrees that over the past decades,” Lowe said. such quotas produce a ripple effect in Compared to other countries across government that affects how it will be the globe, the United States trails managed both currently and in the nearbehind many others in the legislative by future. representation of women. Nations such “When women manage to gain posi-

tions of power and decision-making, it just not only affects the political landscape within our system, but the whole perception of women in general in all other fields of life,” Allam noted. Considering the growing demographics within the communities of minorities, these inspiring women provide a sense of hope to younger generations to come. “Young people of color had to feel that more opportunities were available to them that seemed unreachable. So with women and members of the LGBTQ community winning major elections, it shows our government can be diverse and open to everyone,” Lowe said. With new faces in Congress and ideologies that will potentially provide a fresh change in the country’s future, bound to make a great impact. “It will be interesting in the next 18 months to see the efforts of these representatives in these areas, an increase in minority candidates. Although, I hope that soon we can just drop the ‘minority’ adjective and talk about the best candidate,” Allam concluded.


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Bird Box: Big platform with an even bigger response BY N’SAUN GENTRY The newly acclaimed Netflix original hit Bird Box is the newest trend of late 2018 going into 2019, starring award winning actress Sandra Bullock along with other talented A and B-list actors and actresses. Social media has played a huge part in the buzz of this new Netflix movie that debuted on December 13th of 2018, breaking numerous records on the streaming platform. Never before in Netflix’s eight-year history has a movie had this much of an impact on the social world, with a record-setting 45 million people tuning in. In the movie, the main characters wear blindfolds to avoid looking the monsters in the eyes, if they do they die due to experiencing their own fears. This dynamic creates a suspenseful thriller that keeps the audiences engaged guessing who will die next and their fate. Though Bird Box has broken records for the streaming service, this movie has mixed reviews from critics and viewers alike, as the main critique for this film is the message it conveys as it’s seen as ok to hide or run away from fears or problems instead of addressing them and taking them head on to overcome it. But through these reviews viewers, regardless of the critics and reviews, enjoyed the movie, becoming a sensation espe-

PHOTO BY N’SAUN GENTRY DSA student Desmond Martyn participating in the most up to date trend: the Bird Box challenge. This challenge consists of a blindfold in which the person wraps it around their eyes imitating the main character Malorie finding her way around the lost town and woods. cially with the use of memes to illustrate the humor of the movie. One of the biggest negative effects of every social media trend, is that some person or people take it too far and endanger themselves by causing mass hysteria, affecting others in the process as well. Recently, a teen in Utah crashed

her car, a result of her participating in the infamous Bird Box challenge that has been all over the internet with people of all ages participating in the challenge. In the beginning of the movie, it starts out as Sandra Bullock’s character Malorie and two kids head out to a river to head to the promised location by a

Self-love is the best love

broadcaster to escape the creatures. With this being the beginning, audiences can suggest that she is the lone survivor of her group, indicating that everyone was killed off in the duration of the movie. Audiences experience the cause and effects of character’s actions and decisions within the movie and the safety precautions they take in order to stay alive as the world has gone into a post-apocalyptic state with the deaths of the majority of the population and the one common goal being to survive at all costs. With these trends becoming more prominent in the digital age which people of the world live in and are exposed to on a daily basis, a sense of concern has to be raised in question on the effects pop culture and social media have on the youth. “I think social media altogether has provided an advantage yet has also diminished us as a society. I believe that many trends go too far, personally I would never put my life or others in danger for some clout. But I liked how it had a deeper meaning behind the whole plot; in my opinion that meaning was that nowadays you are unable to keep your innocence when u view society it destroys who you are or in the movies case kills you,” Denisse Ramos, early college student, concluded.

