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EDCI 6180: Microcomputers in Primary & Elementary Schools

Department of Teaching & Learning Tennessee State University

Technology Integration Booklet Dr. Nicole Kendall, Spring 2014

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Purpose: This instructional booklet was developed by graduate candidates enrolled in EDCI 6180- Microcomputers in Primary & Elementary Schools as part of their program requirements in the licensure or educational technology program at Tennessee State University. These students seek to provide a service to their future colleagues through their understanding on technology as a beneficial resource in today’s classroom. Within our global society, digital learners seek opportunities to expand their knowledge beyond textbooks, worksheets, and other traditional resources. Technology is a familiar tool to students whether used for educational or entertainment purposes. It is likely that teachers are not as equipped with materials that incorporate technology effectively in the curriculum. The contributors of this resource guide hope to assist other practitioners with promoting critical thinking, instructional engagement, and curricular enhancements through effective technology integration. The activities support Tennessee curriculum standards, ISTE 2008 technology principles, and TSU’s seven knowledge, skills, and dispositions for teacher education majors. Resources open with six (6) technology action plans followed with various projects/activities completed by the contributors.

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Table of Contents Grade Subject/Content Description Level Area Technology Action Plan First Grade (1st) Donnelly, Patricia 1 Reading In this first grade unit, we will be Comprehension learning about key ideas and details in reading. Students need to learn things like key ideas and details to be able to comprehend any reading opportunities they may have throughout life. Kelly, Megan 1 Human Cultures In this first grade unit, we will be learning about the diversity of human cultures in social studies. Students need to learn about different cultures so they can understand where their family and friends come from and how they live. Technology Action Plan Second Grade (2nd) Batong, Rasheed 2 Numbers and In this second grade unit, we will be Base 10 learning about Numbers and operation in base 10. Students need to comprehend numbers and operation in base 10 in order for them to fully understand addition, subtraction, number sense, place value and counting. Hudson, Chelsea 2 Interdependence This second grade unit plan is used to help students learn about interdependence in science in the topic of food chains. Students need to learn things like interdependence to understand the things that occur around them on a daily basis. Technology Action Plan Third Grade (3rd) Banks, April 3 States & Capitals In this third grade unit, students will be learning about political maps in social studies. Children would have difficulty learning states and capitals if they have never left their home state, town, or county. Author

Page 6 10

30

43 50

63

84 88

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Heyward – Donaldson, Katrice

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Cause and Effect

Smith, Kieohnica

3

Living & NonLiving Things

Technology Action Plan Fourth Grade (4th) 4

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In this third grade unit, we will learning about interdependence in science. Students will learn about the characteristics that distinguish living things from nonliving things.

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118 Cells

Alhaqbani, Sadeem

Henderson, Monae

For every action, there is a reaction, whether negative or positive. The purpose of this third grade unit is to study the cause and effect relationship, which will aid in teaching students how to integrate knowledge and ideas

Multiplication

Technology Action Plan Fifth Grade (5th) Alghamdi, Maram 5 Conventions of Writing: Capitalization, Punctuations, and Spelling deGregory, Crystal

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African-American History

Heater-Knight, Jennifer

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Tennessee History

This fourth grade unit plan is designed to aid students in developing understanding of cells. Students need to learn cells to know that all living things made up of cells. In this fourth grade unit, we will be learning about multiplication in mathematics. Students need to learn multiplication because it is an essential building block of mathematics.

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138

153 In this fifth grade unit, we will be learning about conventions of Standard English in language. Students need to learn the conventions of Standard English to be able to use it in their future study plan and career. In this fifth grade unit, we will be learning about plans and policies for Reconstruction and its subsequent successes and failures with special attention to the establishment of freedmen’s schools turned Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). In this fifth grade unit, we will be learning about the state of Tennessee, the state in which we live. Students need to learn how people in Tennessee lived in the past and how those people have influenced our state today.

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In this unit we will be learning about the manipulation of fractions. This fifth grade unit is designed to aid students in learning about the addition and subtraction of fractions in mathematics

Marks, Kellie

Technology Action Plan Sixth Grade (6th) Al-Ruwaili, Miad 6 Algebra in Math

Halasa, Reem

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Energy

Washko, Christopher

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Technology in Culture

McCoy, Dale

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World Religions

Nyaberi, Christable

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Equations & Expressions

Media Share Resources

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195 In this sixth grade unit, we will be learning about algebra in math. Students see algebra the difficult topic because it’s that combines calculation equations, fractions and roots. In this sixth grade unit, we will be learning about energy in science. Students need to learn how to distinguish among gravitational potential energy, elastic potential energy, and chemical potential energy. This sixth grade unit plan is designed to help students understand the role that technology has played in the development of culture throughout the world. In this seventh grade unit, we will be learning about 5 most prevalent religions through history. Students need to learn these different religions so there are more aware of different cultural differences some of their peers may have, as well as, an understanding of where their own religion may have originated In this seventh grade unit, we will be learning about Equations and Expressions. Students need to learn Equations and Expressions to build their budgeting and planning skills.

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Kieohnica Smith Technology Action Plan Grade 1

General Level

Objectives Standard 6.0

Achievement

(Lowest Need for Teacher Assistance)

Students will utilize technology problemsolving and decisionmaking tools.

•

•

•

Students will use technology resources for solving problems and making informed decisions Students will employ technology in the development of strategies for solving problems in the real world. Students use critical thinking skills to plan and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems, and make informed

ISTE-Student Standard 4. Critical Thinking, Problem Solving, and Decision Making

Specific Strategies Students will:

Use technology resources for solving problems and making informed decisions by recognizing that computers were created to assist in solving problems through learning about the history of a computer.

Employ technology in the development of strategies for solving problems in the real world by using the computer and technology resources to gather information on different ways to solve a specific problem.

Plan and manage activities to develop a solution or complete a project by using technology resources such as puzzles, logical thinking 6


programs, writing tools, digital cameras, and drawing tools for problem solving.

decisions using appropriate digital tools and resources Standard 4.0 Recognition Students will use technology communication tools

•

•

•

1. Creativity and Innovation 2. Communication and Collaboration

Students will use telecommunicati ons to collaborate, publish, and interact with peers, experts, and other audiences Students will use a variety of media and formats to communicate information and ideas effectively to multiple audiences Students use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others

Standard 2.0

Students will:

Recognize and discuss telecommunications as a way to share information by using multimedia software to communicate information and ideas.

Experiment with basic formatting options in a word processor to produce a publication and suggest ways telecommunications can be used to share information electronically with teachers, parents, friends and family members

Communicate information and ideas effectively to multiple audiences using a variety of digital environments and media.

5. Digital Citizenship

Students will:

Belongingness Students will understand the importance of social, ethical, and human issues associated with technology

Demonstrate the safe use of electronic technologies,, describe how computers are used in our daily living(home and work), and respect the 7


privacy of others •

Students will understand the ethical, cultural, and societal, issues related to technology Students will practice responsible use of technology system, information, literacy, and software Students will develop positive attitudes toward technology uses that support lifelong learning, collaboration, personal pursuits, and productivity

Understand and follow classroom rules for technology use by discussing the Acceptable Use Policy

Respect the rights of others by demonstrating positive social and ethical behaviors when using technology

Standard 5.0

5. Digital Citizenship

Students will:

Students will select and use appropriate technology research tools

3. Research and Information Fluency

Use electronic reference tools as a resource and evaluate acquired information for usefulness

Security and Safety

Students will use technology to locate, evaluate, and collect information from a variety of sources Students will use technology to process data and report results. Students will evaluate and select new information resources and technological innovations based

Acquire information from a computer to develop a small basic data base/spreadsheet and process data and report results

Explore the gathering of information using a variety of electronic resources, including but not limited to the Internet

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on the appropriateness for specific tasks Standard 1.0 Physiological Needs

(Highest Need for Teacher Assistance)

Students will understand basic operations and concepts of technology

•

•

•

Students will demonstrate an understanding of the nature and operation of technology systems Students will exhibit a proficiency in the use of technology Students will develop basic skills(alpha numeric and special characters) in using keyboard using the touch system

6. Technology Operations and Concepts

Students will:

List the rules for the proper care for computer equipment and demonstrate the proper care for computers and other technologies

Demonstrate proper sequence for turning on and off computers and other technologies, operate a mouse, open/launch a program, quit a program, minimize and maximize windows, operate stroll bars, and print, save and reopen documents/files with teacher guidance

Use the correct hand and body position while applying the proper touch method of keying for the home row keys (A, S, D, F, J, K, L, ;) and key words consisting of the home row key letters using the proper touch keying technique

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Patricia Donnelly Unit Proposal - Reading Comprehension In this first grade unit, we will be learning about key ideas and details in reading. Students need to learn things like key ideas and details to be able to comprehend any reading opportunities they may have throughout life. Students will be learning how to select key ideas and details out of the stories they are reading in class. The students will listen to and then retell the story in their own words. Students will learn new vocabulary using the glossary and context clues. The students will be able to describe the setting, the characters, and the main events after reading a story. Knowledge of key ideas and details is important for students to know because it will allow them to be able to comprehend future reading assignments, as well as any items they may read as adults. Studying and understanding key ideas and details in reading is a learning expectation covered under Tennessee Common Core State Standard 1.0 •

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.1.1 Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.1.2 Retell stories, including key details, and demonstrate understanding of their central message or lesson.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.1.3 Describe characters, settings, and major events in a story, using key details.

Present.Me: http://present.me/view/162830-­‐donnelly-­‐tellemin10

ASSURE Lesson Plan 10


What’s Your Story Name: Tricia Donnelly Duration of Lesson: 2 Weeks

Subject Area(s): Literacy Grade Level: 1st Grade

Analyze Learners General Characteristics The first grade class at St. Joseph Catholic School in Madison, Tennessee, consists of 20 students; 11 males and 9 females. The students range in age from six years to seven years old. Each student has completed nine months of first grade, and has studied main idea and key details throughout his or her Reading lessons. The student diversity is comprised of nineteen Caucasian students and one African-American student. All students live in homes where English is the main spoken language. Two of the students have IEP’s, and one child visits a speech therapist twice a week. The median household income at St. Joseph School is $55,000. Entry Competencies Curricular: Expect students to select a main idea and the supporting details from a story or other readings. Students will be able to work in a group and produce one product. Students will be able to follow instructions and stay on task to complete a product. Technological: Standard 6.0--Students will utilize technology problem-solving and decision-making tools. •

Students will use technology resources for solving problems and making informed decisions

Students will employ technology in the development of strategies for solving problems in the real world.

Students use critical thinking skills to plan and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems, and make informed decisions using appropriate digital tools and resources

Standard 4.0--Students will use technology communication tools • • •

Students will use telecommunications to collaborate, publish, and interact with peers, experts, and other audiences Students will use a variety of media and formats to communicate information and ideas effectively to multiple audiences Students use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others

Standard 2.0--Students will understand the importance of social, ethical, and human issues associated with technology 11


Students will understand the ethical, cultural, and societal, issues related to technology Students will practice responsible use of technology system, information, literacy, and software Students will develop positive attitudes toward technology uses that support lifelong learning, collaboration, personal pursuits, and productivity

Standard 5.0--Students will select and use appropriate technology research tools • • •

Students will use technology to locate, evaluate, and collect information from a variety of sources Students will use technology to process data and report results. Students will evaluate and select new information resources and technological innovations based on the appropriateness for specific tasks

State Standards and Objective Tennessee Common Core Standards

Technology Standard

Key Ideas and Details •

Creativity and Innovation

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.1.1--Ask and answer questions about key details in a text. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.1.2--Retell stories, including key details, and demonstrate understanding of their central message or lesson. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.1.3--Describe characters, settings, and major events in a story, using key details

Illustrate and communicate original ideas and stories using digital tools and media-rich resources. In a collaborative work group, use a variety of technologies to produce a digital presentation or product in a curriculum area.

Lesson Objective The students will create a 16-page book with text and illustrations that contains a main idea and supporting key details. Select Strategies, Technology, Media, and Materials Curricular Materials •

4 pieces plain typing paper

Technology Materials • •

11 Computers with internet access Projector 12


• • • • •

Plain notebook paper 4 pencils 1 ruler 1 scissor 1 box of crayons and colored pencils

• •

Screen How to Make a Book by Folding and Cutting. Retrieved April 28, 2014, from YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GJvlUT_da QA Leave Gingerbread Men Alone! Retrieved April 28, 2014, from YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=suf6PBqH3 x4 How to Write a Story. Retrieved April 28, 2014, from YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ebSDkhKY 3Eo Learn Drawing for Kids. Retrieved April 28, 2014 from http://www.kidsfront.com/how-todraw-pictures.html Story Maker. Retrieved April 28, 2014 from http://learnenglishkids.britishcouncil.org/en/ma ke-your-own/story-maker

Utilize Technology, Media, and Materials Preview and Prepare Materials • • • • • • • •

4 pieces of plain typing paper per group of 4 students (located next to the computer printer) Plain notebook paper available for students to work on their rough draft Pencils are the responsibility of each student (extra pencils are located next to the pencil sharpener) Rulers are the responsibility of each student Scissors are the responsibility of each student Crayons are the responsibility of each student Make sure eleven computers are operating properly with internet access (one teacher computer and ten student computers). Make sure the projector is working properly

Prepare the Environment • • •

Desks are arranged for group learning (no rearranging necessary) Computers are located along the back wall of the classroom (no rearranging necessary) Desks are clear and ready for group work.

Prepare the Learners •

Introduce the lesson to the students by showing the WebQuest assignment. The group of 4 students will create a 16-page book, including illustrations, that contains a main idea and key details. 13


Require Learner Participation Activity Day 1 Students will be assigned into their group of four students. It will be up to the students to pick 2 writers and 2 book builders/illustrators. The four students will decide what their story will be about…THE MAIN IDEA. Activity Day 2 Book builders/illustrators will begin by watching the following tutorial: •How To Make A Book This is a YouTube video that will demonstrate how the students can create their own book. After watching the video, students will make a book using 4 sheets of paper. This will create a 16-page book. Writers will begin by watching the following tutorials: •Leave Gingerbread Men Alone! This a fun YouTube video of a short story that another 6 year old wrote. Listen to the story and look at how many funny things can happen in a story! Please listen for the Main Idea, Key details, and the characters, then write them on a piece of paper to show the teacher after the video is complete. •How To Write a Story This YouTube video will tell the students how to write a short story. After watching the video, the students will begin to pre-write their story. ü ü ü ü

Title- Decide on a title for the book. Setting- Where will the story take place? Characters- Who will be in the story? Main events- What will happen in the story?

Activity Day 3 The students will spend this day as a group discussing the characters and the setting. The writers should know who the characters are and what they look like. As the writers are describing the characters, the illustrators should draw the characters. Every character should be completed by the end of this day. When the group has completed their character list, please present it to the teacher for permission to move forward with the story. Activity Days 4-5 The illustrators will spend these 2 days practicing art skills with this tutorial: •

Learn to Draw This website is designed to teach the students how to draw. This site provides step-by-step details of how to draw most animals and people. After practicing drawing the characters in the story, begin making the Character page. ü A Character page will include the name and a picture of each character in the story.

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The writers will spend these 2 days practicing their writing skills and learning how small details can create a story. First, the students will spend time playing with this website: •Story Maker This website allows the student to input small details into the story maker and a story will be created. This is a fun way to see how small details really make a story fun and interesting! After the writers have completed the story maker, the students begin to write the first draft of the story. ü The students will write the first draft on notebook paper. ü The final draft will be written in the book. ü EVERY book MUST have: 1.

TITLE page—the title page should have a picture, the title, authors’ name, illustrators’ name, and the year.

2.

CHARACTER page—has a picture and name of each character

3.

7 pages of STORY

4.

7 pages of ILLUSTRATIONS

5.

Include a MAIN IDEA and KEY DETAILS in the story.

6.

Use correct spelling and correct punctuation at the end of every sentence.

The first draft of the stories will be turned in to the teacher at the end of the day. Activity Day 6 The team will work together today to review the story. •The illustrators will decide on how to draw each scene, and the placement of the drawings within the final book. •The writers will review any comments made by the teacher on the first draft and will make corrections. Activity Days 7-9 These three days will be spent writing and illustrating the final book. Three days are allowed because each group will have to share the book as each student writes and illustrates the story. Activity Day 10 The group will present the book to the class. The entire team will stand in front of the class to read and show the book. After all presentations are made, each group will deliver the book to the school library to be placed on the shelves! Evaluate and Revise 15


Assessing Learner Achievement Formative Assessment—The teacher will be in the classroom every day as the project is developing to assist with any student needs. The students will demonstrate their understanding by completing each assignment as scheduled. The teacher will monitor for daily completion so that no group gets behind. Days 2, 3, and 5 are official check-in days to make sure the students are on task and understanding the assignment. Summative Assessment--The learners will be assessed by their ability to successfully build, write, and illustrate the 16-page book, and include a clear main idea with supporting details. Their success will be demonstrated in their group presentation. The learners will be assessed on their abilities as a group to successfully create a book with a clear main idea and key details using the following rubric:

What's Your Story?

Teacher Name: Mrs. Donnelly

Student Name:

________________________________________ Top Shelf

2nd Shelf

3rd Shelf

Title Page

Title page has a graphic or fancy lettering, has the title, author's name, illustrator's name, and the year.

Title page has the title, author's name, illustrator's name, and the year.

Title page has the 3 of the 4 required elements.

Title page has fewer than 3 of the required elements.

Characters

The main characters are named and clearly described in text as well as

The main characters are named and described. Most readers would have

The main characters are named. The reader knows very little about the

It is hard to tell who the main characters are.

CATEGORY

Bottom Shelf

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pictures. Most readers could describe the characters accurately.

some idea of what the characters looked like.

characters.

Main Idea

The main idea is clearly visible in the text.

Most readers would be able to select the main idea.

The reader has a difficult time selecting the main idea.

There is no main idea in the story.

Organization

The story is very well organized. One idea or scene follows another in a logical sequence with clear transitions.

The story is pretty well organized. One idea or scene may seem out of place. Clear transitions are used.

The story is a little hard to follow. The transitions are sometimes not clear.

Ideas and scenes seem to be randomly arranged.

Spelling and Punctuation

There are no spelling or punctuation errors in the final draft. Character and place names that the author invented are spelled consistently throughout.

There is one spelling or punctuation error in the final draft.

There are 2-3 spelling and punctuation errors in the final draft.

The final draft has more than 3 spelling and punctuation errors.

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Evaluating and Revising Strategies, Technology, and Media The teacher will determine if the videos selected facilitated the students in completing the book assignment. The teacher will monitor the daily progress to ensure the students are acquiring the skills needed to complete each task. The teacher will determine if an accurate amount of time was set aside for the five groups of four students to complete the assignment.

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What’s Your Story?

A WebQuest for 1st Grade Literacy Designed by Tricia Donnelly sntdonnelly1@gmail.com Based on the state of Tennessee curriculum standards for First Grade Literacy Key Ideas and Details: CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.1.1 Ask and answer questions about key details in a text. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.1.2 Retell stories, including key details, and demonstrate understanding of their central message or lesson. 19


CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.1.3 Describe characters, settings, and major events in a story, using key details.

Introduction

Task

Process

Evaluation

Conclusion

Credits

Introduction Welcome First Grade Book Brainiacs! You have spent all year learning how to find the main idea and key details in our stories, and now is the time to prove you have what it takes to create your own STORY! Our librarian is in need of your help. The library shelves are very empty and we need to help fill them. You have been given the task of writing and illustrating your very own book to be donated to the library.

Task Now that you have decided to help our librarian, you must plan your work. Each book will be written and illustrated by four students working as a team. You will 20


have 10 days to complete the assignment. You will be in charge of learning how to assemble a book, write the story, and illustrate the story. • Your story must have a Main Idea and should have Key Details to support the main idea. • Your story will be graded on correct spelling and correct punctuation. • The illustrations must match the story being told. • EVERY book MUST have a TITLE page, a CHARACTER page, 7 pages of STORY, and 7 pages of ILLUSTRATIONS.

Placement on the library shelves will be determined by your grade. • If all requirements are met, your book will be placed on the top shelf • If most requirements are met, your book will be placed on the 2nd shelf • If some requirements are met, your book will be placed on the 3rd shelf • If none of the requirements are met, you book will be placed on the bottom shelf

Process Activity Day 1 You will be assigned into your group of four students. It will be up to you to pick 2 writers and 2 book builders/illustrators. The four of you will decide what your story will be about…THE MAIN IDEA.

Activity Day 2 Book builders/illustrators will begin by watching the following tutorial:

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• How To Make A Book This is a YouTube video that will demonstrate how you can create your own book. After watching the video, you will make a book using 4 sheets of paper. This will create a 16-page book. Writers will begin by watching the following tutorials: • Leave Gingerbread Men Alone! This a fun YouTube video of a short story that another 6 year old wrote. Listen to the story and look at how many funny things can happen in a story! Please listen for the Main Idea, Key details, and the characters, then write them on a piece of paper to show me after the video is complete. • How To Write a Story This YouTube video will tell you how to write a short story. After watching the video, you will begin to pre-write your story. ü Title- Decide on a title for your book. ü Setting- Where will the story take place? ü Characters- Who will be in the story? ü Main events- What will happen in the story?

Activity Day 3 You will spend this day as a group discussing the characters and the setting. The writers should know who your characters are and what they look like. As the writers are describing the characters, the illustrators should draw the characters. Every character should be completed by the end of this day. When your group has completed their character list, please present it to me for permission to move forward with your story.

Activity Days 4-5 The illustrators will spend these 2 days practicing your art skills with this tutorial:

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• Learn to Draw This website is designed to teach you how to draw. This site provides step-by-step details of how to draw most animals and people. After you have practiced drawing the characters in your story, begin making the Character page. ü A Character page will include the name and a picture of each character in your story. The writers will spend these 2 days practicing your writing skills and learning how small details can create a story. First, you will spend time playing with this website: • Story Maker This website allows you to input small details into the story maker and a story will be created. This is a fun way to see how small details really make a story fun and interesting! After you have completed the story maker, you begin to write your first draft of the story. ü You will write the first draft on notebook paper. ü The final draft will be written in the book. ü EVERY book MUST have: 1. TITLE page—the title page should have a picture, the title, authors’ name, illustrators’ name, and the year. 2. CHARACTER page—has a picture and name of each character 3. 7 pages of STORY 4. 7 pages of ILLUSTRATIONS 5. Include a MAIN IDEA and KEY DETAILS in the story. 6. Use correct spelling and correct punctuation at the end of every sentence. The first draft of the stories will be turned in to me at the end of the day so that I can review them over the weekend. I can’t wait to read your stories! 23


Activity Day 6 The team will work together today to review your story. • The illustrators will decide on how to draw each scene, and the placement of the drawings within the final book. • The writers will review any comments made by the teacher on your first draft and you will make corrections.

Activity Days 7-9 These three days will be spent writing and illustrating the final book. Three days are allowed because you will have to share the book as you write and illustrate the story.

Activity Day 10 You will present your book to the class. Your entire team will stand in front of the class to read and show your book. After all presentations are made, you will deliver your book to the school library to be placed on the shelves!

Evaluation What's Your Story?

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Teacher Name: Mrs. Donnelly

Student Name:

________________________________________ Top Shelf

2nd Shelf

3rd Shelf

Title Page

Title page has a graphic or fancy lettering, has the title, author's name, illustrator's name, and the year.

Title page has the title, author's name, illustrator's name, and the year.

Title page has the 3 of the 4 required elements.

Title page has fewer than 3 of the required elements.

Characters

The main characters are named and clearly described in text as well as pictures. Most readers could describe the characters accurately.

The main characters are named and described. Most readers would have some idea of what the characters looked like.

The main characters are named. The reader knows very little about the characters.

It is hard to tell who the main characters are.

Main Idea

The main idea is clearly visible in the text.

Most readers would be able to select the main idea.

The reader has a difficult time selecting the main idea.

There is no main idea in the story.

Organization

The story is very well organized. One idea or scene

The story is pretty well organized. One idea or scene

The story is a little hard to follow. The transitions are

Ideas and scenes seem to be randomly arranged.

CATEGORY

Bottom Shelf

25


Spelling and Punctuation

follows another in a logical sequence with clear transitions.

may seem out of place. Clear transitions are used.

sometimes not clear.

There are no spelling or punctuation errors in the final draft. Character and place names that the author invented are spelled consistently throughout.

There is one spelling or punctuation error in the final draft.

There are 2-3 spelling and punctuation errors in the final draft.

The final draft has more than 3 spelling and punctuation errors.

Conclusion By completing this task, you have helped our school fill the library shelves! You have used the knowledge you have learned all year about Main Ideas and Key Details to create your very own book!

Credits 26


Donnelly, T. (2014, April 18). What’s Your Story? Created from http://rubistar.4teachers.org/index.php Unknown. (2014, April, 18). Four kids working together picture. Retrieved from http://www.superstock.com/stock-photos-images/1598R-32149 Unknown. (2014, April 18). Process picture. Retrieved from http://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/newCT_09.htm Unknown. (2014, April 18). Evaluation picture. Retrieved from http://www.cencomfut.com/program_evaluation.htm Unknown. (2014, April 18). The End picture. Retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:The_End_Book.png Unknown. (2014, April 18). Credits picture. Retrieved from http://www.lordheath.com/index.php?p=1_5_Credits-Thanks Unknown. (2014, April 18). Child in library picture. Retrieve from http://www.cnn.com/2011/09/28/opinion/patterson-kids-reading/

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Unit Media Share Language Arts – First Grade Scope and Sequence This time4learning.com website titled “Language Arts-First Grade Scope and Sequence” is an on-line student paced learning system covering pre-k through middle school. It is popular for use as a homeschool curriculum, afterschool tutoring, or summer enrichment. This learning tool allows students to participate in the grade level below, as well as a grade level above, so they can review concepts if needed or work ahead if they have mastered the content. In chapter thirteen of the first grade language arts section, students will learn new vocabulary, read a leveled story, demonstrate comprehension by identifying details, and develop fluency. This website does charge a fee of $19.95 per student, per month. These reading lesson plans are designed to with the first grade Common Core Standards in mind: CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.1.1 Ask and answer questions about key details in a text. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.1.2 Retell stories, including key details, and demonstrate understanding of their central message or lesson. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.1.3 Describe characters, settings, and major events in a story, using key details. time4learning. (2007). Language Arts-First Grade Scope and Sequence [Website] Retrieved on February 21, 2014 from http://www.time4learning.com/Scope-Sequence/1st-languagearts.shtml#LAF

Main Idea Lesson for SFSD Teacher Interview Main Idea Lesson for SFSD Teacher Interview is a wonderful resource for teachers to utilize if they are having trouble teaching the Main Idea concept in first grade literature class. It was very easy to follow the concept as the teacher gave life to the main idea by classifying it as a tabletop. She then describes the table legs as the supporting details that “hold up” the main idea. By using visual aids, the teacher allows the students to see exactly how these concepts play a role together. The video is designed with this first grade Common Core Standard in mind: CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.1.1 Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.

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Main Idea Lesson for SFSD teacher Interview. [YouTube video]. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mmwqFZkHkp4

Reading Comprehension Passages with Multiple Choice Questions: Guided Reading Level C Reading Comprehension Passages with Multiple Choice Questions: Guided Reading Level C is a valuable tool designed to help children learn comprehension skills in the early stages of reading. This app is designed using short passages to give the children the opportunity to practice reading, as well as practicing the skill of locating the key ideas and details in the passages. All questions are formatted in a multiple-choice layout. Locating key ideas and details is fundamental for the success in any future reading. This app is compatible with iPad and requires iOS 5.0 or later. These word problems are designed with the rigor of the following Kindergarten and first grade Common Core standards in Mind: ELA-Literacy.RL.1.1—Ask and answer questions about key details in a text (for the beginning of the year). Tapfun, Inc. (Jan 22, 2014). Reading Comprehension Passages with Multiple Choice Questions: Guided Reading Level C. [iTunes, Free] Retrieved on February 21, 2014 from https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/reading-comprehension-passages/id779880902?mt=8

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Megan Kelly Unit Rationale - Human Cultures In this first grade unit, we will be learning about the diversity of human cultures in social studies. Students need to learn about different cultures so they can understand where their family and friends come from and how they live. Students will be learning what culture is by studying different food, clothing, languages and traditions. Students will first research their own culture. They will speak to relatives about where they came from, family values and traditions. Each student will present their cultural findings to the class. They will also use the internet and books to do research on different cultures. They will watch videos and look at books about how people in different cultures dress, the types of food they eat and the way they speak. We will have a multicultural day where the students try foods from different cultures and we will celebrate different traditions and customs of those cultures. Knowledge of multiculturalism is important for students to learn because America is full of different cultures. Students need to appreciate and respect all types of cultures because throughout the course of their lives they will come in contact with people from all types of backgrounds. Studying and understanding culture is a learning expectation covered under Tennessee Social Studies Standards 1.0. 1.1.01 Understanding the diversity of human cultures. 1.1.02 Discuss cultures and human patterns of place and regions of the world 1.1.03 Recognize the contributions of individuals and people of various ethnic, racial, religious and socioeconomically groups to the development of civilizations.

Present.Me: http://present.me/view/163295-­‐tell-­‐em-­‐in-­‐10-­‐2 Jing Tutorial: http://www.screencast.com/t/BusFcJDXt1ck 30


Name That Culture-Fact Search

Megan Kelly

Social Studies

1 hour lesson

1st grade

Analyze Learners

• • • • • • • • • • • •

State & NETS*S Objectives

26 students 15 females, 11 males Ages- 6-7 years old 11 students are white 12 students are African America 2 students are Hispanic 1 Kurdish the 2 Hispanic students speak English as a second language two children have IEPs for different learning disabilities one of the students with an IEP is for Autism one of the students with an IEP is for ADD most students are below the poverty line

Common core standards: • 1.01 Understand the diversity of human cultures. • 1.02 Discuss cultures and human patterns of places and regions of the world.   • 1.03 Recognize the contributions of individuals and people of various ethnic,   racial, religious, and socioeconomic groups to the development of civilizations. ISTE Standard: Research and information fluency Behavioral Objective: The learners will be able to use the internet and the National Geographic website to learn about the culture of their country. Language Objective: The learners will be able to read through facts and be able to tell which facts have to do with their countries culture. They will recognize words like religion, ethnicity, race, background, food, and language as words that can all describe their countries culture. 31


Select Instructional Methods, Media & Materials

Curriculum Materials: Spiral notebook Pencils Technological materials: Laptops with internet access The National Geographic Website Explore Countries of the World -- National Geographic Kids. (n.d.). National Geographic. Retrieved April 22, 2014, from http://kids.nationalgeographic.com/kids/places/find/

Utilize Media & Materials

Preview & Prepare Materials: • • • •

Every student has their own spiral notebook that is kept in their cubby Every student should have their own pencil If needed, extra pencils are kept in the jar on my desk I will check to make sure the 8 computers needed for the class are working, charged and connecting properly to the internet I will log onto the National Geographic website and make sure it is loading properly

Prepare the Environment: • • •

Move the desks to make 8 groups around the classroom Put 1 laptop on each group of desks Make sure each group of desks is near an outlet in case one laptop begins to lose charge

Prepare the Learners: • •

Put the students into groups and assign them a country Explain to them that we will be doing a week long web quest and that today, Day 1 will be a general research day Remind the students what culture is. Tell them to remember to look for religion, language, the food the people in their country eats, the clothes they wear and the language they speak and more! Get the students excited about the adventure they 32


are about to take Require Learner Participation

Evaluate and Revise

I will first assign the students to their groups and give them their country. The countries we will be learning about are Italy, Canada, France, Mexico, Japan, India, Australia and Germany. I will instruct them to all open the laptop on their group of desks and open the National Geographic website. The students will then click on their country and click through the facts, pictures and watch the video. I will remind them to write down in their journals any facts they find interesting about their country, and any that have to do with the people of that countries culture. I will explain to them that these facts will be used when they are making their poster for the presentation on Multicultural day. Each group will turn in their facts to me once they have found at least 10 facts. Make sure all 10 facts have to do with your countries culture. Also be sure to use proper grammar and punctuation when writing your groups facts. The students will be given 1 hour to browse the site and choose their 10 facts. Category

3

2

1

Requirements Group met turned in at least 10 facts

Group turned in less than 10 facts

Group did not turn in any facts

Content

The group turned in facts that ALL related to their countries culture

The group turned in 5 facts that related to their countries culture

Less than 5 facts had to do with their countries culture

Punctuation and Grammar

All the facts have proper grammar and punctuation

At least 5 of the facts have proper grammar and punctuation

Less than 5 of the facts have proper grammar and punctuation

Formative Assessment: During this assignment students will 33


demonstrate that they understand what makes up someone’s culture. They are only to write down facts that have to do with their countries culture. Once they turn these facts into me I will be able to see if they really understand what the definition of culture is. During the lesson I will go from group to group helping them navigate the National Geographic website. I expect to see the students looking at pictures and videos on their country and reading the different facts aloud to their group members. If I notice a group not recording the correct facts I will direct them back to their notes or textbook to re-read the definition of culture to get them back on track. Summative Assessment: Each group will turn in a page out of their notebook that states their 10 or more facts about their countries culture. I will use the rubric above to ensure that they have at least 10 facts, the facts are relevant to their countries culture and that they used proper grammar and punctuation while writing their facts. The assessment will show whether or not the students really grasp the definition of culture.

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Around the World in 5 Days! First Grade Social Studies Webquest Megan Kelly

Introduction

Task

Process

Evaluation

Conclusion

Credits

Introduction Hi Class! This week we are going to be traveling to different countries to learn all about their different cultures! We will be exploring 8 different countries and learning all about the different languages the people speak, the food they eat, the clothes they wear and what life is like in their country. You will be put into groups and each group will be assigned a country. I want you to soak up as much of your given country as you can! At the end of the week we will celebrate all 8 countries culture with a multicultural day! So pack a suitcase, don’t forget your passport and let’s go!

Task After your week long trip I expect you to come back here and teach your classmates all about the culture of your country. 35


• • • •

Using the internet you will learn facts about your countries culture, different foods they eat and look at the different clothes they wear. Using YouTube you will be able to learn how to say simple phrases in your countries native language. You will then create a poster board with pictures and facts about your country and present your country to your classmates. Make sure you use appropriate and relevant pictures and facts and correct grammar and punctuation on your poster

Based on the Tennessee curriculum standards for first grade Social Studies. • • •

1.02 Discuss cultures and human patterns of places and regions of the world. 1.1.01 Understand the diversity of human cultures. 1.1.03 Recognize the contributions of individuals and people of various ethnic, racial, religious, and socioeconomic groups to the development of civilizations.

Process: Day 1- Today I will assign you to your groups and give you a country. The countries we will be learning about are Italy, Canada, France, Mexico, Japan, India, Australia and Germany. Today I want you to go to the computer and use the internet to learn basic facts about your country. The site you will visit is National Geographic. Click on your country and click through the facts, pictures and watch the video. Be sure to write down in your journal any facts you find interesting about your country, and any that have to do with the people of that countries culture. These will need to be written on your poster board and presented to the class.

Day 2- Today we will be learning about the way people dress in different cultures. Click on your country below and print out enough copies of the coloring sheet for each member of your group. Each group member will color their own coloring sheet. The coloring sheets will be glued to your poster board and used in your multicultural day presentation. Germany Mexico Australia Canada France Italy India 36


Japan

Day 3- Today we will be using Youtube to learn how to say hello in your countries native language. Click on your country below to watch a video on your countries language. Make sure every group member practices how to say hello in your countries language because you will be teaching your classmates how to say hello on multicultural day German Japanese Mexico Italian Indian Australian French Canada

Day 4Today we will be learning about the different types of foods people eat in different countries and cultures. Look at this website and find the food that the people in your country eat. Look at these foods and see if you recognize any of the food in the picture. Do we eat any of these foods in America? Have you ever tried any of the food in the picture? Print out the picture to place on your poster for Multicultural day. You will teach your classmates about the food the people of your country eat.

Day 5- Today is Multicultural day! First you are going to make your poster boards as a group and work on your presentation. Make sure your poster board states the name of your country, has the clothing printouts you colored, the pictures of the cultures food and facts about your country and their culture. This afternoon each group will present what they have learned about their countries culture to the class.

Evaluation: Making A Poster : Multicultural Day Group Country Name: CATEGORY

________________________________________ 4

3

2

1

37


Required Elements

The poster includes all required elements as well as additional information. It had the cultures clothing, food and facts.

All required elements are included on the poster.

All but 1 of the required elements are included on the poster.

Several required elements were missing.

Knowledge Gained

All the students in the group can all say hello in their countries language and teach their classmates how to say it as well.

All the students in the group can all say hello in their countries language but they can\\\'t teach their classmates how to say it as well.

Some of the students in the group can say hello in their countries language and some can teach their classmates how to say it as well

No one in the group can say hello in their countries language and no one in the group can teach their classmates how to say it.

Graphics - Relevance

All graphics are related to the topic and make it easier to understand. All borrowed graphics have a source citation.

All graphics are related to the topic and most make it easier to understand. All borrowed graphics have a source citation.

All graphics relate to the topic. Most borrowed graphics have a source citation.

Graphics do not relate to the topic OR several borrowed graphics do not have a source citation.

Grammar

There are no grammatical mistakes on the poster.

There is 1 grammatical mistake on the poster.

There are 2 grammatical mistakes on the poster.

There are more than 2 grammatical mistakes on the poster.

Use of Class Time

Used time well during each class period. Focused on getting the project done. Never distracted others.

Used time well during each class period. Usually focused on getting the project done and never distracted others.

Used some of the time well during each class period. There was some focus on getting the project done but occasionally distracted others.

Did not use class time to focus on the project OR often distracted others.

Conclusion: Now that our journey around the world is complete I want you all to think about which countries culture you can relate to most! Also think about which country you think you would like to visit in real life. I hope you enjoyed our week long trip around the world and I look forward to our next adventure!

Credits Explore Countries of the World -- National Geographic Kids. (n.d.). National Geographic. Retrieved April 22, 2014, from http://kids.nationalgeographic.com/kids/places/find/

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German Traditional Clothing Coloring Page. (n.d.). Education.com. Retrieved April 20, 2014, from http://www.education.com/worksheet/article/trad-dress-germany/

Cinco de Mayo Traditional Dance coloring page | Super Coloring. (2014, April 4). Cinco de Mayo Traditional Dance coloring page | Super Coloring. Retrieved , from http://www.supercoloring.com/pages/cinco-de-mayo-traditional-dance/

Australian Children Colouring Page. (n.d.). Activity Village. Retrieved April 20, 2014, from http://www.activityvillage.co.uk/australian-children-colouring-page

Free Resources. (n.d.). Simply Multicultural RSS. Retrieved April 20, 2014, from http://simplymulticultural.com/freemulticultural-resources/

How to Say "Hello" in German. (2010, December 15). YouTube. Retrieved , from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n2lLAKSI5UU

Pin, P. (2013, September 20). Hungry Planet: What The World Eats. Time. Retrieved , from http://time.com/8515/hungryplanet-what-the-world-eats/

how to say hello in australian. (2012, February 5). YouTube. Retrieved , from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_YUqCaj361o

Mittal, H. (2010, April 3). How to say Hello in Hindi. YouTube. Retrieved , from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MqbV4wnSCyA

How to Say Hello in Italian. (2010, July 14). YouTube. Retrieved , from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xF5bkKIFZdI

RubiStar Home. (2000, January 1). RubiStar Home. Retrieved , from http://rubistar.4teachers.org/

How to Say "Hello" | Spanish Lessons. (2011, May 31). YouTube. Retrieved , from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iknreBXRZd4

How to Say "Hello" | Japanese Lessons. (2012, January 24). YouTube. Retrieved , from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NqJylGMULSQ

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Unit Media Share One Globe Kids The app I would use in conjunction with my lesson on multiculturalism is the One Globe Kids App. The app costs $12.99 and explores life from the perspective of 8 real children in 5 countries. I found this app to be so cool! Students are given a safe environment to look at the life of real children and hear stories, and learn games that they play in their country and are exposed to the languages these kids speak. They teach you how to count in their language, show you their favorite foods and give you facts about the country they live in. I think first grade students would love using this app because it would make them feel as if they were making new friends all over the world! (2014). Retrieved from http://oneglobekids.com/ Paper dolls around the world The website I would use to assist in my lesson about multiculturalism is on education.com and allows the students to color and dress paper dolls in different cultures traditional clothing. There are also facts that go along with the country that the outfit is from. I like this because it allows the students to be hands on when dressing the paper dolls and see the types of clothing people in others countries and cultures wear. This is a project that can be done on the computer or printed out and colored by hand. Paper dolls around the world. Retrieved from http://www.education.com/slideshow/exploringcultures-paper-dolls-world/

Songs and dances around the world To help my first grade students understand different cultures one of the videos I would show is about different songs and dances around the world. Being able to show them how different cultures sing and dance will be much more effective than just telling them about it or showing it to them in a book. This video is also a medley of different songs and dances so it will keep the children engaged as it changes from different cultures. Using videos and YouTube will be an important learning tool when teaching first graders about different cultures. SONGS AND DANCES AROUND THE WORLD [Web]. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BxuiY9VYVW8 41


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April Banks Technology Action Plan (TAP) Grade 2 This second grade TAP is based on the State of Tennessee standards for technology literacy and also the following general entry-level competencies from first grade. Students leaving the first grade will be able to: ● Identify the home row keys (A, S, D, F, J, K, L, ;), and the keys above and below the home row keys.. ● Have an awareness of the layout of the computer keyboard ● Use input devices ● Work cooperatively and collaboratively with peers, family members, and others when using technology. ● Demonstrate positive social and ethical behaviors when using technology. ● Practice responsible use of technology systems and software. ● Use a variety of media and technology resources for directed and independent learning activities. ● Create developmentally appropriate multimedia products with support from teachers, family members, or student partners. ● Use technology resources (e.g., puzzles, logical thinking programs, writing tools, digital cameras, drawing tools) for problem solving, communication, and illustration of thoughts, ideas, and stories. ● Gather information and communicate with others using telecommunications with support from teachers, family members, or student partners. The school utilizing this plan has an operational computer lab with approximately

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28 stations, 12 stations in the library, and at least 4 high-speed internet connected computers in the classroom. http://www.iste.org/standards/standards-for-students/nets-studentstandards-2007 ISTE NETS for Students 2007 https://www.tn.gov/education/ci/computer/doc/grade_1.pdf State of Tennessee Standards: Computer Technology: Literacy and Usage, 1st Grade http://www.tn.gov/education/ci/computer/doc/grade_2.pdf State of Tennessee Standards: Computer Technology: Literacy and Usage, 2nd Grade

Level

General Objectives

Achievement

Standard 6.0 Students will utilize technology problem- solving and decisionmaking tools.

