Issuu on Google+

Format-specific artist projects

Teodoro Lupo Iacopo Seri Cristiana Palandri Skki Copyrighted Thomas Kilpper Giulia Bonora Nicola Genovese Massimo Ricciardo

no. zero

Spring 2013


L’arte ha sfaccettature e risvolti tanto numerosi quanto la realtà stessa. Sbaglia chi crede che il sistema dell’arte contemporanea sia chiuso e autoreferenziale, sbaglia chi pensa che le produzioni artistiche siano per pochi e pressoché incomprensibili. L’esercizio dell’arte contemporanea ne aiuta la comprensione e da questa norma (proposta?) vogliamo partire con Droste Effect. Un magazine semestrale in lingua inglese e italiana per produzioni d’artista format-specific e luogo fisico per l’approfondimento e la specificazione di concetti correlati alla contemporaneità. Un laboratorio sullo stato attuale del vivere in cui artisti provenienti da tutto il mondo hanno la possibilità di parlare del mondo attraverso la pratica personale. Droste Effect avrà la sua base in Italia, ma sarà strutturato su una rete stabile di contributi internazionali, in questo numero zero provenienti da Messico, Germania e Stati Uniti d’America. Droste Effect è una rivista, ma non solo; mira a diventare uno spazio per produzioni originali d’artista, un luogo per approfondimenti teorici e diffusione leggera di multipli d’artista. – Droste Effect Art has as many facets and implications as reality itself. Those who think the world of contemporary art is closed and self-referential are wrong; and so are those who think that artistic productions are for the few and nearly incomprehensible. The practice of contemporary art helps its comprehension, and this is the norm (proposal?) we want to start from with Droste Effect. A biannual magazine in English and Italian language for format-specific artworks, and physical location for in-depth analysis and specification of concepts related to the contemporary world. A workshop about present-day living in which artists from all over the world have the possibility to talk about the world through their own practice. Droste Effect will have its base in Italy, but it will be structured upon an ongoing network of international contributions, which in this number zero come from Mexico, Germany, and the United States of America. Droste Effect is a magazine, but not only; it aims to become a space for artists original productions, a place for theoretical research and for the light circulation of artist multiples. – Droste Effect

PUBLISHERS AND EDITORS Vincenzo Estremo (editorial director) Dania Rotatori (communication director) Matilde Soligno (project manager) info@drosteeffectmag.com DESIGN Vênus et Milö www.venusetmilo.net

COPY EDITING AND TRANSLATION EDI.MAT sas, Bologna www.edimatstudio.com

PRINTED BY Tipografia Negri, Bologna

THANKS TO all contributing artists, Karin Andersen, Chiara Bernasconi, Giulia Bonora, Francesca Divano, Bruna Esperi, Raffaele Ficaccia, Elisa Gattafoni, Gianni Masci, Maurice Noah, Lia Righi, Antonio Soligno

SERIGRAPHY PRINTED BY Seri Print, Napoli

COVER Artwork by Vênus et Milö. In collaboration with Giulia Bonora


P. 3 TEODORO LUPO OM salvarech

P. 9 IACOPO SERI

PossibilitĂ  di poesia

P. 20 SKKI COPYRIGHTED

Notes

P. 16 CRISTIANA PALANDRI

Shifting between silence and noise

P. 32 GIULIA BONORA

Modi di dire

P. 26 THOMAS KILPPER

Pavilion for Revolutionary Free Speech

P. 38 NICOLA GENOVESE

I decided to be a North American cowboy, Native American, who plays post rock with his uke. I can look like one, therefore I am one.

fin MASSIMO RICCIARDO


o

M 5

SALVARECH

TEODORO LUPO


Thank you, God, for keeping me an unsuccessful artist. Otherwise I would feel guilt y.


Because my flatmate lost his biggest client, who decided to let their tourist guides translate their texts during t h e w i n t e r, when tourism is quieter: they can speak a foreign language, too.


Because my best friend has finished his third book, but the publisher is postponing: there is no money and less readers. And for the next three years his university offers just two jobs for more than one hundred contenders.


Because my collegues, a f t e r t e n y e a r s o f c a r e e r, have completed the “Garutti cycle”: those who wanted to buy or exhibit them already did so, and now they are unoccupied. I don’t think an artist can really be unoccupied, but they can starve.


And keep my parents self-reliant: mentally, physically, and economically. Otherwise, I’m really in the shit.

HUGS AND KISSES


possibility of poetry or

how to produce possibility through contingent reality with visualization exercises


Mexico: minimum wage 60 pesos, or approx. 4 euros. And I came here looking for a job. Great! However, everything here is within reach, it’s the Americas, if you have a good idea everybody is willing to pay and make you rich. More or less. Here everything depends on who you know. If you manage to get an invitation to dinner at someone’s place, it’s done. Nonetheless, everybody here is so kind, that if you ask for a job they’ll say “Let me think. I know a guy.” Who knows if something will happen for real after that. I think it will, because [the text carries on in Spanish].*

Talking about the fact that this city is a FOREST (cf. Charlie’s speech). Sì, hay que tener cuidado. But this is also what I like about this place. It’s true, it is a forest and because of that all this cement is somehow converted into something very natural. The instinctive manner of building things and districts, of crossing the road or the city. Here the left side of one’s brain must necessarily (a matter of survival) leave a little bit of space to the right side, the emotional one, usually atrophied where rules are standardized.

* R. Bolaño, p. 15 in a book suggested by a friend.