BY LEZI TRUESDALE Walking down the hallway in the newest shoes that just came out; being greeted by everyone encountered. This is what society sets out as a norm to being “cool” or “fitting in.” Society sets out almost guidelines as to what it takes for one to be popular or “fit in with the crowd.” When individuals find themselves unable to fit into those set out categories, self confidence decreases, which can cause problems emotionally. Self, as defined by the MerriamWebster’s dictionary, is “the union of elements (such as body, emotions, thoughts, and sensations) that constitute the individuality and identity of a person.” Self isn’t defined by who one knows, who knows a person, or what

type of clothes one may wear, but to the contrary, it’s about how an individual stands out from everyone else, and most importantly, how one is their own person. Having confidence and love within oneself is a very important starting point for success. “Self-love is the task of making sure you’re always good, taking time to care for your needs, a clean room, being filled with calm happiness when in solitude, taking the time to be in perfect solitude, and being confident in the love you have for yourself so that nothing or no one can jeopardize that,” Seven Faruq, senior, stated. As stated, popularity plays an important role on the emotions people, espe-

cially high schoolers, can have. Feeling that no one is there when they’re needed can further affect one’s health. “Popularity isn’t as important as people play it out to be. People aren’t as real and nice as they seem. It’s best to focus on bettering yourself so that you aren’t affected by the actions of others,” Reagan Davis, senior, added. Being consumed by what other people believe about a person is something that can occur all throughout one’s life. The Golden Rule states to treat other the way you want to be treated, however, when rude comments and actions are made towards someone, it can be challenging to find love within one’s self in order to block out negativity.

“When people find rude things to say, that can be considered a form of bullying, which is another level of hurt. Bullying can make someone lose the self-love they have built up for themselves,” Deja Taylor, senior, said. To boost self-confidence and self-love, counselors, true friends, and other trustworthy individuals are there to help. “Self-love and confidence is something that kinda comes over time. As time passes, you gain a better understanding of life and yourself,” Scarlett Earnhardt, senior, concluded. Need someone to talk to? Visit your counselor at Student Services, talk to a friend or loved one.


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Success in a hectic world: former DSA student Hector Muñoz makes his mark BY CAROLINE BATTEN

interviewees, in the sense that he can connect because he has experienced day-to-day struggles with his brand and balancing work, school, family, friends, and passions, just as they do. “I learned one day that in this life we have a choice. We can either live day to day with a pessimistic view of the people around us and the life we live or we can embrace the adversity and be grateful for all of the moments we experience and be kind to others. Find your escape. Be passionate. Be kind. Inspire. Leave a legacy,” Muñoz’s website states.

Check out Muñoz’s website & Instagram:

www.hecticwearlifestyle.com @hecticwear Or search “Bull City Pioneers”

on anchor.fm, stitcher.com, Apple iTunes podcasts, Spotify, and RadioPublic. The friends have interviewed everyone from artist Liion Gamble to former DSA teacher Sean Grier. For Muñoz, the podcast highlights giving back to the incredible and diverse people of which his community is comprised. “We bring on local and rising creatives

who are passionate about their craft whether it be making music, creating artwork, running a pizza business, or create short films. We have conversations about their daily struggles and successes within their craft and talk about the process of building and being a creative,” Muñoz explained. Muñoz has a deep connection to these

on podcast platforms to listen in

Spoiler alert:

PHOTO COURTESY HECTOR MUÑOZ Hector Muñoz poses against a brick wall in downtown Durham with a crewneck sweatshirt from his “Self-aware” collection. He sells his streetwear with a message encouraging people to not only grow their intellectual and physical capacities, but their empathy as well.

read the ridle on page 12 first! “Fun Page” riddle answer: noise

A student scrolls mindlessly through their social media feed, pausing a moment to look at a model wearing a fashionable shirt with the downtown Durham skyline glowing behind them vibrantly. This is no corporate advertisement, however. This is homegrown, Durham-raised passion. Enter Hector Muñoz. Muñoz graduated from Durham School of the Arts in 2015 and is currently in his final semester towards receiving his associate’s degree in science. On top of this, he co-hosts the Bull City Pioneers podcast with close friend Luis Mencias, and is also building up Hectic Wear, his clothing business that was founded in 2017. The Hectic Wear line features hoodies, sweatshirts, hats, and shirts all designed in-house. On his website and Instagram, members of the Durham community stylishly pose amid a backdrop of city edifices, murals, and nature. Muñoz’s passion is evident in how he has built his brand from the ground up. “I told myself a long time ago that my life is finite and if I want to find fulfillment in life, doing something that brings your happiness and helps others at the same time is the greatest form of fulfillment,” Muñoz reflected. This quest has been aided by his friends, family, and especially parents from Honduras, who Muñoz explained worked to the bone so their family could have a better life in America, which is something that has had a large impact on Muñoz. He sees the opportunity available in his life and takes it. This drive is what also inspired the podcast, Bull City Pioneers, which he co-hosts with Luis Mencias. “What initially inspired the podcast was me and my cousin’s desire to do something together that could bring something to the community through simple conversations we have with people. We wanted to do something productive with our lives and saw an opportunity with the hyped up trend of podcasting,” Muñoz said. The podcast, currently 32 episodes and counting, is freely available to the public