(Lowest Need for Teacher Assistance)

Learning Expectations 6.1 Students will use technology resources for solving problems and making informed decisions. 6.2 Students will employ technology in the development

ISTE-Student Standard

Specific Strategies

4. Critical thinking, Students will: problem solving, Use technology and decision resources for making solving problems and making informed decisions by completing a book report using at least 2 online references. They only have to provide the web address, not complete APA style. 44


of strategies for solving problems in the real world. 6.3 Students use critical thinking skills to plan and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems, and make informed decisions using appropriate digital tools and resources.

Recognition

Employ technology in the development of strategies for solving problems in the real world by completing a web quest. Collect and analyze data to identify solutions and/ or make informed decisions by using Excel.

Standard 4.0

Students will:

Students will use technology communications tools.

Use telecommunication s to collaborate, publish, and interact

Learning Expectations 4.1 1.Creativity and Students will use telecommunication Innovation s to collaborate, 2. Communication publish, and and Collaboration interact with peers, experts, and other audiences. 4.2 Students will use a variety of media and formats to communicate

with peers, experts, and other audiences by creating an informative video and uploading it to YouTube or TeacherTube. Use a variety of media and formats to communicate information and ideas effectively to 45


information and ideas effectively to multiple audiences.

multiple audiences by using a Prezi.

4.3 Students will use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others. Belongingness

Standard 2.0 Students will understand the importance of social, ethical, and human issues associated with technology. Learning Expectations 2.1 Students will understand the ethical, cultural, and societal issues related to technology. 2.2 Students will practice responsible use of

5. Digital Citizenship

Students will: Understand the ethical, cultural, and societal issues related to technology by engaging in classroom discussions on the responsible use of the information that can be accessed online. Practice responsible use of technology systems, information, and software by appropriately 46


technology systems, information,

opening and closing programs, browsers, and portable drives used.

and software. 2.3 Students will develop positive attitudes toward technology uses that support lifelong learning, collaboration, personal pursuits, and productivity.

Security and Safety

Standard 5.0 Students will select and use appropriate technology research tools. Learning Expectations 5.1 Students will use technology to locate, evaluate, and collect information from a variety of sources. 5.2 Students will use technology tools to process data and report results.

Develop positive attitudes toward technology uses that support lifelong learning, collaboration, personal pursuits, and productivity by using a shared file on Google Drive. 5. Digital Citizenship 3. Research and Information Fluency

Students will: Use technology to locate, evaluate, and collect information from a variety of sources by finding the nutritional value of candy we eat and use excel to enter the information located. Use technology tools to process data and report results by printing out their typed site words using 47


5.3 Students will evaluate and select new information resources and technological innovations based on the appropriateness for specific tasks.

the bulleted number format. Also, entering the numbers into excel and using the chart wizard to print results. Evaluate and select new information resources and technological innovations based on the appropriateness for specific tasks by using Google Images to search for pictures to accompany the chart.

Physiological Needs (Highest Need for Teacher Assistance)

Standard 1.0 Students will understand basic operations and concepts of technology. Learning Expectations 1.1 Students will demonstrate an understanding of the nature and operation of technology

6. Technology Operations and Concepts

Students will: Demonstrate an understanding of the nature and operation of technology systems by identifying each piece of a desktop. For instance, computer, monitor, mouse, keyboard, browser, desktop, 48


systems.

address bar, etc.

1.2 Students will exhibit a proficiency in the use of technology.

Exhibit a proficiency in the use of technology by navigating to and describing the use of Microsoft Office applications (Word, Excel, Powerpoint), MS Paint, Calculator, and Notepad.

1.3 Students will continue development of and master basic skills (alpha numeric and special characters) for using the touch.

Develop basic skills (alpha numeric and symbol characters) in using keyboard using the touch system by typing site words into the Notepad, or Microsoft Word. Also using www.abcya.com Keyboard Zoo.

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Rasheed Batong Unit Proposal - Numbers and Operations in Base 10 In this second grade unit, we will be learning about Numbers and operation in base 10. Students need to comprehend numbers and operation in base 10 in order for them to fully understand addition, subtraction, number sense, place value and counting. Students will be examining skip counting in base 10, writing numbers to 1,000 using base 10 numerals and writing in expanded form. In order for students to fully understand the topic, I will employ the use of manipulative and counting applications on computers in the various math activities we will be having in class. It is important for students to acquire this knowledge because it will help them understand basic addition and subtraction in life, especially pertaining to currency. Studying and understanding numbers and operations in base ten is an expectation covered in the Common Core State Standards CCSS.Math.Content.2.NBT.B.5 fluently add and subtract within 100 using strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction.

Present.Me: http://present.me/view/163635-­‐tellemin10template Jing  Screencast:  http://screencast.com/t/5aN0tD7GG      

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Rasheed Batong ASSURE Lesson Plan Edci 6180: Microcomputers. Second Grade (Math) Base 10 Dream House.

Analyze learners General characteristics The second grade class at Bordeaux Elementary Enhanced Option School in Nashville, Tennessee, is comprised of 18 students; 12 females and 6 males. The classroom ages range from 5 to 6 years of age. Student diversity consists of two Whites, one Hispanic, and fifteen African-American students. Of the 18 students, 13 are on free or reduce lunch. The remaining 17 students live in the surrounding area. One student is homeless and is living in a car. The previous year her dad died, who was paying all of the bills. Her mother couldn’t seek work so they lost the house. The 18 students living in the surrounding area, 12 are in a lower socio- economic level. Nine percent of the students in this particular classroom have an IEP. One came from Cumberland Life Skills and is working on letter and number recognition and writing. The student must be supplied with other work and/or lead through each assignment and assessment orally. The second student has a developmental delay but has the ability to do all class work. The student may do better on assessments and assignments if each are read orally. Each student with an IEP is in and out of the classroom twice a day for resource. Two other students receive additional tutoring in reading three times a week.

Entry competencies Curricular: Expect students to respond to written and verbal communication that ranges from at grade level to above grade level proficiency. Technological: students should be able to, Ø Ø Ø Ø Ø Ø

Log on and off a computer Use and access the internet on a computer Print documents from the computer Use the key board of a computer Us the mouse as a navigational tool Be aware of safety measures when using a computer

State Standards and Objectives 51


Curriculum standard

Technological standard

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.2.NBT.A.1.A 100 can be thought of as a bundle of ten tens — called a "hundred."

Communication and collaboration

Lesson objectives Students will build a visual house made up of base 10 blocks and the value of the house will depend on the variety of base 10 blocks used.

Select Strategies, Technology, Media, and Materials *Note: Any websites used must be cited in APA format. Curricular materials

Ø Ø

Paper Folder

Technology materials

Ø Ø Ø

Ø Ø

Computer with internet access Projector(TC) Many Rumba (n.d.). BaseTen. Retrieved April 30, 2014, from http://www.learningbox.com/base10/BaseTen.h tml (sc) Virtual manipulative software (SC). Sample videos(SC)

Utilize Technology, Media, and Materials 52


Preview and prepare materials Ø

Scratch paper available for students if needed.

Ø

Pencils are the responsibility of the student.

Ø

Make sure eight computers are operating properly with internet access.

Ø

Make sure web cameras are operating properly

Ø

Make sure projector is operating properly

Ø

Make sure screen is functioning properly

Ø

Make sure the sample video is playing correctly

Ø

Make sure students can find the virtual manipulative website online.

Ø

Make sure students can locate Base 10 online game: Many Rumba.

Prepare the environment

Ø

Desks are arranged for group learning environment (no rearranging necessary)

Ø

Computers are set up along the back wall (no rearranging necessary)

Prepare the learners

Ø

Introduce the lesson to the students, telling them they will be building a base 10 House.

Ø

Explain to the students how learning base 10 manipulatives is crucial to them Understanding place value and counting.

Ø

Explain the requirement that must be included in their Base 10 house. Especially in Relation to the variety of base 10 blocks needed. (conversational)

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Require Learner Participation The learners will follow along in their math workbooks while the teacher reviews the lesson on operation in base 10. The teacher will give examples of problems on the whiteboard. The teacher will ask students to walk through the problem making sure the class understands the process. Learners will then watch a video on operation in base 10, using base 10 manipulatives. Next, the learners will take turns to play an online game on operation in base 10 using base 10 blocks. In addition, the teacher will module how to build a base 10 house using base 10 blocks. When completed, the teacher will let students try their hands on the virtual manipulative to build a house. Any questions will be answered at that time. Evaluate and Revise Assessing Learner Achievement Learners will be assessed on their ability to successfully use different varieties of base 10 blocks in building their house. The teacher will determine any learning deficiencies, and will review the appropriate areas of concern. The highest points will be awarded to the student who exhibits variety in their house. The learners will be assessed using the following rubric:

CATEGORY

4

3

2

1

Foundation

You have used all 3 required base 10 manipulative at this level of your dream house.

You have used 2 required base 10 manipulative at this level of your dream house.

You have used 1 required base 10 manipulative at this level of your dream house.

You have used none of the required base 10 manipulative at this level of your dream house.

Wall

You have used all 3 required base 10 manipulative at this level of your dream house.

You have used 2 required base 10 manipulative at this level of your dream house.

You have used 1 required base 10 manipulative at this level of your dream house.

You have used none of the required base 10 manipulative at this level of your dream house.

Roof

You have used all 3 required base 10 manipulative at this level of your dream house.

You have used 2 required base 10 manipulative at this level of your dream house.

You have used 1 required base 10 manipulative at this level of your dream house.

You have used none of the required base 10 manipulative at this level of your dream house.

Date Created: Apr 24, 2014 02:19 am (CDT) 54


Evaluating and Revising Strategies, Technology, and Media The teacher will ask learner’s questions while the build their house step by step. Following the completion of their house, learners will take a summative assessment. The teacher will determine if building their base 10 house contributed to their understanding of number and operation in base 10. The teacher will determine if enough time was allotted for the duration of the project. If not, the teacher will decide if additional time needs to be added. The teacher will also determine if students are struggling to come up with ideas for their house and will provide some assistance with generating ideas.

Â

55


BASE 10 DREAM HOUSE.

A web Quest for 2nd Grade. Mathematics, Base 10 Designed by: Batong Rasheed. Email: rash2bat@yahoo.com rash2bat@gmail.com Based on the state of Tennessee curriculum standard for second grade mathematics. CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.2.NBT.A.1.A 100 can be thought of as a bundle of ten tens — called a "hundred." CCSS.Math.Content.2.NBT.B.5 fluently add and subtract within 100 using strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction.

Introduction

Task

Process

Evaluation

conclusion

INTRODUCTION Who wants to build their dream house? We all have our dreams houses we wish to build, this class just made your dreams a reality. Each of you will be building your dream homes from a set of building materials that will be provided for you. You are all responsible for the design you 56


wish to achieve from the materials provided for you. Your materials will consist mainly of base 10 blocks; units, rods, and flats. In order to build your beautiful home, your building needs to have three major components, which are: foundation, wall and roof. Since you are building it yourself, the price of the house depends on the number, variety and quantity of base 10 blocks you use. Meaning the price at the end of the lesson will be the addition of all base 10 blocks used. Are you ready to build your dream house?

TASK Since you are ready to build your dream house, you will be provide with your building materials, which are units (1), rods (10) and flats (100). These base 10 blocks are your building materials and are intend to be used for a period of 3 days. The value of your house will be determined mainly on the variety of base 10 blocks used instead of the quantity used. Your construction will be divided into three days. Each day will be associated with each part of your dream house. The parts of you dream house are the foundation, wall and roof. Below is how your dream house will be constructed. Foundation: Ø This is the first part of your house. You are required to use varieties of base 10 blocks when you start building. Ø You may draw your foundation on a piece of paper before going onto the online virtual manipulative. Ø You will be required to print out the foundation of your dream house and store it in your folder for assessment. Wall: Ø This comprise the second level of your house. You are required to use varieties of base 10 blocks when you get to this level of your dream house. Ø You may draw your wall on a piece of paper before going online unto the virtual manipulative to add to your foundation. Ø After you have completed your foundation and wall, you are required to print out you’re the current level of your dream house and put it in your folder for assessment. Roof: Ø This is the final version of your dream house. Again you are required to use varieties of base 10 blocks when you get to this level. 57


Ø It is okay for you to draw it before proceeding online to draw it the virtual manipulative website. Ø After you have completed your dream house, you are required to print out your results and put it in your student folder for assessment.

PROCESS DAY 1- The first day you will be required to play an online game to help you comprehend your understanding of base 10 blocks. Manny Rumba: This is a fun and exciting Base 10 Online Game that combines colorful graphics and sound effects. It helps students add and subtract base 10 manipulatives by using varieties of questioning strategies. As you advance within the game, you will be faced with a lot more challenging questions. In order to build a beautiful house full of variety, this game will help you master how to mix variety in your building process. After you are done playing 10 sessions of the game, you will be ready to move to the next level, which is starting the foundation of your dream home. Glenco: this is an online virtual manipulative that comprises mainly of base 10 blocks. It has wonderful design and color effects that could help build the foundation of your dream house. It is simple and easy to use. For the purpose of this assignment and grade level, you are only required to use the units (1), rods (10) and flats (100). The cube (1000) is not part of the materials required for building your dream home. Your foundation should comprise a total of 100 to 150 base 10 blocks. After building your foundation, you will be required to print it out and have it in your folder. I will look at it before you proceed to day 2 or the next part of your dream house. Day 2- the second day requires you to watch a YouTube video on base 10 manipulatives, this video is suppose to help you further understand how base 10 blocks work. Base ten number system: This is an awesome YouTube video that further breaks down the values, relationships and uses of base 10 blocks. This video is important because in order to get to the next level of your dream house, you have to know which base ten block will best fit the other. Glenco: this is an online virtual manipulative were your dream house will be built. After watching the video, you will need to continue from where you left off. The next level is the wall of your dream house. You are required to mix a variety of base 10 blocks to make up the wall of your dream house.

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As usual, be sure to print out your current level of your dream house and have it in your folder. I will look at it before you proceed to finish your dream house.

Day 3: the third day will be when you finish your dream house. You will access an online resource on base 10 manipulatives. You will be required to complete the worksheet online and print it out and add it to your folder. Math drills: this is a fantastic website that offer a lot of base 10 work sheets and practice tests. You will be required to complete the work sheet online and later print it out after you are done. Glenco: after completing the work sheet, you will be required to continue with your dream house on Glenco. You are now at the final stage of your dream house. At this stage, you should know how many base 10 blocks are required to finish you dream house. You are required to complete your dream house and print it out for your final grade.

EVALUATION.

Teacher Name: Rasheed Batong

Student Name: ________________________________________

CATEGORY 4

3

2

1

Foundation

You have used all 3 required base 10 manipulative at this level of your dream house.

You have used 2 required base 10 manipulative at this level of your dream house.

You have used 1 required base 10 manipulative at this level of your dream house.

You have used none of the required base 10 manipulative at this level of your dream house.

Wall

You have You have You have You have used all 3 used 2 used 1 used none of required base required base required base the required 59


Roof

10 manipulative at this level of your dream house.

10 manipulative at this level of your dream house.

10 manipulative at this level of your dream house.

base 10 manipulative at this level of your dream house.

You have used all 3 required base 10 manipulative at this level of your dream house.

You have used 2 required base 10 manipulative at this level of your dream house.

You have used 1 required base 10 manipulative at this level of your dream house.

You have used none of the required base 10 manipulative at this level of your dream house.

Date Created: Apr 24, 2014 02:19 am (CDT)

CONCLUSION It was a wonderful experience watching all of you make your dreams come true. I know you enjoyed yourselves when you had to build your own house. It is no doubt that you have all learned how to combine base 10 blocks in various ways to give you numbers you desire. I will urge you all to continue exploring the limitless opportunities available to the use of base 10 manipulatives.

REFERENCE. Assessment services, Inc. (2014, January). Base 10 Blocks [Photograph]. Retrieved from http://http://www.assessmentservices-edu.com/Base-Ten-Blocks.aspx

Batong, R. (2014, April 24). Base 10 Rubric. Created in Rubistar http://rubistar.4teachers.org/index.php

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Unit Media Share

Base 10 Blocks Lesson 1 Intro and Explore In this YouTube video, the presenter showed how numbers and operations in base 10 can be taught using base 10 blocks. The video is very interesting to watch and simple to understand. The presenter uses 3 set of manipulative called the units (1), rods (10) and flats (100) to show how numbers and operation can be taught to little kids. He went further in the video to explain how these manipulates come together to make up numbers in a cohesive manner. In my opinion, this video was very informative and it helped give me more ideas on how numbers and operations in base 10 can be taught. TeacherTube Math (2009, September 1). BASE 10 BLOCKS LESSON 1 INTRO AND EXPLORE. Retrieved February 24, 2014, from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2msVlhBtppo

Inside Mathematics – Numbers and Operations in Base Ten Inside mathematics is a nonprofit website that collects many different resources to guide and support mathematics teaching and learning. It has a simple homepage that is easily navigable and has links to the common core state standards, instructional videos, and content standards by grade level and related resources to each math topic listed on the website including number and operations in base 10. I believe this website is valuable to the learner because it is solely dedicated to the teaching and learning of mathematics. It is also detailed and well structured. Shell Centre for Mathematical Education, & University of Nottingham, England (n.d.). NUMBER AND OPERATIONS IN BASE TEN (NBT). Retrieved February 23, 2014, from http://www.insidemathematics.org/index.php/number-and-operations-in-base-ten-nbt

XP Math – Math Games Arcade XP math is an online math game or website that offers a lot of interesting and fascinating games in the area of number & operation, algebra, geometry, measurement and data analysis & probability. Apart from the wonderful games it offers, it also has links to common core state 61


standards, math resources, and homework help. This game site is also user friendly and appealing to second graders too. Some games that are offered on this website in relation to numbers and operations in base 10 includes but not limited to math fighter, math slot machine, need for speed and wheel of fortune. VBulletin Solutions, Inc. (n.d.). XP MATH - MATH GAMES ARCADE. Retrieved February 24, 2014, from http://www.xpmath.com/forums/arcade.php?categoryid=3

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Chelsea Hudson Unit Rationale – Interdependence This second grade unit plan is used to help students learn about interdependence in science in the topic of food chains. Students need to learn things like interdependence to understand the things that occur around them on a daily basis. This is true for how things work collectively and independently in the different habitats that they live. In order for students to move on to other levels of science it is important for them to learn and understand that living things interact with one another and the environment. If students don't understand basic levels of interaction, it will be difficult for them to move deeper into topic. It may be difficult for students to study and understand interdependence due to their reasoning of "why?" They may wonder why humans eat cows instead of insects. When they do understand, they will be able to identify basic ways that plants and animals depend on each other in the different habitats that they live in. Interdependence is relevant in society because it occurs daily. Each day the students exhibit the food chain and interdependence when eating food that comes from another living or nonliving things. Activities will include worksheets that introduce simple food chains starting with grass, which is eaten by rabbits, then the rabbits are eaten by foxes. Other worksheets could have students identify the living things that are producers (which make their own food) and consumers (which need to eat food. Games will be played to further students’ comprehension of interdependence. One game in specific being “The Food chain game.” This game is played by placing pictures of different animals and plants in the correct order in which they flow in the food chain. If the student grows up wanting to be a veterinarian or farmer, understanding the food chain and interdependence will be beneficial for them. Students will be presented with different activities and environments to help them study and see exactly how these things work. This will help them understand how things depend and interact with one another, whether living or nonliving. 63


Studying and understanding interdependence in science is a learning expectation covered under Tennessee Science Standard 2.0. GLE 0207.2.1 Investigate the habitats of different kinds of local plants and animals. GLE 0207.2.2 Investigate living things found in different places. GLE 0207.2.3 Identify basic ways that plants and animals depend on each other.

Present.Me: http://present.me/view/166578-­‐tellem-­‐in-­‐10-­‐2-­‐edited Jing Tutorial: http://www.screencast.com/t/Ot8e5Gslowl6

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ASSURE Lesson Plan Are You a Survivor? A Web quest Name: Chelsea Hudson Duration of Lesson: 4 Weeks

Subject Area(s): Food Chains Grade Level: 2nd

Analyze Learners General Characteristics The 2nd grade class at the Ben Milan Elementary School in Midland, Texas is comprised of 24 students; 12 females and 12 males. The students range in age from six years to 8 years. Student diversity consists of six white/non-Hispanic, ten AfricanAmerican, and eight Hispanic students. The eight Hispanic students live with Spanishspeaking relatives where Spanish is the main language spoken in the home. The median household income of families in Midland is around $38,000, but about two-third of those families fall into the category of low income (under $35,000 for a family of four) according to U.S. Census Bureau. Entry Competencies Curricular: Expect students to respond to the basic understanding of Technological: ● Identify the home row keys (A, S, D, F, J, K, L, ;), and the keys above and below the home row keys.. ● Have an awareness of the layout of the computer keyboard ● Use input devices ● Work cooperatively and collaboratively with peers, family members, and others when using technology. ● Demonstrate positive social and ethical behaviors when using technology. ● Practice responsible use of technology systems and software. ● Use a variety of media and technology resources for directed and independent learning activities. ● Create developmentally appropriate multimedia products with support from teachers, family members, or student partners.

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â—? Use technology resources (e.g., puzzles, logical thinking programs, writing tools, digital cameras, drawing tools) for problem solving, communication, and illustration of thoughts, ideas, and stories. â—? Gather information and communicate with others using telecommunications with support from teachers, family members, or student partners.

State Standards and Objectives Curricular Standards

Technology Standards

GLE 0207.2.1 Investigate the habitats of different kinds of local plants and animals.

Research and Information Fluency

GLE 0207.2.2 Investigate living things found in different places. GLE 0207.2.3 Identify basic ways that plants and animals depend on each other Lesson Objectives Identify food chains and webs that they will need in order to survive a rugged location of their choosing in the form of a poster.

Objectives Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information. Students: a. plan strategies to guide inquiry. b. locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media. c. evaluate and select information sources and digital tools based on the appropriateness to specific tasks. d. process data and report results

Behavioral Objective: 66


You will have three weeks to choose and create proper food chains depending on your location. Each week will be time for you to develop a different food chain. The final week, using the information gathered, each of you will decorate and finalize your poster. Be creative and very descriptive, labeling all required labels. Be sure to accurately represent the place at which you were located and the food needed in order to survive. You must include labels of the animal, a description and proper identification. You must include yourself in the food chain because you were the ultimate Top Level Consumer. Language Objective: Each food chain should be represented by a different color. Have our location represented on the board. Ultimately have fun. Your food chains and web and presentation must include the following: 2 Scavengers 2 herbivores

1 Carnivore 1 top level consumer

2 Secondary Consumers 1 Decomposer

Select Strategies, Technology, Media, and Materials *Note: Any websites used must be cited in APA format. Curricular Materials ● ● ● ● ● ●

Poster Paper Markers Notebook Pencils Folder

Technology Materials ● Computers w/internet access

Utilize Technology, Media, and Materials Preview & Prepare Materials ● Students are taking their own notebooks to write any additional notes that they will need. ● Students will be able to print off any needed material found on website 67


● A folder will be given in order for student to keep all material together

Prepare the Environment ● Desks are arranged for lecture learning environment (no rearranging necessary). ● Computers are set up along the wall (no rearranging necessary) ● Printer is located in the middle of the room for access by all students Prepare the Learners ● Introduce the lesson to the students telling them “Welcome to “Are You A Survivor? I am your host Ms. Hudson. Are you able to survive in an environment different from the one you live in daily? How will you survive without mommy to cook you meals? You have been chosen to be a part of the team in the game show Adventurous Survivor. You will be taken from your homes and left deserted in a location of your choosing across the world. Upon arrival to your destination you will locate and develop food chains that will help you survive the wild. These food chains will help to develop the food web you use to survive your one week conquest. “ Survivor Locations This website will help you in deciding which location you decide to do your study on. This helps you to see what kind of climates and animals are located in the place you decide. It begins in continent form, but you are able to search countries and cities as well. •

Animal Help- Use this site to research an animal you choose in order to complete one of your food chains.

Zoo Help- By simply clicking on the tab animals and searching the animal you have chosen, you will receive a description of the animal. This sight goes into detail of what each animal eats, where and how it survives, and what could eat it.

Food Chain Refresher If you are having trouble in remembering the different labels associated with the food chains refer to this sight. It has games,

Require learner

You will have three weeks to choose and create proper food chains 68


participation depending on your location. Each week we will have 2 days a week in the computer lab. The final week will be held in the classroom decorating and finalizing the posters for presentation. Taking the poster is also acceptable and encouraged. Each lab session will last 55 minutes. Each week you will be graded on a checkpoint to make sure that you are completing the task on time. Week One Day One1. Begin by choosing which location you desire to gather your food chains from. This location is where you will be dropped off in your conquest. Begin by accessing the following links: • Survivor Locations This website will help you in deciding which location you decide to do your study on. This helps you to see what kind of climates and animals are located in the place you decide. It begins in continent form, but you are able to search countries and cities as well. 2. Be sure to choose and journal down where you decide and what animals grow there. Learning about the weather and water conditions will help you to understand what animals are able to survive In order for you to survive. Journal entries should be kept as well as notes on the place you decide. These notes can be saved on the computer. 3. Lastly show me and entry of your notes on the computer or in writing form. If typed asked permission to print before printing. a. More points will not be allotted to kids who type over those who write them. Day Two1. After you have chosen your location choosing a sight that helps to better understand a food chain in that location is key. Using the following sites will help you gather background information you will need in order to pick animals for your food chains. • Animal Help- Use this site to research an animal you choose in order to complete one of your food chains. • Zoo Help- By simply clicking on the tab animals and searching the animal you have chosen, you will receive a description of the animal. This sight goes into detail of what each animal eats, where and how it survives, and what could eat it. • Food Chain Refresher If you are having trouble in remembering the different labels associated with the food chains refer to this sight. It has games, definitions and pictures to help you refresh your mind. 2. Today will complete the first week of the Adventure Survivor Webquest. You have chosen your location and at least two animals apart of your first food chain. You will now show your teacher your 69


progress and wait for further instruction. Week Two Day One1. Begin today by completing your first food chan. Each chain must contain four animals. You must continue to choose and describe and label the animals that you choose. Be sure to add these to your notes from last week. a) Be sure to include and label if the animal chosen is a scavenger, carnivore, herbivore, top level consumer, secondary consumers or decomposer because you are required to have a minimum b) Again refer to the sights listed above again for any assistance you may need.

2. After completing your first food chain, pick one animal from that food chain. This will be the animal you will use in order to begin your next food chain. This will begin the linking of your food web. 3. Begin to research two animals that will be a part of a different food chain associated with the animal.

4. Be sure to save all work whether on the computer or in your notebook. You will now show your teacher your progress and wait for further instruction. Day Two – 1. Begin today in reviewing your previous food chain. Making sure the animals are in order and you have enough of the required information to describe the animal on your poster. 2. Continue on your second food chain that began from an animal in your first food chain. 3. Today your final animal should be chosen and researched in order to complete your second food chain. 4. Be sure to use the sights given from day one to better help you father information.

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a. Be sure to include and label if the animal chosen is a scavenger, carnivore, herbivore, top level consumer, secondary consumers or decomposer because you are required to have a minimum b. Be sure to include and label if the animal chosen is a scavenger, carnivore, herbivore, top level consumer, secondary consumers or decomposer because you are required to have a minimum

5. Be sure to save all work whether on the computer or in your notebook. You will now show your teacher your progress and wait for further instruction. Week ThreeDay One 1. Begin today in reviewing your previous food chains. Making sure the animals are in order and you have enough of the required information to describe the animal on your poster. a. Be sure to include and label if the animal chosen is a scavenger, carnivore, herbivore, top level consumer, secondary consumers or decomposer because you are required to have a minimum b. Be sure to include and label if the animal chosen is a scavenger, carnivore, herbivore, top level consumer, secondary consumers or decomposer because you are required to have a minimum c. Again refer to the sights listed above again for any assistance you may need 2. After completing your 2nd food chain, pick one animal from that food chain. This will be the animal you will use in order to begin your next food chain. This will continue the linking of your food web. 3. Begin to research two animals that will be a part of a different food chain associated with the animal. 4. Be sure to save all work whether on the computer or in your notebook. You will now show your teacher your progress and wait for further instruction.

71


Day Two1. Begin today by choosing your final animal researching it in order to complete your final food chain. 2. Be sure to use the sights given from day one to better help you gather information. • Be sure to include and label if the animal chosen is a scavenger, carnivore, herbivore, top level consumer, secondary consumers or decomposer because you are required to have a minimum • Again refer to the sights listed above again for any assistance you may need 3. Make sure all of your animals are labeled correctly and the information required is provided. 4. Using the sites below find any necessary pictures of your animals if you have not yet found one in the sites given previously. •

Animal Images

Animal Images Two

5. This is the final day in the lab so work promptly to reach all checkpoints. Make sure you have enough labeled animals, food chains, appropriate webs, and pictures needed to make your poster. 6. Be sure to gather all information. This is the final day for research. Next week you will be in the classroom. You will now wait for further instruction. Week Four Day One & Two1. Today you will be allowed to finalize and decorate your poster in the classroom. • Be sure to include and label if the animal chosen is a scavenger, carnivore, herbivore, top level consumer, secondary consumers or decomposer because you are required to have a minimum of 9 •

Make sure all appropriate labels and requirements are 72


displayed. •

Make sure your poster is readable and understandable

•

Make sure your poster is big and visible so that it can be read

•

Be original and do your own work

2. You are allowed to take the poster home within this process of week four to finish. Each poster is due back in class on Friday of the final week.

Evaluate and Revise

Each one of you will be evaluated individually. Listed below is the rubric that your poster will be graded from. You will not receive credit for the checkpoints within the weeks of gathering information. Your presentation and poster will be the sole product that will be graded.

Making A Poster : Adventurous Survivor Teacher Name: Ms. Hudson Student Name:

CATEGORY

________________________________________

4

3

2

1

Labels

All 9 items of importance on the poster are clearly labeled with labels that can be read.

7-8 items of importance on the poster are clearly labeled with labels that can be read.

5-6 items of importance on the poster are clearly labeled with labels that can be read.

4 items or less of importance on the poster are clearly labeled with labels that can be read.

Required Elements

The poster includes All required elements all required elements are included on the as well as additional poster. information.

All but 1 of the required elements are included on the poster.

Several required elements were missing.

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Content Accuracy

At least 7 accurate facts are displayed on the poster.

5-6 accurate facts 3-4 accurate facts Less than 3 accurate are displayed on the are displayed on the facts are displayed poster. poster. on the poster.

Graphics Originality

Several of the graphics used on the poster reflect a exceptional degree of student creativity in their creation and/or display.

One or two of the graphics used on the poster reflect student creativity in their creation and/or display.

The graphics are No graphics made made by the student, by the student are but are based on the included. designs or ideas of others.

Graphics -Clarity

Graphics are all in focus and the content easily viewed and identified.

Most graphics are in focus and the content easily viewed and identified.

Most graphics are in Many graphics are focus and the not clear or are too content is easily small. viewed and identified.

Title

Title can be read from 6 ft. away and is quite creative.

Title can be read from 6 ft. away and describes content well.

Title can be read from 4 ft. away and describes the content well.

The title is too small and/or does not describe the content of the poster well.

Date Created: Apr 23, 2014 12:06 pm (CDT)

Chelsea Hudson 4/16/14 5:48 PM Formatted: Space After: 0 pt, Line spacing: single

Are You A Survivor?

A Webquest for 2nd grade Food Chains Designed by Chelsea Hudson 74


hudson.chelsea30@gmail.com Studying and understanding interdependence in science is a learning expectation covered under Tennessee Science Standard 2.0. GLE 0207.2.1 Investigate the habitats of different kinds of local plants and animals. GLE 0207.2.2 Investigate living things found in different places. GLE 0207.2.3 Identify basic ways that plants and animals depend on each other

Introduction Welcome to “Are You A Survivor? I am your host Ms. Hudson. Are you able to survive in an environment different from the one you live in daily? How will you survive without mommy to cook you meals? You have been chosen to be a part of the team in the game show Adventurous Survivor. You will be taken from your homes and left deserted in a location of your choosing across the world. Upon arrival to your destination you will locate and develop food chains that will help you survive the wild. These food chains will help to develop the food web you use to survive your one week conquest.

Task After your return from your adventure you must present your team with the food chains and web that you used in order to survive your rugged locations in the form of a poster. You will have three weeks to choose and create proper food chains depending on your location. Each week will be time for you to develop a different food chain. The final week, using the information gathered, each of you will decorate and finalize your poster. Be creative and very descriptive, labeling all required labels. Be sure to accurately represent the place at which you were located and the food needed in order to survive. You must include labels of the animal, a description and proper identification. You must include yourself in the food chain because you were the ultimate Top Level Consumer. Each food chain should be represented by a different color. Have our location represented on the board. Ultimately have fun. Your food chains and web and presentation must include the following: 2 Scavengers

1 Carnivore

2 herbivores

1 top level consumer

2 Secondary Consumers 1 Decomposer Chelsea Hudson 4/16/14 5:48 PM Formatted: Tabs: 0.5", Left + 1", Left + 1.5", Left + 3.83", Left

Process You will have three weeks to choose and create proper food chains depending on your location. Each week we will have 2 days a week in the computer lab. The final week will be held in the classroom decorating and finalizing the posters for presentation. Taking the poster is also 75


acceptable and encouraged. Each lab session will last 55 minutes. Each week you will be graded on a checkpoint to make sure that you are completing the task on time. Week One Day One1. Begin by choosing which location you desire to gather your food chains from. This location is where you will be dropped off in your conquest. Begin by accessing the following links: • Survivor Locations This website will help you in deciding which location you decide to do your study on. This helps you to see what kind of climates and animals are located in the place you decide. It begins in continent form, but you are able to search countries and cities as well. 2. Be sure to choose and journal down where you decide and what animals grow there. Learning about the weather and water conditions will help you to understand what animals are able to survive In order for you to survive. Journal entries should be kept as well as notes on the place you decide. These notes can be saved on the computer. 3. Lastly show me and entry of your notes on the computer or in writing form. If typed asked permission to print before printing. a. More points will not be allotted to kids who type over those who write them. Day Two1. After you have chosen your location choosing a sight that helps to better understand a food chain in that location is key. Using the following sites will help you gather background information you will need in order to pick animals for your food chains. • Animal Help- Use this site to research an animal you choose in order to complete one of your food chains. • Zoo Help- By simply clicking on the tab animals and searching the animal you have chosen, you will receive a description of the animal. This sight goes into detail of what each animal eats, where and how it survives, and what could eat it. • Food Chain Refresher If you are having trouble in remembering the different labels associated with the food chains refer to this sight. It has games, definitions and pictures to help you refresh your mind. 2. Today will complete the first week of the Adventure Survivor Webquest. You have chosen your location and at least two animals apart of your first food chain. You will now show your teacher your progress and wait for further instruction. Week Two Day One1. Begin today by completing your first food chan. Each chain must contain four animals. You must continue to choose and describe and label the animals that you choose. Be sure to add these to your notes from last week. 76


a) Be sure to include and label if the animal chosen is a scavenger, carnivore, herbivore, top level consumer, secondary consumers or decomposer because you are required to have a minimum b) Again refer to the sights listed above again for any assistance you may need.

2. After completing your first food chain, pick one animal from that food chain. This will be the animal you will use in order to begin your next food chain. This will begin the linking of your food web. 3. Begin to research two animals that will be a part of a different food chain associated with the animal.

4. Be sure to save all work whether on the computer or in your notebook. You will now show your teacher your progress and wait for further instruction.

Day Two – 1. Begin today in reviewing your previous food chain. Making sure the animals are in order and you have enough of the required information to describe the animal on your poster. 2. Continue on your second food chain that began from an animal in your first food chain. 3. Today your final animal should be chosen and researched in order to complete your second food chain. 4. Be sure to use the sights given from day one to better help you father information. a. Be sure to include and label if the animal chosen is a scavenger, carnivore, herbivore, top level consumer, secondary consumers or decomposer because you are required to have a minimum b. Be sure to include and label if the animal chosen is a scavenger, carnivore, herbivore, top level consumer, secondary consumers or decomposer because you are required to have a minimum

5. Be sure to save all work whether on the computer or in your notebook. You will now show your teacher your progress and wait for further instruction.

Week ThreeDay One 77


1. Begin today in reviewing your previous food chains. Making sure the animals are in order and you have enough of the required information to describe the animal on your poster. a. Be sure to include and label if the animal chosen is a scavenger, carnivore, herbivore, top level consumer, secondary consumers or decomposer because you are required to have a minimum b. Be sure to include and label if the animal chosen is a scavenger, carnivore, herbivore, top level consumer, secondary consumers or decomposer because you are required to have a minimum c. Again refer to the sights listed above again for any assistance you may need 2. After completing your 2nd food chain, pick one animal from that food chain. This will be the animal you will use in order to begin your next food chain. This will continue the linking of your food web. 3. Begin to research two animals that will be a part of a different food chain associated with the animal. 4. Be sure to save all work whether on the computer or in your notebook. You will now show your teacher your progress and wait for further instruction.

Day Two1. Begin today by choosing your final animal researching it in order to complete your final food chain. 2. Be sure to use the sights given from day one to better help you gather information. •

Be sure to include and label if the animal chosen is a scavenger, carnivore, herbivore, top level consumer, secondary consumers or decomposer because you are required to have a minimum

Again refer to the sights listed above again for any assistance you may need

3. Make sure all of your animals are labeled correctly and the information required is provided. 4. Using the sites below find any necessary pictures of your animals if you have not yet found one in the sites given previously. • Animal Images • Animal Images Two 78


5. This is the final day in the lab so work promptly to reach all checkpoints. Make sure you have enough labeled animals, food chains, appropriate webs, and pictures needed to make your poster. 6. Be sure to gather all information. This is the final day for research. Next week you will be in the classroom. You will now wait for further instruction. Week Four Day One & Two1.

Today you will be allowed to finalize and decorate your poster in the classroom. • Be sure to include and label if the animal chosen is a scavenger, carnivore, herbivore, top level consumer, secondary consumers or decomposer because you are required to have a minimum of 9 • Make sure all appropriate labels and requirements are displayed. • Make sure your poster is readable and understandable • Make sure your poster is big and visible so that it can be read • Be original and do your own work

2. You are allowed to take the poster home within this process of week four to finish. Each poster is due back in class on Friday of the final week.

Evaluation Each one of you will be evaluated individually. Listed below is the rubric that your poster will be graded from. You will not receive credit for the checkpoints within the weeks of gathering information. Your presentation and poster will be the sole product that will be graded.

Making A Poster : Adventurous Survivor Teacher Name: Ms. Hudson Student Name:

CATEGORY

4

________________________________________

3

2

1

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Labels

All 9 items of importance on the poster are clearly labeled with labels that can be read.

7-8 items of importance on the poster are clearly labeled with labels that can be read.

5-6 items of importance on the poster are clearly labeled with labels that can be read.

4 items or less of importance on the poster are clearly labeled with labels that can be read.

Required Elements

The poster includes All required elements all required elements are included on the as well as additional poster. information.

All but 1 of the required elements are included on the poster.

Several required elements were missing.

Content Accuracy

At least 7 accurate facts are displayed on the poster.

5-6 accurate facts 3-4 accurate facts Less than 3 accurate are displayed on the are displayed on the facts are displayed poster. poster. on the poster.

Graphics Originality

Several of the graphics used on the poster reflect a exceptional degree of student creativity in their creation and/or display.

One or two of the graphics used on the poster reflect student creativity in their creation and/or display.

The graphics are No graphics made made by the student, by the student are but are based on the included. designs or ideas of others.

Graphics -Clarity

Graphics are all in focus and the content easily viewed and identified.

Most graphics are in focus and the content easily viewed and identified.

Most graphics are in Many graphics are focus and the not clear or are too content is easily small. viewed and identified.

Title

Title can be read from 6 ft. away and is quite creative.

Title can be read from 6 ft. away and describes content well.

Title can be read from 4 ft. away and describes the content well.

The title is too small and/or does not describe the content of the poster well.