LAS FRASES DE LOS AMBULANTES ... VOICE MODULATION IS INCREDIBLE ––> sound poetry cut-up M OCH I LERO S ... Get a backpack–speaker and sell italian music ––> Rock en tu idioma. (In case I don’t find a job, this is the job of the future!)

VIRTUALLY ALL MY WORK IS SYNTHETIZED BY THE FOLLOWING QUESTION: “ WHO’S AN ARTIST?” It happens that in certain moments I PLAY the artist, I wear this mask that others gave me. Now, what happens if I myself put this mask on others, NON-ARTISTS? PROBABLY I BECOME A CURATOR OF REALITY. MAKE AN EXHIBITION WITH NON-ARTISTS, FOLLOWING A PRACTICAL CONTEMPORARY ART WORKSHOP FOR WORKERS. What’s the difference between WORK and ARTWORK? Where’s the borderline dividing them? ––> PRESENT TO JUMEX: THE BIGGEST ART COLLECTION RIGHT BESIDE THE MINIMUM WAGE FACTORY. Understanding art and what an artist is without the pretension to teaching, from the point of view of an immigrant young artist confronting himself with a group of people outside but lateral to the art system.

T H EM ES : – C EN T RE/ PERI PH ERY We’re in a megalopolis outside the best known routes – A M BUL A N T ES Here everything’s on sale and somehow within reach – C O LO N I ES ’ PAY B AC K Am I a 2.0 immigrant? – PAC E A N D RUL ES Everything’s relative.


Cristiana Palandri shifting between silence and noise


SKKI COPYRIGHTED

notes


In September 2010, curator Katerina Gregos invited me to participate in the 54th Venice Bienniale, and her exhibition “Speech Matters” in the Danish pavilion. Venice Biennale ... ... National pavilions and a central exhibition, curated by Bice Curiger with the stupid title “Illuminations” ... N-A-T-I-O-N-S colored and highlighted ! ... it’s not just a normal exhibition but a state event!

The Danish Mohamad-cartoons and foremost the publishers decision to reprint them millionfold after they realized the troubles it caused in Islamic societies was not a fight for the freedom of art and speech, but rather a demonstration of western mass-media power and its superiority over another culture. They were not emancipatory but chauvinistic.

----------------Venice 2011 – in Italy under a Berlusconi-Bossi I use as much recycled materials as possibe, trying to government ... what could make sense – except a work that produce less waste and to save money at the same time; calls for fundamental social change and a REVOLUTION and I like to re-use something already considered “waste” against chauvinism and nationalism? as it is a nice contradiction to the notion of artistic “values” We need a new departure for emancipatory goals for true with high price tags and it is a statement against the equality and social justice ... We need to rebel against present, high-consumption mode of production. the European policies of exclusion towards migrants and My work is an installation – a floor-cut, you can enter refugees, for complete freedom to travel and settle! into its space and walk on it, if you like. At your feet are I wanted to create a work of art that inspires and triggers 33 figures – some of these personalities are equipped with reflection due to its intensity. great power. For a moment you experience a perspective The proposed site for me was a garden and an outdoor area. that reverses the real power relations: some powerful figures are floored... I wanted to go beyond the walls of the national pavillion. Across the portraits runs the question “HOW TO I wanted to add a temporary structure of a similar size to GET RID OF ‘EM WITHOUT FIGHTING FOR the two existing buildings of the Danish Pavilion. REVOLUTION AND EMANCIPATION?”.............. My idea was to create a work that generates its intensity We can’t get rid of them without a fundamental change. from the contradiction between open structure and sinister Have I been wrong? (When I did the work, I did not content. I built a sort of romantic place in the garden; consider or even dream of Berlusconi or Bossi could a kind of sub-pavilion and an anti-palazzo structure that disappear because of the pressure of the financial invites people to have a rest and stay for a while… but markets...) when you enter the space you become aware that it is Everybody visiting my installation in Venice could use heavily loaded with social and political conflict. Like real the megaphone piece installed as part of the pavilion – but life: desire meets reality. because there was no amplifier it required commitment In the floor-cut of the pavilion I focused on the fact and efforts to actually make a statement and be heard. This that sections of the extreme right in Europe with the piece could be used in two ways: to speak and to listen, for help of major conservative parties have managed to example, to what people were talking about at the entrance gain popularity and thereby draw near to the centres of of Thomas Hirschhorn’s installation in the Swiss pavilion power. Within the last two decades this has happened opposite to the Danish. in Austria, Italy, Denmark, Norway, the Netherlands, ----------------Belgium, Switzerland, Hungary and France. Some After the Biennale, the pavilion itself was dismantled, European governments are now dependent on the votes but interestingly most of it has been reused. It now serves of the extreme right in the parliaments – with devastating as a mezzanine and office space for the independent consequences. exhibition space Sale-Docks in Venice. A new space This development is a catastrophy and must be reversed. within the arts. It prevents an equal footing and the ability to live together The entire floor piece and the megaphone remained, without discrimination. It excludes immigrants and and after the Biennale the floor piece went through a refugees from other cultures and prevents an open Europe. transformation. It now also serves as a printing block This development has also led to a growing divergence and stamp – it’s the first time I take prints from my of social forces: increasing poverty of many, exorbitant wood-cuts, after so many people have walked across wealth of a few, increasing xenophobic, nationalistic and the floor. chauvinistic tendencies, strengthening “The European There are traces of the weather, rain, scratches from Fortress” with increasing restrictions of freedom of transport and bubble gum, but the damage is relatively movement and migration for millions. Child abuse by minor - considering how many people have gone over the church officials is played down if not covered-up, and floor and how long it has been exposed to wind homosexuality condemned and marginalized. and weather. Censorship and media manipulation are on the rise: the new Printing opens many new opportunities. I can print and Hungarian media law, the banning of books from public bring together different sections of an image working out libraries in Italy from writers who signed a petition in favour new contexts. I am learning to make better prints. of a former left wing activist, the removal of controversial pieces of art at the Sharjah Biennale in the United Arab Emirates or at Gropius-Bau in Berlin... and so on... Thomas Kilpper – Copenhagen, Denmark, March 2012