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The Gallery

DOWNTOWN

PHOTOS BY OL


Winter Edition 2019

N DURHAM

LIVER WEAVER

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Behind the scenes of the DSA Foundation

BY STEPHANY GUZMAN

Being rooted into the arts, DSA is a school that prides itself with artistic splendor and talent from its students and teachers. Be it orchestra, band, dance and more; the programs at the school would not be made possible without the help of the DSA Foundation. The DSA Foundation was established in 1997 by parents to provide resources to support DSA’s unique educational environment. As a non-profit organization, the foundation raises money for capital improvements and projects that facilitate arts education at the school. Over the years, the foundation has succeeded in raising $200,000 from generous contributions. David Hawks, DSA’s own principal and liaison to the foundation has seen it contribute greatly with such help. “They had something to do with the

new equipment in the Black Box Theatre. I know that they purchased some string instruments before and the renovation of the concert grand piano. It was donated around the same time the Auditorium was built in 1954. One of the foundation members went out to get grants/donations and raise about $57,000 within eighteen months to have it sent all the way back to New York factory to have it completely made new,” Hawks said. Some of their most recognized accomplishments also include scholarships for students to attend high quality summer camps in the arts, computers for photo classes and funding for much needed art supplies. These achievements are worthwhile as they help ensure what DSA represents as an arts school. Helen Cunny, head chairwoman of the DSA Foundation, is in charge of oversee-

ing every little aspect of how the organization works and manages its time. Much of the money that comes in is from people within the community that support DSA. “We soliciting the money from corporations, foundations and members of the DSA family. Most of them include parents, guardians, alumni, friends, local businesses and others. Normally people bring in those donations and they range from a variety of amounts such as twenty five dollars and even thousands of dollars,” Cunny said. Since much of the gratuity is tax-deductible, most people will give the money to certain programs and fields in the school. “Sometimes we have people that say ‘well I want this to go to dance, or orchestra, even sports’. Most of it has to do with them wanting to support what DSA is

providing to its students in a unique and profound way. Regardless, any sum of cash that comes our way is greatly appreciated,” Cunny added. Although it may seem that most of the added help is for the arts at school, it can also be designated to academic programs for classes in the sciences division. An outpouring of support would not be made possible without the help of the organization members and fellow DSA ‘family’ members that come together to withhold what it represents as a whole. “All in all, either as a principal or as a member, I am proud to be involved in what the DSA Foundation has to offer to our students and staff. As one of the best schools in the state, it is important to uphold our image and our passions and I think the Foundation does just that,” Hawks said.

ble check if something seems wrong...I hope that this will help people better understand school policies and help keep both students and teachers honest,” McMillen reflected.

rights. It should be written by everyone that it will affect, not just students. This allows everyone to have a say in what is in it,” Waters noted. This ‘everyone’ includes the counsel-

tails how the students themselves act as a means to help enforce their rights. “Since students at DSA are obviously very invested in what they do, I want y’all to have this piece so you basically take ownership of it,” Hawks reflected. “That you know that you have the support of the school to take full ownership of how you do academically and artistically, and that you know...what’s expected of you, but you should know what’s expected of us...I want both sides to understand what’s expected of each other.” An important clarification of one of these expectations in the bill is that of the grading timeline. The document draft states that other than major projects and papers, all assessments should be put in PowerSchool “...no later than a week after the assessment is submitted…”, which is an item of importance for students such as McMillen. “I hope that the procedures laid out in the bill of rights are followed, especially when it comes to testing schedules and getting grades in on time, which is sometimes followed pretty loosely, unfortunately,” McMillen reflected. Hawks explained that he is serious about the bill and hopes it will be a concise, transparent way to help students, faculty, and the DSA community as a whole.​