Date Created: Apr 23, 2014 12:06 pm (CDT)

Chelsea Hudson 4/16/14 5:48 PM Formatted: Space After: 0 pt, Line spacing: single Chelsea Hudson 4/16/14 6:30 PM Formatted: Tabs: 0.5", Left + 1", Left + 1.5", Left + 3.83", Left

Conclusion You did it. You are a SURVIVOR!!!! You have been able to find food and survive yet another dangerous and treacherous week in the wild. You have chosen the correct food for survival in order to make it to the end of Adventure Survivor. Until next season

Credit and References 80

Chelsea Hudson 4/16/14 6:07 PM Formatted: Underline


Unknown. (2014, April 18). Survivor Picture. Retrieved from http://corduroysbutton.wordpress.com/2011/11/11/survivor-boys-and-girls-club/ Unknown Field Code Changed

Hudson,C. (2012, April 22) Making A Poster : Adventurous Survivor. Created from Rubistar http://rubistar.4teachers.org/index.php?ts=1398272618

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Unit Media Share Food Chain Food Chain by Just-Eat.com is a great way for users to learn about various living things such as animals and plants. This app is designed to help users look into different categories and discover where they fit into the food chain as a fun science activity for kids. With this app you simply match up food in a ‘chain’ for delicious destruction. You must work quickly; if the food hits the top of the screen you’ll be going home hungry. Play through story mode and help Just-Eat’s Belly and Brain search for the mythical “Golden Spoon” as you face off against six fiendish food loving villains. Or challenge your friends with two player VS mode over 3G/Wi-Fi or split screen “table top” two player VS mode on iPad. Just-Eat.com (February 22, 2012). Food Chain. [iTunes, Free] Retrieved on February 20, 2014 from https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/food-chain/id448136567?mt=8

Food Chains, Food Webs, Energy Pyramid in Ecosystems-Video for Kids Food Chains, Food Webs, Energy Pyramid in Ecosystems-Video for Kids is a good quality source resource for instructing students on food chains and interdependence. This video displays the simple baseline that all living things need food to have energy which helps them to grow and move. The video explains that the food chain tells how each living thing gets its food and how most of living beings are dependent on each other for their energy requirement. The video introduces that a food chain always starts with a producer, which in most of the cases is a plant and it ends with a predator, it is at the top of the food chain. Consumers, scavengers, herbivores and decomposer form important constituents of a food chain. makemegenius. (2012). Food Chains ,Food Webs,Energy Pyramid in Ecosystems-Video for Kids. [YouTube Video]. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SWvtRf4TAO4

Interactive Learning for Education This website provides students teachers and parents the opportunity to grow in depth in food chains and also other activities such as food webs, vocabulary, and other subjects. These 82


activities work great with a SMARTboard or interactive whiteboard for whole group or small group instruction or use in the computer lab or at home for individual learning. Choose from fun, educational, interactive games and simulations for math, English language arts, science, social studies, brainteasers, music, art, holidays and more! Just by clicking on the subject science and age level, then the topic of food chains, you are offered numerous worksheets, assignments, and activities to dive deeper into the knowledge of food chains and interdependence Karen Open (2013) Interactive Learning for Education. [Website]. Retrieved on February 20, 2014 from http://interactivesites.weebly.com/food-chains.html

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Katrice Heyward Donaldson Technology Action Plan Grade 3

General Level

Objectives

Achievement

Students will utilize technology problem-solving and decision-making tools.

ISTE-Student Standard Standard 4:b,c

Learning expectation (Lowest Need for § Students will use Teacher technology resources for Assistance) solving problems and making informed decisions. § Students will employ technology in the development of strategies for solving problems in the real world.

Recognition

Students will use technology Standard 1: a,b communications tools. & 2:a,b Learning expectation § Students will use telecommunications to collaborate, publish, and interact with peers, experts, and other audiences.

Specific Strategies Critical Thinking, Problem Solving and Decision Making

§ In groups of 3, students will create a commercial selling a product to the class using PowerPoint presentation technology. They will locate their target audience, research a problem or need and create a product or solution.

§ Students will provide the steps and process they utilized for completing this assignment.

Creativity and Innovation & Communication and Collaboration

§ Students will create an Eyejot message. 84


§ Students will use a variety of media and formats to communicate information and ideas effectively to multiple audiences.

Belongingness

Students will understand the importance of social, ethical, and human issues associated with technology.

§ Students will log-on to an email server with username and password, send, retrieve, and read an e-mail message.

Standard 5:b,c

Digital Citizenship

§ Through whole group class discussion, students will learn the advantages and disadvantages of the use of technology and the purpose of virus protection software.

Learning expectation

§ Students will understand the ethical, cultural, and societal issues related to technology.

§ Students will create a list of ways that technology has made life easier for them today to share with the class.

§ Students will practice responsible use of technology systems, information, and software.

§ Students will develop positive attitudes toward technology uses that support lifelong learning, collaboration, personal pursuits, and productivity.

Security and

Students will select and use appropriate technology research tools.

Standards 3: c & 5: a,d

Research and Information Fluency & Digital Citizenship

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Safety Learning expectation

§ Students will learn rules for logging on and off the computer and class discussion of Acceptable Use Policy.

§ Cite sources of information for class assignments § Practice safe use of electronic equipment

§ Students will be given an assignment that will involve using the Internet as a source. Students will learn the rules for citing their sources through research.

§ Follow Acceptable Use Guidelines as set by local school district.

Students will understand basic operations and concepts of technology.

Standard 6: a & b

Technology Operations and Concepts

Learning expectation Physiological Needs (Highest Need for Teacher Assistance)

§ Students will demonstrate an understanding of the nature and operation of technology systems. § Students will exhibit a proficiency in the use of technology. § . Students will develop basic skills (alpha numeric and special characters) 
in using keyboard using the touch system

§ Students will be given a tutorial on understanding the basic operations and concepts of the functions of computer components as well as how to use output sources.

§ Students will exhibit a proficiency in the use of technology. They will learn how to use devices such as mouse, keyboard, and voice/sound.

§ Students will learn to exhibit proper posture and fingering techniques for the alphanumeric keyboard by using 86


a typing software.

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April Banks Unit Rationale – Geography: States and Capitals

In this third grade unit, students will be learning about political maps in social studies. Children would have difficulty learning states and capitals if they have never left their home state, town, or county. Another reason children may find this subject difficult is if they have never been to their state's capital. A student should know what a state is and what it does. Students should also learn where the capital is and about the capital's usefulness. Using Google Earth as a tool, students can view maps and places to help enrich their learning experience. Children can take a field trip to the state capital as a means to getting field experience. Other activities to assist children in learning political maps include claiming a state for a state pageant or presentations on a state. Another alternate means is to invite a guest speaker. If a student is traveling, they would need to know where they are traveling from, where they are traveling to, and where they are traveling through. If students are interested in careers in travel agencies, airlines, and politics, these skills would be beneficial. Studying and understanding political maps in social studies is a learning expectation covered under Tennessee Social Studies Standard 3.0.

3.03 Demonstrate how to identify and locate major physical and political features on globes and maps.

Present.Me: http://present.me/view/162897-­‐thislandisyour-­‐land_abanks Jing Tutorial: http://screencast.com/t/ZrRFUgAwu   88


April Banks ASSURE Lesson Plan Third Grade- Social Studies This Land Is Your Land

Analyze Learners

General Characteristics

The 3rd grade class at Kendall Elementary School in Somewhere, Tennessee, is comprised of 21 students; 11 females and 10 males. The students range in age from seven years to nine years of age. This classroom has no IEPs or 504 plans. Student diversity consists of nine white/nonHispanic, seven African-American, and five Hispanic students. The five Hispanic students live with Spanish-speaking relatives where Spanish is the main language spoken in the home. This knowledge will help me to make my lessons more culturally relevant for the students. The students can use a variety of media and technology resources for directed and independent learning activities. They can also use technology resources (e.g., puzzles, logical thinking programs, writing tools, digital cameras, drawing tools) for problem solving, communication, and illustration of thoughts, ideas, and stories. This information is based on previous documentation from previous learning experiences. Entry Competencies

Curricular: Expect students to respond to written and verbal communication that ranges from at grade level to above grade level proficiency.

Technological: Expect students to: ● Identify the home row keys (A, S, D, F, J, K, L, ;), and the keys above and below the home row keys.. ● Have an awareness of the layout of the computer keyboard ● Use input devices ● Work cooperatively and collaboratively with peers, family members, and others when using technology. 89


● Demonstrate positive social and ethical behaviors when using technology. Practice responsible use of technology systems and software. State Standards and Objectives

Curricular Standards

Technology Standards

● 3.03 Demonstrate how to identify and locate major 2. Communication and physical and political features on globes and maps. Collaboration d. contribute to project teams to produce original works or solve problems.

Lesson Objectives The students will create a video that details the most interesting facts about 3 states and their capitals.

Select Strategies, Technology, Media, and Materials *Note: Any websites used must be cited in APA format. Curricular Materials ● Paper ● Pencils

Technology Materials ● Computers w/internet access and web cameras ● 50 States. (2014). States and Capitals. [Website]. Retrieved on February 22, 2014 from http://www.50states.com ● Sample Video ● Projector ● Screen 90


● iMovie

Utilize Technology, Media, and Materials

Preview & Prepare Materials ● Scratch paper available for students if needed (located in recycle tray on my desk) ● Pencils are the responsibility of the student (extra pencils located in top desk drawer) ● Make sure eight computers are operating properly with internet access (one teacher computer and seven student computers) ● Make sure web cameras are operating properly ● Make sure projector is operating properly ● Make sure screen is functioning properly ● Make sure the sample video is playing correctly ● Verify 50 States website is running properly ● Make sure the seven student computers have iMovie software installed, and it is running properly. Prepare the Environment ● Desks are arranged for group learning environment (no rearranging necessary). ● Computers are set up along the back wall (no rearranging necessary) ● Filming areas are free from obstacles. Prepare the Learners ● Introduce the lesson to the students telling them they will create a video about 3 states and their capitals. ● Explain to the students the benefits of collaborating to create a video other learners may benefit from when they begin learning about state and capitals. ● Explain the requirements that must be included in the video, and the video style (conversational).

Require Learner Participation

The learners will get into 7 teacher assigned groups of three. The teacher will give examples of interesting facts on the computer displayed through the projector. Learners will then 91


watch a video created by the previous class’ project. Any questions will be answered at that time. Students will select 3 states per group, and begin researching the facts on the 50 States website. Students may use pencil and paper to take notes. For homework, the learners will draft outlines for what they want to include in the video. They will share their ideas with their group members and revise accordingly. Once the learners have decided what they would like to film, the students will use the web cameras and iMovie software on the computer to create a video. The video should not be just facts recited from the website. Instead, it should playful/creative/humorous. Props from outside the classroom must be approved by the teacher. Each group will present their video to the class on Friday.

Evaluate and Revise

Assessing Learner Achievement

The learners will be assessed on their abilities to successfully demonstrate how to identify and locate major physical and political features on globes and maps through homework, quizzes, and test scores. The teacher will determine any learning deficiencies, and will review the appropriate areas of concern. The learners will also be assessed on their abilities to effectively create a video using the following rubric:

Video Creation Rubric Category

3

2

1

Content

Content is covered in detail. Most of the content is (15 facts or more) included. (9-14 facts)

Little or no content is included. (0-8 facts)

Organization

Video is arranged in an Video is mostly easily understood sequence. organized and understood.

Video is unorganized and not very well understood.

Originality

Video demonstrates

Video was mostly lecture

Video demonstrates some creativity and

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Requirements

creativity and uses props.

uses at least one prop.

with no props.

All requirements met.

One to two requirements not met.

More than two requirements not met.

Evaluating and Revising Strategies, Technology, and Media

The teacher will ask learners questions while they are creating their own videos. Following the video completion, students will take a summative assessment. The teacher will determine if creating a video assisted the students in retaining state and capital information. The teacher will determine if enough time is allotted for the groups to complete a video in one week and will determine if an extension is necessary. The teacher will also determine if the groups are struggling to come up with ideas for the videos and will provide some assistance with generating ideas.

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Unit Media Share 50 States.com The 50states.com website titled “States and Capitals� offers a plethora of key facts about each of our 50 states. The website will help students accomplish the goals set by the standard used in my unit rationale (Tennessee Social Studies Standard- 3.03 Demonstrate how to identify and locate major physical and political features on globes and maps.) The planned state pageant will allow students to become more familiar with the states and their capitals. As a supplemental aid, this website provides an alphabetical list of facts for each state. The site is fairly plain and simple to use for beginning internet users or my 3rd grade students. Students will not only learn interesting facts about their selected state, but will be able to peruse the website for additional information on other states as they compile their information. 50 States. (2014). States and Capitals. [Website]. Retrieved on February 22, 2014 from http://www.50states.com Animaniacs Sing the States This video is an awesome resource for demonstrating to students how to sing a song about the states and their capitals. The video teaches students to look for relations between states, capitals. and personal connections to help remember them. The video also encourages learning the placement of states on the United States map. This catchy tune demonstrated in the video helps elementary age children remember all 50. The once popular cartoon characters in the clip ensnare children and capture their attention immediately. drewm. (Producer). (2008). Paragraph attack: Reading strategy. [TeacherTube Video]. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3cxllqT01rE Flashcards [+] Flashcards [+] is a great application for students to use when trying to memorize the states and capitals. The use of flash cards can have a large and immediate positive effect on the students that use them as they can improve their mastery, (Glover, McLaughlin, Derby, and Gower, 2010). In my opinion, the best thing about this app is that you can register as a teacher and upload a class list to ease the enrollment process for classes. Aside from the aesthetics (I love changing the backgrounds), students can play games and quiz themselves with the uploaded items. I can also have the class play a game as a whole on the app using shared decks of cards. As an educator I 94


would upload the 50 states and the capitals. Then use them games on the app to make informal assessments about the students learning. This app is Compatible with iPad, iPhone, and iPod touch and requires iOS 7.0 or later. NKO Ventures, LLC. (February 12, 2014). Flashcards [+] [iTunes, Free] Retrieved on February 22, 2014 from https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/flashcards-+/id478986342?mt=8 Glover, P., McLaughlin, T., Derby, K., & Gower, J. (2010). Using a Direct Instruction Flashcard System with Two Students with Learning Disabilities. Electronic Journal Of Research In Educational Psychology, 8(2), 457-472.

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Katrice Heyward-Donaldson Unit Rationale - Cause and Effect For every action, there is a reaction, whether negative or positive. The purpose of this third grade unit is to study the cause and effect relationship, which will aid in teaching students how to integrate knowledge and ideas. Students are often unaware of the reasons why a particular outcome occurs. Studying cause and effect will help to develop analytical thinkers. The unit will be studied over a 1-2 week time frame, using worksheets that will contain stem questions and linguistic pattern and response frames to help with identifying cause and effect in the assigned information text passages, videos, laptops, games, and collaborative group work. Stem questions such as,” Was ___the cause of ___ or was ___the cause? How did ___effect____? “will be given to the students to help them recognize why certain situations produce particular results. Students will be able to read a passage, answer using text evidence that proves their beliefs, and be able to articulate the relationship between the cause and effect of a circumstance. Socially, this topic will help students understand the consequences of their actions and possibly, help them to become more willing to accept their end result. Studying and understanding Cause and Effect in Reading Literacy is a learning expectation covered under Common Core English Language Arts Standard: Reading Informational Text 3.8. · CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.3.8 Describe the logical connection between particular sentences and paragraphs in a text (e.g., comparison, cause/effect, first/second/third in a sequence).

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Present.Me: http://present.me/view/165495-­‐cause-­‐and-­‐effect Jing Tutorial: http://www.screencast.com/t/YolhTmni    

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ASSURE Lesson Plan

5 slide presentation on Cause and Effect

Name: Katrice Heyward Donaldson

Subject Area: Literacy

Duration of Lesson: (4 days)

Grade Level: 3rd

Analyze Learners: Students learning this lesson today are from Madison Creek Elementary School in Hendersonville, Tennessee. This 3rd grade class is comprised of 20 students. There are 12 boys and 8 girls. The age range is from 8-10 years old. All students speak proficient English. Diversity consists of 3 African American students, 2 African American and Caucasian mixed students, 1 Caucasian and Indian mixed student and 14 Caucasian students. Median household income in Hendersonville is 52,000. No students have an IEP.

Curriculum competencies According to pre-assessments worksheets and previous technology assignments, prior knowledge includes introduction to Cause and Effect key words in second grade.

Technology Competencies 98


Students have been introduced to basic concepts of computer and Internet use. Students are able to use laptops and have been introduced to Microsoft Word and PowerPoint software in the early part of the school year. They have a general knowledge of the computer and its components and have utilized these skills in their computer technology class.

State and ISTE Standards and Objectives: State Standard: CCSS.ELA-

ISTE Standard: Standard 6

Literacy.RI.3.8 Describe the logical connection between particular sentences and paragraphs in a text (e.g., comparison, cause/effect, first/second/third in a sequence).

Technology Operations and Concepts

Objective: Give cause and effect key words, students, in pairs, will create a PowerPoint presentation using text to describe the relationship importance between cause and effect with 100% accuracy.

Select Methods, Media, and Materials: 99


Curriculum Materials: Ø Ø Ø Ø

Pencils Paper Instructional Worksheet for creating PowerPoint slides. Reading Textbook: Journeys Unit 4

Technology Materials: Ø Ø Ø Ø

Computers (Student Centered) Projector (Teacher Centered) Screen PowerPoint Software (Student Centered)

Utilize media and materials: Preview and Prepare Materials

Ø Pencils and paper will be utilized for taking notes during the explanation of the lesson. Students have their own pencils and paper. Ø PowerPoint instructional worksheets are located on the teacher desk in the tray marked worksheets. Ø 10 computers are located along the wall on the table in the back of the room. 1 computer per pair will be utilized. Students will have assigned computers. Ø Make sure projector and screen are working properly.

100


Ø Make sure computers are on and PowerPoint software has been installed on each computer.

Prepare the Environment

Ø Students will take their chairs to the computers. 2 chairs per computer. Ø There are no rearrangements necessary for student’s desks as there is adequate space for students to work at the computers. Ø Projector is located in the middle of the room. No rearrangement necessary.

Prepare the Learners

Ø Lesson will be introduced by reviewing cause and effect key words. Students will also be taught cause and effect stem questions. They will complete a worksheet pertaining to the key words to assess understanding. Ø Explain to students the importance of cause and effect in their daily lives and that they will be creating a 5 slide PowerPoint on cause and effect relationships. Ø Students will be shown an example on the projector.

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Ă˜ďƒ˜ Students will be given a tutorial on how to use the PowerPoint software. They will be given and instructional sheet on how to create a PowerPoint. It will be very basic as this is 3rd grade.

Require learner participation Curricular: As the teacher is teaching the unit on cause and effect, the students will be taking notes on their paper and they will be following along in their reading textbook. Students will participate by volunteering to read passages and answering questions. They will complete the in class worksheet at the end of the lesson to assess understanding of the concept. Teacher will review the worksheet with the whole class. Students will check their own papers. If there are no questions, teacher will then move to teaching how to use the PowerPoint software and teach students how to create slides. Students will be taking notes and following along on their PowerPoint slide instructional worksheet. Teacher will ask if there are any questions and students will have an opportunity to express any concerns. They will get into their pairs and brainstorm any ideas about what they want to present to the class as it pertains to cause and effect. They can use the PowerPoint as a lecture presentation, commercial, or pitch they are selling to the class but they must complete the task in 5 slides.

Technology: The pairs will go to their assigned computer. The computers will currently be turn on and the students will click on the PowerPoint software. Students will share responsibilities of creating their slides and their presentation. Students are to be creative in selling the class on the importance of learning the cause and effect relationship. Students will present on Thursday and Friday if needed.

Evaluate and Revise 102


Formative Assessment:

As students are working in pairs, teacher will assist with ideas on what to present. Teacher will observe on task behavior and contribution from each student in their pairs. There will be a checklist of tasks that students are to complete each day. Checklist will also serve as a guide for future assignments. It will help teacher understand if students are able to complete assigned tasks in the time frame given or if some changes are to be made. Behavior will also be observed along with how well they work in pairs. Students will get bonus points for staying on task. Bonus points will serve as a motivation tool. Day one will consists of learning the concept of cause and effect. Students will be observed taking notes and will have an in class worksheet to complete. The worksheet will assess student understanding of cause and effect and will allow teacher to know if the class can move to the next step. Day two will consist of learning the PowerPoint tool and getting into pairs to discuss ideas. Questioning will occur to assess student understanding of the PowerPoint software. Students will receive immediate feedback each day while completing their assigned tasks. Day 3 students will create PowerPoint slides and complete their presentation. Students are to collaborate with one another for their final presentation. Equal contribution is a must.

Summative Assessment:

Students will be graded on the following skills: Contribution to the assignment, cause and effect relationship clearly stated, presentation in 5 slides, no more, no less, completing all task on time and grammar/spelling.

Students will receive a copy of their rubric along with their grade. This will help them to reflect as to the areas in which they did great and the areas that may need a little work. Presently, there are not students whom need modification, however, if there were, those students may receive extra time on the assignment 103


and the in class worksheet may be modified to meet their educational needs. This assessment is aligned to the Common Core Standard 3.8 in Literacy and it meets ISTE standard 6. The sub-standards a - understand and use technology systems, b select and use applications effectively and productively and d - transfer current knowledge to learning of new technologies will be met within completion of this assignment. The following rubric will be utilized for scoring:

Cause and Effect Relationship PowerPoint Presentation

Student name:______________________________

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Teacher Name: Mrs. Donaldson Student Name:

CATEGORY

________________________________________

20 pts

15 pts

10pts

Presentation

Well-rehearsed with smooth delivery that holds audience attention.

Rehearsed with fairly smooth delivery that holds audience attention most of the time.

Delivery not smooth, Delivery not smooth but able to maintain and audience interest of the attention often lost. audience most of the time.

5pts

Requirements

All requirements are Most requirements met. 5 slides are met. 4 slides

One requirement was not completely met. 3 slides

More than one requirement was not completely met. 2 slides or less

Contribution

The workload is divided and shared equally by both students.

The workload is divided and shared fairly by both students, though workloads may vary from person to person.

The workload was divided, but one person in the pair is viewed as not doing his/her fair share of the work.

The workload was not divided and viewed as not doing their fair share of the work.

Content

Covers topic indepth with details and examples. Subject knowledge is excellent.

Includes essential knowledge about the topic. Subject knowledge appears to be good.

Includes essential information about the topic but there are 1-2 factual errors.

Content is minimal OR there are several factual errors.

Mechanics

No misspellings or grammatical errors.

Three or fewer misspellings and/or mechanical errors.

Four misspellings and/or grammatical errors.

More than 4 errors in spelling or grammar.

Date Created: Apr 29, 2014 07:56 am (CDT)

Â

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Unit Media Share

Brain Pop Brain Pop is an education website that contains many activities, games and lessons for various subjects. In looking at the topic of Cause and Effect, this website is a very helpful tool. It contained games, activities, pop a joke, word walls, quizzes lesson ideas and differentiated learning that involved those who learn by drawing, writing, or reading. This website also contained educational videos on various content. It targets all types of learners, whether, audio or visual and will be of a great benefit not only to the students but for the teachers as well. This website will help students meet the Common Core Standard in English Literacy, regarding reading informational text. Standard 3.8 - Describe the logical connection between particular sentences and paragraphs in a text (e.g., comparison, cause/effect, first/second/third in a sequence). Brain Pop. (2014). Brain pop jr. Retrieved on February 23, 2014 from http://www.brainpopjr.com/readingandwriting/comprehension/causeandeffect

Cause and Effect Podcast This was a podcast made in a technology class about cause and effect. The video breaks down the definition of the two concepts with pictures to further explain the key ideas. It is very appropriate for 3rd grade learners. One great part about the video is it uses one of the books on the 3rd grade reading list “If you give a mouse a cookie� to teach the content, which is one way to make learning exciting and relevant. In order for students to meet the Common Core Standard in English Literacy 3.3, students must be able to describe the relationship between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text, using language that pertains to time, sequence, and cause/effect. This podcast will allow for students to target and meet those goals. MsLittlejohn123. (2011). Cause and effect podcast Retrieved on February 23, 2014 from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PVLF5ENMtuc

Switch Kids 106


Switch Kids is an app that teaches simple cause and effect, multiple-choice cause and effect and a variation of cause and effect with a goal. The program is intended for switch users but can also be used just by touching the screen. It contains three activities all related to teaching cause and effect in an entertaining way and tracks the student’s progress. Upon the completion of using this app, students will understand that different causes will produce different effects. This is a great way to make learning fun. The students will more than likely have a greater understanding of cause and effect utilizing this app. This app meets the ISTE standard Technology Operations and Concepts as students will understand and use technology and use this application effectively and productively. Marble Soft. (2013). Switch Kids. [iTunes, $9.99] Retrieved on February 23, 2014 from https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/switch-kids/id467551739?mt=8

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Kieohnica Smith Unit Rationale – Living & Non-living Things

In this third grade unit, we will learning about interdependence in science. Students will learn about the characteristics that distinguish living things from nonliving things. It is important for to be able to characterize living versus nonliving because they are often confused about what is living and what is not. If we teach children the characteristics of a living thing as something that needs food, water, air, can move, grow and reproduce, then there is a smaller chance of confusion. Even though, children understand that in order of an animal to survive it needs food, water, and air, they may not believe the same about thing about plants. In comparison, nonliving things means not living and does not grow, need food, water, or air. Therefore, students will learn that in science living things are describe as anything that is alive such as cats, trees, flowers and nonliving things are described as anything that is not alive now or never been alive such as glass, clouds, and rocks. In addition, things that are now dead and were once living such as insets is another challenge that students must be able to distinguish. Students will be examining video clips and photographs and a variety of objects and organisms. Students will also gather evidence and develop criteria to decide if something is living or nonliving. More importantly, explaining to students that something that is dead was once living help deepen children’s understanding of all things. Teaching students to be aware that a living thing can die is important for their respect of nature. In order for students to understand the world around us is crucial for them to know the difference between living and nonliving things.

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Studying and understanding interdependence in science is a learning expectation covered under Tennessee Science Standard 2.0. GLE 0307.2.1

Categorize things as living or non-living.

GLE 0307.2.2

Explain how organisms with similar needs compete with one another for resources

. Present.Me: http://present.me/view/163401-­‐livingandnonliving Jing Tutorial: http://www.screencast.com/t/nMOd4hWGGw  

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ASSURE Lesson Plan Template Ready to Race!!! Telling Time In 5 minute Intervals Name: Kieohnica Smith Duration of Lesson: 45 minutes

Subject Area(s): Mathematics Grade Level: 2nd

General Characteristics Analyze learners

The second grade class at the LaVergne Lake Elementary School in LaVergne, Tennessee, is comprised of 23 students; 10 males, 13 females who are 7-8 years old. Student diversity consists of 10 white/non-Hispanic, 8 African-American, 3 Asian and 2 Hispanic students. 1 student has a hearing impairment (hears with assistance of hearing devices and is seated at the front of the classroom. The students come from families of various socioeconomic status however, most are from lower/middle class families. Majority of the students learning style is kinesthetic and visual learners. Most of the students in the class are excellent in counters from 1-200. Three are auditory and textbook oriented where they can read and answer questions when asked orally or in written format. Some of students prefer to work in groups and learn better in cooperative team settings. Some students prefer to work individually and perform better themselves as opposed to group work. The students understand the requirements of an assignment when given a rubric Entry Competencies Students have received prior instruction of the times during the day such as morning, afternoon, and night. Students have received prior instruction of the general structure and setup of both analog and digital clocks. I will introduce the topic on Time and show the students a large clock on the whiteboard. Explain that each number on the clock is worth 5 minutes. Ask the students to count in 5s as you point to the numbers on the clock. Students will watch YouTube videos- What’s the Time? And Telling Time to 5 minute intervals. Complete time games online- Learn to tell time (ABCya.com), Reading Clocks (IXL.com), and Minute March Clock (Kidsnumbers.com). After completion of online games the teacher will have the students write clock times in either analog or digital form. Student will set their individual analog clocks to different times that will be 110


displayed on a White board and compare/share their time with their partner. Students will also evaluated on their knowledge by completing an online test.

Curriculum Standards State & NETS*S objectives

CCSS.Math.Content.2.MD.C.7 Tell and write time from analog and digital clocks to the nearest five minutes. Technology Standards 4. Critical Thinking, Problem Solving, and Decision Making 6. Technology Operations and Concepts Behavioral Objective: Students should be able to do the following with 100% success with little or no difficulty: Students will display the time on an individual analog clock with little to no difficulty, students will be able to read time using an analog clock, and students will tell time five minute intervals. Students will be able to write clock times in the correct form of analog or digital time. Students will apply their understanding of telling time in 5 minute intervals by completing online games and working with individual clocks. Students will also complete an online test for understanding of telling time in 5 minute intervals. Language Objective: Key Vocabulary •

hour hand

minute hand

digital clock

minute

analog clock

hour

second

Select 1.Computer instructional 2.Internet Access methods, 3.Online YouTube Videos “ What’s the Time?” and “Telling Time to 5 111


media, and materials

minute Intervals” 4.Online Educational Games “Learning To Tell Time”, “Reading Clocks”, and “Minute March Clock” 5. Online Telling Time Quiz 6. Individual Analog Clocks 7.White Board 8. Assorted Markers for teacher 9. Pencils 10 .Paper 11. Onsite Resources: ABCya.com (2012). ABCYA! LEARN TO TELL TIME. Retrieved from http://www.abcya.com/telling_time.htm IXL Learning (2013). IXL - READING CLOCKS (2ND GRADE MATH PRACTICE). Retrieved from http://www.ixl.com/math/grade2/reading-clocks The Kids KnowIt Network (1998). MINUTE MARCH - CLOCK GAME FOR KIDS - KIDSNUMBERS.COM. Retrieved November 22, 2013, from http://www.kidsnumbers.com/minute-march.php KidsTV123 (2012, April 28). What's the Time? [Video file]. Retrieved from http://youtu.be/RBvmO7NgUp0 The Matholia Channel (2013, June 3). Telling Time to 5-minute Intervals [Video file]. Retrieved from http://youtu.be/W47g3FMFKJU TIME QUIZ. (n.d.). Retrieved November 22, 2013, from http://www.fi.edu/time/Journey/JustInTime/min_quiz.html

Utilize media and materials

Preview of Materials Students watch a video titled “What Time Is It?” Students watch a video titled “Telling Time in 5 minute Intervals” After watching the videos, the students be will look at individual analog clocks Student will look at Online educational games Student will look at clock times on white board 112


Prepare Materials Ensure computer is booted and ready for use Internet is properly functioning Check following websites ABCya.com, IXL.com, Kidsnumbers.com, and before student use Make sure each student has an individual analog clock for usage Students will have paper and pencil ready on desk Check online Telling Time quiz before student use Prepare Environment Have students seated in the middle of the air conditioned classroom in rows to ensure that they are able to view videos Prepare Learners Show the video titled “What Time Is It?” to the students Show the video titled “ Telling Time in 5 minute Intervals” Group students in two’s Provide students with online website Display different times on the white board Students will write clock times on to their paper Students will complete the online Telling Time quiz Provide Learning Experiences After watching the video, allow students time in class to discuss how to tell time. Place the students into groups of 2’s. Inform students in the groups that they will work together in class on an activity on the computer Have each group of student’s access the online educational games via the Internet. After student have finished the online educational games, distribute individual clocks to each student. Have students look at the different times displayed on the white board and write the times as shown on notebook paper. Allow students to practice setting the time on their individual analog clocks in 5 minute intervals and comparing with their partner Explain to the students the requirements of the assignment based on the rubric for grading or assessment of the lesson. After watching the videos about “What Time Is It” and “Telling Time in 5 Require learner minute Intervals”, students will have a discussion about the video participation (Reflection). Students will be put into groups of two’s. Explain they will be working together to learn more about how to tell time on a digital clock 113


and analog clocks using the computers in class with the internet resources provided. Students will log into the website and play the educational games “Learn To Tell Time”, “Reading Clocks”, and “Minute March Clock”. This lesson does not need any modifying for my student with hearing impairment. Student will be paired with a partner. After students have practiced with his or her partner, the teacher will pass out individual clocks to students. The teacher will show different times on the white board and the students must write the time in either analog or digital form and show the time on their individual analog clock correctly. The students should use the hour hand to represent the number hour and the minute hand to represent the minutes. The student will work independently to display the time. When the students have finished, they should turn to their partner and share their answers. Students should discuss any time that is different and determine which partner has the correct time. While circulating the room the teacher should look the following and take notes: o Do students confuse the minute hand with the hour hand? o Do students correctly model the time with the analog clock face? The teacher will have the students share their times and discuss the activity. Students will have understanding of how to read a clock in 5 minute intervals.

Evaluate and revise

Evaluation The lesson will close with a brief summary from the teacher. An evaluation will be conducted by the teacher on student performance. Student will have to complete an online test to be evaluated on their knowledge of telling time. Students should know the difference between analog and digital clocks. Students are expected to be able to read time to five minute intervals. Students we able to work in groups. Students were able to access and complete internet games. Student was able to correctly write clock times on paper and display clock times on individual analog clocks.

Teachers will be able to evaluate the understanding of the child’s ability to tell time in 5 minute intervals. Whole group assessment can be recorded on a rubric as to whether the children are able to model individual analog clocks correctly and their ability following teacher 114


directions.

Telling Time Rubric CATEGORY 3 Points

2 Points

1 Point

TOTAL:

Directions

You followed all directions when accessing the websites.

You followed some of You did not follow the directions when the directions that accessing the websites. you were given.

/3

Effort

You tried very hard and learned about telling time, and you gave great effort in finishing the activities.

You did not spend enough time learning about telling time. You had a very hard time staying on the activities during class.

You did not learn about telling time. You did not assess the activities during class.

/3

You had trouble staying on task, but you finished most of your work during class.

You did not stay on task. You did not finish your task during class.

/3

You can somewhat tell time by 5 minute intervals. You completed 75% of the online test.

You cannot tell time by 5 minute intervals. You did not complete the online test.

/3

You worked hard during class and you Completion finished the task that you were given.

Telling Time

TOTAL:

You can accurately tell time by 5 minute intervals. You completed 100% of the online test.

/12 115


Teacher Rubric

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Unit Media Share ITooch 3rd Grade Science ITooch is a new and fun way of practicing and learning Science for third graders. It is the largest collection of educational worksheets based on the US National Common Core Standards on Google Play for elementary schools. ITooch apps are used by more than 2,000,00 users, and a full learning solution which helps parents, teachers, and students to identify and address their learning needs in a fun and motivating way. This app requires Android 4.0 and up. Serre, Jerome and Jasmin, Daniel. (March 27, 2012). ITooch 3rd Grade Science. [Google Play, Free] Retrieved on February 24, 2014 from https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.edupad.app.grade3.science Living and Non Living things class science- Logos Academy This video is geared toward 3rd grade students to help them distinguished between living and nonliving things. Discuss more about the source. LogosAcademy. (2010). Living and nonliving things class Science-Logos Academy. [Youtube.com Video] Retrieved on February 24, 2014 from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k3b2VCNzhZo Science Games for Kids: Plants and Animals This website allows students to learn about plants and animals as they spot them in an outdoor scene, discover more about where plants and animals live as well as other interesting facts. Students must spot living things such as flowers, trees, insects, and birds to complete fun activities in this interactive science game. Science Kids Fun Science and Technology for Kids. (2014). Science Games for Kids: Plants and Animals [Website] Retrieved on February 24, 2014 http://www.sciencekids.co.nz/gamesactivities/plantsanimals.html

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Kellie D. Marks Technology Action Plan Grade 4

This fourth grade technology action plan is based on the national and State of Tennessee, and The International Society for Technology in Education for technology literacy and also the following general entry-level competencies from the third grade.

•

Students have been introduced to basic computer understanding including: o Proficiency in the use of technology. o Basic skills (alpha numeric and special characters) in using keyboard using the touch system. o Key at a rate of 10 gross words per minute using the proper touch-keying techniques.

•

Students have had intermediate operational experience with o Identify the functions of computer components. o Use input devices, such as mouse, keyboard, and voice/sound recorder. o Use output devices, such as disk drive, printer, multimedia projector/display screen, etc. o Save, retrieve, and delete files. o Describe the purposes of drives, directories, and files. o Be aware that there are different types of files (different extensions).

•

Students have had intermediate, age-appropriate communication experiences that include: o Use communication tools to participate in projects. o Explore effective ways to demonstrate ideas (font, color, background/white space, graphics, and sound to ensure that products are appropriate for the communication media including multimedia screen displays, Internet documents, and printed materials). o Publish information in a variety of media including, but not limited to, printed copy, monitor display, Internet documents, and video. o Use presentation software to create a product geared to specific audiences. o Select representative student products to be collected and stored in an electronic evaluation tool. o Participate in the creation of technology assessment tools such as checklists, timelines, or rubrics. o Use outlining tools to create simple presentation templates. o Where applicable, log-on to an e-mail server with user name and password, send, retrieve, and read e-mail messages.

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th

The State of Tennessee Standards: Computer Technology, 4 grade: http://www.tennessee.gov/education/ci/computer/doc/grade_4.pdf International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE): http://www.iste.org/docs/pdfs/2014_ISTE_Standards-S_PDF.pdf

General Level

Achievement

(Lowest Need for Teacher Assistance)

Objectives

Standard 6.0 Students will utilize technology problem-solving and decisionmaking tools.

Learning Expectations 6.1 Students will use technology resources for solving problems and making informed decisions. 6.2 Students will employ technology in the development of strategies for solving problems in the real world. 6.3 Students use critical thinking skills to plan and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems, and make informed decisions using appropriate digital tools and resources.

Specific

ISTE-Student Standard

4. Critical thinking, problem solving, and decision making

Strategies

Students will:

Use technology resources for solving problems and making informed decisions by using software and aids to complete a typed research assignment using previously learned skills.

Employ technology in the development of strategies for solving problems in the real world by choosing a current global issue i.e. natural disaster, global warming, hunger in 3rd world countries, and collect online resources to create a database of assets that would help solve the chosen problem. Students will send their findings to a foundation that supports their chosen cause.

Collect and analyze data to identify solutions and/or make informed decisions by selecting useful and appropriate electronic information that could help resolve conflicts of their previously chosen global issue.

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Recognition

Standard 4.0 Students will use technology communications tools.

Learning Expectations 4.1 Students will use telecommunications to collaborate, publish, and interact with peers, experts, and other audiences. 4.2 Students will use a variety of media and formats to communicate information and ideas effectively to multiple audiences. 4.3 Students will use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others.

1.Creativity and Innovation

2. Communication and Collaboration

Students will:

Use telecommunications to collaborate, publish, and interact with peers, experts, and other audiences by creating their own websites. Students will: • •

•

Create a biographical webpage. Students will learn the basic coding procedures, and simulations to create a webpage. Students will learn how a webpage is created, and that anyone can create a space on the internet.

Use a variety of media and formats to communicate information and ideas effectively to multiple audiences by creating a personal blog. The online blog will be updated once a week focusing on the learned objectives/standards of the week. The blog will allow students will demonstrate mastery of academic course in a personal, creative web-based way.

Communicate information and ideas effectively to multiple audiences using a variety of media and formats by premiering their before mentioned blog with their classmates, parents, and teacher. This will showcase what the student has learned from a media format. Students can utilize PowerPoint, Prezi, and Vlog to assist with the presentation. 120


Belongingnes s

Standard 2.0 Students will understand the importance of social, ethical, and human issues associated with technology.

Learning Expectations 2.1 Students will understand the ethical, cultural, and societal issues related to technology. 2.2 Students will practice responsible use of technology systems, information, and software. 2.3 Students will develop positive attitudes toward technology uses that support lifelong learning, collaboration, personal pursuits, and productivity.

5. Digital Citizenship

Students will:

Understand the ethical, cultural, and societal issues related to Technology by completing a cultural awareness activity. Students will be grouped and given a country, where they must report ethical, cultural, and societal norms and problems of 4th graders. This activity will show students how technology has made everyone a global citizen, and the world wide web creates an unmatched closeness that the world has never seen before now.

Practice responsible use of technology systems, information, and software by finding the licensing agreements on 10 major websites, such as, Google, Yahoo, Facebook, CNN, etc.

Develop positive attitudes toward technology uses that support lifelong learning, collaboration, personal pursuits, and productivity by: • •

Creating a list of the ways technology makes things easier. Researching technology startup companies and companies that 121


Standard 5.0 Students will select and use appropriate technology research tools.

Security and

Learning Expectations

Safety

5.1 Students will use technology to locate, evaluate, and collect information

5. Digital Citizenship

3. Research and Information Fluency

Students will:

Use technology to locate, evaluate, and collect information from a variety of sources by completing a google search workshop, where they will learn: •

from a variety of sources. • 5.2 Students will use technology tools to process data and report results. 5.3 Students will evaluate and select new information resources and technological innovations based on the appropriateness for specific tasks.

solely rely on technology to preform business functions. Choosing a theoretical career in technology and understanding the job functions and requirements.

That the words they choose to type into a search tool, such as Google, have a direct connection to the results that are shown. How to take real-world questions and topics and convert them into a set of search terms to collect information. How to identify usable vs unusable search terms, for a given research topic. Ex. Name 3 civic leaders of the Civil Rights movement in the 1960’s.

Use technology tools to process data and report results by learning the functions of Microsoft Excel, and create a personal contact database.

Evaluate and select new information

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resources and technological innovations based on the appropriateness for specific tasks by: •

Standard 1.0 Students will understand basic operations and concepts of technology. Physiological Needs Learning Expectations (Highest Need for Teacher Assistance)

1.1 Students will demonstrate an understanding of the nature and operation of technology systems. 1.2 Students will exhibit a proficiency in the use of technology.

6. Technology Operations and Concepts

Identifying the latest 10 technology tools and explain how they can be useful. Going on a virtual field trip to the Sistine Chapel in Rome.

Students will:

As a 4th grade student, it is an expectation that students will demonstrate an understanding of the nature and operation of technology systems by adhering to the physical etiquette of maneuvering and handling classroom technological tools. Classroom technology guidelines are: • •

1.3 Students will continue development of and master basic skills (alpha

numeric and special characters) for using the touch.

No food, drink, gum or candy is allowed while using any device. Students will not touch the screen, hold onto the computer lids, or touch the machine with any other object, expect their fingers. Students will be assigned a laptop number, and are not allowed to use any other device aside from the one assigned. If something on the device isn’t working properly, students must inform the teacher immediately. Students are NOT allowed to troubleshoot any device. Using the technology device is for educational purposes. They are tools, not toys— students must treat them gently. Students will only be allowed to go on the internet when directed by the teacher.