1 c 1 s 2 s 2 i i 2 p 2 2 t m o t 2 a l 2 P 2 2 D a 2 o 3 P 3 3 b 3 1 S 2 F s 3 4 5 f 6 7 8 l 9 m n 1 e A 1 o 1 c 1 o 1 t 1 c 1 i 1 c 1 c 1 s 2 s 2 i i 2 p 2 2 t m o t 2 a l 2 P 2 2 D a 2 o 3 P 3 3 b 3 1 S 2 F s 3 4 5 f 6 7 8


18. Oriana Fallaci, born 1929 in Florence and died 2006 in Florence, Italy. Journalist, author, political interviewer. Fallaci, who has been a partisan during World War II, published in her late career texts mostly critical towards Islamic extremism and Islam in general. “Europe no longer is Europe, it is Eurabia, a colony of Islam...” 19. Thilo Sarrazin, born 1945 in Gera, Germany. Politician and member of the Social Democratic Party, former member of the Executive Board of Deutsche Bundesbank. Mostly known for his book Deutschland schafft sich ab (Germany does away with itself), in which he derides Muslims who he claims do not want to integrate into German society. 20. Geert Wilders, born 1963 in Venlo, the Netherlands. Politician, founder and current leader of the right-wing Partij voor de Vrijheid (PVV: Party for Freedom), known for his anti-islamic statements and views such as “I don’t hate Muslims, I hate Islam”. 21. Umberto Bossi, born 1941 in Cassano Magnago, Italy. Politician, co-founder and Federal Secretary of the right-wing separatist party Lega Nord (Northern League). Sentenced for a 200-million lire bribe in 1992 and for the incitement of violence in 1998. While being Reforms Minister in 2003, he was quoted in the newspaper Corriere della Sera for saying that “the navy should fire on boats carrying illegal immigrants to Italy”. 22. Raffaele Speranzon, born 1971 in Mestre/Venecia, Italy. Politician, member of Lega Nord (Northern League) for Cultural Affairs of the Province of Veneto. He recently proposed to remove books from the public libraries in Veneto written by writers, who signed a petition in favour of former left wing activist Cesare Battisti (see also no. 5. Elena Donazzan). 23. Francesca Zaccariotto, born 1962, Italy. Politician, President of the Province of Venice. Suggested to use the army against street vendors in Venice, calling it “a public awareness campaign”. 24. Silvio Berlusconi, born 1936 in Milan, Italy. Entrepreneur and politician, currently Prime Minister of Italy, leader and founder of Il Popolo della Libertà (PdL). He has an extensive record of criminal allegations, including mafia collusion, false accounting, tax fraud, corruption and bribery of police officers and judges. He has been tried in Italian courts in several cases. While Prime Minister, he has retained effective control of 90% of all national television broadcasting of Italy. He is accused of entertaining links to the Mafia and has been involved in a host of sex scandals. He has said: “It is better to like young girls rather than to be gay...”. 25. Pope Benedict XVI, born Joseph Aloisius Ratzinger, 1927 in Marktl, Germany. Was elected Pope in 2005. In April 2010 Richard Dawkins and Christopher Hitchens have asked human rights lawyers to produce a case charging Pope Benedict with his alleged cover-up of sexual abuse in the Catholic church. In his annual New Year’s speech to the diplomatic corps of the Vatican City in 2010 the Pope stated that the legalization of gay marriage is an assault upon creation. 26. Luigi Cesaro, born 1952 in Sant’Antimo, Italy. President of the Province of Naples. He began his political career in the Socialist Party, but is now provincial coordinator of the centre right wing party The People of Freedom (PdL). He is accused of having ties with the Camorra. 27. Thomas Kilpper, born 1956, Stuttgart, Germany. Artist, engages with history and the public sphere through artistic interventions that reveal hidden or obscured political conflicts and social significances. 28. Sheikh Sultan Bin Mohamed Al Qasimi, born 1939 in Sharjah, United Arab Emirates. The ruler of Sharjah emirate (since 1972). President of Sharjah Biennial, responsible for the dismissal of Jack Persikian, Director of the Sharjah Art Foundation since 2005, after a public outcry over the perceived offensive content in an artwork exhibited in the 10th edition of the Sharjah Biennial by Algerian artist, journalist and activist Mustapha Benfodil. 29. Ignazio La Russa, born 1947 in Paternò, Italy. Politician, current Minister of Defence in the Berlusconi government. He started his career in the neo-fascist Movimento Sociale (MSI) and became later head of the National Alliance that merged with Berlusconi’s The People of Freedom Party (PdL). Renowned for anti-islamic, anti-communist tough language. 30. Benjamin Netanyahu, born 1949 in Tel Aviv, Israel. Politician, currently Prime Minister and Chairman of the right wing Likud party. He is not in favour of an independent Palestinian state and stresses that the Palestinians must recognize Israel as a Jewish state. He recently rejected President Barack Obama’s support for a two state solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. 31. Bart de Wever, born 1970 in Mortsel, Belgium. Politician, president of the right-wing separatist New Flemish Alliance. 32. Daniela Santachè, born 1961 in Cuneo, Italy. Politician, founder of right-wing party Movimento per l’Italia, currently State Secretary to Prime Minister Berlusconi. She is known for saying “I am proud to be a fascist” and known as a militant adversary of Islam. 33. Christoph Blocher, born 1940 in Schaffhausen, Switzerland. Politician, Vice President of the conservative The Swiss People’s Party. 1. Giulio Andreotti, born 1919 in Rome, Italy. Politician, former Prime Minister and Minister of Finance, Interior Defence and Foreign Affairs, associated with the Mafia and the secret P2 lodge (Licio Gelli, Michele Sindona...). Life time member of the senate. 