Old rules, new document: Student Bill of Rights BY CAROLINE BATTEN The room is filled with whispers as students converse about the test grade still absent from PowerSchool. In a classroom across the hall, pupils grumble and shoot each other looks as their teacher returns a major assignment weeks after it was turned in. A new Student Bill of Rights could change scenes such as these throughout the school. Durham School of the Art’s very own Student Bill of Rights is in the finalization process, with the second semester as its projected publishing date. All faculty and students in the school community will be able to access it online, in posters throughout the school, and in agendas for next year. The chief author and orchestrator of this document was principal Mr. Hawks, who consulted with department chairs, parents, student club Young People Unite, counselors, and student council officers during the drafting of the document. Student Council President Meredith McMillen, senior, was one of the individuals asked to look over and review the bill. She explained that she thinks it will clarify student and teacher expectations, while also holding them accountable. “I do think it’s beneficial to have a student bill of rights. It’s not mandatory to read it, but if ever you think something isn’t right, it serves as a reference to dou-

PHOTO BY CAROLINE BATTEN Students converse over important elements from DSA’s Student Bill of Rights. The document was created to be an important tool for students by providing a solid foundation for ideas that students in the DSA community hold highly. Matt Waters, senior, explained why he feels an additional document outside of the DSA Student Handbook is necessary. “...[I]t will allow everyone to have a source to know what the limits of their rights are, and everyone can agree on said

ors, who added a significant piece to the bill, titled “Course of Action Regarding Rights”. As with any rule, a document is only as effective as its level of enforcement, which will test the practicality of the new Student Bill. This section de-


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Artistry swings through the year BY CAROLINE BATTEN The room is dark, but the spotlight shines bright on a student as they take a deep breath and begin their solo at the cue. Starting to play, they lose themself in triplets upon triplets and rifts of an underlying melodious chord. Before they know it, the audience is applauding for the Durham School of the Arts Jazz Artistry band as the song ends. Representing the highest-level jazz class at Durham School of the Arts, Artistry is led by Ken Davis and comprised of a handful of talented students for this 2018-2019 school year. With such a tight group, the number of graduating seniors will have a big impact. “Next year, Artistry will definitely suffer in quality. All but two of the players will be graduating, and there really aren’t people who can replace the quality of all of those players,” Gareth Ferguson, senior and tenor saxophone player who has been involved with jazz since 8th grade, explained. Jazz requires students to perform in a more vulnerable environment compared to other band classes, partially because of the solos they must take on. It will be an adjustment for incoming students next year, as they learn the ropes not just of jazz, but of their balance with each other. “[T]he toughest moment was definite-

ly the first year of [Artistry] just because I wasn’t used to being put on the spot or having an entire band depend on my playing,” Darren Laville, senior and pianist who has been involved with jazz since his

take the risk. Mr. Davis explained that one of the band’s most notable recent performances was on December 15th, when they backed Daniel D. and Eric Stanley, two esteemed contemporary electric vio-

PHOTO COURTESY OF KEN DAVIS The silhouettes of Gareth Ferguson, Peter Sumner, Sophie Lowry, and Toby Falvo paint a striking picture against the empty theatre, hours before the show begins. Moments like these demonstrate the camaraderie and kinship among the musicians in the band. freshman year, said. linists at the Carolina Theatre. Ken Davis, who has taught Artistry for “...[G]oing over there was a great op12 years, echoed this, emphasizing that it portunity for us to learn how to deal with can be hard for students to improvise and professional sound people and lighting

people, and just to have the venue of all the seats in front of you; it was really pretty cool,” Mr. Davis reflected. In addition, the band has also performed at the Durham Performing Arts Center and the Rickhouse. The Artistry class, and jazz in general, has been an avenue of self-expression and exploration for many of the seniors in the band class, such as Laville. “Jazz has opened up the possibility of becoming a musician as a career by enabling me to interact and surround myself with all of these amazing musicians and people,” Laville said. Not only is jazz music a way to convey feelings through sound for these seniors leaving soon, it is also a way to communicate with each other. Mr. Davis explained that jazz is important because when playing, musicians are reacting to what they hear and then change how they themselves are playing. “[With] most music you don’t do that. You’re still listening, but you have to play exactly what’s on the page. Not jazz music. You’re reacting to what somebody else is doing and then making something up that goes with that; it’s almost as if there’s a little conversation going between everybody who’s playing a solo and the rhythm section,” Mr. Davis said.