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Exhibit a proficiency in the use of technology by completing a preliminary technology usage assignment. The assignment will take 4 weeks to complete and will include: •

A technology scavenger hunt and survey. This will allow students to become more familiar with the dos and don’ts of using technology devices. Students will read and create a written report on netiquette standards, and include a personalized list they feel should be added to the classroom etiquette standards. Properly identify and correctly use basic computer functions, such as on/off, keyboard, modem, Microsoft office, Internet Browsers, and using a memory drive.

Develop basic skills (alpha numeric and symbol characters) in using keyboard using the touch system by completing an intensive hand placement course. Students must: •

• •

Demonstrate proper knowledge of posture and finger techniques for the alphanumeric keyboard. Properly use all rows of the keyboard. Show movement towards typing 15 wpm.

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Sadeem Alhaqbani Unit Rationale - Cells This fourth grade unit plan is designed to aid students in developing understanding of cells. Students need to learn cells to know that all living things made up of cells. Combination of vocabulary (parts of cells) might be difficult for 4th grade since they had never touched in the earlier grades. Students will be looking into what is a cell? The parts of cells and basic structure of plant and animal cells, how each part of cells does? , and how they look like? Students need to be provided with some activities such as power cells vocabulary activities (matching, memory game, new word cards) to enhance their learning and make it easier. Knowledge of cells is very significant to know because cells are the basic unit in everybody and everything living. Students should learn about cells since it is the smallest unit of everything (human, animal, plant). Therefore, when they have the basic and they can learn the details and move forward deeply in the upper levels. Studying and understanding cells in science is a learning expectation covered under Tennessee Science Standard 1.0 GLE 0407.1.1 Recognize that cells are the building blocks of all living things.

PresentMe: http://present.me/view/162814-­‐tellemin10template-­‐cells Jing Tutorial: http://www.screencast.com/t/RZAjTXWyif

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ASSURE Lesson Plan Cell Parts Name: Sadeem Alhaqbani

Subject Area(s): Science

Duration of Lesson: 1 hour

Grade Level: 4th Grade

Analyze learners

● The total number of students of this class is 18 composed of 10 girls and 8 boys. ● The age range of the students is between 9 to 10 years old ● Five of the students are international, which encompass a challenge towards language proficiency. The rest of the students appear to have excellent language proficiencies particularly in terms of academic and conversational English. ● The previous learning experience of the students in science and anatomy lessons can be attributed to the prior knowledge that can be shared to the current lesson on cells. Reviewing the past lessons that the students took in their science class will help identify the level of knowledge that students have about cell structure and function. ● Two of the students need special consideration. These two students are having difficulty in terms of sight, which requires providing them with materials in braille. ● The students come from various social and ethnic backgrounds. Since there is a mix of cultural background among the student’s, it is imperative to have an effective delivery of the lesson considering the language challenges. ● With regards to the student’s current knowledge about the lesson objectives, it appears that the students know how to read flashcards and use supplemental materials such as the visual aid.

*The Common Core Standards under Tennessee Science Standard 1. GLE State & NETS*S objectives

0407.1.1 Recognize that cells are the building blocks of all living things. * The Technological standard is Communication and Collaboration.

Behavioral Objective: The students’ learning outcome is the understanding of the cellular structure and function wherein the students are able to identify, compare, and give examples of cell types. It can be demonstrated by observing how the students participate and 126


give insights during the discussion. Language Objective: ● Key vocabulary words belong to parts of the cell namely chloroplast, cell wall, cytoplasm, membrane, mitochondria, nucleus, and vacuole. ● The students express their understanding by naming each part in the worksheet. ● Linguistic forms: in terms of phrases and word use, the students will use less complex words and sentence to enable them to communicate their ideas easily. ● One of the opportunities that can be provided to students is to practice language and develop fluency by instructing them the activities on the worksheet. Select instructional methods, media, and materials

Technological materials ● United Streaming video. Magic School Bus Goes Cellular. (2014, January 3). YouTube. Retrieved April 29, 2014, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D3C1qnIdC98 ● Computer. ● Internet access. ●

Projector.

● 3D simulation. (n.d.). Retrieved April 29, 2014, from http://www.forgefx.com/casestudies/prenticehall/ph/cells/cells.htm) Curricular materials ● Workbook. ● Paper. ● Pencils. ● Modeling clay. Utilize media and materials

• • •

The video will provide an introductory knowledge about cells, its parts and functions. The workbook will be used to test the student’s knowledge about cell parts based from the presented video. The students will use the modeling clay to recreate the parts of the cell 127


and put them in the individual charts The 3D simulation will be used in the discussion as the visual aid while discussing function.

• Require learner participation

1. 2. 3. 4.

Watch the video Complete the workbook Listen to the discussion about cell parts and function Use the modeling clay to recreate the parts of the cell, place them in an individual chart, and provide labels to each part.

Evaluate and revise

Rubric

Student Name:

________________________________________

CATEGORY

4

3

2

1

Attractiveness

The chart is exceptionally attractive in terms of design, layout, and neatness.

The chart is attractive in terms of design, layout and neatness.

The chart is acceptably attractive though it may be a bit messy.

The chart is distractingly messy or very poorly designed. It is not attractive.

Labels

All items of importance on the chart are clearly labeled with labels that can be read from at least 3 ft. away.

Almost all items of importance on the chart are clearly labeled with labels that can be read from at least 3 ft. away.

Several items of importance on the chart are clearly labeled with labels that can be read from at least 3 ft. away.

Labels are too small to view OR no important items were labeled.

Knowledge Gained

Student can accurately answer all questions related to facts in the poster and

Student can accurately answer most questions related to facts in the chart and

Student can accurately answer about 75% of questions related to facts in the

Student appears to have insufficient knowledge about the facts or 128


processes used to create the chart.

processes used to create the chart.

chart and processes used to create the chart.

processes used in the chart.

Formative Assessment (Process): ●

Determining whether the students are learning from the discussion by checking the outcome of their work in the worksheet versus the outcome of responses on the chart modeling.

If the student showed errors in identifying cell parts in the worksheet, the completed chart would be checked to see if the students were able to get the errors right.

Monitoring student learning involves checking their work during the process of completing the workbook and chart. The outcome of the workbook in particular would be a guide that will determine the instruction strategy.

The students are expected to demonstrate active participation and cooperation from the given activities.

Taking notes will be the strategies that will be used to record student observations

The outcome of the chart activity will determine if the students have learned enough from the lesson

The students will be given feedbacks by correcting the wrong items in the chart and providing marks to their work. Recommended readings will be used as well to reinforce learning.

This methods will be used in the learning objectives and identify ineffective approach and change them in the future lessons

Summative Assessment (Product): ●

The charts will indicate what the students have learned from the discussion and providing a mark on the chart that each student created provides the outcome measure of the lesson.

Proving grading marks indicates what the students have achieved in the lesson

The assessment allows the students to show what they learned based on the items that most students got correctly and the number of mistakes.

Modifying the assessment would mean providing alternative such a short quiz.

Allowing the students to create their model of cell parts enables them to reflect on what they have learned from the lesson. 129


â—?

The evaluative criteria that will measure student proficiency will consist of accuracy in replicating the cell parts using the modeling clay, responses from the worksheet, participation from the discussion, accuracy in identifying cell parts based on the describe function.

â—?

This goal is to teach students about the parts of the cell and its function. The assumption provides such information, and the ability of the students to identify cell parts during the chart completion indicates that meeting the objective.

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A webQuest for 4th grade Designed by Sadeem Alhaqbani (sadoom1406@gmail.com) Based on the state of Tennessee curriculum standards for Fourth grade Science 1. GLE 0407.1.1 Recognize that cells are the building blocks of all living things. Introduction

Task

Process

Evaluation

Conclusion

Credits

Introduction 131


4th graders it is time to take an amazing journey through Cells. The first stop you will identify what are they? Then, you will learn what are they made of? Finally, you will end your journey by learning what do they do and how do they work? This journey will hopefully help you to gain a better understanding of Cells which is the building blocks of all life! Good luck and happy journeyJ!!

Task As a fourth grade explorer you will now start your journey through Cells. On your way, you will learn about cell structure and cell parts. During your journey you will be asked to create your own poster about cells. The poster must contain at least five facts, interesting information in each organelle (cell parts), and pictures of Cells. This task should be done in four days. To share the information which you have gathered in your trip, you will present your poster to your classmates. Your presentation should be organized very well and exciting.

BE CREATIVE!! J Please use correct spelling J

Make sure that your labels are clear J Enjoy your Cell poste J Get ready to... 5, 4, 3, 2, 1, 132


GO!! J

Process 4th grade discovers let's begin:

Day one of your journeyJ: You will research links provided below and get to know more about cells. Then, you need to gather important facts about cells. Important facts include basic knowledge such as what is a cell? How big is a cell? How does a cell look like? How many parts in a cell? However, facts that make the cell unique are important. At least five facts about the cell need to be found. Biology for kids This article introduces a cell, and simply explains the purpose of cells. Kids discover cells This website is designed as an electronic book, and it has five valuable pages includes pictures since it helps children to read and collect some pictures for cells. In this electronic book Kids Discover: Cells spells out these important tasks in fun and fascinating detail. It offers a lesson on what in cell? What cells do? How cells can work alone or together, and much more.

Day two of your journeyJ: In order to become experts on the cells, you have to look in deep and learn more about the function of cells from the video link provided below, and remember it is important to know the function of each part of the cell. BE FOCUSED AND TAKE SOME NOTES! Cell and its functions This video explains different cell structures and functions.

Day three of your journeyJ: Now you need to test your knowledge and use the information that you have gathered and found on this worksheet provided below 133


GRADE 4 CELLS WORKSHEET This worksheet will help students to review the information which they have learned knowledge of the cell and its organelles.

Day four of your journeyJ: Now, it is the time to find an interesting way to organize your information and create a poster of your CELL! Be creativeJ be sure to include at least five facts about cellsJuse picturesJuse correct spellingJuse clear labels .

If you have trouble remembering the information, this picture below will help you! Cell structure and functions This picture describes all the cell organelle structures and functions. Once you have finished Complete the poster, present your Cell Poster to your classmates

I hope you enjoyed your journey

Making A Poster : Cells  

 

Teacher Name: Mrs. ALHAQBANI

Student Name:

________________________________________

CATEGORY

4 Excellent

3 Good

2 Average

1 Needs work

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Knowledge Gained

Student can accurately answer all questions related to facts in the poster and processes used to create the poster.

Student can accurately answer most questions related to facts in the poster and processes used to create the poster.

Student can accurately answer about 75% of questions related to facts in the poster and processes used to create the poster.

Student appears to have insufficient knowledge about the facts or processes used in the poster.

Labels

All items of importance on the poster are clearly labeled with labels that can be read from at least 3 ft. away.

Almost all items of importance on the poster are clearly labeled with labels that can be read from at least 3 ft. away.

Several items of importance on the poster are clearly labeled with labels that can be read from at least 3 ft. away.

Labels are too small to view OR no important items were labeled.

Attractiveness

The poster is exceptionally attractive in terms of design, layout, and neatness.

The poster is attractive in terms of design, layout and neatness.

The poster is acceptably attractive though it may be a bit messy.

The poster is distractingly messy or very poorly designed. It is not attractive.

Presentation

The poster was exciting. The cell model was very well organized. Excellent research and organization.

The poster was appropriate. The cell model was well organized. Appropriate research and organization

The poster had some organized information. The cell model was not organized. Some research and organization

The poster was confusing to the audience. The cell model was not organized at all. Limited research and organization.

Spilling

No misspellings.

Fewer misspellings.

Three misspellings.

More than three misspellings.

Date Created: Apr 21, 2014 12:52 am (CDT)

SCORE____________

Conclusion 4th graders Congratulations!! You have completed your journey successfully, and you were able to help yourself to get all the significant information that are needed. Through this journey you should have learned a good base knowledge about Cells. 135


You should now be able to prepare yourself to learn more and more about Cells in the in future grades.

Credits Alhaqbani, S. (2014, April 21). Create a Poster: Cells. Created in Rubistar from http://rubistar.4teachers.org/index.php

Unknown. (2014, April 21). Cell picture. Retrieved , from http://classroom.jc-schools.net/sciunits/cells.htm

Unknown. (2014, April 21). Introduction picture. Retrieved , from http://www.sagta.org.uk/Introduction.html

Unknown. (2014, April 21). Task picture. Retrieved , from http://www.taskca.org/

Unknown. (2014, April 21). Process picture . Retrieved , from http://www.fastweb.com/collegesearch/articles/25-changing-colleges-handling-the-transfer-process

Unknown. (2014, April 21). Evaluation picture. Retrieved , from http://www.energyefficiencymatters.org/tag/evaluation/#

Unknown. (2014, April 21). Conclusion picture. Retrieved , from http://lowtestosteronecure.org/about-supplements/conclusion/

Unknown. (2014, April 21). Credits picture . Retrieved , from http://miniclip.wikia.com/wiki/File:Icon_credits.png

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Unit Media Share Cell function- Different Parts& their Function This video is animated cartoon video for kids. It easily teaches students to look at the cell structure. Also, it provides different parts called organelles, and their functions. This video is really splendid for early learner since it shows simple lecture to understand cells. This video offers a knowledge of cells which is essential for students in order to have the main concept of cells, and they can learn the details and move forward deeply in the upper levels. Makemegenius. (2013, April 21). Cell function- different parts& their function. [YouTube Video]. Retrieved on February, 23 2014 from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MfopLilIOeA iCell iCell is a beneficial application for early learner to recognize the parts and functions for each cell. It gives students a 3D view inside a cell. It has three categories of cell: Planet, Bacteria, and Animal. Students can use their fingers to select any part then zoom in to see the name, description, and function of each part in the cell. The goal of this application is to prepare children learn the main idea of cells, and help them to learn independently. HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology. (2013, September 11). iCell. [iTunes, Free] Retrieved on February, 23 2014 from https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=org.hudsonalpha.icell&hl=en. Kids Discover This website is designed as an electronic book, and it has five valuable pages since it helps children to read and learn cells. In this electronic book Kids Discover: Cells spells out these important tasks in fun and fascinating detail. It offers a lesson on what in cell? What cells do? How cells can work alone or together, and much more. Early learners will enjoy reading this information by this exiting method. Kids Discover. (n.d.). Cells. [Website]. Retrieved on February, 23 2014 from http://www.kidsdiscover.com/digital-sampler/

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Monae Henderson Unit Rationale - Multiplication In this fourth grade unit, we will be learning about multiplication in mathematics. Students need to learn multiplication because it is an essential building block of mathematics. Division, fractions, percentages, decimals, and algebra all require a solid foundation in multiplication. A student who has not mastered multiplication will have difficulty succeeding in mathematics beyond the fourth grade. The difficulties associated with the mastery of multiplication include the misinterpretation of what multiplication is (the group of sets, repeated addition) and the inability to memorize multiplication tables as a result of low working memory. Students will interpret a multiplication equation as a comparison. Students will review the commutative property with visual models to justify that seven groups of five is equivalent to five groups of seven. Students will represent verbal statements of multiplicative comparisons as multiplication equations. Students will learn how multiplication is a comparison by using number sentences e.g., how can seven times as many as five be written as a multiplication equation. Knowledge of multiplication is important for students to know because it is part of everyone’s daily life. Students may use multiplication while cooking as a result of a recipe for omelettes requiring that three times two eggs is needed to make three omelettes. Multiplication may also be used when a student is shopping to calculate the cost of an item with a percentage given. Future careers such as accounting, automotive mechanics, and culinary arts, all require the mastery of multiplication. Studying and understanding multiplication in mathematics is a learning expectation covered under Common Core State Standards for Mathematics 4.OA.A.1 138


CCSS.Math.Content.4.OA.A.1Interpret a multiplication equation as a comparison, e.g., interpret 35=5 x 7 as a statement that 35 is 5 times as many as 7 and 7 times as many as 5. Represent verbal statements of multiplicative comparisons as multiplication equations.

Present.Me: http://present.me/view/162838-­‐tellem-­‐in-­‐10 Jing tutorial:  http://www.screencast.com/t/eyOJTuVuv  

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Monae Henderson EDCI 6180-80 ASSURE Lesson Plan Fourth Grade- Mathematics Multiplication

A nalyze Learners General Characteristics The fourth grade class at Brighton Elementary School consists of a total of 16 students. Ten of the students are girls, while the remaining six are boys. The class is composed of four Caucasians, one Hispanic, and eleven African American students. Students are typically either 10-11 years of age during the sixth grade school year. There are a total of two students that have an IEP plan. One of the students has autism, which is assessed by an IEP team. The teacher has help from a special education teacher that comes in the general education setting during daily routines. The student also exits the room at certain periods to strictly work with the special education teacher. The other student has an IEP plan that is under a hearing impairment category with a cochlear implant. This student was born deaf, but received the cochlear implant at a younger age. This student has an IEP plan developed that requires a speaker at a desk. The speaker is required when the student has difficulty hearing the teacher. The student sits at the front of the room in order to help decrease the amount of speaker use. The teacher uses a hands free microphone when the speaker is required in class. The student is proficient with spoken and written language, since the disability was found in earlier academic development. Most of the students live in the city, while three live in a rural neighborhood. Up to ž of students have financial security that enables them to have supplies, food, and more. The remaining Ÿ of the students are on reduced or free lunch. Entry Competencies Curricular: Students will possess an understanding of number sense, such as decomposing numbers (35 is the same as 10 + 10 + 10 + 5 or 30 + 5) and the reasonableness of answers. Students will be able to identify place value, including writing numbers in expanded form to recognize grouping by place value. Students will understand the base ten number operations of addition. Technological: Students have been introduced to basic computer understanding that includes proficiency in the use of technology, basic skills (alpha numeric and special characters) in using a keyboard using the touch system, and the ability to key at a rate of 10 gross words per minute using the proper touch keying techniques.

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S tate Standards and Objectives Curricular Standards

Technology Standards

Interpret a multiplication equation as a comparison, e.g., interpret 35=5 x 7 as a statement that 35 is 5 times as many as 7 and 7 times as many as 5.Represent verbal statements of multiplicative comparisons as multiplication equations.

Creativity and innovation

Lesson Objectives Students will create a multiplication board game that will help students interpret a multiplication equation as a comparison.

S elect Strategies, Technology, Media, and Materials Curricular Materials • • • • • • • • • • • •

Mathematics Textbook Construction Paper Paint Markers Crayons Colored Pencils Pencils Glue Tape Scissors Collage Crafts 12 x 15-1/2” Manila ExtraHeavyweight Clasp Envelopes

Technology Materials • •

Computers with internet access Ordonez, A. “n.d.” The commutative property. [Video file] Retrieved April 26, 2014, from http://learnzillion.com/student/lessons/23 57-the-commutative-property Ordonez, A. “n.d.” Comparing numbers using bar models. [Video file] Retrieved April 26, 2014, from http://learnzillion.com/student/lessons/25 69-comparing-numbers-using-bar-models Ordonez, A. “n.d.” See multiplication as a comparison using number sentences. [Video file] Retrieved April 26, 2014, from http://learnzillion.com/student/lessons/25 43-see-multiplication-as-a-comparisonusing-number-sentences IXL Learning. (2014). D.2 Missing factors- facts to 12 [Online game] 141


Retrieved April 26, 2014, from http://www.ixl.com/math/grade4/missing-factors-facts-to-12 IXL Learning. (2014). D.7 Properties of multiplication [Online game] Retrieved April 26, 2014, from http://www.ixl.com/math/grade4/properties-of-multiplication Jimmie. (2009, August 11). Homemade Board Games. [Web log comment] Retrieved April 26, 2014, from http://heartofthematteronline.com/homem ade-board-games/

U tilize Technology, Media, and Materials Preview & Prepare Materials • • •

Review the WebQuest document to make sure that all hyperlinks are functioning properly. Make sure five computers are operating properly with internet access (four student computers and one teacher computer). Construction paper, paint, markers, crayons, colored pencils, pencils, glue, tape, scissors, and collage crafts (located in the white plastic bins labeled Multiplication Game Creation directly behind the teacher’s desk) have all been sorted according to the total number of groups and the selected members within the group. One textbook per student will be available (located on the first shelf of the bookcase.

Prepare the Environment •

Desks are arranged for lecture learning environment (no rearranging necessary).

Computers are set up along the back wall (no rearranging necessary)

Prepare the Learners •

Introduce the lesson to the students telling them they will perform a WebQuest that requires them to create the best multiplication board game that will help students interpret a multiplication equation as a comparison in order to be the winners of the Toys"R"Fun Company contest.

Explain to the students that all of the required information associated with the multiplication board game creation is provided within the WebQuest. 142


•

Express to students that assistance with the WebQuest will be provided upon request.

R equire Learner Participation Students will review multiplication facts and how to interpret the multiplication facts as an equation first. After the students have reviewed multiplication facts and how to interpret the multiplication facts as an equation, students will brainstorm with their selected group members the type of model that they want their game to have. Students can create a board game, card game, number cube game, or a flashcard game; for an example, Monopoly, Life, Sorry, Clue, Yahtzee, etc. Once students and their selected group members have developed the model for the game, they will then generate questions associated with interpreting a multiplication equation as a comparison and representing verbal statements of multiplicative comparisons as multiplication equations for the game. After students and their selected group members have generated the questions that will be associated with the game, they will generate the instructions and rules associated the game. Once students and their selected group members have generated the instructions and rules associated with the game, they will then perform a trial run by playing the game amongst each other. If a student or their selected group members happen to notice any changes that need to be made while performing the trail run they will do so immediately. After any necessary changes have be made (if any) students and their selected group members will submit the game to the Toys"R"Fun Company by placing all parts associated with the game in the self-addressed envelope provided and place the envelop in our schools mailbox located directed in front of the school by the flagpoles. Students will make sure that their name and their selected group members name, grade, and teacher's name is written on the space provided on the back of the envelope.

E valuate and Revise Assessing Learners Achievement The learners will be assessed on their abilities to successfully interpret a multiplication equation as a comparison. The teacher will determine any learning deficiencies within the process of interpreting a multiplication equation as a comparison and review the appropriate areas of concern. Upon the completion of the WebQuest, the learners will be assessed on their knowledge gained, accuracy of content, cooperative work, rules, and creativity using the following rubric:

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Making A Game : Toys"R"Fun Game Creation Teacher Name: Ms. Henderson Student Name:

CATEGORY

________________________________________

4

3

2

1

Knowledge Gained

All students in group could easily and correctly state several facts about the topic used for the game without looking at the game.

All students in the group could easily and correctly state 1-2 facts about the topic used for the game without looking at the game.

Most students in the group could easily and correctly state 12 facts about the topic used for the game without looking at the game.

Several students in the group could NOT correctly state facts about the topic used for the game without looking at the game.

Accuracy of Content

All information cards made for the game are correct.

All but one of the information cards made for the game are correct.

All but two of the information cards made for the game are correct.

Several information cards made for the game are not accurate.

The group generally worked well together with all members contributing some quality work.

The group worked fairly well together with all members contributing some work.

The group often did not work well together and the game appeared to be the work of only 1-2 students in the group.

Cooperative work The group worked

well together with all members contributing significant amounts of quality work.

Rules

Rules were written clearly enough that all could easily participate.

Rules were written, but one part of the game needed slightly more explanation.

Rules were written, The rules were not but people had some written. difficulty figuring out the game.

Creativity

The group put a lot of thought into making the game interesting and fun to play as shown by creative questions, game pieces and/or game board.

The group put some thought into making the game interesting and fun to play by using textures, fancy writing, and/or interesting characters.

The group tried to make the game interesting and fun, but some of the things made it harder to understand/enjoy the game.

Little thought was put into making the game interesting or fun.

Evaluating and Revising Strategies, Technology, and Media The teacher will determine if the review videos on interpreting a multiplication equation as a comparison aided the students in the mastery of the skill. The teacher will determine if the proper amount of time is allotted for the groups of four to create a game in one week and determine if and extension is necessary. The teacher will provide an actual model of a board game in reference to interpreting a multiplication equation as a comparison for students in need. 144


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READY, SET, GO!

Designed by: Monae Henderson

Based on the state of Tennessee curriculum standards for Fourth grade Mathematics:

CCSS. Math.Content. 4.OA.A.1 Interpret a multiplication equation as a comparison, e.g., Interpret 35 = 5 x 7 as a statement that 35 is 5 times as many as 7 and 7 times as many as 5. Represent verbal statements of multiplication comparisons as multiplication equations.

Introduction

Task

Process

Evaluation

Conclusion

Credits

Introduction Greetings my Fourth Grade Tigers! How cool would it be to learn a mathematical concept while having fun? The Toys "R" Fun Company wants to receive ideas for new multiplication games. What better way to receive these ideas from none other than students just like you! They have decided to have a contest for students in the fourth grade to see who can create the best multiplication game. Can you create a game that helps students interpret a multiplication equation as a comparison? Go for the challenge and enter now!

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Task ü

The five day plan of action associated with being the winners of the contest consists of you and your selected group members reviewing multiplication facts and how to interpret the multiplication facts as an equation first.

ü

After you and your selected group members have reviewed multiplication facts and how to interpret the multiplication facts as an equation, you and your selected group members will brainstorm the type of model that you all want your game to have. You and your selected group members can create a board game, card game, number cube game, or a flashcard game. For an example, think about your favorite game: Monopoly, Life, Sorry, Clue, Yahtzee, etc.

ü

Once you and your selected group members have developed the model for the game, you and your selected group members will then generate questions associated with interpreting a multiplication equation as a comparison and representing verbal statements of multiplicative comparisons as multiplication equations for the game.

ü

After you and your selected group members have generated the questions that will be associated with the game, you and your selected group members will generate the instructions and rules associated the game.

ü

Once you and your selected group members have generated the instructions and rules associated with the game, you will then perform a trial run by playing the game amongst each other.

ü

If you or your selected group members happen to notice any changes that need to be made while performing the trail run do so immediately.

ü

After any necessary changes have be made (if any) you and your selected group members will submit the game to the Toys"R"Fun Company by placing all parts associated with the game in the self-addressed envelope provided and place the envelop in our schools mailbox located directed in front of the school by the flagpoles.

ü

Make sure that you and your selected group members write your name, grade, and teacher's name on the space provided on the back of the envelope.

Process •

Day One You have been assigned to a selected group according to the color card that you received. Before you and your fellow group members create the contest winning game, you will first need to review interpreting multiplication as an equation and representing verbal statements of multiplicative comparisons as multiplication equations. The hyperlinks provided below will benefit you greatly in regards to this review.

The Commutative Property- In this lesson you will review the Commutative Property of Multiplication by using visual models. Comparing numbers using bar models- In this lesson you review how to compare numbers by using bar models and the phrase “times as many”. See multiplication as a comparison using number sentences- In this lesson you will review how multiplication is a comparison by using number sentences. Missing Factors- You will identify the missing factors for numbers 0-12 while performing this review. Properties of Multiplication- You will identify the properties of multiplication while performing this review. •

Day Two Upon the reviewing of interpreting multiplication as an equation and representing verbal statements of multiplicative comparisons as multiplication equations, you and your selected group members will gather at 147


the table with the colored construction paper according to the color card you received yesterday. You and your selected group members will then brainstorm the type of model you all want your game to have and how you all want the game to look. The construction paper, paint, markers, crayons, colored pencils, pencils, glue, tape, scissors, and collage crafts placed on each of the assigned tables will further assist you with this development along with the hyperlink listed below. Homemade Board Games- This website will provide you with information on how to create your games, sources for free online game board templates, and materials you may consider using as your creation takes place.

Day Three Upon you and your selected group members developing the model for your game and deciding on how you all want the game to look, you and your selected group members will gather at your assigned table according to the color card you received on Monday. You and your selected group members will then generate questions associated with interpreting a multiplication equation as a comparison and representing verbal statements of multiplicative equations for the game. You may refer back to any of the hyperlinks listed under Day 1 to assist you with this aspect. Your Mathematics textbook will also provide you with questions associated with CCSS.Math.Content.4.OA.1

Day Four 1.

Upon you and your selected group members generating the question associated with your game, you and your selected group members will gather at your assigned table according to the color card you received on Monday.

2.

You and your selected group members will then generate the instructions and rules for your game.

3.

Once you and your selected group members have generated the instructions and rules for your game, you will then play your game amongst each other.

4.

If you happen to notice any changes that need to be made while performing your trail run do so immediately.

5.

After those changes (if any) have been made, your game will be ready for contest submission.

Day Five Congratulations my Fourth Grade Tigers, you have successfully met all of the necessary requirements in hopes to have created the winning game and your game is now ready for submission! Before you and your selected group members enclose the self-addressed envelope to the Toys"R"Fun Company provided, you will play your classmates games. Each group will rotate amongst the game stations until each group has played each game. As each group has played every game, I will be conducting group interviews regarding the creation of your game.

Evaluation Making A Game : Toys"R"Fun Game Creation

Teacher Name: Ms. Henderson

148


Student Name:

CATEGORY

________________________________________

4

3

2

1

Knowledge Gained

All students in group could easily and correctly state several facts about the topic used for the game without looking at the game.

All students in the group could easily and correctly state 12 facts about the topic used for the game without looking at the game.

Most students in the group could easily and correctly state 12 facts about the topic used for the game without looking at the game.

Several students in the group could NOT correctly state facts about the topic used for the game without looking at the game.

Accuracy of Content

All information cards All but one of the made for the game information cards are correct. made for the game are correct.

All but two of the information cards made for the game are correct.

Several information cards made for the game are not accurate.

The group generally worked well together with all members contributing some quality work.

The group worked fairly well together with all members contributing some work.

The group often did not work well together and the game appeared to be the work of only 1-2 students in the group.

Cooperative work The group worked well together with all members contributing significant amounts of quality work.

Rules

Rules were written clearly enough that all could easily participate.

Rules were written, but one part of the game needed slightly more explanation.

Rules were written, The rules were not but people had some written. difficulty figuring out the game.

Creativity

The group put a lot of thought into making the game interesting and fun to play as shown by creative questions, game pieces and/or game board.

The group put some thought into making the game interesting and fun to play by using textures, fancy writing, and/or interesting characters.

The group tried to make the game interesting and fun, but some of the things made it harder to understand/enjoy the game.

Little thought was put into making the game interesting or fun.

Conclusion Upon you adhering to all of the guidelines listed in the Task portion of this WebQuest and successfully submitting your multiplication game, the Toys"R"Fun Company will be notifying me within two weeks with the announcement of the winner. I would like to applaud each of you for the completion of this WebQuest. You have worked diligently on the mastery of interpreting multiplication equations as a comparison and representing verbal statements of multiplicative comparisons as multiplication equations. Good luck and I wish each and every one of you the best!

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Credits Henderson, M. (2014, April 21). RubiStar Home - 4teachers.org. Making a Game: Toys"R"Fun Game Creation. Retrieved from http://rubistar.4teachers.org

Lloyd.M. (2014, April 21). Laughing Stock- Stock Illustrations and Assignments. Ready, Set, Go picture. Retrieved from http://www.laughingstock.com/index.php?module=media&pId=102&id=4249&category=gallery/ML&start=0/

Unknown. (2014, April 21). Clipboard and pencil picture. Retrieved from http://redroom.com/member/henrymosquera/media/images/clipart-pencil-checklistjpg-0

Unknown. (2014, April 21). Smiley face thinking picture. Retrieved from http://www.clipartbest.com/clipart9izqoL5iE

Unknown. (2014, April 21). Evaluation picture. Retrieved from http://www.canstockphoto.com/illustration/evaluation.html#file_view.php?id=9425708

Unknown. (2014, April 21). Running to the finish line picture. Retrieved from http://www.questgarden.com/22/68/9/060417151700/conclusion.htm

Unknown. (2014, April 21). Mac book picture. Retrieved from http://www.vectors4all.net/vectors/laptop-imac-clipart

Unknown. (2014, April 21). Announcing lady picture. Retrieved from http://bluecat50.sharepoint.com/Pages/BLUCATBULLETIN.aspx

Unknown. (2014, April 21). Multiplication board game picture. Retrieved from http://www.learn-with-mathgames.com/multiplication-facts-games.html

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Unit Media Share AplusMath Aplusmath.com provides interactive math activities to help students improve their math skills. This website features free math worksheets, math games, math flashcards, and homework help. This website compliments Common Core State Standard 4.OA.A1- interpret a multiplication equation as a comparison, e.g., interpret 35=5 x 7 as a statement that 35 is 5 times as many as 7 and 7 times as many as 5. The mastery of standard 4.OA.A1 is reinforced through the various interactive multiplication games provided. Matho (Multiplication Bingo) allows students to choose their game type (addition, subtraction, multiplication, or division) and level of difficulty (easy, medium, or hard). Students compete against time as a timer initiates the game. Once students complete the game they are provided the opportunity to enter their initials and their score is displayed and ranked amongst student their age from all over the world. Fourth grade students will enjoy becoming proficient at interpreting multiplication as a comparison in this fun, exciting, and competitive way. Parents, teachers, and students will find that Aplusmath.com is one of the top math websites in the world as a result of the many useful resources. Aplus Math. (1998). Matho Multiplication Bingo. [Website]. Retrieved on February 22, 2014 http://www.aplusmath.com/Games/matho/Matho.html

Math Circus Math Circus provides an entertaining, yet thorough introduction to multiplication. Children are guided through the Multiplication Circus by a host named Stephanie along with her friends. Once a child selects a factor the journey through the Multiplication Circus begins. Difficulty associated with the mastery of multiplication includes the misinterpretation of what multiplication is. Under the subheading titled “What is multiplication?” engaging models display that multiplication is a shortcut for repeated addition or skip counting, which facilitates the previously mentioned difficulty immensely. Under the subheading titled “Properties and Vocabulary”, Common Core State Standard Math.Content.4OA.A.1 is supported with a comprehensive engaging model of interpreting a multiplication equation as a comparison. This specific comparison is referred to as “turn around numbers” on Math Circus. This application is compatible with iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch, and requires iOS 4.2 or later. CSL Associates, Inc. December 11, 2010. Math Circus. (Version 0.1). [iTunes, Free]. Retrieved on February 22, 2014 from https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/mathcircus/id407115296?mt=8 151


See multiplication as a comparison using number sentences See multiplication as a comparison using number sentences is a beneficial resource for teaching students how to interpret multiplication as a comparison and represent verbal statements of multiplicative comparisons as multiplication equations. This video teaches students how to think about multiplication as a comparison. Interpreting that multiplication is a comparison, is an important skill that students must learn in order to recognize that any two factors and their products can be read as a comparison (e.g., 8 is the same as 4 sets of 2 or 2 sets of 4; 8 is 4 times as many as 2, or 2 times as many as 4). Interpreting multiplication as a comparison includes making a comparison that 5 groups of 7 is the same as 7 groups of 5, analyzing from this comparison that both products are 35, and understanding that this representation illustrates the commutative property. Although See multiplication as a comparison using number sentences is a skilled geared towards fourth grade, it could easily be modified to support kindergarten through third grade; establishing the opportunity of interpreting multiplication as a comparison to be mastered antecedently. Ordonez, A. “n.d.� See multiplication as a comparison using number sentences. [Video file] Retrieved February 22, 2014, from http://learnzillion.com/lessons/2543-see-multiplicationas-a-comparison-using-number-sentences

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Crystal A. deGregory Technology Action Plan Grade 5 General Level Achievement (Lowest Need for Teacher Assistance)

Objectives Standard 6.0 Students will utilize technology problem-solving and decisionmaking tools. Learning Expectations 6.1 Students will use technology resources for solving problems and making informed decisions. 6.2 Students will employ technology in the development of strategies for solving problems in the real world. 6.3 Students use critical thinking skills to plan and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems, and make informed decisions using appropriate digital tools and resources.

ISTE-Student Standard 4. Critical thinking, problem solving, and decision making

Specific Strategies Students will: Use technology resources for solving problems and making informed decisions by using software programs such as Powerpoint with audio, video, and graphics to enhance learning experiences. Employ technology in the development of strategies for solving problems in the real world by using interactive technology environments, such as simulations, electronic science or mathematics laboratories, virtual museum field trips, or online interactive lessons, to extend learning. Collect and analyze data to identify solutions and/or make informed decisions by determining which technology is useful and select the appropriate tool(s) and technology resources to address a 153


variety of tasks and problems.

Recognition

Standard 4.0 Students will use technology communications tools. Learning Expectations

1.Creativity and Innovation 2. Communication and Collaboration

4.1 Students will use telecommunications to collaborate, publish, and interact with peers, experts, and other audiences.

Students will: Use telecommunications to collaborate, publish, and interact with peers, experts, and other audiences by using communication tools such as Google Docs to participate in projects. Use a variety of media and formats to communicate

4.2 Students will use a variety of media and formats to communicate

information and ideas effectively to multiple audiences by using appropriate applications, including, but not limited to spreadsheets and databases to develop charts and graphs by using data from

information and ideas effectively to multiple audiences. 4.3 Students will use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others.

various sources such as Google Sheets. Communicate information and ideas effectively to multiple audiences using a variety of media and formats by using presentations platforms such as Prezi.

Belongingnes Standard 2.0 s Students will understand the importance of social, ethical, and human issues associated with technology.

5. Digital Citizenship

Students will: Understand the ethical, cultural, and societal issues related to technology by 154


recognizing the need for equal access to materials and resources.

Learning Expectations 2.1 Students will understand the ethical, cultural, and societal issues related to

Practice responsible use of technology systems, information, and software by adhering to software licensing agreements and respect the electronic work of other individuals; practicing and respecting the copyright laws and accurately record information

technology. 2.2 Students will practice responsible use of technology systems, information, and software. 2.3 Students will develop positive attitudes toward technology uses that support lifelong learning, collaboration, personal pursuits, and productivity.

source; and by knowing and using rules of “Netiquette.� Develop positive attitudes toward technology uses that support lifelong learning, collaboration, personal pursuits, and productivity by analyzing the advantages and disadvantages of the use of technology with respect to personal safety, ethics, and efficiency.

Security and Safety

Standard 5.0 Students will select and use appropriate technology research tools. Learning Expectations 5.1 Students will use technology to locate, evaluate, and collect information from a variety of sources. 5.2 Students will use technology tools to process data and report results.

5. Digital Citizenship 3. Research and Information Fluency

Students will: Use technology to locate, evaluate, and collect information from a variety of sources by performing simple searches to acquire information such as text, audio, video, graphics, and online help, using CDROM and online databases. 155


5.3 Students will evaluate and select new information resources and

Use technology tools to process data and report results by creating an outline for a report using information from resources and reference sources.

technological innovations based on the appropriateness for specific tasks.

Evaluate and select new information resources and technological innovations based on the appropriateness for specific tasks by distinguishing between statements of fact and opinion.

Physiological Needs (Highest Need for Teacher Assistance)

Standard 1.0 Students will understand basic operations and concepts of technology. Learning Expectations 1.1 Students will demonstrate an understanding of the nature and operation of technology systems. 1.2 Students will exhibit a proficiency in the use of technology. 1.3 Students will continue development of and master basic skills (alpha numeric and special characters) for using the touch.

6. Technology Operations and Concepts

Students will: Demonstrate an understanding of the nature and operation of technology systems by using and applying appropriate computer terminology. Exhibit a proficiency in the use of technology by developing skills in using function keys and keyboard short cuts. Develop basic skills (alpha numeric and symbol characters) in using keyboard using the touch system by typing at a rate of 20 gross words per 156


minute (GWAM) for a 2 minute straight copy timed writing.

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Maram Alghamdi Unit Rationale -Conventions of Writing: Capitalization, Punctuations, and Spelling In this fifth grade unit, we will be learning about conventions of Standard English in language. Students need to learn the conventions of Standard English to be able to use it in their future study plan and career. Students will be looking in how these conventions of Standard English will be used in different ways of writing. Students will see how they can change the structures of sentences by adding these conventions. Students will be provided with different activities to see exactly how these things can be used such as, asking them to fill the blank with an appropriate conventions, changing the structure of sentences by adding these conventions, asking them when would these conventions be used in an appropriate ways. Knowledge of conventions of Standard English is important to be learned because it is an important part of the students’ study life and their future career. Also, it is important for students to move on to other levels in their study life to learn these conventions of Standard English.

Studying and understanding conventions of Standard English in language is learning expectation covered under Common Core State Standards. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.5.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

Present.Me: http://present.me/view/163176-­‐alghamditellemin10 Screencast Tutorial: http://www.screencast.com/t/M3R2pppUjITp  

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ASSURE Lesson Plan Fifth Grade- English Name: Maram Alghamdi Subject Area: Punctuation

A nalyze Learners General Characteristics

This fifth grade class at Wonderland Magnet School for the Arts and Sciences in Los Angeles, California consists of 26 students. Of the 26 students, 14 are male and 12 are female, all of which are bussed up the canyon from the surrounding San Fernando Valley. The students’ ages range from nine- to eleven-years of age. The students’ ethnic and racial backgrounds are relatively diverse, with the classroom being composed of three Hispanics/Latinos (Mexican, Peruvian, Guatemalan), seven Caucasians, eight African Americans/Blacks, and seven Asians (three Koreans, one Japanese and two Asian Indians). Most students belong to families of middle socio-economic status (a few of which border on high SES), and five students fall into the low SES classification and receive free or reduced lunch. Four students live in linguistically isolated homes in which their parents only speak in their native language, however all students are proficient in English, except for one who is an English Language Learner (ELL). The one ELL is incredibly advanced. Approximately half the students come from divorced parents and one student comes from a family with two fathers. Most of the students come from families in which both parents work at least one full time job, but all students’ parents seem to be whole-heartedly invested in their child’s education and they try to be as involved as possible. With the exception of two students (one well above and one a little below), all students read at least at grade level. One student has Autism and has an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) in which paraprofessional support is provided for the student throughout the day. The student’s IEP mostly focuses on aiding social development.