2. Paolo Baratta, born 1939 in Milan, Italy. Politician and manager, former chairman of the Board of Directors of the State Railways and of Telecom Italy, as well as vice-president of the Italian Environmental Fund. President of the Venice Biennale 1998 – 2002 and again since 2007. At the Venice Biennale in 2009 about 110 biennale employees went on strike. Their grievances included unpaid overtime, lack of job security, poor management, and lack of placement for workers who have worked on previous biennales. 3. Marine Le Pen, born 1968 in Neuilly-sur-Seine, France. Politician, member of European Parliament, leader of right wing nationalistic party National Front (FN). 4. Bice Curiger, born 1948 in Zurich, Switzerland. Curator of the Venice Biennale 2011 and thus responsible for its title IllumiNations and its emphasis on the significance of “nation”. 5. Elena Donazzan, born 1972 in Bassano del Grappa, Italy. Politician, Minister of Education and Labour in the regional government for the party People of Freedom. In 2010 she approved the removal of books from the public libraries that are written by writers who signed a petition in favour of former left wing activist Cesare Battisti (see also no. 22. Raffaele Speranzon). 6. Flemming Rose, born 1958, Denmark. Journalist and former cultural editor of the Danish newpaper Jyllands-Posten, which commissioned and published the controversial Mohammad Cartoons in 2006. 7. Vittorio Feltri, born 1943 in Bergamo, Italy. Journalist and editor, strongly affiliated with Berlusconi’s media empire. Editor of Il Giornale, founder of right-wing newspaper Libero. 8. Alessandra Mussolini, born 1962 in Rome, Italy. Politician, grand daughter of dictator Mussolini, founder and former leader of the right-wing party Social Action, member of the Chamber of Deputies, the lower house of the Italian Parliament, for the party People of Freedom. 9. Roberto Calderoli, born 1956 in Bergamo, Italy. Politician, member of Lega Nord (Northern League), former minister in Berlusconi’s government. During the international crisis sparked by the so-called Muhammad Cartoons, he made statements favouring the use of force against Muslims. When France lost the 2006 World Cup Final, Calderoli dubbed France for having “sacrificed its identity for results by fielding niggers, Muslims and Communists”. 10. Janet Napolitano, born 1957 in New York, USA. Politician and member of the Democratic Party. Since 2009 she is US Secretary of Homeland Security and as such responsible for the rising numbers of refused entries to the US and for the more and more militarized wall to Mexico. In 2010 she tolerated Joe Lieberman from the Republican Party, when he as a member of the Committee for Homeland Security made Amazon stop dealing with the internet platform WikiLeaks. 11. Christos Papoutsis, born 1953 in Larissa, Greece. Politician and currently Minister for Citizen Protection. Member of the Panhellenic Socialist Movement (PASOK). In his New Year’s speech he unveiled plans of the government to erect a 206 kilometers long separation wall to Turkey to stop immigrants from entering Europe. 12. Pia Kjærsgaard, born 1947 in Copenhagen, Denmark. Politician, co-founder and leader of the right wing nationalistic party “Danish People’s Party” DPP. In 2001, she referred to Muslims as people who “lie, cheat and deceive.” 13. Anders Fogh Rasmussen, born 1953 in Ginnerup, Denmark. Politician and the current Secretary General of NATO, former Prime Minister and leader of the Liberal Party in Denmark. As Prime Minister he relied on the right wing Danish People’s Party (DPP) for support. He started off with a radical cut down on social benefits and restrictive politics towards immigrants. 14. Siv Jensen, born 1969 in Oslo, Norway. Politician, leader of the conservative-liberal Progress Party. In 2009 she claimed that “radical Islam is a dark and scary ideology” and that the fight against it “is the most important fight of our time”. 15. Victor Orbàn, born 1963 in Székesfehérvár, Hungary. Politician, currently Prime Minister and leader of the Hungarian Civic Party. His government issued a highly controversial new media law, reinstalling state censorship, threatening journalists and editors with high fines in case of socalled “imbalanced writings”. 16. Angela Merkel, born 1954 in Hamburg, Germany. Politician, currently Chancellor of Germany and the chairwoman of the Christian Democratic Union. In February 2003 she supported the US-British intervention in Iraq. In May 2011 she welcomed the recent killing of Osama Bin Laden. 17. Mark Rutte, born 1967 in the Hauge, the Netherlands. Politician, currently Prime Minister and leader of People’s Party for Freedom and Democracy since 2006. In 2003 as State Secretary Rutte advised to check on the local Somali population. In a court case it was concluded that he had incited racial discrimination. 18. Oriana Fallaci, born 1929 in Florence and died 2006 in Florence, Italy. Journalist, author, political interviewer. Fallaci, who has been a partisan during World War II, published in her late career texts mostly critical towards Islamic extremism and Islam in general. “Europe no longer is Europe, it is Eurabia, a colony of Islam...” 19. Thilo Sarrazin, born 1945 in Gera, Germany. Politician and member of the Social Democratic Party, former member of the Executive Board of Deutsche Bundesbank. Mostly known for his book Deutschland schafft sich ab (Germany does away with itself), in which he derides Muslims who he claims do not want to integrate into German society. 20. Geert Wilders, born 1963 in Venlo, the Netherlands. Politician, founder and current leader of the right-wing Partij voor de Vrijheid (PVV: Party for Freedom), known for his anti-islamic statements and views such as “I don’t hate Muslims, I hate Islam”. 21. Umberto Bossi, born 1941 in Cassano Magnago, Italy. Politician, co-founder and Federal Secretary of the right-wing separatist party Lega Nord (Northern League). Sentenced for a 200-million lire bribe in 1992 and for the incitement of violence in 1998. While being Reforms Minister in 2003, he was quoted in the newspaper Corriere della Sera for saying that “the navy should fire on boats carrying illegal immigrants to Italy”. 