DSA flies abroad to the British Isles

BY THOMAS MACDOUGALL Each year, Durham Schol students and teachers go on a trip to a different country, be it the UK, Greece, or even China. These trips are an educational and fun experience for everyone who goes. The students, and teachers learn about cultures, traditions, and enjoy themselves while doing it. In July of 2019, a new group of students will take a trip to the British Isles, visiting places like Scotland and Ireland. The trips are not only used to teach the high schoolers about different cultures and history, but to also give them skills and experiences that they will remember for the rest of their lives. The two teachers who arrange and lead the trip every year, Chad Ervin and Skylar Zee, are passionate about what they do and how

they do it. “We go on these trips because I believe that the best way to help students gain new perspectives and build skills for the future is through experiential learning… students expand their knowledge of the world around them, understand new people, places, and cultures, discover more about themselves, and grow more confident and independent,” Ervin, history teacher, said. The trips abroad are a big event for both students and teachers. This trip, they’ll be visiting places like Dublin, which is the capital of Ireland, and Edinburgh, the capital of Scotland. “Students are led by local, bilingual tour guides that are experts on the things you are visiting and are deep wells of

knowledge. You don’t have to worry about being dropped off somewhere and wonder what it is you are looking at or why it’s important, the local guides give in-depth stories and explanations. Students get to immerse themselves in the local cuisine and dine on traditional foods for that area, as well as meet and interact with local people and experience firsthand different cultures,” Ervin explained. The annual trip can also teach students and chaperones about different cultures and people. They can see things that they would otherwise never see, and meet interesting and diverse people. The trips can be an opportunity for students and even teachers to see and learn about countries and people they’re interested

in. The people who go on them come back with memories that will last them a lifetime. “We started these trips because we wanted students to have the chance to experience other cultures, languages, foods, and ideas. I think the more we can open our worlds, the more accepting we are,” Zee, history teacher, said.

Future trips include destinations such as Berlin, Prague, Krakow, and Budapest. These trips will take place in July of 2020.


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The Gallery

DSA Women’s Swim Team Treads on Success BY SAM BARTLETT Everyone is tense for the start of the meet against Carrboro and the North though the girls lost that meet, they meet, strained, and wound up, but this Carolina School of Science and Math. still encouraged each other and stood stress is released in vivacious cheering as However, both of these schools beat DSA together. the swimmers hit the water. Swim meets like this require skill and training to come out on top, and for the 2018-2019 season the DSA Women’s Swim Team has done just that. At the Conference Championship meet on January 23rd, the boys finished third and the girls in second. The team has been successful this season, and this level of achievement could not be possible without the dedication and hard work these young women have put into the sport. “We’re like dedicated to getting better,” Audrey Sander, a freshman on the swim team, said. Dedication is very important when it comes to swim team. The swimmers have to be committed to arriving at practice every morning at 6:00 AM. Waking up four hours before school even starts doesn’t appeal to many students, but the girls on the swim team do it anyway so PHOTO COURTESY OF CATHY SANDER they can improve their times, and as of Matt Schram, a captain on the DSA swim team, leads the team in a cheer now they have. before their meet against Jordan high school. The DSA swim team does “[The early practices] get us kicking cheers such as this to pump up their teammates before every meet. in the morning and sort of gives us something to start off our day, it’s like a bonding experience,” Logan Braun, by a thin margin. Carborro’s forty eight “It’s more of a community, people junior, stated. points only surpassed DSA’s by two, and don’t get down on themselves as much Unfortunately the women have lost Science and Math’s forty nine points as I’ve seen in other sports which really the title of “undefeated” after a dual triumphed over DSA’s score by five. Even helps the team factor,” Grace Erick-

son, junior captain on the swim team, commented.The team’s closeness and camaraderie is another factor that leads to their success. Something that helps this bonding spirit are the leaders on the team. Amongst the group there are a few individuals that represent the whole and facilitate their success. These leaders provide a positive role model for the swimmers to look up to. “[The leaders] definitely stick up for the team and if there is a question amongst the team or if they believe something should go a different way they will step up and ask the coach,” Erickson explained. One thing these leaders give the team is a lot of encouragement. It is important to be motivated during competition to increase performance and boost morale. Most motivation comes in the form of cheering during the meets themselves. Without the help of their teammates none of the swimmers could have been so successful; the team relies on the support of each other to maintain a positive mindset and emerge victorious. All of these factors lead to a community feel within the team. “Even if we win or lose we all still work together and we still cheer each other on, so if we lose it’s like not a big deal because we’re all having fun,” Sander concluded.