Entry Competencies

Curricular: Expect learners to write and read in a proficiency range.

Technological: Expect learners to have a general knowledge in using computer and its peripherals such as, keyboard, mouse, printer. Also, able to search on the Internet; have some keyboard skills, able to use Microsoft Word. 159


S tate Standards and Objectives Curricular Standard

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.5.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

Technology Standard

Creativity and Innovation.

Lesson Objectives

The learners will create a persuasive letter in any topic using each punctuation mark and capitalization correctly and effectively in order to demonstrate command of the convention of Standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

S elect Strategies, Technology, Media, and Materials Curricular Materials

English book Papers Pencils Colors 160


Technology Materials

Computers with Internet access Microsoft Word Projector Screen Speaker

U tilize Technology, Media, and Materials Preview and Prepare Materials

• • • • • • • • •

One English book for each student available. Papers available for students. Pencils are available. Colors are available. Make sure the computers are working with Internet access. (One for teacher and 6 student computers). Make sure projector is working properly. Make sure screen is working. Make sure speakers are working properly. Make sure the students’ computers have Microsoft Word.

Prepare the Environment

• • • •

Desks are arranged for lecture learning environment. Computers are set along back wall. Screen is located in a place that allows each student to see it well. Speakers are located in places that allow all students to hear it.

Prepare the Learners

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• •

Introduce the lesson to the students telling them that they will watch a YouTube video about punctuation, answer some questions from their book, taking an online quiz, creating a creative paper about each punctuation definition and examples, and creating a letter using each punctuation and capitalization correctly. Explaining to the students how learning punctuation marks is very important in English writing. Explaining to the students how learning punctuation marks now will help them a lot in their higher academic writing skills.

R equire Learner Participation • •

• •

The teacher will review the lesson on punctuation marks and the learners will follow in their English books. The teacher will give some examples of how and when to use punctuation on the whiteboard and the teacher will ask the learners to participate by let them provide some examples to make sure the learners understand it. Then learners will watch a YouTube video on punctuation. Next, the learners will take an online quiz Punctuation quiz and their answers will be checked online in seconds. After completing the quiz, the teacher will go over it and any questions about the quiz will be answered at that time. For homework, the learners will create a creative and colorful paper that must have: the definition of each punctuation mark and an example of how to use it. The teacher will collect these papers next class for a homework grade.

The learners will be placed into groups of four and each group will create a persuasive letter in a topic of their choice. In the letter, the learners must use each punctuation mark and capitalization correctly using Microsoft Word. Each group will bring their letter to the class on Monday.

E valuate and Revise Assessing Learner Achievement

The learners will be assessed on their ability in using punctuation mark effectively through quiz, assignment, etc. The teacher will determine any low skills in using punctuation marks correctly, and then will review the areas of concern.

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The learners will be assessed on their ability in using punctuation marks correctly in writing through writing the letter.

The learners will be assessed using the following rubric:

CATEGORY

1

2

3

Knowledge Gained

Learner has little knowledge about punctuation.

Learner has most knowledge about punctuation.

Learner has all the knowledge about punctuation.

Paper

The paper is missing many elements and is not creative.

The paper has most of The paper has all the elements and in elements and is somewhat creative. creative.

Letter

Letter is poorly done and missing many punctuation.

Letter is somewhat good and uses each punctuation mark.

Letter is greatly done and uses each punctuation mark.

Evaluating and Revising Strategies, Technology, and Media

The teacher will determine if writing a letter using punctuation mark has aided the learners in using punctuation marks effectively by asking them some questions after reading the letters.

The teacher will determine if three days to complete the lesson for groups of four are appropriate. Also the teacher will ask the learners if they have any difficult to came up with letter ideas and provide some examples.

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Punctuation Marks

Designed by: Maram Alghamdi

Based on the Common Core State Standards for Fifth Grade English:

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.5.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

Introduction

Task

Process

Evaluation

Conclusion

Credits

Introduction

Greetings Fifth Grade Class! By finishing this lesson, you will understand the different uses and rules about punctuation marks. You will know how and when to use each punctuation mark effectively and correctly. This lesson involves YouTube video, online quiz, creating a creative paper about punctuation, and finally writing a letter for me using punctuation marks. You have three days to complete this lesson.

Task 164


You will learn how correctly use the different kinds of punctuation marks: comma, colon, semicolon, question mark…etc. You have three days to finish the following task: Ø

You will watch a YouTube video about how and when to use each punctuation mark.

Ø

You will then take an online quiz about punctuation marks.

Ø

You will create a creative paper contain a definition and example for each punctuation mark.

Ø

Finally, you will break into group of three. Each group will write a persuasive letter for me in any topic using each punctuation mark and please remember to use capitalization correctly.

Process

Day 1

Ø

Your first step to accomplish this lesson is watching a YouTube video about punctuation marks. This video contains the important of each punctuation mark and when to use each one with an example. The YouTube video can be found here: Punctuations

Ø

Next, take the following online punctuations quiz. After finishing the quiz your answers will be checked in seconds. The online quiz can be found here: Punctuation quiz Day 2

You will create a creative paper that must have: the definition of each punctuation mark and an example of how to use it, make the paper colorful, creative, and clear, write your name and date.

Day 3

Finally, You will break into group of three. Then each group will create a persuasive letter in a topic of your choice. In the letter you must use each punctuation mark correctly and remember to use capitalization correctly.

Evaluation

• Teacher Name: Ms. Alghamdi Student Name: CATEGORY

________________________________________ Beginning 1

Developing 2

Very Good 3

Exemplary 4 165


Knowledge Gained

Several students in the classroom appear to have little knowledge about the lesson.

Students appear to have developing knowledge about the lesson.

Students appear to have most knowledge about the lesson.

Students appear to have all the knowledge about the lesson.

Paper

The paper is missing many elements and is not creative.

The paper has some elements and somewhat is creative.

The paper has most of the elements and mostly creative.

The paper has all elements and is creative.

Letter

Letter is poorly done.

Letter is missing some punctuation marks.

Letter is somewhat good and uses each punctuation mark.

Letter is greatly done and uses each punctuation mark.

Capitalization and Punctuation

Writer makes more than 4 errors in capitalization and punctuation.

Writer makes 3-4 errors in capitalization and punctuation.

Writer makes 1-2 errors in capitalization and punctuation.

Writer makes no errors in capitalization and punctuation.

Conclusion

Congratulation Fifth Grade Class! You have completed the lesson! By completing this lesson, you should have learned how to use the different kinds of punctuation marks correctly and effectively.

Credits

Alghamdi, M. (2014, April 22). Scoring Rubric. Created from Rubistar http://rubistar.4teachers.org/index.php

Unknown. (2014, April 20). Conclusion picture. Retrieved from http://changingjournalism.wordpress.com/2011/05/11/conclusion/

Unknown. (2014, April 20). Credits picture. Retrieved from https://www.jaspersoft.com/store/learning-credits

Unknown. (2014, April 20). Evaluation picture. Retrieved from http://www.naplesnews.com/news/2013/feb/15/lee-teachers-receive-state-evaluation-results/

Unknown. (2014, April 20). Introduction picture. Retrieved from http://www.sagta.org.uk/Introduction.html

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Unknown. (2014, April 20). Process picture. Retrieved from http://creativityinabox.co.uk/ingredients/the-creative-process.html

Unknown. (2014, April 20). Punctuation Marks picture. Retrieved from http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Math-and-Punctuation-Peeps-Graphics-for PersonalCommercial-Use683839

Unknown. (2014, April 20). Task picture. Retrieved from http://portableapps.com/apps/office/task_coach_portable

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Unit Media Share English Grammar- Punctuations English Grammar-Punctuations is an excellent resource in teaching students when and how to use the punctuations in right way and place. This video teaches the students what is the punctuations and why is important to use in writing. This video provides and teaches the punctuations using cartoon characters and fun way in showing the examples. Appuseries (Producers). (2011). English Grammar-Punctuations. [YouTube video]. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmXVhw67Euc

Language Arts – 5th Grade Lesson Plans This time4learning.come website titled “Language Arts- 5th grade lesson plans” offers language lessons for fifth grade students. This website is an online classes and it cost $19,95 per month. This website has a multimedia activities in language and it provides a detailed report about the student’s learning progress. Time4learning.com (2007). Language Arts-5th grade lesson plans [Website]. Retrieved from http://www.time4learning.com/Scope-Sequence/5th-language-arts.shtml

Punctuation & Capitalization [HD] Punctuation & Capitalization is a great app to help students to use a correct grammar and punctuation in their writing and avoid the mistake that can be annoying to readers. This app has a content that is easy to follow. Students can chose from the different topics that the app included such as, periods, commas, semicolons…etc. and learn about those different punctuation marks and how and when to use while writing and has over 400 examples. This app is compatible with iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch and requires iOS 4.3 or later. Digital Partners (Ottawa). (Aug 26, 2013). Punctuation & capitalization [iTunes $1.99] Retrieved from https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/punctuation-capitalization/id399194850?mt=8

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Crystal deGregory Unit Rationale – African American History In this fifth grade unit, we will be learning about plans and policies for Reconstruction and its subsequent successes and failures with special attention to the establishment of freedmen’s schools turned Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). Students need to learn things about Reconstruction and the establishment of freedmen’s schools to understand the importance of education as well as how history shapes the world in which we live. Students will be examining the educational plans of the Reconstruction period. They will explore the plans’ successes and failures as well as the reasons for them through examining the founding and early history of freedmen’s schools. Students will see for example, how Reconstruction policies led to the establishment of enduring black institutions including freedmen’s schools-turned-HBCUs. Students will be provided with different activities to identify these institutions via their distinguished alumni, including both historic and contemporary figures. Knowledge of Reconstruction and the educational institutions born of its policies is important for students to know because helps reinforce the importance of education and offers them an awareness of the educational opportunities HBCUs provide. In order for students to move on to other levels of science it is important for them to learn and understand that living things interact with one another and the environment. It is important that a new generation of students seek out HBCUs to provide them with educational opportunities in order for them to persist as viable educational centers for subsequent generations.

Understanding the plans and policies for Reconstruction and subsequent successes and failures 169


with special attention to the establishment of freedmen’s schools-turned-HBCUs is a learning expectation covered under Tennessee Science Standard 5.02. Era 5 - Civil War and Reconstruction (1850-1877) 5.02 Understand the plans and policies for Reconstruction and subsequent successes and failures. a. Identify components of the various plans for Reconstruction. b. Evaluate the successes and failures of Reconstruction plans. c. Decide the reasons for successes and failures of the various plans. d. Assess the lasting impact of the Civil War and Reconstruction.

Present.Me: http://present.me/view/163358-­‐hbcu-­‐powerpoint-­‐in-­‐10 Screenr tutorial: http://www.screenr.com/cldN  

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ASSURE Lesson Plan Template

HBCUs Name: Crystal A. deGregory Duration of Lesson: 50mins

Analyze learners

State & NETS*S objectives

Subject Area(s): African-American History Grade Level: Five

Located in Nashville, Tennessee, Excellence Academy private school features small class sizes of fifteen or less students. My class has fourteen students, nine of which are girls while five are boys. The students’ ages range from 11 to 12. They are all English language proficient and they have exhibited above average to exceptional conversational and academic English. Because of prior classroom exchanges, the students bring a working knowledge of American history during in the Civil War period, which easily lend themselves to understanding the naissance of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). There are no students with exceptional needs or who require special considerations. None of them have Individualized Educational Plans (IEPs) or 504 plans. The students represent a mostly middle class socio-economic background, and 80% are African American while the remaining 20% are Hispanic. While some students have a remote knowledge of these schools, most are completely unaware of their founding mission and contemporary purpose. It will be my burden as their teacher to convey the content and context in a comprehensively relatable way. Students already know how history effects their contemporary lives and will learn about higher education options that may best suit them. Students will utilize technology problem-solving and decisionmaking tools. • Students will use technology resources for solving problems and making informed decisions; • Students will employ technology in the development of strategies for solving problems in the real world; • Students use critical thinking skills to plan and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems, and make informed decisions using appropriate digital tools and resources. Behavioral Objective: 171


Given the HBCU Powerpoint in 10, the learners will create a list of all the HBCUs they can recall in class and begin their research projects in order to demonstrate critical thinking skills to plan and conduct research, manage projects. Language Objective: Students will be required to express their understanding of the historic context from which HBCUs emerge and convey their contemporary importance using the key vocabulary terms. Key vocabulary: slave, freedmen, freed person, college, the North and South, illiteracy, literacy, illegal, Civil War, Reconstruction, Freedmen’s Schools, Historically Black Colleges and Universities, American Baptist College, Fisk University, Meharry Medical College and Tennessee State University.

Select instructional methods, media, and materials

Students will be required to choose an HBCU for further study and present their choice to the instructor via Eyejot.

Students will be required to develop a research project based on an HBCU of their choice, to be presented to their classmates using Powerpoint.

Instructor needs: •

Internet-connected computer device

Projector and display screen

Powerpoint software

Student needs:

Utilize media and materials

Internet-connected computer device

Powerpoint software

Scrap Paper

Sharpened Pencil

Preview & Prepare Materials •

Scratch paper available for students if needed (located in recycle tray on top of bookcase)

Pencils are the responsibility of the student (extra pencils located in top desk drawer)

Make sure fifteen laptop computers connections are 172


operating properly with internet access (one teacher computer and fourteen student computers) •

Make sure projector is operating properly

Make sure screen is functioning properly

Make sure Powerpoint is operating properly

Make sure link to video is operating properly

Make sure internet connection is operating properly

Prepare the Environment •

Each desk should have on or more space for a student with laptop (no rearranging necessary).

Prepare the Student • •

Require learner participation

Evaluate and revise

Explain to the students how the Civil War and Reconstruction period was important in American history. Explain how familiarity with HBCUs will give them better options for college.

Students must set-up their laptops at their desks.

Make sure internet connection is operating properly

Close their laptops.

Watch the Powerpoint presentation.

Participate in the presentation activities.

We directed to do so, open their laptops and begin their research.

Formative Assessment (Process): Learners will demonstrate that they are working towards their research goals by creating a 3-5 minute Eyejot message conveying their HBCU research paper choice and what they have learned for approval to proceed with the larger project. The instructor will provide individualized feedback via Eyejot to each student to help him/her in the research process. Summative Assessment (Product): The instructor will determine if the Powerpoint on HBCUs aided the students in understanding the context and content of HBCUs during the Civil War and Reconstruction by asking them questions after the Powerpoint is over before they do their in-class research. The teacher will also require learners to answer these questions in their 173


Eyejot presentations. The instructor will determine if the Powerpoint on HBCUs gave learners an understanding of the contemporary importance of HBCUs given their Powerpoint research presentations using the following rubric: POWER POINT GRADING RUBRIC: Compone nt

5 points

3 points

1 point

Total

Accurate and complete Information Informati informati is on gaps on is incomplete Informatio and ___ presente ; logical n lengthy d in a sequence text are concise, is not evident logical evident sequenc e

Backgrou nd and text complime nt each other; Backgroun easy to d & Text read, consistent throughou t the presentati on

Backgro und is not consisten t througho ut the presenta tion; text size and color change with each slide

Text cannot be read on selected backgroun d; text size ___ and color make it difficult to focus on information

Commen ts

___

___

174


Graphics are appropriat e and relate to Graphics content; & transitions Transitions are consistent throughou t the presentati on

Few graphics are utilized througho ut the presenta tion, they do not relate to the topic; transition s are not consisten t or effective

Little or no attempt was made ___ to utilize graphics or transitions

___

A complete d and accurate bibliograp Bibliograp hy is hy included at the conclusion of the presentati on

Bibliogra A phy is bibliograph included y is not , included ___ notation within the mistakes presentatio are n evident

___

Spell check has Spelling, been Punctuatio utilized n& Grammar throughou t the presentati

Several spelling mistakes occur througho ut the presenta

___

Spelling mistakes occur throughout ___ the entire presentatio n, standard

175


on; tion; a grammar correct few usage is grammar gramma not evident is evident r mistakes are present

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Jennifer Heater-Knight Unit Rationale – Tennessee History In this fifth grade unit, we will be learning about the state of Tennessee, the state in which we live. Students need to learn how people in Tennessee lived in the past and how those people have influenced our state today. Who and how did key people influence Tennessee? Students will learn and define relevant key terms and be introduced to using timelines which are used to document the year and description of important events. What were important words used in the past? How can using a timeline be beneficial to learning about historical events? Students need to be provided with different methods of learning about historical events. Knowledge of the state of Tennessee equips the students with information about the state in which they live. In order for students to properly take interest in other locations in the United States and the world, students must be knowledgeable about their current location, acquiring skills to use when studying additional locations. Studying and understanding the formative years of the state of Tennessee is a learning expectation covered under the Tennessee Social Studies Standard, Culture 1.0. Content Standard 1.03 Recognize the contributions of individuals and people of various ethnic, racial, religious, and socioeconomic groups to the development of civilization. Content Standard 1.04 Understand the contributions of individuals and people of various ethnic, racial, religious, and socioeconomic groups to Tennessee. Present.Me: http://present.me/view/163654-­‐tn-­‐history-­‐pp Screenr  Tutorial:  http://www.screenr.com/KXdN   177


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ASSURE Lesson Plan Tennessee History Name: Jennifer Knight Duration of Lesson: 2 Weeks

Analyze learners

Subject Area(s): Social Studies Grade Level: 5th Grade

The fifth grade Social Studies Class at Dalewood Elementary School is comprised of 18 students- 10 girls and 8 boys. Everyone in the class is either 10 or 11 years of age. Through an informal assessment, it was determined that the majority of the students are proficient when engaging in conversational English. Academic English was observed during classroom discussions, as being proficient for most of the students. Prior knowledge, skills and academic background indicated that 3 students scored advanced, 9 students proficient, and 6 students scored basic on the Tennessee Comprehensive Assessment Program in the 4th grade. All 18 students are of African American heritage. Of the 18 students, 1 student has a Speech/Language disorder in which his words are sometimes unintelligible. This student has an IEP in which he receives services from the Speech Pathologists 30mins. daily in the Special Education classroom. 15 of the students qualify for free and reduced lunch, which means that the majority of the students fall into the “Low Income� category. Most of the research needed for this project will be acquired during school hours in case there is no access to a computer at home. All students are computer literate, as computer class is required for all 5th graders.

State & NETS*S objectives

Content Standard 1.0 Studying and understanding the formative years of the state of Tennessee. ISTE Standard 3- Research and Information Fluency Students will apply digital tools to gather, evaluate and use information. Behavioral Objective:

179


Given the task of gathering specific information on Tennessee, the learners will be able to access websites, books etc. relevant to their section of the state, in order to demonstrate knowledge of the formative years of the state of Tennessee.

Language Objective: Students should be able to describe their section of Tennessee, naming specific locations on the map, natural boundaries, regional weather, important landforms, natural resources, important people, and position during the Civil War. Relevant terms include, but not limited to: Naming landforms such as the Cumberland Plateau, Smoky Mountains and Tennessee River Resources such as copper, iron, and granite Important people such as Daniel Boone, Native Americans, and Abraham Lincoln Academic language include using words such as landforms, minerals, natural resources. Linguistically students should be using terms such as South, to describe location, and Grand Divisions, to describe East Tennessee, Middle Tennessee, and West Tennessee. Opportunities provided include class discussions, virtual tours of different areas of Tennessee, guided reading in the textbook, and research using relevant websites.

Select instructional methods, media, and materials

Materials needed include the 5th grade Social Studies textbook, computer w/internet access, and projector/screen.

Utilize media

The Social Studies textbook will serve as a guide to the progression

Students will need pencils, individual composition notebook, textbook, and access to the computer lab/ lab teacher for 7 days, one hour during the Social Studies class period.

180


and materials

of knowledge acquisition. The teacher’s computer/projector/screen will be used to explain requirements for the project, virtual tours and prompts for class discussions. Students will need the Social Studies textbook for reading and/or visual prompts. Pencils and composition notebooks will be used for notes, and computer lab/teacher will be used for guidance/gathering information.

Require 1. Students will be divided into 3 groups learner 2. Each group will be responsible for researching specific participation information about their section of Tennessee 3. Each group will have designated days to do research in the computer lab 4. Each group will record an eyejot which will include specific information about their section of Tennessee 5. Each group will perform a song about Tennessee

Each group will be graded according to the amount of relevant information included in the eyejot. Evaluate and revise

CATEGORY Learning of Content

4

3

2

1

The student accurately describes important events, people, landforms, natural resources, and role in the Civil War as it pertains to Tennessee history.

The student accurately describes some important events, people, landforms, natural resources, and role in the Civil War as it pertains to Tennessee history.

The student barely describes important events, people, landforms, natural resources, and role in the Civil War as it pertains to Tennessee history.

The student describes little to no important events, people, landforms, natural resources, and role in the Civil War as it pertains to Tennessee history.

Formative Assessment (Process): Students will be monitored daily during class discussions, through question/answer, group check ins and notes in composition notebooks. Utilizing these methods of monitoring progression will be instrumental in determining if the information being relayed is being 181


grasped by the students or if a different approach needs to be implemented in order to ensure content knowledge. For instance, teacher led discussions will be topic related, so how well students are engaged and knowledgeable about the subject, will be evident at this time. The teacher will also monitor project progress upon completion to make sure each member of the group is participating, and to make sure the information is accurate. This will be done by asking each group questions about their topic and reviewing written notes acquired about their topic. Summative Assessment (Product): Collecting student composition notebooks and reading them will aid in assessing if the material is being researched properly, and if the students are comprehending the subject. If the completion of this project requires an extension due to unforeseen circumstances then an appropriate extension will be added. Content knowledge will be measured by accuracy and implementation of specific information regarding each groups particular section of Tennessee.

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Tenn-a-palooza!

Designed by: Ms. Jennifer Knight 6th Grade Social Studies

Studying and understanding the formative years of the state of Tennessee is a learning expectation covered under the Tennessee Social Studies Standard, Culture 1.0.

Content Standard 1.03 Recognize the contributions of individuals and people of various ethnic, racial, religious, and Socio-economic groups to the development of civilization.

Content Standard 1.04 Understand the contributions of individuals and people of various ethnic, racial, religious, and Socio-economic groups to Tennessee.

Introduction

Task

Process

Evaluation

Conclusion

Credits

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Introduction

Hi Class! I want to thank you in advance for helping me put together the “Tenn-a-palooza!” What is the Tenn-a-palooza you ask? It is the celebration of Tennessee’s landforms, natural resources, people and contributions to the United States through song and music. That’s right, your group will perform a song that is about Tennessee that either you make up or already exist in front of the whole class. Each group will also create an eyejot that summarizes their section, to be viewed in class, prior to each performance. *Note, the Eyejot presentation does not need to be more than 5 minutes. Task

The class will be divided into three groups. Each group will be made up of six members. The first group will represent East Tennessee, the second group will represent Middle Tennessee, and the last group will represent West Tennessee. Each group will explain important information about your section, in an eyejot such as; 184


*location on the map/natural boundaries *typical weather *important landforms *natural resources *2 important people to know and what they did *position of your section of Tennessee during the civil war. Why?

Process

Here is a list of websites that can serve as references.

Tennessee History for Kids/Geography- Provides information about the land of Tennessee. Also includes an explanation of how the land helped shape Tennessee history.

Facts about Tennessee- This site offers little known facts about Tennessee, its people and various other important resources.

The Civil War- This site gives an overview about each section of Tennessee’s role in the Civil War.

Awesome America- This site offers a summary of Tennessee’s past. Also has a list of quotes from important Tennesseans.

History- This site offers important Tennessee history facts.

Eyejot- each group will create an eyejot account in class.

On Wednesday 4/30/14 and

Thursday 5/1/14 before the final performance each group will record their eyejot in a separate classroom during the Social Studies class period.

185


The School’s Library- checking out books about Tennessee and/or The Civil War is an excellent way to gather relevant information regarding your subject.

Two Weeks from this date 4/21/14 to be ready to perform your song for the class. The Tenn-a-palooza will take place on Monday May 5, 2014. Each group will be given

What to Expect‌.. *Day One 4/21/14 Introduction- overview of the project Group Assignments- each student is assigned a group in which they are to create an eyejot and perform a song about Tennessee together.

*Day Two 4/22/14 Group One will go to the library and meet, check out books, gather resources from the computer, during the regular Social Studies class period. The remaining two groups will meet in class, use classroom computers, and ask questions.

*Day Three 4/23/14 Group Two will go to the library and meet, check out books, gather resources from the computer, during the regular Social Studies class period. The remaining two groups will meet in class, use classroom computers, and ask questions.

*Day Four 4/24/14 Group Three will go to the library and meet, check out books, gather resources from the computer, during the regular Social Studies class period. The remaining two groups will meet in class, use classroom computers, and ask questions.

*Day Five 4/25/14 Each group will meet with the teacher to set up eyejot accounts. Group One will go to the library and meet, check out books, gather resources from the computer, during the regular Social Studies class period. Teacher will meet with Groups Two and Three to answer questions, monitor progress and/or offer suggestions.

*Day Six 4/28/14

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Group Two will go to the library and meet, check out books, gather resources from the computer, during the regular Social Studies class period. Teacher will meet with Groups One and Three to answer questions, monitor progress and/or offer suggestions.

*Day Seven 4/29/14 Group Three will go to the library and meet, check out books, gather resources from the computer, during the regular Social Studies class period. Teacher will meet with Groups One and Two to answer questions, monitor progress and/or offer suggestions.

*Day Eight 4/30/14 Each group will record their eyejot in a separate classroom.

*Day Nine 5/1/14 Finish up eyejots Class will be held outside, so that each group can split up and practice their song and dance moves for the Tennessee celebration.

*Day Ten 5/2/14 Class will be held outside, so that each group can split up and practice their song and dance moves for the Tennessee celebration.

Tenn-a-palooza!! 5/5/14 Each group will perform their song about Tennessee. All eyejots will be presented prior to each group’s performance.

Let’s Rock!!!!

Evaluation

 

187


Teacher Name:  Ms.  Knight      

 

 

 

Student   Name:          ________________________________________      

 

4  

3  

2  

1  

Learning of  Content  

The student   accurately  describes   important  events,   people,  landforms,   natural  resources,   and  role  in  the  Civil   War  as  it  pertains  to   Tennessee  history.  

The student   accurately  describes   some  important   events,  people,   landforms,  natural   resources,  and  role   in  the  Civil  War  as  it   pertains  to   Tennessee  history.  

The student  barely   describes  important   events,  people,   landforms,  natural   resources,  and  role   in  the  Civil  War  as  it   pertains  to   Tennessee  history.  

The student   describes  little  to  no   important  events,   people,  landforms,   natural  resources,   and  role  in  the  Civil   War  as  it  pertains  to   Tennessee  history.  

CATEGORY

Conclusion

By the end of the Tenn-a-palooza, you should have adequate knowledge of Tennessee such as: 1.) important landforms, natural resources 2.) important people and events 3.) role in the Civil War 4.) familiar with using eyejot

Credits .(n.d.).. retrieved, from http://blogs.egusd.net/kirchgater/

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Children Celebrating The Fourth of July Stock Photo 142457813. (n.d.). Getty Images. Retrieved, from http://www.gettyimages.com/detail/photo/children-celebrating-the-fourth-of-july-royalty-free-image/142457813 MissBrooklyn2011.(n.d.),: March Madness!. Retrieved, from http://missbrooklyn2011.blogspot.com/2011/04/marchmadness.html Owen, P. (2012, January 9). Digital literacy campaign-we need your help. The guardian.com. Retrieved from http://www.theguardian.com/education/mortarboard/2012/jan/09/digital-literarcy-campaign-we-need-your-help Testimonials From Current DAA Members.(n.d.). Daa Online Blog. Retrieved, from http://www.daaonline.org/blog/testimonials-from-current-daa-members/

189


Unit Media Share

Disney, The American Presidents: Abraham Lincoln In this video about Abraham Lincoln, students will learn about his humble beginnings, defining moments in his life, his presidency, and his legacy. This video is not only animated, but riddled with special effects, sure to capture the 5th grade learners’ attention. Lincoln’s presidency was a defining moment in U.S. History, which directly affected the way of living in the South in particular Tennessee. Disney Educational Productions, (2010, January 27) American Presidents: Abraham Lincoln [video] Retrieved on February 24, 2014 from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MFABcUUJMrI#t=89 Experience State History Students will be able to access their required textbook online by logging onto www.experiencestatehistory.com. Students will be given their user name and password which will then allow them to be able to read, answer study questions and prepare for test and quiz from the digital outlet of their choice. This is a convenient alternative to the hassle of dragging bulky, heavy books home every day. This online textbook is readily available to all students with internet access. Smith, Gibbs (2006). Experience State History. [Website] Retrieved on February 24, 2014 from http://www.experiencestatehistory.com. Quizlet Student will be instructed to set up a quizlet account, for free, by logging on to www.quizlet .com. On this site the student will be able to type in vocabulary words, important people, places, and years to know. In turn the website offers the option of making digital/printable flashcards, generate test questions, and/or other techniques to help the students learn academic material. Sutherland, Andrew. (2005). Quizlet. [iOS App. Store, Free] Retrieved on February 24, 2014 from http://www.quizlet.com.

190


Kellie Marks Unit Rationale – Fractions In this unit we will be learning about the manipulation of fractions. This fifth grade unit is designed to aid students in learning about the addition and subtraction of fractions in mathematics. In math fractions are a way to represent parts of a whole number. Students need to learn how to manipulate fractions because it will increase understanding in solving real world problems involving fragmented numbers. For example, fractions can refer to a certain part of a group of items, or used to gauge distances. The learners will be provided with fractional analogies that they will immediately recognize like, a pizza pie, ingredients in recipes, and mile markers as a representation of how to use of fractions. Students will be learning how to solve word problems involving fractions with unlike denominators, like denominators, and mixed numbers. In order for students to move on to higher levels of evaluating numerical expressions, it is important that this foundational framework is established. Studying and understanding numbers and operations in mathematics is a learning expectation covered under the Standards for Mathematical Practice through the Common Core State Standards. CCSS.Math.Content.5.NF.A.1: Add and subtract fractions with unlike denominators (including mixed numbers) by replacing given fractions with equivalent fractions in such a way as to produce an equivalent sum or difference of fractions with like denominators. CCSS.Math.Content.5.NF.A.2: Solve word problems involving addition and subtraction of fractions referring to the same whole, including cases of unlike denominators, e.g., by using visual fraction models or equations to represent the problem. Use benchmark fractions and number sense of fractions to estimate mentally and assess the reasonableness of answers.

191


CCSS.Math.Content.5.NF.B.3: Interpret a fraction as division of the numerator by the denominator (a/b = a รท b). Solve word problems involving division of whole numbers leading to answers in the form of fractions or mixed numbers, e.g., by using visual fraction models or equations to represent the problem.

192


Unit Media Share

Cooking Up Fractions Series In this YouTube series, the presenters cook dishes with fraction-filled recipes. The program is intended to meet the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics criteria and provide a review and reinforcement of teaching fractions in an age-appropriate manner. The series has the option to infuse their fraction cookbook, which will help students review vocabulary and practice skills. The video covers common denominators, equivalent fractions, and simplifying and comparing fractions. The video is a fun relief for students, and will instantly cause students to connect with how fractions are used in daily life. HumansRelationMedia (January 2012). Cooking Up Fractions Series. Retrieved February 27, 2014 from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DCqYoL1a3a4

Fraction Basics Fraction Basics is a free video app that provides a quick way for students to learn and understand the basics behind fractions. The app has a huge gamete of animated videos on understanding manipulating fractions in their several forms. The app is a straightforward, and age appropriate educational tool, that is not centered on games. This app is for learners who wish to deepen their understanding of using and applying mathematical rules to solve any problem that involves fractions. This tool is aligned with Common Core Standard, CCSS.Math.Practice.MP1 as it helps students become mathematically proficient by setting the framework for understanding fractions, and helps the student to continually cultivate further cognizance. The app is divided into 12 sectors, each computer animated video including an introduction, examples, and definitions for any question on fractions. The app is designed for and compatible with iPad, iPhone, and iPod touch and requires a iOS 4.3 or later. This app is optimized for the iPhone 5. Ng Wei Chong. November 24, 2012. Fraction Basics (Version 1.2) [iTunes, Free]. Retrieved on February 27, 2014 from https://itunes.apple.com/US/app/id404527208?mt=8

Help With Fractions 193


Help with fractions is dedicated to assisting students understand the overall processes of solving mathematical problems involving fractions. The website highlights that all math problems can be solved using a particular set of rules, and offers step-by-step support to solve any fraction problem. The website is a tool students can use in case they need to review the rules of manipulating fractions, and is also useful to parents, as it gives step by step instructions, much like the instructor would provide in a classroom setting. The website offers how-to guides, several links, worksheets, a fraction calculator, and tables that will aid in deepening understanding of fractions.

The website is easy to navigate, and it provides real time assistance in case any questions arise. The ISTE teacher standards that can be applied are, collaborating using digital tools and resources to support student success, and communicate relevant information effectively to students, and parents using digital age media and formats.

Help With Fractions. (2012) Adding Fractions with Different Denominators. [Website]. Retrieved on February 27, 2014 http://www.helpwithfractions.com/adding-fractions-differentdenominators/

194


Reem Halasa Technology Action Plan Grade 6 This sixth grade technology action plan is based on the National ITSE Student Standards for educational technology. National Educational Technology Standards (NETS) for Students 2007 By the end of the fifth grade the student is able to: 1. Understand basic operations and concepts of technology: • Use keyboards and other common input and output devices (including adaptive devices when necessary) efficiently and effectively. • Key at a rate of 20 gross words per minute using the proper touch-keying techniques on a 2 minute timed writing. • Key a simple letter with two paragraphs with no more than two mistakes.

2. Use technology productivity and communication tools: • Discuss common uses of technology in daily life and the advantages and disadvantages those uses provide. • Discuss basic issues related to responsible use of technology and describe personal consequences of inappropriate use. • Use technology tools (i.e., multimedia authoring, presentation, Web tools, digital cameras, and scanners) for individual and collaborative writing, communication, and publishing activities to create knowledge products for audiences inside and outside the classroom.

3. Select and use appropriate technology research tools as well as utilize technology problem-solving and decision-making. • Use telecommunications efficiently to access remote information, communicate with others in support of direct and independent learning, and pursue personal interests. • Use telecommunications and online resources (i.e., e-mail, online discussions, Web environments) to participate in collaborative problem-solving activities for the purpose of developing solutions or products for audiences inside and outside the classroom. 195


• Use a variety of technology resources for problem solving, self-directed learning, and extended learning activities. • Determine which technology is useful and select the appropriate tool(s) and technology resources to address a variety of tasks and problems.

General Level

Objectives Standard 6.0

Achievement

(Lowest Need for Teacher Assistance)

Students will utilize technology problem-solving and decisionmaking tools.

Learning Expectations 6.1 Students will use technology resources for solving problems and making informed decisions. 6.2 Students will employ technology in the development of strategies for solving problems in the real world. 6.3 Students use critical thinking skills to plan and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems, and make informed decisions using appropriate digital tools and resources.

ISTE-Student Standard 4. Critical thinking, problem solving, and decision making

Specific Strategies A. Use technology in self-directed activities by sharing products for defined audiences. For example: 1. Create a document using a word processor to share with the class. 2. Create presentations for extracurricular activities (i.e., science fair or PTA events).

B. Integrate acquired technology applications skills, strategies, and use of the word processor, database, spreadsheet, telecommunications, draw, paint, and/or utility programs into the foundation and enrichment curricula. For example: 1. Compose essays or reports using a Word. 2. Create charts and graphs using a spreadsheet in Excel.

C. Development of technology strategies for solving problems in real world and for life-long learning and daily living. For example: 1. Discuss uses of technology at home. 2. Students will use technology resources (i.e. calculators, videos, educational software) for self-directed learning, 196


General Level

Objectives

ISTE-Student Standard

Specific Strategies problem solving and extended learning activities.

Standard 4.0 Recognition

Students will use technology communications tools.

Learning Expectations 4.1 Students will use telecommunications to collaborate, publish, and interact with peers, experts, and other audiences. 4.2 Students will use a variety of media and formats to communicate information and ideas effectively to multiple audiences. 4.3 Students will use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others.

1. Creativity and Innovation

2. Communication and Collaboration

A. Design, develop, publish, and present products (i.e., Web pages, videotapes) using technology resources that demonstrate and communicate curriculum concepts to audiences. 1. Using multimedia authoring programs to create linear or non-linear projects incorporating text, audio, video, and/or graphics. 2. Creating a document using desktop publishing techniques including, but not limited to, the creation of multi-column or multi-section documents with a variety of text-wrapped frame formats.

B. Collaborate with peers, experts, and others using telecommunications and collaborative tools to investigate curriculum-related problems, issues, and information, and to develop solutions or products for audiences. 1. Planning, creating, and editing documents created with a Word using readable fonts, alignment, page setup, tabs, and ruler settings. 2. Creating and editing spreadsheet documents using all data types, formulas and functions, and chart information.

197


General Level

Belongingness

Objectives

Standard 2.0 Students will understand the importance of social, ethical, and human issues associated with technology.

Learning Expectations 2.1 Students will understand the ethical, cultural, and societal issues related to technology. 2.2 Students will practice responsible use of technology systems, information, and software. 2.3 Students will develop positive attitudes toward technology uses that support lifelong learning, collaboration, personal pursuits, and productivity.

ISTE-Student Standard

5. Digital Citizenship

Specific Strategies A. Students will demonstrate knowledge of current changes in information technologies and the effect those changes have on the workplace and society. 1. Students will verbally describe when and how technology is used in everyday life and occupations. Using observation, a rubric will be developed to evaluate the behavior of the students as they use technology in content area lessons.

B. Students will exhibit legal and ethical behaviors when using information and technology, and discuss consequences of misuse. 1. Discuss copyright laws/issues and model ethical acquisition and use of digital information, citing sources using established methods. 2. Demonstrate proper etiquette and knowledge of acceptable use while in an individual classroom, lab, or on the Internet and intranet. 3. Describe the consequences regarding copyright violations including, but not limited to, computer hacking, computer piracy, intentional virus setting, and invasion of privacy. 4. Teacher can develop situational examples to test concepts of piracy.

C. Research and evaluate the accuracy, relevance, appropriateness, comprehensiveness, and bias of electronic information sources 198


General Level

Objectives

ISTE-Student Standard

Specific Strategies concerning real-world problems. 1. Discuss current changes in information technologies and how those changes affect society and the workplace. 2. Discuss the cultural impact of global communication. 3. Demonstrate knowledge of responsible, safe, effective and efficient use of telecommunication/Internet. 4. Demonstrate knowledge of responsible, safe, and ethical use of networked digital information.

D. Implement safe personal practices when using the Internet. 1. Practice safe use of electronic technology. 2. Have students list their own bylaws for personal practices when using the Internet. Standard 5.0 Security and Safety

Students will select and use appropriate technology research tools.

Learning Expectations 5.1 Students will use technology to locate, evaluate, and collect information from a variety of sources. 5.2 Students will use technology tools to process data and report

5. Digital Citizenship

3. Research and Information Fluency

A. Use content-specific tools, software, and simulations (i.e., environmental probes, graphing calculators, exploratory environments, Web tools) to support learning and research. 1. Given examples for students to apply appropriate electronic search strategies in the acquisition of information including keyword and/or Boolean search strategies. Have students identify the differences with use of Boolean as oppose to not using Boolean search techniques.

199


General Level

Objectives

ISTE-Student Standard

results.

(Highest Need for Teacher Assistance)

Standard 1.0 Students will understand basic operations and concepts of technology.

Learning Expectations

1.1 Students will demonstrate an understanding of the nature and operation of technology systems.

1.2 Students will be proficient in the use of technology.

1.3 Students will apply the touch system of keying when using the computer keyboard for input.

Strategies B. Select and use appropriate tools and technology resources to accomplish a variety of tasks and solve problems.

5.3 Students will evaluate and select new information resources and technological innovations based on the appropriateness for specific tasks.

Physiological Needs

Specific

1. Use on-line help and other documentation. 2. Evaluate the electronic information for accuracy and validity; and identify the source and location of available information. Have students research authenticity of statements and sources from a list that teacher has provided.

6. Technology Operations and Concepts

A. Demonstrate knowledge and appropriate use of operating systems, software applications, and communication and networking components. 1. Manipulate icons on the desktop, create folders, and store files within the folder. 2. Use different software programs (Word, Excel, etc.).

B. Maintain a current vocabulary of networking terms. 1. Use technology terminology appropriate to the task. 2. Use appropriate Internet terminology.

C. Compare, contrast, and appropriately use various input, output, and primary/secondary storage devices. 1. Use a mouse, keyboard, and scanner correctly. 2. Organize files on a computer disk, 200


General Level

Objectives

ISTE-Student Standard

Specific Strategies hard drive, server, or other storage device. 3. Print reports based on a sort and query

D. Perform basic software application functions. 1. Type, edit, and print a document. 2. Create a chart that visually represents data. 3. Import graphics with appropriate placement.

E. Using appropriate ergonomics, apply the touch system on the alpha, numeric, and symbol keys at a rate of 20 net words per minute. 1. Apply the touch system to the numeric keypad 2. Key a letter to include all parts of the letter. The body should be at least two paragraphs.