22. Raffaele Speranzon, born 1971 in Mestre/Venecia, Italy. Politician, member of Lega Nord (Northern League) for Cultural Affairs of the Province of Veneto. He recently proposed to remove books from the public libraries in Veneto written by writers, who signed a petition in favour of former left wing activist Cesare Battisti (see also no. 5. Elena Donazzan). 23. Francesca Zaccariotto, born 1962, Italy. Politician, President of the Province of Venice. Suggested to use the army against street vendors in Venice, calling it “a public awareness campaign”. 24. Silvio Berlusconi, born 1936 in Milan, Italy. Entrepreneur and politician, currently Prime Minister of Italy, leader and founder of Il Popolo della Libertà (PdL). He has an extensive record of criminal allegations, including mafia collusion, false accounting, tax fraud, corruption and bribery of police officers and judges. He has been tried in Italian courts in several cases. While Prime Minister, he has retained effective control of 90% of all national television broadcasting of Italy. He is accused of entertaining links to the Mafia and has been involved in a host of sex scandals. He has said: “It is better to like young girls rather than to be gay...”. 25. Pope Benedict XVI, born Joseph Aloisius Ratzinger, 1927 in Marktl, Germany. Was elected Pope in 2005. In April 2010 Richard Dawkins and Christopher Hitchens have asked human rights lawyers to produce a case charging Pope Benedict with his alleged cover-up of sexual abuse in the Catholic church. In his annual New Year’s speech to the diplomatic corps of the Vatican City in 2010 the Pope stated that the legalization of gay marriage is an assault upon creation. 26. Luigi Cesaro, born 1952 in Sant’Antimo, Italy. President of the Province of Naples. He began his political career in the Socialist Party, but is now provincial coordinator of the centre right wing party The People of Freedom (PdL). He is accused of having ties with the Camorra. 27. Thomas Kilpper, born 1956, Stuttgart, Germany. Artist, engages with history and the public sphere through artistic interventions that reveal hidden or obscured political conflicts and social significances. 28. Sheikh Sultan Bin Mohamed Al Qasimi, born 1939 in Sharjah, United Arab Emirates. The ruler of Sharjah emirate (since 1972). President of Sharjah Biennial, responsible for the dismissal of Jack Persikian, Director of the Sharjah Art Foundation since 2005, after a public outcry over the perceived offensive content in an artwork exhibited in the 10th edition of the Sharjah Biennial by Algerian artist, journalist and activist Mustapha Benfodil. 29. Ignazio La Russa, born 1947 in Paternò, Italy. Politician, current Minister of Defence in the Berlusconi government. He started his career in the neo-fascist Movimento Sociale (MSI) and became later head of the National Alliance that merged with Berlusconi’s The People of Freedom Party (PdL). Renowned for anti-islamic, anti-communist tough language. 30. Benjamin Netanyahu, born 1949 in Tel Aviv, Israel. Politician, currently Prime Minister and Chairman of the right wing Likud party. He is not in favour of an independent Palestinian state and stresses that the Palestinians must recognize Israel as a Jewish state. He recently rejected President Barack Obama’s support for a two state solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. 31. Bart de Wever, born 1970 in Mortsel, Belgium. Politician, president of the right-wing separatist New Flemish Alliance. 32. Daniela Santachè, born 1961 in Cuneo, Italy. Politician, founder of right-wing party Movimento per l’Italia, currently State Secretary to Prime Minister Berlusconi. She is known for saying “I am proud to be a fascist” and known as a militant adversary of Islam. 33. Christoph Blocher, born 1940 in Schaffhausen, Switzerland. Politician, Vice President of the conservative The Swiss People’s Party. 1. Giulio Andreotti, born 1919 in Rome, Italy. Politician, former Prime Minister and Minister of Finance, Interior Defence and Foreign Affairs, associated with the Mafia and the secret P2 lodge (Licio Gelli, Michele Sindona...). Life time member of the senate. 2. Paolo Baratta, born 1939 in Milan, Italy. Politician and manager, former chairman of the Board of Directors of the State Railways and of Telecom Italy, as well as vice-president of the Italian Environmental Fund. President of the Venice Biennale 1998 – 2002 and again since 2007. At the Venice Biennale in 2009 about 110 biennale employees went on strike. Their grievances included unpaid overtime, lack of job security, poor management, and lack of placement for workers who have worked on previous biennales. 3. Marine Le Pen, born 1968 in Neuilly-sur-Seine, France. Politician, member of European Parliament, leader of right wing nationalistic party National Front (FN). 4. Bice Curiger, born 1948 in Zurich, Switzerland. Curator of the Venice Biennale 2011 and thus responsible for its title IllumiNations and its emphasis on the significance of “nation”. 5. Elena Donazzan, born 1972 in Bassano del Grappa, Italy. Politician, Minister of Education and Labour in the regional government for the party People of Freedom. In 2010 she approved the removal of books from the public libraries that are written by writers who signed a petition in favour of former left wing activist Cesare Battisti (see also no. 22. Raffaele Speranzon). 6. Flemming Rose, born 1958, Denmark. Journalist and former cultural editor of the Danish newpaper Jyllands-Posten, which commissioned and published the controversial Mohammad Cartoons in 2006. 7. Vittorio Feltri, born 1943 in Bergamo, Italy. Journalist and editor, strongly affiliated with Berlusconi’s media empire. Editor of Il Giornale, founder of right-wing newspaper Libero. 8. Alessandra Mussolini, born 1962 in Rome, Italy. Politician, grand daughter of dictator Mussolini, founder and former leader of the right-wing party Social Action, member of the Chamber of Deputies, the