My out-of-this-world experience

BY SRIKAR KALIGOTLA

I am delighted to share the experience I had on December 5th, 2018. Students from schools across Durham County and I, named as Team Orion, did an experiment that was launched on the SpaceX 16 Falcon 9 mission. Our experiment analyzes a radiotrophic fungus that absorbs radiation. First, we identified the problems astronauts face in space as well as on earth. We scoped out the significant issues and two other key ones. The issues we found were related to radiation and loss of fuel in the engines. Furthermore, we found out that our idea about the loss of fuel crossed the safety concerns for the astronauts, so we went with the radiation idea. I came up with the idea of fungi and one of my

groupmates, Graham Shunk, put the concept of fungi and radiation together. As we researched through the internet, we found out that there was a fungus that absorbs radiation to grow. This fungus is Cladosporium sphaerospermum. This fungus is found in the Mediterranean and tropical-like climate. The fungus is very special because it absorbs the sun’s UV Radiation waves to grow. Since radiation is a big issue in space, the group and I wanted to see if the fungus acts any different in microgravity and if so how. We first have a cube called the Tango Lab. In this box, we have a radiation sensor to see how much radiation is inside the compared to the outside. We

also have a humidity sensor, and a camera to measure the humidity and see the growth of the fungus. The opportunity to do this experiment was held at the Durham County Library. There we were part of a program called Higher Orbits Go For Launch. This company has direct ties with CASIS and Space Tango. On April 4th, 2018 the group and I presented our project there and got to see the other six teams present as well. In the end, our team, Team Orion, won the Durham County Library Round. Our next presentation came to Downtown Durham. Then on December 3, 2018, I went to Florida to watch my groups experiment launch.

The experiment was launched on the SpaceX 16 mission, Falcon 9 rocket. On this rocket were other experiments from different groups. One of these experiments was about mice food. The mice food had to sterilize because it could harm the mice once it in outer space. So because of the food arriving late, our launch was delayed one day. Then on December 5th, 2018 the Falcon 9 rocket took off into space for the International Space Station to make our experiment a reality. I just want to thank my family, Durham County Library, SpaceX, Space Tango, Higher Orbits, and CASIS for this great opportunity. So, that concludes my out-of-this-world experience.


Winter Edition 2019

page 11

Students matter: Meet DSA’s DPAC Ambassadors BY N’SAUN GENTRY From broadway plays to concerts of the biggest singers and acts in the world, the DPAC is a staple of Durham culture. The Durham Performing Arts Center also known as DPAC, has become the center of entertainment in North Carolina since its opening back in 2008. Audiences, not only those originating from Durham, travel from all over to see the memorable performances. Recently, the DPAC has selected their first ever Ambassadors. These members consist of DSA high school students Maddie Brigman, Elena Holder, and Veronica Gilligan. DPAC provides an opportunity for students all across Durham county to get a behind the scenes look of the theatre industry to those who later down the line seek this as a career choice. “It’s really cool being an ambassador, we get to create the program a little bit because they don’t know what it’s actually gonna be. I applied to be an ambassador because I wanted to study musical theater in college so I thought it would be really cool to participate in classes for writing, getting experience and it’s a great opportunity,” Veronica Gilligan, junior, stated. Theatre has been a way for people f many cultures to express themselves and tell a story, whether professional or amatuer, theatre has had a mark on civilization for centuries.