201


Miad Al-Ruwaili Unit Rationale - Algebra in Math In this sixth grade unit, we will be learning about algebra in math. Students see algebra the difficult topic because it’s that combines calculation equations, fractions and roots. Algebra needs to be more effort and calculation and intelligence. These skills are not found at all students. This sixth grade unit plan is designed to aid students in developing understanding of algebra. Sixth grade students need to learn things like equations and fractures. Students need in this unit to many of the exercises on the calculation method of solving equations and algebraic equations and knowing the difference between algebraic equations. Also, we will use the technology as ipad to the students. To see how it can be used to help students learn several non-traditional types of skill and knowledge in the context of algebra. We can use algebra in real life in a couple of ways. The most obvious way would be if the career you choose requires use of algebra; engineers, mathematicians, teachers, and scientists are examples of people that might need to use algebra. Otherwise, everyone does use algebra even though they may not realize it. For example, you're at the grocery store picking out ingredients for a big recipe. You need 2 pounds of peanuts, but the store only sells quarter pound bags. Well, in a case like that you're going to have to quickly figure out how many bags will equal the 2 pounds you need. It is just like solving an equation!

Studying and understanding algebra in math is a learning expectation covered under Tennessee Core Standard 6.0 6.1 Write and evaluate numerical expressions involving whole-number exponents. 202


6.2 Write expressions that record operations with numbers and with letters standing for numbers. For example, express the calculation “Subtract y from 5” as 5 – y. 6.3 Identify parts of an expression using mathematical terms (sum, term, product, factor, quotient, coefficient); view one or more parts of an expression as a single entity. For example, describe the expression 2(8 + 7) as a product of two factors; view (8 + 7) as both a single entity and a sum of two terms. 6.4 Apply the properties of operations to generate equivalent expressions. For example, apply the distributive property to the expression 3 (2 + x) to produce the equivalent expression 6 + 3x; apply the distributive property to the expression 24x + 18y to produce the equivalent expression 6 (4x + 3y); apply properties of operations to y + y + y to produce the equivalent expression 3y.

Present.Me: presentation file available in media folder* Jing Tutorial: http://screencast.com/t/orGpI0l2vF

203


Unit Media Share Algebra the Fun and Easy Way Algebra the Fun and Easy Way: This video shows that the Hands-On Equations program is demystifying the learning of algebra for younger students. The setting is the Sawgrass Elementary School in Broward County, Florida, where 4th graders are using Hands-On Equations to learn to solve advanced algebraic equations while having fun. Apply the properties of operations to generate equivalent expressions. For example, apply the distributive property to the expression 3 (2 + x) to produce the equivalent expression 6 + 3x; apply the distributive property to the expression 24x + 18y to produce the equivalent expression 6 (4x + 3y); apply properties of operations to y + y + y to produce the equivalent expression 3y. Borenson. (Producer). (2010). Algebra the Fun and Easy Way.[Teacher Tube]. Retrieved from http://www.teachertube.com/viewVideo.php?video_id=169380

P.17 Simplify variable expressions using properties Practice Math & Language Arts | K–12 This IXL.com website titled “H.2 Simplify expressions” offers mathematics lesson as a list of all of the skills students learn in K12. These skills are organized into categories, and you can move your mouse over any skill name to view a sample question. To start practicing, just click on any link. IXL will track your score, and the questions will automatically increase in difficulty as you improve! It's easy to find the right skills to practice for your state's standards! All of IXL's dynamic math and language arts skills are aligned to your standards, including: IXL assesses your students' performance on each standard instantly, so you will have all the information you need to prepare them for standardized testing. Simply select your standards to view skills and start practicing. IXL Practice Math & Language Arts| K–12. (2014). P.17 Simplify variable expressions using properties. [Website]. Retrieved from http://www.ixl.com/math/grade-6/simplify-variableexpressions-using-properties

The Fun Way to Learn Algebra Teach your children the joys of learning algebra with Hands-On Equations 1 Lite – the fun, FREE algebra app for children as young as eight! With an intuitive visual interface, Hands-On Equations has proven itself to be the best algebra app for kids on the market. And now it is available for the Android app and phone. 204


The original Hands-On Equations program, using physical game pieces, has already helped more than a million students gain confidence with algebra. Now that same, proven method is available virtually in the palm of your hand. Algebra can be a tricky subject to master but with the help of Hands-On Equations 1 Lite, equations such as 4x+2=3x+9 become child’s play! In three easy lessons the young student obtains a feeling of success and a sense of mathematical power in solving sophisticated looking equations. Download this FREE app today and see how much fun and how easy algebra can be!

Harris Crowne, Adrian. (February 19, 2014). The Fun Way to Learn Algebra. [iTunes Free]. Retrieved on February 23, 2014 from https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.handsonequationslite1

205


Reem Halasa Unit Rationale - Energy

In this sixth grade unit, we will be learning about energy in science. Students need to learn how to distinguish among gravitational potential energy, elastic potential energy, and chemical potential energy. Students will interpret the relationship between potential and kinetic energy. Students will recognize that energy can be transformed from one type to another. Students will be able to explain the Law of Conservation of Energy using data from variety of energy transformation. What basic energy related ideas are essential for understanding the dependency of the natural and man-made worlds on energy? Students will create a poster that illustrates different forms of potential energy. Students will design a model that demonstrates a specific energy transformation. Students will then be able to explain why a variety of energy transformations illustrates the Law of Conservation of Energy. The study of energy is significant because we experience energy in various forms throughout our daily lives. In addition, future scientific theories that will be taught build upon energy concepts, such as motion and forces of nature. Studying and understanding energy in science is a learning expectation covered under the Tennessee State Standard 10.0. GLE 0607.10.1

Compare and contrast the three forms of potential energy.

GLE 0607.10.2

Analyze various types of energy transformations. 206


GLE 0607.10.3

Explain the principles underlying the Law of Conservation of Energy.

Present.Me: http://present.me/view/163577-­‐1-­‐tellemin10halasa_reem Jing Tutorial: http://www.screencast.com/t/seWpqMTy

207


ASSURE Lesson Plan Energy Demonstrated in Real Life Name: Reem B. Halasa Duration of Lesson: 3 Days in Class

Analyze learners

Subject Area(s): Science Grade Level: 6th

At this point, the students have successfully tested and completed prerequisites to begin 6th grade science. The student population in this class includes a total of 27 students (16 Females / 11 Males). Given this is 6th grade class, the students are between the ages of 11 to 12 years old. Of the student population, 5 students are first generation American. Parents are from various countries. Interacting with these 5 students’ I observed their proficiency in speaking and understanding English is high. Majority of the students are on target for Sixth grade science. Only 4 students are below average and need additional tutoring. This information was gained during pre-assessment given to the class. There are 2 students with IEPs and they are granted extra time on exams. I have discussed possible arrangements for testing days with these two students (one male and one female). Overall, the student population is mixed with 18% from Latino decent, 42% black, 30% white, and 10% mixed nationalities. Over 55% of the class received some type of federal aid. The remaining group comes from middle to upper-class households. Given the diverse group of students, I will be using several formative assessment methods to gauge students’ progress. I will also include class time to have students work individually as well as in groups to complete assignments. This will give me time to work with certain students on a one-onone basis. I will provide a preview of the standards the students are expected to know with regard to the particular lesson and discuss the objectives of this lesson. In addition, students will become proficient with vocabulary for the lesson with repeated review of definitions and the use of flash cards. Students are already familiar with terms due to repetition from earlier lesson.

State & NETS*S objectives

Studying and understanding energy in science is a learning expectation covered under the Tennessee State Standard 10.0. GLE 0607.10.1 Compare and contrast the three forms of potential energy. GLE 0607.10.2 Analyze various types of energy transformations. GLE 0607.10.3 Explain the principles underlying the Law of Conservation of Energy.

The standards below are from the International Society for Technology in Education (2007). Each of these standards are exemplified in the lesson on energy – includes Standards 1, 2, 5 and 6, see below. ISTE® is a registered trademark of the International Society for Technology in Education. 1. Creativity and Innovation - Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct 208


knowledge, and develop innovative products and processes using technology. Students: a.

Apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes.

b. Create original works as a means of personal or group expression. c.

Use models and simulations to explore complex systems and issues.

d. Identify trends and forecast possibilities. 2. Communication and Collaboration - Students use digital media and

environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others. Students: a. Interact, collaborate, and publish with peers, experts, or others employing a variety of digital environments and media. b. Communicate information and ideas effectively to multiple audiences using a variety of media and formats. c. Evaluate and select information sources and digital tools based on the appropriateness to specific tasks. 5. Digital Citizenship - Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior. Students: a. advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology. b. exhibit a positive attitude toward using technology that supports collaboration, learning, and productivity. c. demonstrate personal responsibility for lifelong learning. d. exhibit leadership for digital citizenship. 6. Technology Operations and Concepts - Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems, and operations. Students: a. understand and use technology systems. b. select and use applications effectively and productively.

c. troubleshoot systems and applications. d. transfer current knowledge to learning of new technologies. Behavioral Objective: In this unit we will be learning about energy in science. Sixth grade students need to learn how to distinguish among gravitational potential energy, elastic potential energy, and chemical potential energy. Students will interpret the relationship between potential and kinetic energy. Students will recognize that energy can be transformed from one type to another. Students will be able to explain the Law of Conservation of Energy using data from variety of energy transformation. What basic energy related ideas are essential for understanding the dependency of the natural and 209


man-made worlds on energy? Given the background on energy in science, Students will be able to model energy by downloading photos off the Internet and create a PowerPoint presentation or a Prezi Presentation that compares and contrasts the different forms of potential energy. This assignment will be a project for groups of 4 to 5 students to collaborate together. Students will then be able to explain to the class why a variety of energy transformations illustrates the Law of Conservation of Energy. Students will also understand copyright laws and use resources that allow free use media on the Internet with regards to downloading images as well as citing resources. The study of energy is significant because we experience energy in various forms throughout our daily lives. In addition, future scientific theories that will be taught build upon energy concepts, such as motion and forces of nature.

Language Objective: Students will be able to identify these terms and the meaning. In addition, students will be able to depict each with real life examples. •

Potential energy is stored energy and the energy of position.

Kinetic energy is motion.

Gravitational potential energy is energy stored in an object's height. The higher and heavier the object, the more gravitational energy is stored.

Elastic potential energy is the energy stored when an object is squeezed or stretched.

Chemical potential energy is energy stored in the bonds of atoms and molecules.

Students will compare and contrast the different forms of potential energy and provide real-world images that depict each. Students will then be able to explain why a variety of energy transformations illustrates the Law of Conservation of Energy. Select instructional methods, media, and materials

Students will work together in groups of 4 to 5 per group.

Utilize media and materials

Students will have all terms written down with definitions on a flash card to reference during their project.

Materials needed: -

15 laptops or desktop computers (2 students per computer) 15 Jump drives for students to save their work Internet service for student to search for images PowerPoint on all the computers Projector for student to present their presentations Screen to display projector images Flash cards for 27 students to write down all vocabulary terms Pencil/Pens for 27 students

Students will utilize the Internet to download pictures to use in their 210


presentations. Students will be able to demonstrate the ability to research for photos and download and save the images on a jump drive. Students will then organize the photos in a PowerPoint presentation or use of Prezi presentation. Student will demonstrate proper use of these applications and create a presentation to share with the class. As a group students will work together to create the finished product. Students will pair up on computers and collaborate the searches as a team. Require learner participation

1. Students will write all terms on flash cards provided, with definition included. (Day 1) 2. Students will pair off in groups of 4 to 5 students. (Day 1) 3. Students will discuss the type of photos that would exemplify the various forms of potential energy. (Day 1) 4. Students will also decide which presentation application they will use. (Day 1) 5. Students will begin to search and download images in groups of two per computer. That way searches are collaborated among groups of students. (Day 1 and 2) 6. Students will then insert images in a presentation that they can explain to class. (Day 2) 7. Groups will share their projects with the class. (Day 3)

Evaluate and revise

Once the lesson is complete, I will reflect on the effectiveness of the lesson by monitoring and gauging the students’ comprehension of the lesson with formal and informal assessments. Lesson will be formally assessed according to rubric and students’ progress with each step of the project. In addition, class discussion and review of class notes will also help me to assess students’ knowledge and understanding. Lastly, their images from their projects and the explanations provided for each image will let me know if students understand each type of energy form. Reflection questions that I will ask myself include: •

What worked? What did not? For whom? Why? How did the lesson unfold as compared to what I anticipated in your planning?

How does this reflection inform what I plan to do in the next lesson? If I were to teach this lesson differently, describe the changes you would make?

What were my instructional strengths and areas for growth?

What did I learn from previous observations and feedback from supervisors and/or cooperating teachers that informed this lesson?

See copy of Rubric for this project below. 211


Multimedia Project : Energy Demonstrated in Real Life Teacher Name: R Halasa Student Name: CATEGORY

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Organization

Content is well organized using headings or bulleted lists to group related material.

Uses headings or bulleted lists to organize, but the overall organization of topics appears flawed.

Content is logically organized for the most part.

There was no clear or logical organizational structure, just lots of facts.

Content

Covers topic indepth with details and examples. Subject knowledge is excellent. Compares and contracts energy types.

Includes essential knowledge about the topic. Subject knowledge appears to be good. Mainly compares and contrasts energy types.

Includes essential information about the topic but there are 1-2 factual errors. Minimal comparison of energy types.

Content is minimal OR there are several factual errors. No comparison of energy types.

Presentation

Easy to read presentation and clear images that are appropriate for energy type defined.

Fairly easy to read presentation and fairly clear images that are mostly appropriate for energy type defined.

Presentation is hard to read images that are mostly not appropriate for energy type defined.

Presentation is unclear, hard to follow, images are unclear and do not appropriately matched with energy type defined.

Mechanics

No misspellings or grammatical errors.

Three or fewer misspellings and/or mechanical errors.

Four misspellings and/or grammatical errors.

More than 4 errors in spelling or grammar.

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Oral Presentation

Interesting, wellrehearsed with smooth delivery that holds audience attention.

Relatively interesting, rehearsed with a fairly smooth delivery that usually holds audience attention.

Delivery not smooth, but able to hold audience attention most of the time.

Delivery not smooth and audience attention lost.

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Unit Media Share

DOE Teach and Learn DOE Teach and Learn includes creative lesson plans, labs, projects and other activities for grades K-12 on energy-related topics. Students will learn the importance of clean energy as an enhancement to required curriculum. The DOE Teach and Learn application can be incorporated into the classroom lesson providing additional information on conserving energy. The intention of this application is to prepare students for a greener future. U.S. Department of Energy. (January 11, 2013). DOE teach and learn. [iTunes, Free]. Retrieved on February 22, 2013 from https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/doe-teach-andlearn/id591982817?mt=8 Energy Defined Energy Defined provides a quick and yet thorough lesson on energy in a visually engaging manner. The video provides differentiation that would appeal to visual learners, great alternative to a simple lecture. The vocabulary words were written out as the speaker defined and discussed terms in further detailed examples. The emphasis on key terms that are identified with energy, such as kinetic or potential, are essential for students to learn. The Energy Defined video provided real life examples that assist understanding the various components of energy. In the end, the video left the question open for students to consider, how can we create new and cheaper energy sources? The video could be presented prior to having students engage in a hands on activity. NOVA. (Producer). (2012). Energy defined: What is energy and why are we on a never ending search for new energy sources? [PBS Video] Retrieved from http://video.pbs.org/video/2288960356/

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Energy Quest is an energy education website of the California Energy Commission. The website provides games, education lessons, and teaches students “energy ethic� behaviors in order to conserve resources. The Energy Quest website helps students to think creatively about energy while satisfying their limitless imaginations. Given the multiple learning tools on this website, students of all learning styles may benefit from engaging in the Energy Quest website. The website also provides resources for teachers and parents to teach children about energy. California Energy Commission. (2014). Energy quest. [Website]. Retrieved on February 22, 2014 from http://energyquest.ca.gov/index.html

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Christopher Washko Unit Rationale - Technology In Culture This sixth grade unit plan is designed to help students understand the role that technology has played in the development of culture throughout the world. When sixth grade students develop a better understanding of other cultures, it leads to greater acceptance and respect for one another in our modern, multi-cultural word. Students will explore the historical significance of technology in cultures throughout history. They will discover how advancements in technology have had a profound impact upon the way that a culture develops perceptions, solves problems, and develops traditions. The world has become smaller and better connected than ever before thanks to developments in technology. Students today live in an exciting time where contact with those from cultures the world over is possible. To be able to learn about one another’s development of technology in their culture will encourage understanding, acceptance, and respect for one another throughout the world. Culture encompasses similarities and differences among people including their beliefs, knowledge, changes, values, and traditions that are addressed in Tennessee Social Studies Standard 6.1-Culture. GLE 1.06 Understand the influence of science and technology on the development of culture through time.

Present.Me: http://present.me/view/163357-­‐technology-­‐in-­‐culture Jing Tutorial: http://screencast.com/t/OJPEWclb3   216


Christopher Washko EDCI 6180, Dr. Kendall

ASSURE

Lesson Plan

Sixth Grade Social Studies A WebQuest In Search Of Important Technology In Culture

A nalyze Learners

Characteristics Of The Learners

The sixth grade class at the West End Middle School of Nashville, Tennessee is comprised of 26 students of which 14 are female and 12 are male. All students are either 11 or 12 years old. The diversity of students in this class is as follows: 11 are white, 6 are Asian, 5 are African-American, and 4 are Indian. The households of the Hispanic and Asian children are multilingual with English being the primary spoken language. One Indian family speaks Tamil as a second language, but only infrequently in historical contexts. Children who attend this school reside primarily in the 37205 zip code. In this zip code, average median household income is $82,476.00 as compared to the estimated average Tennessee median family household income of $41,693.00. It is important to note that though this is a neighborhood-zoned public school, 11% of the student body resides outside of the 37205 zip code. The reason? Some parents opt to transport their children (at their own expense) to this school to take advantage of the International Baccalaureate curriculum. The school also has a vigorous PTO. In this class, 2 children have autism spectrum disorders. The first student is high 217


functioning and has an Asperger's Syndrome diagnosis. The IEP for this student requires that he receive more time to prepare for and make transitions. To better aid the student, he is accommodated with advance introductions to new curriculum and personal notifications as to when the time of the next transition will occur. The second child with an Autism Spectrum Disorder diagnosis and is virtually non-communicative. He requires the assistance of a secondary, support teacher to help deliver curriculum and accommodate his physical disabilities.

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Entry Competencies

Curricular: With the exception of the student with the severe Autism Spectrum Disorder, students in this class demonstrate written and verbal communication skills ranging from grade level to exceeding grade level proficiency. For more detailed information regarding student assessment and demographic data for this school, please consult West End Middle School, Nashville, TN Data.

Technological: With the exception of the student with severe Autism Spectrum Disorder, the students' computer knowledge is fairly broad with all students having computers in their homes. Student's demonstrate a keen understanding of Internet navigation skills, have adept keyboarding ability with "Home Row" typing proficiency and can create documents and presentations in Powerpoint, Google Docs, and Microsoft Office with relative ease.

S tate Standards and Objectives Curriculum Standards For Metro-Nashville Public School 6.1 .06 Understand the influence of science and technology on the development of culture through time.

Lesson Objective Relating To MNPS Standard 1.1. Given the opportunity to explore a variety of technological developments in world culture, students will be able to demonstrate a written understanding of the importance that a single technology can play in the development of world culture.

ISTE Technology Standard 4 219


Critical Thinking, Problem Solving, and Decision Making Students use critical thinking skills to plan and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems, and make informed decisions using appropriate digital tools and resources. Students: a. Identify and define authentic problems and significant questions for investigation. b. Plan and manage activities to develop a solution or complete a project.

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c. Collect and analyze data to identify solutions and/or make informed decisions. d. Use multiple processes and diverse perspectives to explore alternative solutions. Lesson Objective Relating To ISTE Standard # 4 Given the opportunity to explore a variety of technological developments via the use of computers and the Internet, students will embark upon a 7-day WebQuest. By Quest's end, students will be able to demonstrate in writing, an understanding of how a single, game-changing technology can effect the development of world culture. Students will be able to collect, analyze, and synthesize data from a variety of electronic sources in order to make a thesis statement which can supported by data and solid research.

S elect Strategies, Technology, Media, and Materials Curricular Materials: - Journals - Pens and pencils - Rulers - Erasers (extra large ones in case pencil top erasers won't suffice)

Technological Material - Computers (26) with active, working, hi-speed internet connections. - Google Docs (with student user account) - USB drives (26) for students - Ducksters.com, (2014, April 28). Ancient Egypt Inventions & Technology, retrieved from http://www.ducksters.com/history/ancient_egypt/inventions_and_technology.php 221


- Ehow.com, (2014, April 28). How to Use Index Cards to Write a Speech, retrieved from: http://www.ehow.com/how_5013225_use-index-cards-writespeech.html#ixzz30Ie32kTN - Google Images, (2014, April 28). Images for Presidential and United Nations Symbols, retrieved from: https://www.google.com/search?q=presidential+seal and

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https://www.google.com/search?q=United+Nations+Seal - History Channel, (2014, April 28). Ancient History Videos, retrieved from http://www.history.com/topics/ancient-history - History of Information Technology & Systems, (2014, April 28). Ancient history timeline, retrieved from http://www.tcf.ua.edu/AZ/ITHistoryOutline.htm - Inc.com, (2014, April 28). How to Prioritize When Everything is a Priority: 5 Tips, retrieved from http://www.inc.com/lauren-perkins/how-to-prioritizewhen-everything-is-a-priority.html - Inventions, Innovations, and Other Contributions from Ancient China, (2014, April 28). Ancient history timeline, retrieved from: http://www.bcps.org/offices/lis/models/chinahist/dynasties.html - MNPS.org (2-14, April 28). Data for West End Middle School, Nashville, TN, retrieved from: http://www.mnps.org/Page58047.aspx - Un.org, (2014, April 28). Retrieved from: http://http://www.un.org/en/aboutun/ Whitehouse.gov (2014, April 28). Retrieved from: http://www.whitehouse.gov/ - Youtube.com, (2014, April 28). President Obama Addresses the United Nations, retrieved from: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1s7eHoRBqKI -

12 Great African Inventions That Changed The World - Politics - Nairaland, (2014, April 28). Retrieved from: http://www.nairaland.com/981268/greatafrican-inventions-changed-world

U tilize Technology, Media, and Materials Preview and Prepare Materials -

One journal to be distributed to each student. Journals are located on the shelf below the big surfing poster. 223


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Extra pencils are available for students as needed in the pencil cup on the teacher's desk.

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Prepare the Environment -

Computers have been reserved for class use in Media Center beginning Monday, May 5 through Tuesday, May 13 from 9:30-10:15 am.

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Media Center Director and contact: Dr. Lana Bananananuh.

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Verify with Dr. Bananananuh that 26 computers with Internet access are functioning prior to taking students to the Media Center.

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Make sure that all students have their USB thumb drive prior to leaving for the Media Center in order to back up their saved work. Thumb drives are located in large thumb cookie jar on the teacher's desk. Each drive is labeled with each student's name.

Prepare the learners Below please find the anticipatory set instruction and motivating set up to be delivered to the students for their WebQuest: "Like you, President Barack Obama is a skilled, daily user of technology. He has both a Blackberry and an Iphone and is an avid Mac user. When United Nation's Chairman Ban Kimoon learned of Obama's love of technology, he asked Obama to give a speech to the United Nations to acknowledge what he believed to be the greatest technological contribution from any culture in history. It will be your responsibility as the new President's new Speech Writer to research the world's many cultures in search of the greatest technological contribution to mankind. You will find that man's inquisitive nature has motivated him all throughout time to explore the sciences and develop many interesting technologies. Moreover, you will discover that people from all cultures have made wonderful technological contributions to mankind. Your task will be to write a speech for the President that pays homage to the many great technological contributions from cultures the world over but argues for what he believes to be the single greatest technological contribution to mankind. President Obama will give the speech that you 225


write to the United Nations General Assembly in New York City. Are you up to the challenge? I think that you are!"

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R equire Learner Participation In your new role as Presidential Speech Writer, you will embark upon a 7-day web quest. The first section of your WebQuest will last 2 days and will consist of exploration & journaling whereby you will scour the history of technological development and record your findings. On day 3 of your web quest, your task will be to analyze & rank the discoveries that you have made in your exploration. This section will require you to enlist critical thinking skills as you analyze the technology to assign it a rank number relative to its contributory value to world culture. On day 4 of your quest, you will begin your speech writing process whereby you will use Index cards to catalog main points to arrange in a logical order. On day 5 you begin your rough draft of the speech that you will deliver to President Obama. On day 6, you will revise and complete your final draft of the speech. On day 7, you will create a cover for your final version of the speech to make it worthy of Presidential acceptance. Remember that throughout this process, you will be discovering new material and synthesizing many different bits of information in order produce a narrative that explains why the technology that you chose as supreme is the single greatest technological contribution to mankind. You will be assessed on how well you write about what the single most important contribution to technology in culture in time and how well you argue for your beliefs. You well also be assessed on grammar, spelling, and sentence structure as they all relate to becoming an excellent writer who is capable of creating and thesis and defending it with good data and supporting research.

Activity Day 1 You will begin by researching technological contributions from cultures the world over. Remember, technologies do not have to be complicated in order to be miraculous and have incredible impact upon our world's culture. Primitive technologies were motivated by the 227


scientifically inquisitive mind of man in order to make their lives easier, more productive, more efficient, and sometimes more fun. Be sure to take notes on in your journal on what you have discovered. All the while in your exploration process, please keep in mind that you are to be thinking about the role that this

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technology played, the part of the world that it was developed, and how it improved the culture of that particular group. Please explore the hyperlinks to get your exploration started. Note: hyperlinks in this WebQuest will always be cited as ALL CAPS AND UNDERLINED. YOUTUBE This video will give you an informative and interesting overview of some of the most incredible technological contributions on history and get your mind thinking. HISTORY CHANNEL Today's developments in technology owe a lot to the developments of the cultures of the past. Their developments, procedures and ideas empowered mankind to establish the framework for life in the cutting edge world. TECHNOLOGY TIMELINE Consult this link to motivate exploration into technologies that you might not have otherwise imagined. Be sure to journal your findings and record your thoughts (metadata) on related ideas, questions for further exploration. Remember, you may use bullet points to jot notes but a minimum of 4 thoughts per hyperlink is required. This is your jump off point so I am sure it will be very easy to create 4 or more bullets per site visited.

Activity Day 2 The exploration and journaling portion of your WebQuest continues today with a more specific exploration of ancient civilizations. ANCIENT EGYPT Here's a look at Egyptian history and their many contributions to technology. ANCIENT CHINA Here's a look at Chinese contributions to technology. TECHNOLOGY & INVENTIONS OF AFRICA Here's a look at the technology and inventions emanating from Africa. 19TH CENTURY TECHNOLOGY (AND OTHER CENTURIES TOO) you will acquire a great deal of information for further exploration at this site. Remember to keep the culture of origin in mind as well as the heft of the technology's contribution to mankind. 229


Again as in day 2, be sure to journal your findings and record your thoughts (metadata) on related ideas, questions for further exploration. Remember, you may use bullet points to jot notes but a minimum of 4 thoughts per hyperlink is required. This is your jump off point so I am sure it will be very easy to create 4 or more bullets per site visited.

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Activity Day 3 Today you will take the exploration research that you have complied and begin your analysis of each technology for their importance and impact upon mankind. Begin to ask yourself, "Is this technology more important than that technology? If so, why? How does its value relate in importance to the other technology?"

HOW TO PRIORITIZE This link will help you develop a criterion for figuring out what is most important when everything seems important! In your journal, create a new page with the heading, "Rank Order of The Most Important Technologies In Time." Rank each technology in order of importance and value to the contribution to mankind with "1" being the most important and the less important following downward as, "2,3,4‌" Include in your rank order your metadata of why you created the rank that you did for the technology so as to be able to reflect upon your thoughts at a later date with accuracy and line of reasoning. The collection of metadata is a valuable tool that you will be able to use throughout your entire academic life. You will find that a cataloging of your thoughts will insure further and different thoughts when you go back to them!

Activity Day 4 Today you will look to your notes for main points that you would like to include in your speech. With these cards, remember to: 1- Include only one thought per card. 2Write legibly and clearly. 3- Do not number your cards, as you will manipulate the order of them prior to creating your rough draft. 4- Rather than using a separate sheet of notebook paper for notes as cited in the hyperlink, I would like you to put your notes on the reverse side of the card so that you have a single 231


idea on the front of the card and notes on the backside of the same card. 5- A minimum of 12 Index cards filled out front and back is required for today's activity

USING INDEXCARDS TO ORGANIZE A SPEECH This hyperlink will guide you in how to organize your thoughts in organizing an outline for a speech.

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Activity Day 5 OBAMA SPEECH TO THE UNITED NATIONS In order to get you in the frame of mind to write a speech worthy of the President of the United States of America, please take a moment to watch President Obama address the United Nations in 2010. Pay attention to the way that President Obama speaks. Listen for the rhythm of his speech patterns. Listen for the sound of "Presidential" words and the tone of his delivery. In addition to the content of his speech, these are all additional thoughts that you must consider if you are to write a speech worthy of the President of the United States. Remember: the main point the speech that you will write for the President is what he believes the single most important technological contribution to mankind to be. At the same time, you must convey how we should appreciate its value above the other many great contributions from other equally as important cultures. Writing your rough draft can be a challenging task. Feel free to consult the other speechwriters in your class to bounce ideas off of one another. Collaboration is a great way to pre-test the strength of your ideas as your fellow speechwriters will be likely to give you instant feedback. Important too is to notice their body language as you share your ideas. Be aware of the look on people's faces as you share your ideas. Note their seriousness, the way their eyes focus upon you as you speak, and conversely, the rolling of their eyes as you speak. These gestures and body language cues all convey how the listener is receiving and processing your message. For your rough draft, a minimum of 3 pages is required for my review and consultation with you on day 6.

Activity Day 6 Today I will consult with each of you to go over your rough drafts. Please have your rough draft printed out and with the proper format (SEE TASK SECTION: ROUGH DRAFT). In our consultation, I will be looking for the following items and thoughts in your rough draft of your speech for President Obama: 233


1- Do you have a topic sentence? 2- Does your topic sentence define a belief or opinion? 3- Does your rough draft defend your thoughts and opinions with facts and practical application? Opinions without backing mean little. Opinions with clear reasoning,

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evidence, and conviction can change the world. 4- Does your rough draft acknowledge contributions from other cultures and name technologies specifically? 5- Is your rough draft written with clear, complete sentences? 6- Does your rough draft follow a logical order of your thoughts or is it a random collection of ideas? 7- Do I agree or disagree with your position on what the single greatest contribution of technology to culture and mankind or do I walk away not agreeing with you? After our consultation, please edit to include any changes that you would like to make to your speech in its final draft. Remember, the final draft is what you will hand to the President so be sure that you are confident in its ability to make a point and be persuasive. He will deliver to the world's leaders you hand to him. IF YOU NEED A SECOND CONSULTATION PLEASE, BY ALL MEANS, ASK FOR ONE. I WANT TO HELP YOU IN ANY WAY THAT I CAN TO HAVE YOU REALIZE YOUR FULL POTENTIAL AS AN EFFECTIVE AND PERSUASIVE WRITER!

Activity Day 7 In your final day of your WebQuest, you will have fun in creating a "Presidential" looking speech. You have free reign in this activity with regard to creative design. The only requirements I have for this day's activity in creating a cover for your speech is as follows: 1- It must be titled. 2- The author must be cited below the title. 3- It must include the date. Remember, the artwork is up to you! Please check the hyperlinks to obtain ideas and art to make the cover of your speech look fabulous! PRESIDENTIAL SEAL Here you will find examples of the many different iterations for the 235


seal of the President of the United States of America. UNITED NATIONS SEAL Here you will find examples of the many different iteration for the seal of the United Nations General Assembly.

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INFORMATION AT A GLANCE ON THE UNITED NATIONS There is more detailed information on the United Nations at this link if you do not find what you need at the previous link. THE WHITE HOUSE Information regarding the White House may be found at this link. You will find logos for the White House here but I would not advise you to include random images of the White House, as your speech is not about the White House.

E valuate and Revise Assessing Learner Achievement Students will be assessed on their ability to navigate the Internet in their 7 day WebQuest. They will encounter many different sources of information, which will require them to collect, synthesize and evaluate a great deal of material in their development of a thesis. The student must construct sound and logical arguments in order to support what they believe to be the single most life-changing technological development in the history of world culture. Students will be assessed on the logical order of their speech as well as grammar, spelling, and sentence structure. I will utilize the following rubric in order to be able to assess this project fairly and without bias.

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E valuating and Revising Strategies, Technology, and Media.

The ASURE Lesson Plan provided explicit directions, rich in details for students to be able to produce a meritable thesis. There are times however, that despite all precise planning, modifications and improvements need to be made. I will look to embellish further iterations with the addition of more student and instructor directed scaffolding. Though this lesson offers moments for student collaboration, future iterations of it may incorporate a Collaborative Learning component, more tailored for group activity. At the completion of this ASSURE Lesson, I will also be better able to evaluate if more time is needed for the completion of the research, writing, and consultation portions of this assignment. In conclusion, extra set up and explanation time was allotted to my two special needs students. A review of the accommodations provided to special needs students will be conducted to ensure that an equitable learning opportunity is afforded to all future students participating in this ASURE Lesson Plan.

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“CONGRATULATIONS! YOU ARE MY NEW SPEECHWRITER. YOUR FIRST ASSIGNMENT? WRITE A SPEECH FOR ME TO PRESENT TO THE UNITED NATIONS. ARE YOU UP TO THE CHALLENGE?”

A WebQuest for 6th Grade Social Studies Designed by Christopher Washko christopherwashko@gmail.com

This WebQuest is based upon the following Tennessee State 6th grade Social Studies Standards:

6.1.05 Understand the role that diverse cultures and historical experiences had on the development of the world.

6.1.06 Understand the influence of science and technology on the development of culture through time.

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Navigation Bar Introduction | Task | Process | Evaluation | Conclusion | Credits

INTRODUCTION

Like you, President Barack Obama is a skilled, daily user of technology. He has both a Blackberry and an Iphone and is an avid Mac user. When United Nation’s Chairman Ban Kimoon learned of Obama’s love of technology, he asked Obama to give a speech to the United Nations to acknowledge what he believed to be the greatest technological contribution from any culture in history. It will be your responsibility as the new President’s new Speech Writer to research the world’s many cultures in search of the greatest technological contribution to mankind. You will find that man’s inquisitive nature has motivated him all throughout time to explore the sciences and develop many interesting technologies. Moreover, you will discover that people from all cultures have made wonderful technological contributions to mankind. Your task will be to write a speech for the President that pays homage to the many great technological contributions from cultures the world over but argues for what he believes to be the single greatest technological contribution to mankind. President Obama will give the speech that you write to the United Nations General Assembly in New York City. Are you up to the challenge? I think that you are!

Task

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In your new role as Presidential Speech Writer, you will embark upon a 7-day web quest. The first section of your WebQuest will last 2 days and will consist of exploration & journaling whereby you will scour the history of technological development and record your findings. On day 3 of your web quest, your task will be to analyze & rank the discoveries that you have made in your exploration. This section will require you to enlist critical thinking skills as you analyze the technology to assign it a rank number relative to its contributory value to world culture. On day 4 of your quest, you will begin your speech writing process whereby you will use Index cards to catalog main points to arrange in a logical order. On day 5 you begin your rough draft of the speech that you will deliver to President Obama. On day 6, you will revise and complete your final draft of the speech. On day 7, you will create a cover for your final version of the speech to make it worthy of Presidential acceptance. Remember that throughout this process, you will be discovering new material and synthesizing many different bits of information in order produce a narrative that explains why the technology that you chose as supreme is the single greatest technological contribution to mankind.

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Exploration & Journaling

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In your exploration of the technological contributions from different cultures throughout time, you will be required to take good notes in the Research Journal provided. Keep in mind the following as you explore: 1- The impact and importance of the technology. 2- Its influence upon mankind. 3- The country and culture of origin. Your notes must be thorough and legible and may be taken in bullet point form. You may also make sketches. I encourage you to include metadata of your thoughts along the exploration process. You will be supplied with hyperlinks to direct your exploration.

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Analyze & Rank In the analysis and ranking portion of your quest, you will need to develop a ranking for the impact and importance of the technologies that you have explored. You will be supplied with hyperlinks to help develop your own personal criteria for creating a rank. The rank order that you create will help you identify the most important technological development in the history of the development of world culture that you will argue for and defend in the speech that you will write for President Obama.

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Organize The Speech In this phase of your WebQuest, you will organize your speech via individual Index cards. Index cards are a great strategy that allows you to have a global view of your many ideas. Using index cards also allows you to move your ideas about easily in the construction of a logical and well-organized speech. It is important to note that only one idea per card is allowed. You will be supported with hyperlinks to give you support in this process.

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Rough Draft All well-written speeches begin with a rough draft. A rough draft is the first attempt at writing your speech based upon the structure that you developed in index card stage. Your rough draft should be written with observation of the following format rules: 1. Create your speech in a document using Microsoft Word. Name it “Obama Speech-your name.doc” 2. Double space between lines. 3. Use Times New Roman, 12-point font.

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4. Your Font color should be Royal Blue. 5. Margins should be 1” borders all around 6. The speech should be a minimum of three pages in length. It is often the case that White House Speech Writers bounce ideas off of one another in order to produce the best possible speech for the President on any topic that he requests. Feel free to consult with your fellow speechwriters on the validity and power of your ideas, if you encounter writers block, etc.

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Revise & Final Draft I will be available to help you through the revision and final draft process of your speech writing. In this phase of the quest, I ask that you remain quiet with your thoughts. Go over them in your head. Reflect upon the words that you are writing and how they will sound as President Obama is delivering them to the world leaders. In this phase, you must think, reflect, revise, and create oratory art! I have included a hyperlink of a previous United Nations speech by President Obama to get you into the frame of mind of what sounding “Presidential” is like.

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Adorn & Present In the final phase of your quest, you will prepare your speech for presentation to the President. The speech must look Presidential and be presented with the proper appearance appropriate to the office of the President. The speech must have a cover that includes the symbol of the President as well as that of the United Nations. It must be precisely titled and its author must be cited below the title. Include the date below the author. I have included hyperlinks for you to explore the symbols required for a proper Presidential speech.

STANDARDS 1.05 Understand the role that diverse cultures and historical experiences had on the development of the world. 1.06 Understand the influence of science and technology on the development of culture through time.

PROCESS

ACTIVITY DAY 1 YOU WILL BEGIN BY RESEARCHING TECHNOLOGICAL CONTRIBUTIONS FROM CULTURES THE WORLD OVER. REMEMBER, TECHNOLOGIES DO NOT HAVE TO BE COMPLICATED IN ORDER TO BE

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MIRACULOUS AND HAVE INCREDIBLE IMPACT UPON OUR WORLD’S CULTURE. PRIMITIVE TECHNOLOGIES WERE MOTIVATED BY THE SCIENTIFICALLY INQUISITIVE MIND OF MAN IN ORDER TO MAKE THEIR LIVES EASIER, MORE PRODUCTIVE, MORE EFFICIENT, AND SOMETIMES MORE FUN. BE SURE TO TAKE NOTES ON IN YOUR JOURNAL ON WHAT YOU HAVE DISCOVERED. ALL THE WHILE IN YOUR EXPLORATION PROCESS, PLEASE KEEP IN MIND THAT YOU ARE TO BE THINKING ABOUT THE ROLE THAT THIS TECHNOLOGY PLAYED, THE PART OF THE WORLD THAT IT WAS DEVELOPED, AND HOW IT IMPROVED THE CULTURE OF THAT PARTICULAR GROUP. PLEASE EXPLORE THE HYPERLINKS TO GET YOUR EXPLORATION STARTED. NOTE: HYPERLINKS IN THIS WEBQUEST WILL ALWAYS BE CITED AS ALL CAPS AND UNDERLINED.

YOUTUBE THIS VIDEO WILL GIVE YOU AN INFORMATIVE AND INTERESTING OVERVIEW OF SOME OF THE MOST INCREDIBLE TECHNOLOGICAL CONTRIBUTIONS ON HISTORY AND GET YOUR MIND THINKING. HISTORY CHANNEL TODAY’S DEVELOPMENTS IN TECHNOLOGY OWE A LOT TO THE DEVELOPMENTS OF THE CULTURES OF THE PAST. THEIR DEVELOPMENTS, PROCEDURES AND IDEAS EMPOWERED MANKIND TO ESTABLISH THE FRAMEWORK FOR LIFE IN THE CUTTING EDGE WORLD.

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TECHNOLOGY TIMELINE CONSULT THIS LINK TO MOTIVATE EXPLORATION INTO TECHNOLOGIES THAT YOU MIGHT NOT HAVE OTHERWISE IMAGINED. BE SURE TO JOURNAL YOUR FINDINGS AND RECORD YOUR THOUGHTS (METADATA) ON RELATED IDEAS, QUESTIONS FOR FURTHER EXPLORATION. REMEMBER, YOU MAY USE BULLET POINTS TO JOT NOTES BUT A MINIMUM OF 4 THOUGHTS PER HYPERLINK IS REQUIRED. THIS IS YOUR JUMP OFF POINT SO I AM SURE IT WILL BE VERY EASY TO CREATE 4 OR MORE BULLETS PER SITE VISITED.

ACTIVITY DAY 2 THE EXPLORATION AND JOURNALING PORTION OF YOUR WEBQUEST CONTINUES TODAY WITH A MORE SPECIFIC EXPLORATION OF ANCIENT CIVILIZATIONS. ANCIENT EGYPT HERE’S A LOOK AT EGYPTIAN HISTORY AND THEIR MANY CONTRIBUTIONS TO TECHNOLOGY. ANCIENT CHINA HERE’S A LOOK AT CHINESE CONTRIBUTIONS TO TECHNOLOGY. TECHNOLOGY & INVENTIONS OF AFRICA HERE’S A LOOK AT THE TECHNOLOGY AND INVENTIONS EMANATING FROM AFRICA. 19TH CENTURY TECHNOLOGY (AND OTHER CENTURIES TOO)

YOU

WILL ACQUIRE A GREAT DEAL OF INFORMATION FOR FURTHER EXPLORATION AT THIS SITE. REMEMBER TO KEEP THE CULTURE OF

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ORIGIN IN MIND AS WELL AS THE HEFT OF THE TECHNOLOGY’S CONTRIBUTION TO MANKIND. AGAIN AS IN DAY 2, BE SURE TO JOURNAL YOUR FINDINGS AND RECORD YOUR THOUGHTS (METADATA) ON RELATED IDEAS, QUESTIONS FOR FURTHER EXPLORATION. REMEMBER, YOU MAY USE BULLET POINTS TO JOT NOTES BUT A MINIMUM OF 4 THOUGHTS PER HYPERLINK IS REQUIRED.