G I U L I A B O N O RA

Mo d i d i d i re Ways o f say in g


Nicola Genovese Ho deciso di essere un cowboy nordamericano, nativo americano, che suona post rock con il suo ukulele. Posso sembrarlo, quindi lo sono. I decided to be a North American cowboy, Native American, who plays post rock with his uke. I can look like one, therefore I am one.


In queste pagine/In these pages: vintage Tony Lama black boot vintage cowboy hat navajo pink dream catcher vintage Navajo bolo tie vintage Pendleton jacket vintage Red Wing google wolf t-shirt


Teodoro Lupo Sono nato a Treviso nel 1975. Mi sono laureato nel 2003 in Conservazione dei Beni Culturali sotto la supervisione di Roberta Valtorta con una tesi su una pubblica committenza fotografica francese: La Mission Photographique de la DATAR. Ho lavorato per diversi anni con la fotografia e in seguito mi sono aperto a differenti media con una preferenza per scultura e installazione. Vivo a Berlino da marzo 2002. Teodoro Lupo I was born in Treviso, Italy in 1975. In 2003 I graduated from the University of Udine with a Master degree in Cultural Heritage Conservation under the supervision of Roberta Valtorta. I wrote my dissertation on a French photographic public assignment: La Mission Photographique de la DATAR. I worked for many years with photography, and later I opened up to different media, with a predilection for sculpture and installation. I have been living in Berlin since March 2002.

Iacopo Seri (Arezzo, Italia, 1983) Dopo una laurea in Exhibition Design all’Università degli Studi di Firenze, si è formato artisticamente ottenendo un Master in Arti Visive all’Università di Architettura IUAV di Venezia. Ha vissuto, lavorato e transitato per diverse città italiane tra cui Venezia, Milano, Roma e Torino, sempre privilegiando gli spazi indipendenti, il low budget e la tendenza a una immaterialità del lavoro. Nel 2011 ha partecipato al XVII Advanced Course in Visual Arts della Fondazione Antonio Ratti a Como, con Susan Hiller come visiting professor. Nello stesso anno ha ottenuto una borsa ed ha lavorato, in qualità di artista, alla produzione di dOCUMENTA (13), rimanendo in residenza a Kassel fino a settembre 2012. Attualmente fa parte del programma educativo SOMA a Città del Messico, dove sta cercando lavoro.

Cristiana Palandri nasce nel 1977 a Firenze, città dove attualmente vive e lavora. Dopo aver vinto una borsa di studio alla University of the West of England di Bristol, prosegue il suo percorso artistico partecipando a numerose esposizioni collettive in contesto nazionale e internazionale, tra cui le collettive a BACC, Bangkok (2010), Horton Gallery, Berlino, Scaramouche Gallery, New York (2011), Podbielski Contemporary, Berlino, Museo Marino Marini, Firenze (2012). Nel 2013 partecipa a “White&White” al Museo Bilotti di Roma e ad “Arimortis” al Museo del Novecento di Milano. Tra le sue mostre personali, nel 2008 crea la performance “Oversight” al MLAC di Roma, a cui seguono nel 2010 “Reverse” alla Fondazione Merz di Torino, “Slipping time” al Project Space – Galeria Sabot a Cluj-Napoca (Romania) in seguito alla residenza alla Fabrica de Pensule, e “Noiseless” alla Scaramouche Gallery, New York.

Iacopo Seri (Arezzo, Italy 1983) After a degree in Exhibition Design at the University of Florence, he obtained a Master in Visual Arts at IUAV University of Architecture in Venice. He has lived, worked and passed through several Italian cities, including Venice, Milan, Rome and Turin, always favoring independent spaces, low budget projects, and a tendency towards immateriality in his work. In 2011 he took part in the XVII Advanced Course in Visual Arts at Fondazione Antonio Ratti in Como, with Susan Hiller as a visiting professor. In the same year he obtained a scholarship and worked as an artist in the production of dOCUMENTA (13), staying in Kassel until September 2012. He’s currently part of SOMA’s educational program in Mexico City, where he is looking for a job.