This newly created program has provided students with insight on things that go on behind the scenes of theatre performances. Being present for many different events allow these individuals to reflect on the performances and shape their futures down the path of theatre. “We get to go to the shows then write blog posts about our experiPHOTO COURTESY OF WWW.DPAC.COM ences there and (Pictured from left to right: Maddie Brigman, Veronica Gilligan and Elena Holder) can be anything Ambassadors will attend events throughout the year and document their experiences on-line with from like videos, blog posts and social media updates. Through this program, high school students will be exposed to articles, to to the diversity of what is offered at DPAC and get a behind the scenes look at the industry. photo journals, we give publicity online application then film a vlog then and family time, along with other extra to the shows from a high school perspec- put it on Youtube, they asked us why we curriculars, which can either take a toll tive,” Gilligan, said. were interested, why would we be good or be a blessing down the road. With an opportunity this huge, only for the position, they emailed everyone “Every month or so they have a cala handful of students were selected to who had signed up,” Elena Holder, soph- endar where they put the events on so participate in the program, meaning that omore, added. I sign up for as much as I can and then they had many requirements to meet in With the skills these ambassadors its a raffle so I don’t get to go to all the order to earn the ambassador position. are learning on the stage, there’s a life shows, so if I know far enough in ad“There’s twenty ambassadors from all outside of the stage that they have to live vance I’ll do my work then go to DPAC,” around Durham. They had us fill out an from balancing their school work, friend Maddie Brigman, junior, concluded.

Hypnotizing Rhythm: the enriching benefits of music BY BLAZE WANG Students rush out of their classrooms as the final bell rings. Popping in some earbuds and hitting play, feet began to tap and heads bop as the instrumental melodies flow in. Lyrics take over as time moves, the beat taking control. Music is one of the major arts at DSA with many branches such as band, orchestra, chorus, piano, and guitar. It has been a part of human culture for years, changing as the times go on. Today there are over 1,000 different genres such as rock, country, and pop. Many studies have shown how music impacts the brain in a multitude of ways. “One of the first things that happens when music enters our brains is the triggering of pleasure centers that release

dopamine, a neurotransmitter that makes you feel happy. This response is so quick, the brain can even anticipate the most pleasurable peaks in familiar music and prime itself with an early dopamine rush,” ashford.edu found. Music is a very complex auditory stimulus, as it contains layered rhythms and beats. According to ideas.ted.com, music is one of the most complicated things our brain processes. Creating music and playing it also influences our brains. Mnn.com found that people who practice music are better at decision- making as more white matter is developed, connecting the two halves of the brain. White matter is tissue in the brain that sends out messages to surrounding parts of the

brain, helping the learning process. They also found that people who play instruments have better memory, better motor skills, and higher self confidence. “When I’m really down or when I’m inspired, music always plays a significant role in my life everyday life. With music I’m not alone, I can express who I really am through the music I hear. Listening to music impacts me by helping me feel more empathetic, analyzing a song’s meaning or creating a meaning to that song for yourself,” Ariannah Haney, guitar student, said. Many people listen to music for enjoyment, whether to sing or dance. Another draw is that learning music can improve auditory processing skills, learning,

and memory. There are a multitude of platforms that are available to listen to music or find new songs such as Pandora, Spotify, and Soundcloud. There are also many resources to record songs and make them available to the community such as Garageband and Bandcamp. Ways to find new music include attending local concerts, going to open mic nights, and asking others such as friends and family for music recommendations. “Making music helps me to release those emotions; making music can put you in the emotions, you’ll feel it and it’s truly there, but when you’re making that music it just comes out as if you were talking to someone about something troubling you,” Haney said.


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UNDERREPRESENTED HECTICWEAR SUSPENSIONS HECTICWEAR TEAMORION SELFLOVE UNDERREPRESENTED SCOTLAND SWIMTEAM POLITICS SUSPENSIONS TEXTING TEAMORION RIGHTS

SELFLOVE TEXTING HAWKS ARTISTRY DPAC

DPAC BIRDBOX POLITICS FOUNDATION BIRDBOX PERFORMINGARTS SCOTLAND FOUNDATION RIGHTS PERFORMINGARTS ARTISTRY SWIMTEAM HAWKS

Sometimes I’m loud, and viewed with distatste. Poke out my “eye”, then I’m on the front of your face. What am I? Check page 5 for the answer!

SPOT THE 5 DIFFERENCES:

DOWNTOWN DURHAM

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Profile for DSA Gallery

WINTER EDITION 2019 - THE GALLERY DURHAM SCHOOL OF THE ARTS  

This edition features suspensions, texting and driving, a new Student Bill of Rights at DSA, self-love, and a student who had their experime...

WINTER EDITION 2019 - THE GALLERY DURHAM SCHOOL OF THE ARTS  

This edition features suspensions, texting and driving, a new Student Bill of Rights at DSA, self-love, and a student who had their experime...

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