Page 1

Grammar Island Second Edition

art by Milton N. Kemnitz

Student Manual

Michael Clay Thompson

Royal Fireworks Press Grammar Island

1


Royal Fireworks

Language Arts

by Michael Clay Thompson

Copyright @ 2010, Royal Fireworks Publishing Company, Inc. All Rights Reserved - All Copying Prohibited Pretest pages 165 and 167 in the teacher resource section may be copied. Royal Fireworks Publishing Company First Avenue, PO Box 399 Unionville, NY 10988 845 726-4444 FAX 845 726-3824 Email: mail@rfwp.com Website: rfwp.com Support Group: rfwpsupport.com ISBN: 978-0-88092-575-2 Student Manual 978-0-88092-576-0 Teacher Manual Printed in the United States of America on acid-free recycled paper using vegetable-based inks by the Royal Fireworks Printing Company of Unionville, New York. November 2010

2

Grammar Island


Table of Contents Introduction .............................................................................Pages 4-11 Part One: The Parts of Speech ............................................ Page 12 Part Two: The Parts of the Sentence ................................ Page 95 Part Three: Phrases ...............................................................Page 127 Part Four: Clauses ...................................................................Page 136 Teacher Resource Section ......................................................Page 161

Grammar Island

3


4

Grammar Island


There is a place called Grammar Island, made of words and dreams. There are ďŹ sh and birds, and waves and wind, and beaches where kids can play. On Grammar Island you ďŹ nd wonderful things, such as birds and language. Grammar Island

5


On Grammar Island you learn that thinking about language is fun! Language is talking and writing. It is how we make our ideas out of words!

6

Grammar Island


It is important to be good at language because we use language for almost everything, even to say, “Let us go for a swim!� So the better you are at language, the better you are at MANY THINGS!

Grammar Island

7


When we talk or write, that is language. When we think in words, like the word “splash,� that is language.

8

Grammar Island


When we think about language, that is called GRAMMAR. On Grammar Island, we think about language in FOUR great ways.

Grammar Island

9


The four ways of thinking about language are called noun

1. parts of speech

verb

pron adj

adv interj

prep conj

2. parts of the sentence 3. phrases 4. clauses 10

Grammar Island

on

old the

pier


We will learn more about these soon, but here is a sneak preview: 1. parts of speech: the eight kinds of words 2. parts of the sentence: the parts of ideas 3. phrases: little groups of words 4. clauses: subject/predicate ideas

Grammar Island

11


noun

verb

pron adj

adv interj

prep conj

Part One The Parts of Speech (the eight kinds of words!) 12

Grammar Island


Grammar lets us think about our words.

noun

verb

pron adj

adv interj

prep conj

There are many words. bug, blue, wave, smell, ower, yellow, beach, ocean, cloud ďŹ sh, ran, splash, duck, island, wow, boat, tide

Grammar Island

13


But how many dierent kinds of words do you think there are for all the things on Grammar Island? A zillion?

14

Grammar Island


noun

verb

pron adj

adv interj

prep conj

Guess what? There are only eight kinds of words!

Only eight! Grammar Island

15


noun

verb

pron adj

adv interj

prep conj

The eight kinds of words are called the Parts of Speech. Our language is made of only eight kinds of parts!

16

Grammar Island


Here are the names of the Parts of eight kinds of words: Speech

noun

verb

pron adj

adv interj

prep conj

noun, pronoun, adjective, verb, adverb preposition, conjunction, interjection

Grammar Island

17


noun

verb

pron adj

adv interj

prep conj

It is surprising that in a huge language, there are only eight kinds of words! There are two main kinds of words, the noun and the verb, and six others.

18

Grammar Island


noun

verb

pron adj

adv interj

prep conj

And since there are only eight kinds of words, it is EASY to learn what they are! Grammar Island

19


noun

verb

pron adj

adv interj

prep conj

1. Nouns are words that name things, like boat, ďŹ sh, bird, island, and wind. Nouns can even be names of people, like Jim Hawkins. Mark, Rachel, dragony, puppy, smile, wind, wave, sunshine, mom, tree, lizard, harbor, freedom, frog, noun

20

Grammar Island


Part Four

Clauses

136

Grammar Island


Do you remember that every sentence has TWO parts, the subject and the predicate? Each group of words with a subject and predicate in it is called a CLAUSE. Grammar Island

137


The rain came quickly. is a clause, because it has a subject, the noun rain, and a predicate, the verb came. The adjective the and the adverb quickly are also part of this clause. They go with their subject and predicate. 138

Grammar Island


Sometimes we connect one subject and predicate to ANOTHER subject and predicate to make a big double sentence! The rain came quickly, and the island grew green. And each group of words with a subject and predicate in it is a CLAUSE. Grammar Island

139


The rain came quickly is a clause, and the island grew green is a clause. Each clause has its OWN subject and predicate!

140

Grammar Island


If we take this CLAUSE: Ducks quack and add it to this CLAUSE: cats mew We get ONE sentence with TWO clauses: Ducks quack, and cats mew. It is like two sentences in one!

Grammar Island

141


When we put two clauses together to make a double sentence, this is called a COMPOUND sentence. If it has only one clause, it is called a SIMPLE sentence.

142

Grammar Island


SIMPLE sentence: One clause. FiďŹ barked at the sailboat. COMPOUND sentence: Two clauses. Ducks quacked loudly, and Gato mewed.

Grammar Island

143


Here is something important: When you write a compound sentence, like

Larry ran, and Curly fell. You have to put a COMMA before the conjunction. A comma is a little mark, like this, that separates the two clauses. The comma goes after the ďŹ rst clause, then a space, and then the conjunction.

144

Grammar Island


BUT... if it is not a compound sentence, but only a compound part of speech, like Romeo likes

birds and bugs.

which is only a compound noun, then you do not put a comma before the conjunction. Grammar Island

145


So, one time this clause collector went down to the beach, looking for a compound sentence. “Who’s got the compound?” he asked, and looked closely at all the sentences. “I don’t have a compound,” said one sentence, and giggled. “I’m a simple sentence,” said another, and drew in the sand. “Compounds double me up,” said another, and everyone laughed. Finally, the clause collector looked at the last sentence, who had been very quiet. “Are you a compound sentence?” asked the clause collector. “I won’t tell, and you can’t make me!” said the sentence, and the clause collector said, “Aha! It’s you!”

146

Grammar Island


Now, we know FOUR ways to look at ideas! In the examples that follow, the four dierent ways to look at ideas are separated, with each one on its own line!

Ducks eat bugs, but piglets squeal in mud. Parts of Speech n. v. n. conj. n. v. prep. n. ________________________________ Parts of Sentence subj. AVP D.O. subj. AVP ________________________________ Phrases prep. phrase ________________________________ Clauses ------------clause-------------------------------clause-----------(This is a compound sentence.)

________________________________ Grammar Island

147

Grammar Island 47 pages  

Grammar Island introduces, in very simple fashion, the full four-level grammar of (1) parts of speech, (2) parts of sentences, (3) phrases,...