Cristiana Palandri was born in 1977 in Florence, where she currently lives and works. Her first important solo exhibition was curated by Sergio Risaliti at Quarter, Florence 2007. After that, she held a performance at MLAC, Rome, and won the A. T. Kearney Prize 2008, curated by Milovan Farronato in Milan. In 2010 she had her first solo show in New York at Scaramouche Gallery, and she took part in an artistic residency at Fabrica de Pensule in Cluj-Napoca (Romania) followed by a solo exhibition in Sabot Gallery’s project space. Other performances were held by the artist at Fondazione Merz, Turin, Palazzo Italia, Berlin, and BACC Museum, Bangkok. Among her group shows: Podbielski Contemporary in Berlin, and Museo Marino Marini in Florence (2012); “White & White” at Museo Bilotti, Rome and “Arimortis” at Museo del Novecento, Milan (2013).

Skki ©, nato in Polonia e cresciuto a Parigi, ha cominciato la sua carriera di artista come graffitista (New York Style) in Europa agli inizi degli anni 1980 marchiando a spray la sua tag in varie città del mondo tra cui Parigi, Barcellona, New York, Tokyo, Berlino: di quest’ultima dipingendo il muro durante la guerra fredda fino alla sua caduta nel 1989. Trasferitosi a New York City nel 1993, oggi lavora tra Parigi e la Grande Mela utilizzando un’ampia gamma di media, stili e atmosfere e spaziando tra installazioni video, grafica, pittura, fotografia e soprattutto arte concettuale. Come Marcel Duchamp e l’artista tedesco Martin Kippenberger, “SI RIFIUTA DI ADOTTARE UNO STILE SPECIFICO”. I suoi lavori sono marchiati di una consapevolezza delle contraddizioni che è tipicamente est-europea, probabilmente un lascito della sua eredità culturale polacca. Nella sua opera si ritrovano molte dicotomie: Spiritualità vs Capitalismo, Umorismo vs Disperazione, Astrazione vs Narrazione. Alla fine, gli opposti arrivano ad assomigliarsi reciprocamente, ricordandoci che un punto di vista interessante necessita di larghe vedute. Skki © was born in Poland and grew up in Paris, France. He started has as one of the first graffiti artists (New York Style) in Europe back in the early 1980s, spraying his tag in various cities around the world, including Paris, Barcelona, New York, Tokyo, and Berlin, where he’d been painting on the Berlin Wall during the cold war till its fall in 1989. He moved to New York City in 1993, and today he works between Paris and the Big Apple, using a wide range of different media, styles and moods – video installation, graphics, painting, photography, and a lot of conceptual art. Like Marcel Duchamp or German artist Martin Kippenberger, he is “REFUSING TO ADOPT A SIGNATURE STYLE.” He marks all sorts of works with a certain EasternEuropean awareness of contradiction, probably left by his Polish cultural heritage. In his oeuvre, dichotomies pile-up: Spirituality vs Capitalism, Humor vs Despair, Abstraction vs Narration. Ultimately, the opposites come to resemble one another, a reminder that an interesting view needs to be wide eyed.


Photo © Antonio Rasi Caldogno

Thomas Kilpper. Artista, ha studiato pittura e scultura all’Accademia di Francoforte (Städel School), di Dusseldorf e di Norimberga. Da 12 anni intraprende interventi artistici in edifici per gran parte inutilizzati declinati in riferimento al sito, alla sua storia e funzione sociale. Ha creato alcune incisioni pavimentali di grandi dimensioni, su linoleum e legno, calpestabili durante l’apertura dell’esposizione; specchiate nello spazio pubblico, stampe del lavoro totale venivano esposte sulla facciata esterna. Dal 2006 Kilpper gestisce a Berlino uno spazio sperimentale non-profit per l’esposizione di arte contemporanea e legata a tematiche sociali all’interno di un’ex bottega di macellaio; da qui il nome dello spazio, “After the butcher”, che ha all’attivo circa 40 esposizioni (tra gli artisti coinvolti, Thomas Bayrle, Michael Beutler, Alice Creischer, Twin Gabriel, Judith Hopf, Henrik Olesen e Manfred Pernice). Nel 2011 ha partecipato alla 54esima Biennale di Venezia ed è stato uno dei vincitori del premio di Villa Romana a Firenze. Thomas Kilpper. Artist, studied painting and sculpture at the art academies in Frankfurt (Städel School), Dusseldorf and Nuremberg. For the last 12 years he’s been carrying out artistic interventions in mostly empty buildings with references to the site, its history and social function. He created some large-scale floor-cuttings (lino- and wood cuttings) that could be walked upon during exhibitions while – mirrored into the public space – the overall prints were hung and presented on the outside facade. Since 2006, he runs an experimental and not-for-profit exhibition space for contemporary art and social issues in a former butcher shop in Berlin named “After the butcher.” So far about 40 exhibitions have been held inside the space (with, among the others, Thomas Bayrle, Michael Beutler, Alice Creischer, Twin Gabriel, Judith Hopf, Henrik Olesen and Manfred Pernice). In 2011 he participated in the 54th Venice Biennale and was one of the Villa Romana prize winners in Florence.