THIS IS YOUR JUMP OFF POINT SO I AM SURE IT WILL BE

VERY EASY TO CREATE 4 OR MORE BULLETS PER SITE VISITED.

ACTIVITY DAY 3 TODAY YOU WILL TAKE THE EXPLORATION RESEARCH THAT YOU HAVE COMPLIED AND BEGIN YOUR ANALYSIS OF EACH TECHNOLOGY FOR THEIR IMPORTANCE AND IMPACT UPON MANKIND. BEGIN TO ASK YOURSELF, “IS THIS TECHNOLOGY MORE IMPORTANT THAN THAT TECHNOLOGY? IF SO, WHY? HOW DOES ITS VALUE RELATE IN IMPORTANCE TO THE OTHER TECHNOLOGY?”

HOW TO PRIORITIZE

THIS LINK WILL HELP YOU DEVELOP A

CRITERIA FOR FIGURING OUT WHAT IS MOST IMPORTANT WHEN EVERYTHING SEEMS IMPORTANT! IN YOUR JOURNAL, CREATE A NEW PAGE WITH THE HEADING, “RANK ORDER OF THE MOST IMPORTANT TECHNOLOGIES IN TIME.” RANK EACH TECHNOLOGY IN ORDER OF IMPORTANCE AND VALUE TO THE

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CONTRIBUTION TO MANKIND WITH “1” BEING THE MOST IMPORTANT AND THE LESS IMPORTANT FOLLOWING DOWNWARD AS, “2,3,4…” INCLUDE IN YOUR RANK ORDER YOUR METADATA OF WHY YOU CREATED THE RANK THAT YOU DID FOR THE TECHNOLOGY SO AS TO BE ABLE TO REFLECT UPON YOUR THOUGHTS AT A LATER DATE WITH ACCURACY AND LINE OF REASONING. THE COLLECTION OF METADATA IS A VALUABLE TOOL THAT YOU WILL BE ABLE TO USE THROUGHOUT YOUR ENTIRE ACADEMIC LIFE. YOU WILL FIND THAT A CATALOGING OF YOUR THOUGHTS WILL INSURE FURTHER AND DIFFERENT THOUGHTS WHEN YOU GO BACK TO THEM!

ACTIVITY DAY 4 TODAY YOU WILL LOOK TO YOUR NOTES FOR MAIN POINTS THAT YOU WOULD LIKE TO INCLUDE IN YOUR SPEECH. WITH THESE CARDS, REMEMBER TO: 1- INCLUDE ONLY ONE THOUGHT PER CARD. 2- WRITE LEGIBLY AND CLEARLY. 3- DO NOT NUMBER YOUR CARDS, AS YOU WILL MANIPULATE THE ORDER OF THEM PRIOR TO CREATING YOUR ROUGH DRAFT. 4- RATHER THAN USING A SEPARATE SHEET OF NOTEBOOK PAPER FOR NOTES AS CITED IN THE HYPERLINK, I WOULD LIKE YOU TO PUT YOUR NOTES ON THE REVERSE SIDE OF THE CARD SO THAT YOU HAVE A SINGLE IDEA ON THE FRONT OF THE CARD

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AND NOTES ON THE BACKSIDE OF THE SAME CARD. 5- A MINIMUM OF 12 INDEX CARDS FILLED OUT FRONT AND BACK IS REQUIRED FOR TODAY’S ACTIVITY

USING INDEXCARDS TO ORGANIZE A SPEECH

THIS HYPERLINK

WILL GUIDE YOU IN HOW TO ORGANIZE YOUR THOUGHTS IN ORGANIZING AN OUTLINE FOR A SPEECH.

ACTIVITY DAY 5 OBAMA SPEECH TO THE UNITED NATIONS

IN ORDER TO GET YOU

IN THE FRAME OF MIND TO WRITE A SPEECH WORTHY OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, PLEASE TAKE A MOMENT TO WATCH PRESIDENT OBAMA ADDRESS THE UNITED NATIONS IN 2010. PAY ATTENTION TO THE WAY THAT PRESIDENT OBAMA SPEAKS. LISTEN FOR THE RHYTHM OF HIS SPEECH PATTERNS. LISTEN FOR THE SOUND OF “PRESIDENTIAL” WORDS AND THE TONE OF HIS DELIVERY. IN ADDITION TO THE CONTENT OF HIS SPEECH, THESE ARE ALL ADDITIONAL THOUGHTS THAT YOU MUST CONSIDER IF YOU ARE TO WRITE A SPEECH WORTHY OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES. REMEMBER: THE MAIN POINT THE SPEECH THAT YOU WILL WRITE FOR THE PRESIDENT IS WHAT HE BELIEVES THE SINGLE MOST IMPORTANT TECHNOLOGICAL CONTRIBUTION TO MANKIND TO BE. AT THE SAME TIME, YOU MUST CONVEY HOW WE SHOULD APPRECIATE ITS VALUE

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ABOVE THE OTHER MANY GREAT CONTRIBUTIONS FROM OTHER EQUALLY AS IMPORTANT CULTURES. WRITING YOUR ROUGH DRAFT CAN BE A CHALLENGING TASK. FEEL FREE TO CONSULT THE OTHER SPEECHWRITERS IN YOUR CLASS TO BOUNCE IDEAS OFF OF ONE ANOTHER. COLLABORATION IS A GREAT WAY TO PRE-TEST THE STRENGTH OF YOUR IDEAS AS YOUR FELLOW SPEECHWRITERS WILL BE LIKELY TO GIVE YOU INSTANT FEEDBACK. IMPORTANT TOO IS TO NOTICE THEIR BODY LANGUAGE AS YOU SHARE YOUR IDEAS. BE AWARE OF THE LOOK ON PEOPLE’S FACES AS YOU SHARE YOUR IDEAS. NOTE THEIR SERIOUSNESS, THE WAY THEIR EYES FOCUS UPON YOU AS YOU SPEAK, AND CONVERSELY, THE ROLLING OF THEIR EYES AS YOU SPEAK. THESE GESTURES AND BODY LANGUAGE CUES ALL CONVEY HOW THE LISTENER IS RECEIVING AND PROCESSING YOUR MESSAGE. FOR YOUR ROUGH DRAFT, A MINIMUM OF 3 PAGES IS REQUIRED FOR MY REVIEW AND CONSULTATION WITH YOU ON DAY 6.

ACTIVITY DAY 6 TODAY I WILL CONSULT WITH EACH OF YOU TO GO OVER YOUR ROUGH DRAFTS. PLEASE HAVE YOUR ROUGH DRAFT PRINTED OUT AND WITH THE PROPER FORMAT (SEE TASK SECTION: ROUGH DRAFT).

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IN OUR CONSULTATION, I WILL BE LOOKING FOR THE FOLLOWING ITEMS AND THOUGHTS IN YOUR ROUGH DRAFT OF YOUR SPEECH FOR PRESIDENT OBAMA: 1- DO YOU HAVE A TOPIC SENTENCE? 2- DOES YOUR TOPIC SENTENCE DEFINE A BELIEF OR OPINION? 3- DOES YOUR ROUGH DRAFT DEFEND YOUR THOUGHTS AND OPINIONS WITH FACTS AND PRACTICAL APPLICATION? OPINIONS WITHOUT BACKING MEAN LITTLE. OPINIONS WITH CLEAR REASONING, EVIDENCE, AND CONVICTION CAN CHANGE THE WORLD. 4- DOES YOUR ROUGH DRAFT ACKNOWLEDGE CONTRIBUTIONS FROM OTHER CULTURES AND NAME TECHNOLOGIES SPECIFICALLY? 5- IS YOUR ROUGH DRAFT WRITTEN WITH CLEAR, COMPLETE SENTENCES? 6- DOES YOUR ROUGH DRAFT FOLLOW A LOGICAL ORDER OF YOUR THOUGHTS OR IS IT A RANDOM COLLECTION OF IDEAS? 7- DO I AGREE OR DISAGREE WITH YOUR POSITION ON WHAT THE SINGLE GREATEST CONTRIBUTION OF TECHNOLOGY TO CULTURE AND MANKIND OR DO I WALK AWAY NOT AGREEING WITH YOU? AFTER OUR CONSULTATION, PLEASE EDIT TO INCLUDE ANY CHANGES THAT YOU WOULD LIKE TO MAKE TO YOUR SPEECH IN ITS

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FINAL DRAFT. REMEMBER, THE FINAL DRAFT IS WHAT YOU WILL HAND TO THE PRESIDENT SO BE SURE THAT YOU ARE CONFIDENT IN ITS ABILITY TO MAKE A POINT AND BE PERSUASIVE. HE WILL DELIVER TO THE WORLD’S LEADERS YOU HAND TO HIM. IF YOU NEED A SECOND CONSULTATION PLEASE, BY ALL MEANS, ASK FOR ONE. I WANT TO HELP YOU IN ANY WAY THAT I CAN TO HAVE YOU REALIZE YOUR FULL POTENTIAL AS AN EFFECTIVE AND PERSUASIVE WRITER!

ACTIVITY DAY 7 IN YOUR FINAL DAY OF YOUR WEBQUEST, YOU WILL HAVE FUN IN CREATING A “PRESIDENTIAL” LOOKING SPEECH. YOU HAVE FREE REIGN IN THIS ACTIVITY WITH REGARD TO CREATIVE DESIGN. THE ONLY REQUIREMENTS I HAVE FOR THIS DAYS ACTIVITY IN CREATING A COVER FOR YOUR SPEECH IS AS FOLLOWS: 1- IT MUST BE TITLED. 2- THE AUTHOR MUST BE CITED BELOW THE TITLE. 3- IT MUST INCLUDE THE DATE. REMEMBER, THE ARTWORK IS UP TO YOU! PLEASE CHECK THE HYPERLINKS TO OBTAIN IDEAS AND ART TO MAKE THE COVER OF YOUR SPEECH LOOK FABULOUS! PRESIDENTIAL SEAL HERE YOU WILL FIND EXAMPLES OF THE MANY DIFFERENT ITERATIONS FOR THE SEAL OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

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UNITED NATIONS SEAL HERE YOU WILL FIND EXAMPLES OF THE MANY DIFFERENT ITERATION FOR THE SEAL OF THE UNITED NATIONS GENERAL ASSEMBLY. INFORMATION AT A GLANCE ON THE UNITED NATIONS THERE IS MORE DETAILED INFORMATION ON THE UNITED NATIONS AT THIS LINK IF YOU DO NOT FIND WHAT YOU NEED AT THE PREVIOUS LINK. THE WHITE HOUSE INFORMATION REGARDING THE WHITE HOUSE MAY BE FOUND AT THIS LINK. YOU WILL FIND LOGOS FOR THE WHITE HOUSE HERE BUT I WOULD NOT ADVISE YOU TO INCLUDE RANDOM IMAGES OF THE WHITE HOUSE AS. YOUR SPEECH IS NOT ABOUT THE WHITE HOUSE.

Evaluation Rubric

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Dale McCoy Unit Rationale - World Religions

In this seventh grade unit, we will be learning about 5 most prevalent religions through history. Students need to learn these different religions so there are more aware of different cultural differences some of their peers may have, as well as, an understanding of where their own religion may have originated. Students will be looking into the key differences and similarities the religions have as it relates to social norms and society. Students will research different religions found if different geographical regions of the world. How do religions impact who we are? How do religions perceive us to interact with others in the world? Students need to be provided with different activities and environments to study and see exactly how religion influences society. Knowledge of different religions is important for students to know because it is part of everyone’s daily life. In order for students to move forward in their personal growth in is important they know where they have come. This holds true about the history of religion and each of the big 5’s belief structure.

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Studying and understanding interdependence in science is a learning expectation covered under Tennessee Social Studies standards 7.1.spi.1. recognize cultural definitions (i.e., language, religion, customs, political system, economic system). 7.1.spi.2. locate cultural information on a thematic map (i.e., languages, political systems, economic systems, religions). 7.1.spi.3. compare and contrast the tenets of the five major world religions (i.e., Christianity, Buddhism, Islam, Hinduism, and Judaism).

Present.Me: http://present.me/view/164125-­�religion_tell_them_in_10

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ASSURE Lesson Plan 8th Grade – Social Studies Academic Vocabulary

A nalyze Learners General Characteristics

The eight grade class for our team at John Early Museum Magnet Middle School is comprised of 70 students; 40 females and 30 males. The students range in age from thirteen years to fifteen years. Student diversity consists of 1%white/non-Hispanic, 98% African American, and 1% other. Of the 70 students, 65% cannot read on a 4th grade reading level. I have two of mu four blocks that have a total of 14 IEPs not counting the students on low reading levels. The median household income of families in Gallatin is around $30,125 and over 97% free or reduced lunch.

Entry Competencies Curricular: Expect students to respond to written and verbal communication that ranges from below to above grade level proficiency. As well as, the students being able to have general knowledge of how the vocabulary was used throughout the year

Technological: Expect students to have general knowledge of what a computer and its peripherals are comprised of (monitor, CPU, printer, keyboard, and mouse), be able to navigate the internet, basic keyboarding skills, and some experience with computer usage either through creating documents, presentations, social networking or gaming.

S tate Standards and Objectives

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Curricular Standards

Technology Standards

1. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.7

1.Creativity and Innovation

Integrate visual information (e.g., in charts, graphs, photographs, videos, or maps) with other information in print and digital texts.

2. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.68.10 BY THE END OF GRADE 8, READ AND COMPREHEND HISTORY/SOCIAL STUDIES TEXTS IN THE GRADES 6-8 TEXT COMPLEXITY BAND INDEPENDENTLY AND PROFICIENTLY.

Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge, and develop innovative products and processes using technology. Students: a.

apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes.

b.

create original works as a means of personal or group expression.

c.

use models and simulations to explore complex systems and issues.

d.identify trends and forecast possibilities.

Lesson Objectives

THE STUDENT EXPLORES WITH A LIST OF 35 WORDS WILL COMPLETE THE FOLLOWING: • • • • •

FIND THE DEFINITION FIND A PICTURE ON THE INTERNET WOULD HAVE REPRESENTED THIS WORD IN THE PAST FIND A PICTURE ON THE INTERNET THAT WOULD REPRESENT THIS WORD IN THE PRESENT IN YOUR OWN WORDS, WRITE WHAT THE TERM MEANS TO YOU CREATE A WAY TO REMEMBER THIS WORD AND ITS MEANING, OR DESCRIBE HOW YOU REMEMBER WHAT THIS WORD MEANS

WHEN YOU HAVE THIS INFORMATION, CREATE A POWERPOINT WITH 1 SLIDE PER WORD. THERE SHOULD BE 35 SLIDES IN TOTAL. THE STUDENT AT THIS TIME SHOULD SEE HOW THE WORD RELATES TO THE PAST AND PRESENT DAY HISTORIES.

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S elect Strategies, Technology, Media, and Materials *Note: Any websites used must be cited in APA format. Curricular Materials

Social Studies Book

Paper

• • •

Technology Materials

Computers w/internet access (Lenovo cart)

Pencils

Projector (TC)

Webquest instructions

Screen

Checkpoint paper

PowerPoint software (SC)

U tilize Technology, Media, and Materials

Preview & Prepare Materials •

One Social Studies book per student available brought from locker (5 are located in the last cabinet)

Scratch paper available for students if needed (located in bottom right hand drawer of desk)

Pencils are the responsibility of the student (NO extra pencils)

Make sure Lenovo C.O.W is operating properly with internet access (Cart will be with Mr. Finch)

Make sure projector is operating properly

Make sure screen is functioning properly

Make sure PowerPoint software is operating properly

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Prepare the Environment •

Desks are arranged for lecture learning environment (no rearranging necessary).

Computers are charging in C.O.W (no rearranging necessary)

Prepare the Learners •

Introduce the Webquest to the students asking them to read and underline or write down any questions they may have.

Explain to the students the Task of the webquest

Explain how being able to see how these words are used in the modern world will help students understand how the history of these word has changed over time.

R equire Learner Participation PROCESS

TO ACCOMPLISH THIS TASK YOU WILL TAKE EACH DAY AND USE IT TO YOUR MAXIMUM POTENTIAL. AT THE END OF THE DAY MAKE SURE TO EMAIL YOUR WORK TO YOUR TEACHER AND YOURSELF FOR SAFE KEEPING. (IF YOU DO NOT HAVE AN EMAIL MAKE SURE YOUR BRING YOUR 2 GB FLASH DRIVE TO CLASS EVERYDAY) MONDAY- MAKE A LIST IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER OF THE WORDS WITH THEIR TECHNICAL DEFINITIONS FOR THIS TASK YOU CAN USE THE SITES LISTED BELOW OR OTHERS THAT YOU FIND.

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• DICTIONARY- THIS LINK HAS BOTH THE DICTIONARY AND A THESAURUS TO HELP YOU FIGURE OUT WHAT THE WORD MEAN AND OTHER HELPFUL ADVICE. • WEBSTER- THE FOLLOWING WEBSITE IS A SIMPLER DESIGN THAN DICTIONARY.COM. THIS WEBSITE ALSO HAS A THESAURUS. THE INTERESTING ABOUT THIS SITE IS THAT YOU COULD FIND A COUPLE OF PICTURES IN THIS SITE AS WELL AS THE DEFINITIONS • VOCABULARY-THIS IS JUST A STRAIGHT DICTIONARY FOR THOSE WHO LIKE IT SIMPLE REMEMBER THE GOAL FOR THE DAY IS ALL THE WORDS LISTED AND DEFINED. MAKE SURE YOU ARE USING A WORD DOCUMENT FOR THIS TASK SO WHEN YOU ARE READY FOR YOUR POWERPOINT ALL YOU HAVE TO DO IS COPY AND PASTE. TUESDAY- TODAY EACH STUDENT WILL TYPE WHAT EACH WORD MEANS IN THEIR OWN WORDS. THE STUDENTS WILL ALSO USE THE TIME TO FINISH UP ANYTHING THAT WAS NOT COMPLETED ON MONDAY.

WEDNESDAY- NOW THAT ALL OF YOUR WORDS ARE DEFINED AND TYPED, IT IS TIME TO FIND THE PICTURES THE ALIENS ASKED FOR. USE THE FOLLOWING WEBSITES TO HELP YOU ON YOUR WAY:

§ LIBRARY OF CONGRESS PICTURE ARCHIVE- THIS WEBSITE HAS ALL THE PICTURES THAT THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS HAS ARCHIVES OVER THE LAST COUPLE HUNDRED YEARS. IF YOU NEED TO FIND SOMETHING IT IS HEAR, BUT YOU MAY HAVE TO WADE THROUGH A COUPLE OF PAGES UNTIL YOU FIND SOMETHING YOU LIKE.

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§ CIA FACT BOOK- ANOTHER WONDERFUL RESOURCE TO FIND DIFFERENT TYPES OF GOVERNMENTS AND BE ABLE TO RELATE THEM WITH THE WORLD PRESENTLY *AS YOU MAY KNOW GOOGLE IMAGE IS TURNED OFF ON SCHOOL COMPUTERS, BUT IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO USE THIS SEARCH TOOL TO HELP FIND YOUR IMAGES BE SURE TO SITE THE PICTURE FROM THE ORIGINAL WEBPAGE NOT FROM GOOGLE IMAGES. THURSDAY- STUDENTS MUST START PLACING THE PICTURES WE FOUND INTO OUR POWERPOINT. YOU MAY WANT TO CONSIDER A POWERPOINT TUTORIAL LINK OR VIDEO HERE FOR THOSE STUDENTS THAT NEED TO UNDERSTAND THIS TOOL OR REINFORCE THIS SKILL. EACH

WORD AND THEIR CORRESPONDING PICTURES HAVE A SLIDE. SINCE THE LIST STUDENTS TYPED AND DEFINITIONS ARE IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER, COPY AND PASTE IN THE POWERPOINT WILL BE A BREEZE. FRIDAY- THIS IS THE LAST DAY YOU WILL HAVE TO ACCOMPLISH THIS TASK IN CLASS. MAKE SURE ALL THE WORDS ARE SPELLED CORRECTLY AND THE PICTURES MATCH THE WORDS ON EACH SLIDE. THE FINAL COPY WILL HAVE TO BE EMAILED TO THE FOLLOWING ADDRESS DALE.MCCOY@MNPS.ORG.

E valuate and Revise Assessing Learner Achievement

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The learners will be assessed on their abilities to successfully fulfill the webquest by using a rubric.

Powerpoint Content  :  Past,  Present…Future?   Teacher  Name:  Mr.  McCoy  

Student Name:          ________________________________________   CATEGORY

 

20 Points each

17 Points each

15 Points each

10 Points each

Background does not detract from text or other graphics. Choice of background is consistent from card to card and is appropriate for the topic.

Background does not detract from text or other graphics. Choice of background is consistent from card to card.

Background does not detract from text or other graphics.

Background makes it difficult to see text or competes with other graphics on the page.

Presentation has no misspellings or grammatical errors.

Presentation has 1-2 misspellings, but no grammatical errors.

Presentation has 1-2 grammatical errors but no misspellings.

Presentation has more than 2 grammatical and/or spelling errors.

All pictures are relevant (size and colors) and support the theme/content of the presentation.

A few Pictures are not relevant but all support the theme/content of the presentation.

All graphics are relevant but a few do not seem to support the theme/content of the presentation.

Several graphics are irrelevant AND detract from the content of the presentation.

Alphabetical order

Vocabulary is organized in a clear, logical way. It is easy to anticipate the type of material that might be on the next card.

Most vocabulary is organized in a clear, logical way. One card or item of information seems out of place.

Some Vocabulary is logically sequenced. An occasional card or item of information seems out of place.

There is no clear plan for the organization of vocabulary.

All 44?

All Vocabulary words throughout the presentation are accurately depicted. There are no factual

Most of the Vocabulary is accurate but there is one piece of information that might be inaccurate.

The vocabulary is generally accurate, but one piece of information is

Vocabulary is typically confusing or contains more than one factual error.

Pimp my PowerPoint

CCSS.ELALITERACY.RH.6-8.7

Spelling and Grammar

CCSS.ELALITERACY.RH.6-8.10

Past and Present Pictures

CCSS.ELALITERACY.RH.6-8.7

CCSS.ELA-

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LITERACY.RH.6-8.10

errors.

clearly flawed or inaccurate.

Evaluating and Revising Strategies, Technology, and Media

The teacher will determine if PowerPoint is designed correctly helped the student explorers discover what Academic vocabulary discussed in Social Studies stand the test of time. Students will also see how the words used in the past can help define the future. The teacher will determine if the pictures and student definitions on each slide met he appropriate criteria for actually creating something original.

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PAST, PRESENT…FUTURE?

+

=

A WebQuest for 8th Grade Academic Vocabulary for Social Studies Designed by Mr. McCoy dale.mccoy@mnps.org Introduction | Task | Process | Evaluation | Conclusion | Credits | INTRODUCTION

THE TRIAL OF THE TIME MACHINE WAS AN AMAZING FEAT. UNFORTUNATELY, BECAUSE THE SPACE TIME CONTINUUM WAS INTERRUPTED, THE ALIENS NOTICED OUR PRESENCE IN THE UNIVERSE. ALSO, THE DAY YOU PICKED TO GO BACK WAS THE SAME AS THE “UFO SIGHTINGS” IN ROSWELL, NEW MEXICO. THE ONLY DIFFERENCE IN THIS DIMENSION IS THAT THE ALIENS ABDUCTED YOU AND WOULD LIKE YOU TO COMPLETE A PROJECT FOR THEM. THIS PROJECT WILL DETERMINE IF HUMANITY IS ERADICATED OR PRAISED FOR ITS USE OF TIME TRAVEL. YOU ARE THE ONLY THING SEPARATING LIFE AND DEATH FOR HUMANITY. SUCCESS!

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TASK

THE TASK THE ALIENS GAVE YOU SEEMS SIMPLE ENOUGH, YOU HAVE A LIST OF 35 WORDS AND 1 WEEK TO FINISH. THEY HAVE DICTATED THAT YOU COMPLETE THE FOLLOWING FOR EACH WORD: • • • • •

FIND THE DEFINITION FIND A PICTURE ON THE INTERNET WOULD HAVE REPRESENTED THIS WORD IN THE PAST FIND A PICTURE ON THE INTERNET THAT WOULD REPRESENT THIS WORD IN THE PRESENT IN YOUR OWN WORDS, WRITE WHAT THE TERM MEANS TO YOU CREATE A WAY TO REMEMBER THIS WORD AND ITS MEANING, OR DESCRIBE HOW YOU REMEMBER WHAT THIS WORD MEANS WHEN YOU HAVE THIS INFORMATION, CREATE A POWERPOINT WITH 1 SLIDE PER WORD. THERE SHOULD BE 35 SLIDES IN TOTAL. PRESENT THIS TO THE ALIENS TO DECIDE OUR FATE, IF ALL HUMANITY SHOULD LIVE OR DIE. ALL OF THE WORDS ARE INSTRUMENTAL TO 8 T H GRADE SOCIAL STUDIES… GOOD LUCK

THE WORDS CAN BE FOUND BELOW: PHILANTHR OPY ALTRUISM ANTEBELLU M ABSOLUTE EXCHANGE COMMERCE CONGRESSI ONAL CIVIC EFFICACY CONSTITUTI

HOLOCAUST HUMAN IMPACT INFRASTRUC TURE INSURRECTI ON INTERDEPEN DENCE INTERNATION AL MAP PROJECTION

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ONAL CONTRACT CONSUMPTI ON AUTOCRACY OLIGARCHY DICTATORS HIP DIPLOMACY DOMESTIC DOCTRINE FEDERALIS M

S NATIONALISM MAGNA CARTA RECESSION RELATIVE REPUBLICANI SM SOCIAL NORMS TOTALITARIA N VERNACULAR AUTOCRACY OLIGARCHY

STANDARDS

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.7 INTEGRATE VISUAL INFORMATION (E.G., IN CHARTS, GRAPHS, PHOTOGRAPHS, VIDEOS, OR MAPS) WITH OTHER INFORMATION IN PRINT AND DIGITAL TEXTS. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.10 BY THE END OF GRADE 8, READ AND COMPREHEND HISTORY/SOCIAL STUDIES TEXTS IN THE GRADES 6-8 TEXT COMPLEXITY BAND INDEPENDENTLY AND PROFICIENTLY.

PROCESS

TO ACCOMPLISH THIS TASK YOU WILL TAKE EACH DAY AND USE IT TO YOUR MAXIMUM POTENTIAL. LUCKILY THE ALIENS ARE ALLOWING YOU TO USE A COMPUTER AND NOW TIME IS TICKING AWAY. AT THE END OF THE DAY MAKE SURE TO EMAIL YOUR WORK TO YOUR

269


TEACHER AND YOURSELF FOR SAFE KEEPING. (IF YOU DO NOT HAVE AN EMAIL MAKE SURE YOUR BRING YOUR 2 GB FLASH DRIVE TO CLASS EVERYDAY) MONDAY- MAKE A LIST IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER OF THE WORDS WITH THEIR TECHNICAL DEFINITIONS FOR THIS TASK YOU CAN USE THE SITES LISTED BELOW OR OTHERS THAT YOU FIND. • DICTIONARY- THIS LINK HAS BOTH THE DICTIONARY AND A THESAURUS TO HELP YOU FIGURE OUT WHAT THE WORD MEAN AND OTHER HELPFUL ADVICE. • WEBSTER- THE FOLLOWING WEBSITE IS A SIMPLER DESIGN THAN DICTIONARY.COM. THIS WEBSITE ALSO HAS A THESAURUS. THE INTERESTING ABOUT THIS SITE IS THAT YOU COULD FIND A COUPLE OF PICTURES IN THIS SITE AS WELL AS THE DEFINITIONS • VOCABULARY-THIS IS JUST A STRAIGHT DICTIONARY FOR THOSE WHO LIKE IT SIMPLE REMEMBER THE GOAL FOR THE DAY IS ALL THE WORDS LISTED AND DEFINED. MAKE SURE YOU ARE USING A WORD DOCUMENT FOR THIS TASK SO WHEN YOU ARE READY FOR YOUR POWERPOINT ALL YOU HAVE TO DO IS COPY AND PASTE. TUESDAY- TODAY EACH STUDENT WILL TYPE WHAT EACH WORD MEANS IN THEIR OWN WORDS. THE STUDENTS WILL ALSO USE THE TIME TO FINISH UP ANYTHING THAT WAS NOT COMPLETED ON MONDAY. THE ALIENS CALL THIS THE SNOWBALL EFFECT. THE MORE TASKS YOU HAVE PILED ON TO COMPLETE, THE BIGGER THIS PROJECT BECOMES AND THE FATE OF HUMANITY IS IN YOUR HANDS.

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WEDNESDAY- NOW THAT ALL OF YOUR WORDS ARE DEFINED AND TYPED, IT IS TIME TO FIND THE PICTURES THE ALIENS ASKED FOR. USE THE FOLLOWING WEBSITES TO HELP YOU ON YOUR WAY:

§ LIBRARY OF CONGRESS PICTURE ARCHIVE- THIS WEBSITE HAS ALL THE PICTURES THAT THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS HAS ARCHIVES OVER THE LAST COUPLE HUNDRED YEARS. IF YOU NEED TO FIND SOMETHING IT IS HEAR, BUT YOU MAY HAVE TO WADE THROUGH A COUPLE OF PAGES UNTIL YOU FIND SOMETHING YOU LIKE. § CIA FACT BOOK- ANOTHER WONDERFUL RESOURCE TO FIND DIFFERENT TYPES OF GOVERNMENTS AND BE ABLE TO RELATE THEM WITH THE WORLD PRESENTLY…HINT FROM THE ALIENS…

*AS YOU MAY KNOW GOOGLE IMAGE IS TURNED OFF ON SCHOOL COMPUTERS, BUT IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO USE THIS SEARCH TOOL TO HELP FIND YOUR IMAGES BE SURE TO SITE THE PICTURE FROM THE ORIGINAL WEBPAGE NOT FROM GOOGLE IMAGES. THURSDAY- WE MUST START PLACING THE PICTURES WE FOUND INTO OUR POWERPOINT. EACH WORD AND THEIR CORRESPONDING PICTURES HAVE A SLIDE. SINCE THE LIST WE TYPED AND DEFINITIONS ARE IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER, COPY AND PASTE IN THE POWERPOINT WILL BE A BREEZE. (IF FOR SOME REASON YOU DID NOT PLACE ALL OF THE WORDS IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER USE EXCEL TO HELP YOU ORDER

271


BOTH WORDS AND DEFINITIONS. THE ALIENS HEAR YOUR TEACHER IS VERY GOOD AT THIS.) FRIDAY- THIS IS THE LAST DAY YOU WILL HAVE TO ACCOMPLISH THIS TASK IN CLASS. MAKE SURE ALL THE WORDS ARE SPELLED CORRECTLY AND THE PICTURES MATCH THE WORDS ON EACH SLIDE. BECAUSE THE ALIENS ARE MERCIFUL THEY ARE GIVING YOU THE WEEKEND TO FINISH UP IF NEEDED. THE FINAL COPY WILL HAVE TO BE EMAILED TO THE FOLLOWING ADDRESS DALE.MCCOY@MNPS.ORG. THE ALIENS WILL NOT TAKE ANY PRESENTATIONS MONDAY.

Evaluation The Aliens, like all great educators, grade from a rubric listed below:

Powerpoint Content  :  Past,  Present…Future?   Teacher  Name:  Mr.  McCoy   Student  Name:          ________________________________________     CATEGORY Pimp my PowerPoint

CCSS.ELALITERACY.RH.68.7

20 Points each Background does not detract from text or other graphics. Choice of background is consistent from card to card and is appropriate for the topic.

17 Points each Background does not detract from text or other graphics. Choice of background is consistent from card to card.

15 Points each Background does not detract from text or other graphics.

10 Points each Background makes it difficult to see text or competes with other graphics on the page.

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Spelling and Grammar

Presentation has no misspellings or grammatical errors.

Presentation has 1-2 misspellings, but no grammatical errors.

Presentation has 1-2 grammatical errors but no misspellings.

Presentation has more than 2 grammatical and/or spelling errors.

All pictures are relevant (size and colors) and support the theme/content of the presentation.

A few Pictures are not relevant but all support the theme/content of the presentation.

All graphics are relevant but a few do not seem to support the theme/content of the presentation.

Several graphics are irrelevant AND detract from the content of the presentation.

Alphabetical order

Vocabulary is organized in a clear, logical way. It is easy to anticipate the type of material that might be on the next card.

Most vocabulary is organized in a clear, logical way. One card or item of information seems out of place.

Some Vocabulary is logically sequenced. An occasional card or item of information seems out of place.

There is no clear plan for the organization of vocabulary.

All 44?

All Vocabulary words throughout the presentation are accurately depicted. There are no factual errors.

Most of the Vocabulary is accurate but there is one piece of information that might be inaccurate.

The vocabulary is generally accurate, but one piece of information is clearly flawed or inaccurate.

Vocabulary is typically confusing or contains more than one factual error.

CCSS.ELALITERACY.RH.68.10

Past and Present Pictures

CCSS.ELALITERACY.RH.68.7

CCSS.ELALITERACY.RH.68.10

CONCLUSION EUREKA! THE EARTH IS SAVED WITH YOUR HARD WORK. THE TIME MACHINE HAS BEEN DESTROYED FOR FEAR OF ITS POWER. AS YOU RETURN HOME NOBODY KNOWS OR WILL BE ABLE TO COMPREHEND

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HOW CLOSE THE EARTH AND EVERYONE LIVING HERE CAME TO ERADICATION. THE WORDS, OH THOSE 35 WORDS, EACH ONE WILL LIVE ON IN YOUR MEMORY FOREVER AND YOUR LIFE WILL ALWAYS SEEM A LITTLE BIT BETTER BECAUSE OF EACH ONE. REMEMBER TO ALWAYS ADD TO THE VOCABULARY THAT YOU KNOW OR THE ALIENS MAY RETURN.

CREDITS & REFERENCES

-MCCOY, D. (2014, APRIL 21). POWERPOINT CONTENT : PAST, PRESENT…FUTURE?. CREATED FROM HTTP://RUBISTAR.4TEACHERS.ORG/INDEX.PHP -WEBB, T. (2007, DECEMBER 1). TENNESSEE ACADEMIC VOCABULARY A GUIDE FOR TENNESSEE EDUCATORS . HTTP://WWW.TENNESSEE.GOV/EDUCATION/CI/DOC/VO CABULARY.PDF. RETRIEVED JULY 1, 2009, FROM HTTP://WWW.TENNESSEE.GOV/EDUCATION/CI/DOC/VO CABULARY.PDF -UNKNOWN.(2014, APRIL 21).ALIEN HEAD. WEBPAGE. RETRIEVED FROM HTTP://WWW.PINTEREST.COM/PIN/96334879499712347/ -UNKNOWN.(2014, APRIL 21).CORE VOCABULARY. WEBPAGE. RETRIEVED FROM HTTP://IMAVEX.VO.LLNWD.NET/O18/CLIENTS/SMEKENS EDUCATION/IMAGES/VOCABULARY/CORE_VOCABULAR

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Y.JPG -UNKNOWN.(2014, APRIL 21).QUESTION MARK. WEBPAGE. RETRIEVED FROM HTTP://UPLOAD.WIKIMEDIA.ORG/WIKIPEDIA/EN/4/44/QU ESTION_MARK_(BLACK_ON_WHITE).PNG

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Christable Nyaberi Unit Rationale – Equations and Expressions In this seventh grade unit, we will be learning about Equations and Expressions. Students need to learn Equations and Expressions to build their budgeting and planning skills. Learners may find it difficult understanding when an addition sign changes to subtraction and vice versa while combining like terms in expressions and equations. Students may also find it difficult understanding the difference on how to get the solution of an expression and an equation. Learners will work with real life items and objects like different currencies, and different fruits. Knowledge of Equations and Expressions is important for students to know because it is part of everyone’s daily life. In order to start or operate a business, one needs to know how to budget for their capital. Studying and understanding Equations and Expressions is a learning expectation covered under Common Core State Standards for Mathematics. CCSS 7.EE.A.1.-Apply properties of operations as strategies to add, subtract, factor and expend linear expressions with rational coefficients.

Present.Me: http://present.me/view/162795-­‐algebra Jing Tutorial: http://screencast.com/t/afEV7aKPTtq    

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ASSURE Lesson Plan Design your roller coaster Name: Christable Nyaberi Subject Area: Algebra 1;-Equations and Expressions Duration of Lesson: Three weeks Grade Level: Grade 7 Analyze Learners There are three 7th grade Algebra classes at Nashville Magnet School. The ½ Block, the first class to view the lesson, consists of 26 students; 13 boys and 13 girls. The diversity of the students are as follows: 10 Caucasian, nine African American, one Asian, and six Hispanics. The age span of the class is 14-15 years old. Twenty students come from two-parent homes where both of their parents have college degrees. In addition, there are four students whose parents are professors at local universities in the city. With this in mind, the 20 students seem to be economically stable and privileged. The students have the latest technological gadgets such as iPhones, androids, tablets, and laptops. Although approximately 20 out of the 26 students are economically stable, there are 6 students in particular that are on reduced lunch. One of the reduced lunch students is pregnant, and she is not allowed to participate in laboratory activities. The students were chosen from a lottery to attend this school. Eight students are gifted and talented. One student in the class has a learning disability. This student is not motivated to learn, so there is weekly contact, whether through e-mail or phone, on the student’s progress. The gifted and talented students can sometimes become disengaged with the lesson because they are bored. Their lack of motivation causes a distraction for the other 14 students from time to time. Lastly, there is an ELL student that has a paraprofessional. Entry Competencies Curricular: Knowledge of ratios and proportional relationships, and the number system. The level of understanding and interpretation of these concepts may vary due to the diverse learning abilities of the students. Technological: Expect students to have general knowledge of what a computer and its peripherals are comprised of (monitor, CPU, printer, keyboard, and mouse), be able to navigate

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the internet, basic keyboarding skills, and some experience with computer usage either through creating documents, presentations, social networking or gaming. State Standards and Objectives

Curricular Standards

Technology Standards

1.Apply properties of operations as

Creativity and innovation.

strategies to add, subtract, factor, and expand linear expressions with rational coefficients. 2.Understand that rewriting an expression in different forms in a problem context can shed light on the problem and how the quantities in it are related 3.Use variables to represent quantities in a real-world or mathematical problem, and construct simple equations and inequalities to solve problems by reasoning about the quantities Lesson Objectives

By the end of three weeks, the learners will design a three dimension model of a roller coaster showing the relationships between all the dimensions on the roller coaster using at least 15 equations and expressions. (For instance, if the height of the first hill is h and the second hill is 25% higher than hill one, then the height of hill two, say H=1.25h)

Select Strategies, Technology, Media, and Materials

Curricular Materials

Technology Materials

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Math workbook

Computers with internet access

White sketch pads, pencil and eraser

May use computer tablets or cell

Flexible wires, easy to cut sticks and

phones with internet access.

wood, cardboards, strings, or any other construction materials the student may choose.

Utilize Technology, Media, and Materials

Preview & Prepare Materials

One math workbook per student available (located on second shelf of bookcase)

Scratch paper available for students if needed (located in recycle tray on top of bookcase)

Pencils are the responsibility of the student (extra pencils located in top desk drawer)

Ensure each student has access to a computers that is operating properly with internet access.

Ensure the suggested links for internet search are working and free of destructions

Prepare the Environment

Desks are arranged for lecture learning environment (no rearranging necessary).

Computers are set up along the back wall (no rearranging necessary)

Prepare the Learners

Introduce the lesson by emphasizing the standards being taught (both curriculum and technology).

Link the standards to entry competency skills (both curriculum and technology).

Teach the task expectations and objectives.

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•

Explain the procedure.

•

Explain the scoring rubric.

Require Learner Participation The learners will respond to questions about on the entry competency skill. Then they will follow along in their math workbooks while the teacher reviews the lesson on Equations and Expressions. The teacher will give examples of problems on the whiteboard. The teacher will ask students to attempt solving different equations and expression. Then the learners will create, solve and simplify at least 5 equations and 5expressons. The teacher will teach the task expectations as the learners take note. Learners will then review the links in the task session for the week at glance. The teacher will explain the process as learners take notes. Then the learners will use their curiosity, imagination, and creativity to do the assignment for the weekly tasks. Questions about the assignment will be answered continuously until the standards are achieved. The learners will use their creativity and innovation guided by the website provided in the process section of the webquest to create equations, sketch the equations, and model a roller coaster. The learners will be allowed to use additional internet links for their research as long as the links are preapproved by the instructor. This exercise is designed the help the learner explore the internet and create something fun relating learned content to real life. Evaluate and Revise Assessing Learner Achievement The learners will be assessed on their abilities to successfully create equations and expressions, simplify the expressions and expressions, relate quantities to each other, and use odder of operation properties while solving equations and expressions. The teacher will determine any learning deficiencies within the process of interpreting and representing equations and expressions and will review the appropriate areas of concern. The creation, simplification, interpretation and application of these equations and expressions will be seen in the end products; at least 15 equations and expressions, a sketch representation of the equations and expression, and final the model roller coaster.