Giulia Bonora nasce nel 1986 a Ferrara, dove attualmente vive e lavora. Studia all’Accademia di Belle Arti di Bologna, dove nel 2011 si diploma al Biennio Specialistico in Scultura. Il suo percorso artistico è scandito da una ricerca che intreccia l’arte del mangiare e la scultura. L’ultimo lavoro è una performance chiamata Croquette Machine, nella quale il nutrimento dello spettatore avviene tramite la scultura. Finalista dell’edizione 2011 del Premio Celeste, partecipa alla mostra collettiva presso il Museo Civico Archeologico di Bologna; nel 2012 viene selezionata per partecipare al workshop Accademie Eventuali, laboratorio con Michele Di Stefano e Margherita Morgantin a cura della Fondazione Furla. Giulia Bonora was born in 1986 in Ferrara, where she currently lives and works. She studied at the Fine Arts Academy in Bologna, where in 2011 she took her Postgraduate degree in Sculpture. Her artistic journey is marked by a research intertwining the art of eating with sculpture. Her latest work is a performance called Croquette Machine, in which the viewer’s nourishment is provided by a sculpture. One of Celeste Prize’s finalists in 2011, she took part in the final exhibition at Civic Archaeological Museum, Bologna; in 2012, she was selected to take part in Accademie Eventuali, a workshop with Michele Di Stefano and Margherita Morgantin curated by Furla Fondation.

Nicola Genovese (Venezia 1971) vive e lavora a Padova. È un artista visivo che lavora con diversi medium, dall’installazione al video al libro d’artista. Nei suoi lavori si confronta con i temi dell’identità e del mito, partendo da aspetti autobiografici che poi sviluppa attraverso riflessioni sulla società contemporanea. Le sue opere possono evocare allo stesso tempo immagini familiari e destabilizzanti che funzionano attraverso rapide associazioni inconsce, spesso evocando forme e significati misteriosi. Viene selezionato per diverse residenze in Italia e all’estero, tra cui Salzamt (Linz) e Rave (Udine) con Adrian Paci. Tra le mostre collettive: “Liberty Control” al Duende di Rotterdam e “Spectator is a worker” al Tina B di Praga. Tra le personali, al BB15 di Linz, a Interno 4 di Bologna e al MARS di Milano. Nel 2011 fonda Superfluo, un progetto indipendente per l’arte contemporanea, con lo scopo di organizzare mostre, talk e concerti in locali commerciali sfitti della città di Padova. Nicola Genovese (Venice 1971) lives and works in Padua, Italy. He is a visual artist working with different media, from installation to video art to artist books. In his work he deals with the themes of identity and myth. His practice originates from autobiographical aspects which he then develops through reflections on contemporary society. His works may evoke familiar but destabilizing images that work by rapid, unconscious associations, often evoking shapes and mysterious meanings. He was selected for several residencies in Italy and abroad, including Salzamt (Linz) and Rave (Udine) with Adrian Paci. Among his group exhibitions: “Liberty Control” at Duende, Rotterdam, “Spectator is a worker” at Tina B, Prague. Among his solo shows: BB15, Linz, Interno 4, Bologna, and MARS, Milan. In 2011 he founded Superfluo, an independent contemporary art project with the aim of organizing exhibitions, concerts and talks in vacant shops in the city of Padua.

Massimo Ricciardo è nato a Darmstadt, Germania nel 1979, e trascorre la sua adolescenza in Sicilia. Dopo gli studi di pittura presso l’Accademia di Belle Arti di Firenze e l’Università di Scienze Applicate di Potsdam, attualmente lavora a Firenze. L’artista lavora principalmente con materiali d’archivio, video e performance culinarie. Gran parte della sua pratica artistica prende spunto dalla memoria e dalle relazioni sociali della sua famiglia. L’artista gestisce e dispone un processo per la realizzazione di una nuova “memoria vivente”. I suoi lavori sono stati esposti a Beirut, in Cina, alla Biennale del Mediterraneo a Skopje, in gallerie e project spaces in Toscana, Sicilia e Berlino. Massimo Ricciardo was born in Darmstadt, Germany in 1979, but spent his teenage years in Sicily. He studied Painting at the Fine Arts Academy in Florence, and Applied Sciences at Potsdam University. He currently lives and works in Florence. The artist mainly works with archival material, video and culinary performances, and a great part of his work is inspired by the memory and social relations of his own family. He handles and predisposes the process for the realization of a new “living memory.” His artworks have been exhibited in Beirut, in China, at Skopje’s Mediterranean Biennal, and in galleries and project spaces in Tuscany, Sicily and Berlin.


ricette quasi edibili

giulia bonora

almost edible recipes


DrosteEffectMag.com

Facebook/Droste-Effect Twitter/DrosteEffectMag

croquettes by Giulia Bonora


L’effetto Droste prende il nome da una marca olandese di cacao sulla cui scatola era utilizzata una particolare tecnica di pittura ricorsiva, o mise en abyme, nella quale un’immagine contiene una piccola copia di se stessa, nel punto in cui dovrebbe trovarsi se si trattasse di un’immagine reale, in una sequenza ripetuta apparentemente all’infinito. The Droste effect is named after the boxes of a Dutch brand of cocoa powder that displayed a particular technique of recursive painting, or mise en abyme, in which an image contains a smaller copy of itself, in a place where a similar picture would realistically be expected to appear, in a seemingly infinite sequence.


Droste effect magazine