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Evaluation CATEGORY

4

3

2

1

Properties of

Proper use of

Less than 3 errors

More than 5

Little evidence of

operation to add,

properties

on the use of

errors on the

using mathematical

subtract, factor,

operation

properties of

use of

properties of

and expand

without any

operation.

mathematical

operation.

linear

errors.

properties of

expressions with

operation

rational coefficients. Understanding

Representing all

Some

Unclear

No relation

and rewriting

values in a

knowledge

relation

representation of

equations in

relationship

representation

representation

quantities.

different forms

forms relating all

relation of

indicated in

showing

distance to d,

equations and

an attempt to

relationship

and height to h.

expressions.

relate

between

More than half

quantities but

quantities.

the values

erroneous

represented

placement of

correctly.

values.

Use variables to

Proper

Proper

Lack of

No evidence of

represent

explanations of

explanations

consistency

knowledge of how to

quantities in a

variables used.

and consistency

with the use of

use variable to solve

real-world or

Consistency with

of variables.

variables

real life problems.

mathematical

the chosen

Well

Errors in the

problem, and

variables.

constructed

construction

construct simple

Well

equations and

and solving

equations and

constructed

expression with

equations

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inequalities to

equations and

a few minor

and

solve problems

expressions.

errors.

expressions

by reasoning

Clear illustration

An effort to use

about the

of how the

equations to

quantities

equations are

solve real life

use to solve

problems

mathematical problems Neatness and

The work is

The work is clear

The work is

The work appears

Organization

presented in a

and organized

presented in

sloppy and

neat, clear,

but not neat.

an organized

unorganized. It is

organized

fashion but

hard to know what

fashion that is

may be hard

information goes

easy to read.

to read at

together.

times. Total number of

15 or more

10-14equations

5-9 equations

Less 5 equations and

equations and

equations and

and expressions

and

expression

expressions.

expressions.

Sketch

Neat and clear

Neat and clear

Lack of clarity

Untidy work that

representation

representation

on the

does not meet the

of the actual

of the actual

orientation of

guidelines given in

roller coaster

roller coaster

the model.

the task section

drawn on a

drawn on a

drawn on a

week 2

white sketch

white sketch

white

pad with a

pad with a

sketchpad

pencil.

pencil.

with a pencil.

Values of all

May have errors

May have

lengths should

on the values

errors for

be indicated

indicted for

lengths

expressions

lengths 3 dimension

On time

On time

On time

On time submission

model submitted

submission of

submission of a

submission of

of a model that does

on time.

the 3dimension

3D model that

3D model with

not reflect the sketch

model that is a

has more that

less than 50%

or meet the

scale

75% relation to

similarity to

guidelines of week 3

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representation

the sketch.

the sketch

task.

of the sketch.

Evaluating and Revising Strategies, Technology, and Media The teacher will ask learners guided questions to determine their understanding and mastering the standards being taught. The evidence of proper application of equations and expressions in the sketches and final model will be a measure of the students' understanding. The teacher will also ask learners questions while they are working on their project to gage the areas they need help. The teacher will determine if proper amount of time is allotted for the task assigned per week. The teacher will consult with students with, especially the student with learning disability to find out if the students needs extra help with the assignment.

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Grade 7 Mathemaics Design your roller coaster

Algebra 1 :- Equtions and Expressions Designed by Christable Nyaberi christable6180@gmail.com Standards Tennessee Common Core State Standards CCSS.Math.Content.7.EE.A.1 Apply properties of operations as strategies to add, subtract, factor, and expand linear expressions with rational coefficients. CCSS.Math.Content.7.EE.A.2 Understand that rewriting an expression in different forms in a problem context can shed light on the problem and how the quantities in it are related. For example, a + 0.05a = 1.05a means that "increase by 5%" is the same as "multiply by 1.05." CCSS.Math.Content.7.EE.B.4 Use variables to represent quantities in a real-world or mathematical problem, and construct simple equations and inequalities to solve problems by reasoning about the quantities

Introduction

Task

Process

Evaluation

Conclusion

Credits

Introduction Hello students! Today a dream comes true! You are privileged to be part of the Nashville amusement park construction project. Besides the joy this amusement park will bring to you and your loved ones, your class is

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among the classes selected to design a roller coaster for the park. There is a great reward for the best model. A reward that looks like this..

or close to that ... Go architects! ************MAY THE BEST MODEL WIN************** Task There are only three regulations you must abide by; Ø

Ø

First: You have a circular field of radius r=1.5 miles (and area, ! = !! ! ) assigned for the roller coaster, ♦

leave a safety margin of distance 2d around the field.

Estimate your dimensions within the remaining field

Use equations and expressions to represent dimensions

Use h for height, d for distance and A for area.

Define any other variables used

Use the same variable to represent similar quantities using representative relationships.

Second: The total cost of all materials, x, and manpower, y, should not exceed $650,000, (x+y≤650,000), ♦

Estimate the cost of materials x. Note that different materials may have different prices. The material you choose to use will depend on the type of roller coaster you wish to model.

Write an equation for x

Everyone is paid according to their level of expertise and probably hours worked. Design your hierarchy of work force and write an equation or equations for Y. (Use relationship properties to relate earnings on the hierarchy, for instance; if z earns 10% more than v, then z = 1.1v)

Ø

Third: You have three weeks to come up with a model of your design. Week 1 ♦

Review the links provided in the process section week 1.

Decide on a model

Define your model using equations and expressions. ü

show the relationships between heights, distance, and area.

ü

Use the equation of a line y=mx+b where m is the slope and b is the yintercept where necessary.

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ü

Use the quadratic equation ax2 + bx + c = y to determine the values of X at varied reference points of y. Note that the absolute magnitude of the two values of x will define how steep the slope is and the shape of loops

ü

use these values to estimate and calculate your speed, s=d/t, velocity v=s, acceleration a=v/t, force f=ma where m is the mass. you need these for formulas when writing equations of how much weight your coaster can accommodate at a given height and speed.

ü

In case of any uncertainty on how to relate any of these values, consult me.

Submit your roller coaster theory based on mathematical calculations by the end of week 1.

Week 2 ♦

Review the links provided for both week 1 and 2.

Use your equations and expressions developed in week one to sketch a model for your roller coaster

The sketch should be a scale drawing of the actual roller coaster.

Refer to your notes on rations and proportions before sketching.

Use a pencil and geometrical instruments to sketch.

Sketch on a white sketch pad.

Indicate the values of various length and equations of all the lines you will use.

Consult me if you need additional help. Week 3

Review the links for week 1, 2 and 3.

construct a 3 dimension roller coaster of your design based on the equations and sketch.

Use materials that reflect your actual roller coaster

Use any colors you deem appropriate.

The model should be a scale representation of your sketch and your actual roller coaster. ************MAY THE BEST MODEL WIN**************

Standards CCSS.Math.Content.7.EE.A.1 Apply properties of operations as strategies to add, subtract, factor, and expand linear expressions with rational coefficients. CCSS.Math.Content.7.EE.A.2 Understand that rewriting an expression in different forms in a problem context can shed light on the problem and how the quantities in it are related. For example, a + 0.05a = 1.05a means that "increase by 5%" is the same as "multiply by 1.05."

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CCSS.Math.Content.7.EE.B.4 Use variables to represent quantities in a real-world or mathematical problem, and construct simple equations and inequalities to solve problems by reasoning about the quantities Process Week 1;-Think, Decide and do the Math. Form at least 15 equations and expressions. You have 7 days from today to review the links provided bellow. These links will lead you to adventure sites about roller coasters.

E1

E2 Ø

E3

Left click on any of the images above, then click on open link to view more models. This models will give you ideas of what your roller coaster may look like. DO NOT DUPLICATE ANY OF THE MODELS YOU FIND ONLINE. Remember, you are creating your own; if the construction company wanted to select a model online, they would have done that!

ctrl+ click BEGIN to access the link

Ø

This image will take you to a sample roller coaster construction steps. You may adopt the procedures but do not duplicate it. Use variables (alphabetical letters ) and constants or coefficient to represent your lengths.

Ø

Take a few minutes to play the game provided on this link to gage the fun and safety rating of different designs.

Ø

Visit THE ROLLER MODEL MUSEUM to discover fun and easy ways to make a roller coaster model

Ø

Visit How to Create a Business Budget to ensure that you plan of a sketch is within the allocated funds

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Ø

Use the information provided in these links as a working basis for developing the mathematical background of your roller coaster. Write the equations and expressions to describe your model and submit them to me for evaluation. ************MAY THE BEST MODEL WIN**************

week 2. Use your math work to sketch your model E4

E6

E5 Ø

The sketches above are hiperlinks. crlt+click to follow the links or right click then open the links

Ø

Draw your sketch on a white drawing pad. Use a pencil to draw. Use h, for hieght, see E5 for diffrent hieghts at diffrent places on your roller coaster. For this class, you will indicate your distances as representations of the other. That is, if h5 is twice h1, the h5=h while h1=2h. or h5=h while h1=0.5h.

Ø

Submit your sketch before class in 14 days time.

************MAY THE BEST MODEL WIN************** Week 3:- Use all you have from wk 1 and 2 to develop a 3dimention model.

.M1 Ø

Ctrl+click M2 for pictures of 3d models of roller coasters.

Ø

Create a model for your roller coaster.

Ø

The model should be three dimension.

M2

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Ø

Use readily available material for roller coaster.

Ø

The material you chose to use may reflect the actual design. If you chose to color your model, use colors you consider attractive for kids.

Ø

Submit your model by the end of the third week before class. ************MAY THE BEST MODEL WIN**************

Evaluation CATEGORY

4

3

2

1

Properties of

Proper use of

Less than 3 errors

More than 5

Little evidence of using

operation to add,

properties operation

on the use of

errors on the

mathematical properties of

subtract, factor, and

without any errors.

properties of

use of

operation.

operation.

mathematical

expand linear expressions with

properties of

rational coefficients.

operation

Understanding and

Representing all

Some knowledge

Unclear

No relation representation

rewriting equations

values in a

representation

relation

of quantities.

in different forms

relationship forms

relation of equations

representation

showing relationship

relating all distance

and expressions.

indicated in

between quantities.

to d, and height to h.

More than half the

an attempt to

values represented

relate

correctly.

quantities but erroneous placement of values.

Use variables to

Proper explanations

Proper explanations

Lack of

No evidence of knowledge

represent quantities

of variables used.

and consistency of

consistency

of how to use variable to

in a real-world or

Consistency with

variables.

with the use

solve real life problems.

mathematical

the chosen

Well constructed

of variables

problem, and

variables.

equations and

Errors in the

construct simple

Well constructed

expression with a

construction

equations and

equations and

few minor errors.

and solving

inequalities to solve

expressions.

An effort to use

equations and

problems by

Clear illustration of

equations to solve

expressions

reasoning about the

how the equations

real life problems

quantities

are use to solve mathematical problems

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Neatness and

The work is

The work is clear

The work is

The work appears sloppy

Organization

presented in a neat,

and organized but

presented in

and unorganized. It is hard

clear, organized

not neat.

an organized

to know what information

fashion that is easy

fashion but

goes together.

to read.

may be hard to read at times.

Total number of

15 or more

10-14equations and

5-9 equations

Less 5 equations and

equations and

equations and

expressions

and

expression

expressions.

expressions.

Sketch

Neat and clear

Neat and clear

Lack of

Untidy work that does not

representation of the

representation of the

clarity on the

meet the guidelines given

actual roller coaster

actual roller coaster

orientation of

in the task section week 2

drawn on a white

drawn on a white

the model.

sketch pad with a

sketch pad with a

drawn on a

pencil.

pencil.

white

Values of all lengths

May have errors on

sketchpad

should be indicated

the values indicted

with a pencil.

for lengths

May have

expressions

errors for lengths 3 dimension model

On time submission

On time submission

On time

On time submission of a

submitted on time.

of the 3dimension

of a 3D model that

submission of

model that does not reflect

model that is a scale

has more that 75%

3D model

the sketch or meet the

representation of the

relation to the

with less than

guidelines of week 3 task.

sketch.

sketch.

50% similarity to the sketch

conclusion Hurrah to all of you architectures! You have successfully applied equations and expressions to create a model of a roller coaster. This is an example of the many scenarios that equations and expressions can be used for planning, and budgeting. In future you may use your model of the roller coaster while applying for a job as an architect.... Creditis Nyaberi, C. O. (2014, April, 20) Design your Roller Coaster, adopted from http://rubistar.4teachers.org/ on 4/17/2014.

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Unkown, (2014, April, 19) Design your Roller Coaster Images, Retrieved from http://www.bing.com/images/search?

Unit Media Share Language of Algebra Language of Algebra is a great way to introduce the topic Equations and Expressions. The video introduces the topic by defining and differentiating Equations from Expressions with examples. This video complements common Core Standards (CCSS.Math.Content.7.EE.A.1 Apply properties of operations as strategies toad, subtract, factor, and expand rational coefficients and CCSS.Math.Content.7.EE.B.4 Use variables to represent quantities in real-world or mathematical problem, and construct simple equations and inequalities to solve problems by reasoning about the quantities). Vhsallison. (Producer). 2010. Language of Algebra: Expressions and Equations. Teacher tube video. Retrieved from http://www.teachertube.com/viewVideo.php?video_id=188155#.UwlIz5oCivg.gmail Linear Equation Solver Linear Equation Solver is a great way for students advancing their knowledge on the topic Equations and Expression to practice their learnt skills. It offers Mathick Games on linear equations and prepares students for systems of linear equations. It also gives a step by step solution to randomly picked questions. Linear Equations Solver, Mathick Games is a free app on Google play store. It requires android 2.2 and up.

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Mathick (Aug, 16, 2013). Linear Equations solver. Google play. Retrieved on 2/23/2014 from https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.mathick.games.equationsolver1 U.1, Write variables and expressions This ixl website titled seventh grade Math- U.1 write variable expressions offers practice questions for students’ practice and illustrates the procedures for getting the right solution. This website compliments the Common Core Standard (CCSS.Math.Content.7.EE.A.1 Apply properties of operations as strategies to add, subtract, factor, and expand linear expressions with coefficients). This website gives students an opportunity to write variable expressions introducing the terminology to be used in the topic Equations and Expressions. The simple word questions ask students to add, get the sum, subtract, indicate which value is less or great, find the quotient, get the product among other terminologies used in operations. It is great way to introduce the chapter because it links directly to what the students know. IXL Math.(2014). U.1, write variables and expressions. (website). Retrieved on 2/23/2014 from http://www.ixl.com/math/grade-7/write-variable-expressions

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Media Share Resources

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Literacy/Language Arts Resources

Brain Pop Brain Pop is an education website that contains many activities, games and lessons for various subjects. In looking at the topic of Cause and Effect, this website is a very helpful tool. It contained games, activities, pop a joke, word walls, quizzes lesson ideas and differentiated learning that involved those who learn by drawing, writing, or reading. This website also contained educational videos on various content. It targets all types of learners, whether, audio or visual and will be of a great benefit not only to the students but for the teachers as well. This website will help students meet the Common Core Standard in English Literacy, regarding reading informational text. Standard 3.8 - Describe the logical connection between particular sentences and paragraphs in a text (e.g., comparison, cause/effect, first/second/third in a sequence). Brain Pop. (2014). Brain pop jr. Retrieved on February 23, 2014 from http://www.brainpopjr.com/readingandwriting/comprehension/causeandeffect

Cause and Effect Podcast This was a podcast made in a technology class about cause and effect. The video breaks down the definition of the two concepts with pictures to further explain the key ideas. It is very appropriate for 3rd grade learners. One great part about the video is it uses one of the books on the 3rd grade reading list “If you give a mouse a cookie� to teach the content, which is one way to make learning exciting and relevant. In order for students to meet the Common Core Standard in English Literacy 3.3, students must be able to describe the relationship between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text, using language that pertains to time, sequence, and cause/effect. This podcast will allow for students to target and meet those goals.

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MsLittlejohn123. (2011). Cause and effect podcast Retrieved on February 23, 2014 from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PVLF5ENMtuc

English Grammar- Punctuations English Grammar-Punctuations is an excellent resource in teaching students when and how to use the punctuations in right way and place. This video teaches the students what is the punctuations and why is important to use in writing. This video provides and teaches the punctuations using cartoon characters and fun way in showing the examples. Appuseries (Producers). (2011). English Grammar-Punctuations. [YouTube video]. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmXVhw67Euc

Language Arts – First Grade Scope and Sequence This time4learning.com website titled “Language Arts-First Grade Scope and Sequence” is an on-line student paced learning system covering pre-k through middle school. It is popular for use as a homeschool curriculum, afterschool tutoring, or summer enrichment. This learning tool allows students to participate in the grade level below, as well as a grade level above, so they can review concepts if needed or work ahead if they have mastered the content. In chapter thirteen of the first grade language arts section, students will learn new vocabulary, read a leveled story, demonstrate comprehension by identifying details, and develop fluency. This website does charge a fee of $19.95 per student, per month. These reading lesson plans are designed to with the first grade Common Core Standards in mind: CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.1.1 Ask and answer questions about key details in a text. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.1.2 Retell stories, including key details, and demonstrate understanding of their central message or lesson. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.1.3 Describe characters, settings, and major events in a story, using key details. time4learning. (2007). Language Arts-First Grade Scope and Sequence [Website] Retrieved on February 21, 2014 from http://www.time4learning.com/Scope-Sequence/1st-languagearts.shtml#LAF

Language Arts – 5th Grade Lesson Plans This time4learning.com website titled “Language Arts- 5th grade lesson plans” offers language lessons for fifth grade students. This website is an online classes and it cost $19,95 per month.

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This website has a multimedia activities in language and it provides a detailed report about the student’s learning progress. Time4learning.com (2007). Language Arts-5th grade lesson plans [Website]. Retrieved from http://www.time4learning.com/Scope-Sequence/5th-language-arts.shtml

Main Idea Lesson for SFSD Teacher Interview Main Idea Lesson for SFSD Teacher Interview is a wonderful resource for teachers to utilize if they are having trouble teaching the Main Idea concept in first grade literature class. It was very easy to follow the concept as the teacher gave life to the main idea by classifying it as a tabletop. She then describes the table legs as the supporting details that “hold up” the main idea. By using visual aids, the teacher allows the students to see exactly how these concepts play a role together. The video is designed with this first grade Common Core Standard in mind: CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.1.1 Ask and answer questions about key details in a text. Main Idea Lesson for SFSD teacher Interview. [YouTube video]. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mmwqFZkHkp4

Punctuation & Capitalization [HD] Punctuation & Capitalization is a great app to help students to use a correct grammar and punctuation in their writing and avoid the mistake that can be annoying to readers. This app has a content that is easy to follow. Students can chose from the different topics that the app included such as, periods, commas, semicolons…etc. and learn about those different punctuation marks and how and when to use while writing and has over 400 examples. This app is compatible with iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch and requires iOS 4.3 or later. Digital Partners (Ottawa). (Aug 26, 2013). Punctuation & capitalization [iTunes $1.99] Retrieved from https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/punctuation-capitalization/id399194850?mt=8

Reading Comprehension Passages with Multiple Choice Questions: Guided Reading Level C Reading Comprehension Passages with Multiple Choice Questions: Guided Reading Level C is a valuable tool designed to help children learn comprehension skills in the early stages of reading. This app is designed using short passages to give the children the opportunity to practice reading, as well as practicing the skill of locating the key ideas and details in the passages. All questions are formatted in a multiple-choice layout. Locating key ideas and details is fundamental for the success in any future reading. This app is compatible with iPad and requires iOS 5.0 or later.

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These word problems are designed with the rigor of the following Kindergarten and first grade Common Core standards in Mind: ELA-Literacy.RL.1.1—Ask and answer questions about key details in a text (for the beginning of the year). Tapfun, Inc. (Jan 22, 2014). Reading Comprehension Passages with Multiple Choice Questions: Guided Reading Level C. [iTunes, Free] Retrieved on February 21, 2014 from https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/reading-comprehension-passages/id779880902?mt=8

Switch Kids Switch Kids is an app that teaches simple cause and effect, multiple-choice cause and effect and a variation of cause and effect with a goal. The program is intended for switch users but can also be used just by touching the screen. It contains three activities all related to teaching cause and effect in an entertaining way and tracks the student’s progress. Upon the completion of using this app, students will understand that different causes will produce different effects. This is a great way to make learning fun. The students will more than likely have a greater understanding of cause and effect utilizing this app. This app meets the ISTE standard Technology Operations and Concepts as students will understand and use technology and use this application effectively and productively. Marble Soft. (2013). Switch Kids. [iTunes, $9.99] Retrieved on February 23, 2014 from https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/switch-kids/id467551739?mt=8

Math Resources Algebra the Fun and Easy Way Algebra the Fun and Easy Way: This video shows that the Hands-On Equations program is demystifying the learning of algebra for younger students. The setting is the Sawgrass Elementary School in Broward County, Florida, where 4th graders are using Hands-On Equations to learn to solve advanced algebraic equations while having fun. Apply the properties of operations to generate equivalent expressions. For example, apply the distributive property to 297


the expression 3 (2 + x) to produce the equivalent expression 6 + 3x; apply the distributive property to the expression 24x + 18y to produce the equivalent expression 6 (4x + 3y); apply properties of operations to y + y + y to produce the equivalent expression 3y. Borenson. (Producer). (2010). Algebra the Fun and Easy Way.[Teacher Tube]. Retrieved from http://www.teachertube.com/viewVideo.php?video_id=169380

AplusMath Aplusmath.com provides interactive math activities to help students improve their math skills. This website features free math worksheets, math games, math flashcards, and homework help. This website compliments Common Core State Standard 4.OA.A1- interpret a multiplication equation as a comparison, e.g., interpret 35=5 x 7 as a statement that 35 is 5 times as many as 7 and 7 times as many as 5. The mastery of standard 4.OA.A1 is reinforced through the various interactive multiplication games provided. Matho (Multiplication Bingo) allows students to choose their game type (addition, subtraction, multiplication, or division) and level of difficulty (easy, medium, or hard). Students compete against time as a timer initiates the game. Once students complete the game they are provided the opportunity to enter their initials and their score is displayed and ranked amongst student their age from all over the world. Fourth grade students will enjoy becoming proficient at interpreting multiplication as a comparison in this fun, exciting, and competitive way. Parents, teachers, and students will find that Aplusmath.com is one of the top math websites in the world as a result of the many useful resources. Aplus Math. (1998). Matho Multiplication Bingo. [Website]. Retrieved on February 22, 2014 http://www.aplusmath.com/Games/matho/Matho.html Base 10 Blocks Lesson 1 Intro and Explore In this YouTube video, the presenter showed how numbers and operations in base 10 can be taught using base 10 blocks. The video is very interesting to watch and simple to understand. The presenter uses 3 set of manipulative called the units (1), rods (10) and flats (100) to show how numbers and operation can be taught to little kids. He went further in the video to explain how these manipulates come together to make up numbers in a cohesive manner. In my opinion, this video was very informative and it helped give me more ideas on how numbers and operations in base 10 can be taught. TeacherTube Math (2009, September 1). BASE 10 BLOCKS LESSON 1 INTRO AND EXPLORE. Retrieved February 24, 2014, from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2msVlhBtppo

Inside Mathematics – Numbers and Operations in Base Ten

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Inside mathematics is a nonprofit website that collects many different resources to guide and support mathematics teaching and learning. It has a simple homepage that is easily navigable and has links to the common core state standards, instructional videos, and content standards by grade level and related resources to each math topic listed on the website including number and operations in base 10. I believe this website is valuable to the learner because it is solely dedicated to the teaching and learning of mathematics. It is also detailed and well structured. Shell Centre for Mathematical Education, & University of Nottingham, England (n.d.). NUMBER AND OPERATIONS IN BASE TEN (NBT). Retrieved February 23, 2014, from http://www.insidemathematics.org/index.php/number-and-operations-in-base-ten-nbt

Language of Algebra Language of Algebra is a great way to introduce the topic Equations and Expressions. The video introduces the topic by defining and differentiating Equations from Expressions with examples. This video complements common Core Standards (CCSS.Math.Content.7.EE.A.1 Apply properties of operations as strategies toad, subtract, factor, and expand rational coefficients and CCSS.Math.Content.7.EE.B.4 Use variables to represent quantities in real-world or mathematical problem, and construct simple equations and inequalities to solve problems by reasoning about the quantities). Vhsallison. (Producer). 2010. Language of Algebra: Expressions and Equations. Teacher tube video. Retrieved from http://www.teachertube.com/viewVideo.php?video_id=188155#.UwlIz5oCivg.gmail Linear Equation Solver Linear Equation Solver is a great way for students advancing their knowledge on the topic Equations and Expression to practice their learnt skills. It offers Mathick Games on linear equations and prepares students for systems of linear equations. It also gives a step by step solution to randomly picked questions. Linear Equations Solver, Mathick Games is a free app on Google play store. It requires android 2.2 and up. Mathick (Aug, 16, 2013). Linear Equations solver. Google play. Retrieved on 2/23/2014 from https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.mathick.games.equationsolver1 Math Circus Math Circus provides an entertaining, yet thorough introduction to multiplication. Children are guided through the Multiplication Circus by a host named Stephanie along with her friends. Once a child selects a factor the journey through the Multiplication Circus begins.

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Difficulty associated with the mastery of multiplication includes the misinterpretation of what multiplication is. Under the subheading titled “What is multiplication?” engaging models display that multiplication is a shortcut for repeated addition or skip counting, which facilitates the previously mentioned difficulty immensely. Under the subheading titled “Properties and Vocabulary”, Common Core State Standard Math.Content.4OA.A.1 is supported with a comprehensive engaging model of interpreting a multiplication equation as a comparison. This specific comparison is referred to as “turn around numbers” on Math Circus. This application is compatible with iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch, and requires iOS 4.2 or later. CSL Associates, Inc. December 11, 2010. Math Circus. (Version 0.1). [iTunes, Free]. Retrieved on February 22, 2014 from https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/mathcircus/id407115296?mt=8

P.17 Simplify variable expressions using properties Practice Math & Language Arts | K–12 This IXL.com website titled “H.2 Simplify expressions” offers mathematics lesson as a list of all of the skills students learn in K12. These skills are organized into categories, and you can move your mouse over any skill name to view a sample question. To start practicing, just click on any link. IXL will track your score, and the questions will automatically increase in difficulty as you improve! It's easy to find the right skills to practice for your state's standards! All of IXL's dynamic math and language arts skills are aligned to your standards, including: IXL assesses your students' performance on each standard instantly, so you will have all the information you need to prepare them for standardized testing. Simply select your standards to view skills and start practicing. IXL Practice Math & Language Arts| K–12. (2014). P.17 Simplify variable expressions using properties. [Website]. Retrieved from http://www.ixl.com/math/grade-6/simplify-variableexpressions-using-properties

See multiplication as a comparison using number sentences See multiplication as a comparison using number sentences is a beneficial resource for teaching students how to interpret multiplication as a comparison and represent verbal statements of multiplicative comparisons as multiplication equations. This video teaches students how to think about multiplication as a comparison. Interpreting that multiplication is a comparison, is an important skill that students must learn in order to recognize that any two factors and their products can be read as a comparison (e.g., 8 is the same as 4 sets of 2 or 2 sets of 4; 8 is 4 times as many as 2, or 2 times as many as 4). Interpreting multiplication as a comparison includes making a comparison that 5 groups of 7 is the same as 7 groups of 5, analyzing from this comparison that both products are 35, and understanding that this representation illustrates the commutative property. Although See multiplication as a comparison using number sentences is a skilled geared towards fourth grade, it could easily be modified to support kindergarten through 300


third grade; establishing the opportunity of interpreting multiplication as a comparison to be mastered antecedently. Ordonez, A. “n.d.” See multiplication as a comparison using number sentences. [Video file] Retrieved February 22, 2014, from http://learnzillion.com/lessons/2543-see-multiplicationas-a-comparison-using-number-sentences The Fun Way to Learn Algebra Teach your children the joys of learning algebra with Hands-On Equations 1 Lite – the fun, FREE algebra app for children as young as eight! With an intuitive visual interface, Hands-On Equations has proven itself to be the best algebra app for kids on the market. And now it is available for the Android app and phone. The original Hands-On Equations program, using physical game pieces, has already helped more than a million students gain confidence with algebra. Now that same, proven method is available virtually in the palm of your hand. Algebra can be a tricky subject to master but with the help of Hands-On Equations 1 Lite, equations such as 4x+2=3x+9 become child’s play! In three easy lessons the young student obtains a feeling of success and a sense of mathematical power in solving sophisticated looking equations. Download this FREE app today and see how much fun and how easy algebra can be!

Harris Crowne, Adrian. (February 19, 2014). The Fun Way to Learn Algebra. [iTunes Free]. Retrieved on February 23, 2014 from https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.handsonequationslite1 U.1, Write variables and expressions This ixl website titled seventh grade Math- U.1 write variable expressions offers practice questions for students’ practice and illustrates the procedures for getting the right solution. This website compliments the Common Core Standard (CCSS.Math.Content.7.EE.A.1 Apply properties of operations as strategies to add, subtract, factor, and expand linear expressions with coefficients). This website gives students an opportunity to write variable expressions introducing the terminology to be used in the topic Equations and Expressions. The simple word questions ask students to add, get the sum, subtract, indicate which value is less or great, find the quotient, get the product among other terminologies used in operations. It is great way to introduce the chapter because it links directly to what the students know. IXL Math.(2014). U.1, write variables and expressions. (website). Retrieved on 2/23/2014 from http://www.ixl.com/math/grade-7/write-variable-expressions

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XP Math – Math Games Arcade XP math is an online math game or website that offers a lot of interesting and fascinating games in the area of number & operation, algebra, geometry, measurement and data analysis & probability. Apart from the wonderful games it offers, it also has links to common core state standards, math resources, and homework help. This game site is also user friendly and appealing to second graders too. Some games that are offered on this website in relation to numbers and operations in base 10 includes but not limited to math fighter, math slot machine, need for speed and wheel of fortune. VBulletin Solutions, Inc. (n.d.). XP MATH - MATH GAMES ARCADE. Retrieved February 24, 2014, from http://www.xpmath.com/forums/arcade.php?categoryid=3

Science Resources

Cell function- Different Parts& their Function This video is animated cartoon video for kids. It easily teaches students to look at the cell structure. Also, it provides different parts called organelles, and their functions. This video is really splendid for early learner since it shows simple lecture to understand cells. This video offers a knowledge of cells which is essential for students in order to have the main concept of cells, and they can learn the details and move forward deeply in the upper levels. Makemegenius. (2013, April 21). Cell function- different parts& their function. [YouTube Video]. Retrieved on February, 23 2014 from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MfopLilIOeA

DOE Teach and Learn DOE Teach and Learn includes creative lesson plans, labs, projects and other activities for grades K-12 on energy-related topics. Students will learn the importance of clean energy as an 302


enhancement to required curriculum. The DOE Teach and Learn application can be incorporated into the classroom lesson providing additional information on conserving energy. The intention of this application is to prepare students for a greener future. U.S. Department of Energy. (January 11, 2013). DOE teach and learn. [iTunes, Free]. Retrieved on February 22, 2013 from https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/doe-teach-andlearn/id591982817?mt=8 Energy Defined Energy Defined provides a quick and yet thorough lesson on energy in a visually engaging manner. The video provides differentiation that would appeal to visual learners, great alternative to a simple lecture. The vocabulary words were written out as the speaker defined and discussed terms in further detailed examples. The emphasis on key terms that are identified with energy, such as kinetic or potential, are essential for students to learn. The Energy Defined video provided real life examples that assist understanding the various components of energy. In the end, the video left the question open for students to consider, how can we create new and cheaper energy sources? The video could be presented prior to having students engage in a hands on activity. NOVA. (Producer). (2012). Energy defined: What is energy and why are we on a never ending search for new energy sources? [PBS Video] Retrieved from http://video.pbs.org/video/2288960356/

Energy Quest Energy Quest is an energy education website of the California Energy Commission. The website provides games, education lessons, and teaches students “energy ethic� behaviors in order to conserve resources. The Energy Quest website helps students to think creatively about energy while satisfying their limitless imaginations. Given the multiple learning tools on this website, students of all learning styles may benefit from engaging in the Energy Quest website. The website also provides resources for teachers and parents to teach children about energy. California Energy Commission. (2014). Energy quest. [Website]. Retrieved on February 22, 2014 from http://energyquest.ca.gov/index.html

Food Chain Food Chain by Just-Eat.com is a great way for users to learn about various living things such as animals and plants. This app is designed to help users look into different categories and discover where they fit into the food chain as a fun science activity for kids. 303


With this app you simply match up food in a ‘chain’ for delicious destruction. You must work quickly; if the food hits the top of the screen you’ll be going home hungry. Play through story mode and help Just-Eat’s Belly and Brain search for the mythical “Golden Spoon” as you face off against six fiendish food loving villains. Or challenge your friends with two player VS mode over 3G/Wi-Fi or split screen “table top” two player VS mode on iPad. Just-Eat.com (February 22, 2012). Food Chain. [iTunes, Free] Retrieved on February 20, 2014 from https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/food-chain/id448136567?mt=8

Food Chains, Food Webs, Energy Pyramid in Ecosystems-Video for Kids Food Chains, Food Webs, Energy Pyramid in Ecosystems-Video for Kids is a good quality source resource for instructing students on food chains and interdependence. This video displays the simple baseline that all living things need food to have energy which helps them to grow and move. The video explains that the food chain tells how each living thing gets its food and how most of living beings are dependent on each other for their energy requirement. The video introduces that a food chain always starts with a producer, which in most of the cases is a plant and it ends with a predator, it is at the top of the food chain. Consumers, scavengers, herbivores and decomposer form important constituents of a food chain. makemegenius. (2012). Food Chains ,Food Webs,Energy Pyramid in Ecosystems-Video for Kids. [YouTube Video]. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SWvtRf4TAO4

iCell iCell is a beneficial application for early learner to recognize the parts and functions for each cell. It gives students a 3D view inside a cell. It has three categories of cell: Planet, Bacteria, and Animal. Students can use their fingers to select any part then zoom in to see the name, description, and function of each part in the cell. The goal of this application is to prepare children learn the main idea of cells, and help them to learn independently. HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology. (2013, September 11). iCell. [iTunes, Free] Retrieved on February, 23 2014 from https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=org.hudsonalpha.icell&hl=en.

Interactive Learning for Education This website provides students teachers and parents the opportunity to grow in depth in food chains and also other activities such as food webs, vocabulary, and other subjects. These

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activities work great with a SMARTboard or interactive whiteboard for whole group or small group instruction or use in the computer lab or at home for individual learning. Choose from fun, educational, interactive games and simulations for math, English language arts, science, social studies, brainteasers, music, art, holidays and more! Just by clicking on the subject science and age level, then the topic of food chains, you are offered numerous worksheets, assignments, and activities to dive deeper into the knowledge of food chains and interdependence Karen Open (2013) Interactive Learning for Education. [Website]. Retrieved on February 20, 2014 from http://interactivesites.weebly.com/food-chains.html iTooch 3rd Grade Science ITooch is a new and fun way of practicing and learning Science for third graders. It is the largest collection of educational worksheets based on the US National Common Core Standards on Google Play for elementary schools. ITooch apps are used by more than 2,000,00 users, and a full learning solution which helps parents, teachers, and students to identify and address their learning needs in a fun and motivating way. This app requires Android 4.0 and up. Serre, Jerome and Jasmin, Daniel. (March 27, 2012). ITooch 3rd Grade Science. [Google Play, Free] Retrieved on February 24, 2014 from https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.edupad.app.grade3.science

Kids Discover This website is designed as an electronic book, and it has five valuable pages since it helps children to read and learn cells. In this electronic book Kids Discover: Cells spells out these important tasks in fun and fascinating detail. It offers a lesson on what in cell? What cells do? How cells can work alone or together, and much more. Early learners will enjoy reading this information by this exiting method. Kids Discover. (n.d.). Cells. [Website]. Retrieved on February, 23 2014 from http://www.kidsdiscover.com/digital-sampler/ Living and Non Living things class science- Logos Academy This video is geared toward 3rd grade students to help them distinguished between living and nonliving things. LogosAcademy. (2010). Living and nonliving things class Science-Logos Academy. [Youtube.com Video] Retrieved on February 24, 2014 from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k3b2VCNzhZo Science Games for Kids: Plants and Animals

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This website allows students to learn about plants and animals as they spot them in an outdoor scene, discover more about where plants and animals live as well as other interesting facts. Students must spot living things such as flowers, trees, insects, and birds to complete fun activities in this interactive science game. Science Kids Fun Science and Technology for Kids. (2014). Science Games for Kids: Plants and Animals [Website] Retrieved on February 24, 2014 http://www.sciencekids.co.nz/gamesactivities/plantsanimals.html

Social Studies Resources 50 States.com The 50states.com website titled “States and Capitals� offers a plethora of key facts about each of our 50 states. The website will help students accomplish the goals set by the standard used in my unit rationale (Tennessee Social Studies Standard- 3.03 Demonstrate how to identify and locate major physical and political features on globes and maps.) The planned state pageant will allow students to become more familiar with the states and their capitals. As a supplemental aid, this website provides an alphabetical list of facts for each state. The site is fairly plain and simple to use for beginning internet users or my 3rd grade students. Students will not only learn interesting facts about their selected state, but will be able to peruse the website for additional information on other states as they compile their information. 50 States. (2014). States and Capitals. [Website]. Retrieved on February 22, 2014 from http://www.50states.com Animaniacs Sing the States This video is an awesome resource for demonstrating to students how to sing a song about the states and their capitals. The video teaches students to look for relations between states, capitals. and personal connections to help remember them. The video also encourages learning the placement of states on the United States map. This catchy tune demonstrated in the video helps elementary age children remember all 50. The once popular cartoon characters in the clip ensnare children and capture their attention immediately.

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drewm. (Producer). (2008). Paragraph attack: Reading strategy. [TeacherTube Video]. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3cxllqT01rE

Disney, The American Presidents: Abraham Lincoln In this video about Abraham Lincoln, students will learn about his humble beginnings, defining moments in his life, his presidency, and his legacy. This video is not only animated, but riddled with special effects, sure to capture the 5th grade learners’ attention. Lincoln’s presidency was a defining moment in U.S. History, which directly affected the way of living in the South in particular Tennessee. Disney Educational Productions, (2010, January 27) American Presidents: Abraham Lincoln [video] Retrieved on February 24, 2014 from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MFABcUUJMrI#t=89

Experience State History Students will be able to access their required textbook online by logging onto www.experiencestatehistory.com. Students will be given their user name and password which will then allow them to be able to read, answer study questions and prepare for test and quiz from the digital outlet of their choice. This is a convenient alternative to the hassle of dragging bulky, heavy books home every day. This online textbook is readily available to all students with internet access. Smith, Gibbs (2006). Experience State History. [Website] Retrieved on February 24, 2014 from http://www.experiencestatehistory.com.

Flashcards [+] Flashcards [+] is a great application for students to use when trying to memorize the states and capitals. The use of flash cards can have a large and immediate positive effect on the students that use them as they can improve their mastery, (Glover, McLaughlin, Derby, and Gower, 2010). In my opinion, the best thing about this app is that you can register as a teacher and upload a class list to ease the enrollment process for classes. Aside from the aesthetics (I love changing the backgrounds), students can play games and quiz themselves with the uploaded items. I can also have the class play a game as a whole on the app using shared decks of cards. As an educator I would upload the 50 states and the capitals. Then use them games on the app to make informal assessments about the students learning. This app is Compatible with iPad, iPhone, and iPod touch and requires iOS 7.0 or later. NKO Ventures, LLC. (February 12, 2014). Flashcards [+] [iTunes, Free] Retrieved on February 22, 2014 from https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/flashcards-+/id478986342?mt=8 307


Glover, P., McLaughlin, T., Derby, K., & Gower, J. (2010). Using a Direct Instruction Flashcard System with Two Students with Learning Disabilities. Electronic Journal Of Research In Educational Psychology, 8(2), 457-472.

One Globe Kids The app I would use in conjunction with my lesson on multiculturalism is the One Globe Kids App. The app costs $12.99 and explores life from the perspective of 8 real children in 5 countries. I found this app to be so cool! Students are given a safe environment to look at the life of real children and hear stories, and learn games that they play in their country and are exposed to the languages these kids speak. They teach you how to count in their language, show you their favorite foods and give you facts about the country they live in. I think first grade students would love using this app because it would make them feel as if they were making new friends all over the world! (2014). Retrieved from http://oneglobekids.com/

Paper dolls around the world The website I would use to assist in my lesson about multiculturalism is on education.com and allows the students to color and dress paper dolls in different cultures traditional clothing. There are also facts that go along with the country that the outfit is from. I like this because it allows the students to be hands on when dressing the paper dolls and see the types of clothing people in others countries and cultures wear. This is a project that can be done on the computer or printed out and colored by hand. Paper dolls around the world. Retrieved from http://www.education.com/slideshow/exploringcultures-paper-dolls-world/

Quizlet Student will be instructed to set up a quizlet account, for free, by logging on to www.quizlet .com. On this site the student will be able to type in vocabulary words, important people, places, and years to know. In turn the website offers the option of making digital/printable flashcards, generate test questions, and/or other techniques to help the students learn academic material.

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Sutherland, Andrew. (2005). Quizlet. [iOS App. Store, Free] Retrieved on February 24, 2014 from http://www.quizlet.com.

Songs and dances around the world To help my first grade students understand different cultures one of the videos I would show is about different songs and dances around the world. Being able to show them how different cultures sing and dance will be much more effective than just telling them about it or showing it to them in a book. This video is also a medley of different songs and dances so it will keep the children engaged as it changes from different cultures. Using videos and YouTube will be an important learning tool when teaching first graders about different cultures. SONGS AND DANCES AROUND THE WORLD [Web]. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BxuiY9VYVW8

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Microcomputers in Primary & Elementary Schools, SP 2014  

Unit booklet developed by EDCI 6180 graduate students.

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