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JUDITH LAUAND

Brazilian Concrete Abstractions

Essay by Aliza Edelman, Ph.D.

Exhibition on view June 15 - July 28, 2017

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JUDITH LAUAND: FROM THE CIRCLE TO THE OVAL Aliza Edelman In each picture we create a problem and the picture is the solution. –Judith Lauand

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udith Lauand had an invaluable experience in her early career that catalyzed her future.1 She participated as one of the first gallery monitors or docents at the now celebrated II São Paulo Biennial, held from late 1953 to early 1954. The second biennial—the international exhibition with over thirty-two participating countries from Europe, the Americas, the Middle East, and Asia—also coincided with the celebration of the city’s fourth centenary at the newly constructed Ibirapuera Park by architect Oscar Niemeyer. Wolfgang Pfeiffer directed the early courses and workshops for the biennial monitors, a group that included the future art critics and curators Aracy Amaral and Radha Abramo, with whom Lauand become friends. In a striking photograph, Lauand is lecturing in one of the galleries to a captivated audience of well-dressed men from variously diverse backgrounds (fig. 1). In another, Lauand, in the company of her colleagues from the biennial workshop, listens with rapt attention to British sculptor Henry Moore, who was awarded the International Sculpture Prize (fig. 2).2 This biennial was an unparalleled opportunity for emerging artists, and for Lauand, specifically, as modernism unfolded before her eyes. In addition to special galleries devoted to individual artists, there were on display monumental examples of De Stijl, Cubism, and Futurism. Alexander Calder’s kinetic sculptures and mobiles floated in the company of Paul Klee’s intricately woven drawings, and Picasso’s anguished masterpiece, Guernica (1937), sought a momentary dialogue with the pure rhythmic tension of Mondrian’s late Broadway Boogie Woogie (194243).3 And she beheld the works of artists soon associated with the Brazilian Constructivist project, including Geraldo de Barros, Lothar Charoux, Luiz Sacilotto, Alexandre Wollner, Ivan Serpa, Abraham Palatnik, and Lygia Clark, among others. It was in the same year that Lauand declared the significance of her encounter with Concrete art: “Em 1954, eu me encontrei com a arte concreta.”4 Judith Lauand: Brazilian Concrete Abstractions is the second survey presented by Driscoll Babcock Galleries that examines the legacy of the artist. Spanning her career from the mid-1950s to 2008, this exhibition offers another opportunity to consider the clarity of Lauand’s vision and the historical significance of her personal and aesthetic relationship to Concretism. Unlike the trajectories of her female Brazilian contemporaries who had experimented with stylistic modes and directions beyond Concrete painting, such as the large-scale three-dimensional sculptural installations of Lygia Pape (1929-2004) and Mira Schendel (1919-1988), or the therapeutic practices of Lygia Clark (1920-1988), respectively, Lauand’s enduring identification with this geometric language was rather imperious and unmitigated. Moreover, there is an underlying connection between Lauand’s lifelong adherence to the structural problems and investigations of Concretism and the emergence of her identity as a postwar modern woman.5

Opposite (detail): Do Círculo à Oval, 1958, Paint and stucco on particle board, 24 x 24 inches (60 x 60 cm), Plate 11, p. 26

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Figure 1 Judith Lauand as a gallery docent at the II São Paulo Biennial of 1953-54. Courtesy Arquivo Histórico Wanda Svevo / Fundação Bienal de São Paulo

Figure 2 Judith Lauand (second from left) in a workshop for the gallery docents led by British sculptor Henry Moore at the II São Paulo Biennial, 1953. Courtesy Arquivo Histórico Wanda Svevo / Fundação Bienal de São Paulo

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Figure 3 Study for Concreto 33, 1956

Even as Lauand’s career was fashioned on a serious dedication to mathematical thinking, she continually released her art from strict precision through the subtle appearance of irregular angles, diverging vectors, and chromatic imbalances. In many instances, Lauand sets her own pictorial or geometric constraints in order to depart from them, a process that invites the viewer to find the works’ inherent contradictions and tensions. These multiple encounters explore the picture plane’s critical and material affirmation—based on a dialectical relationship between the object and the viewer—but equally suggest the artist’s unintentional and even involuntary expressiveness. Ultimately, Lauand not only negotiates the social constraints of her position as a woman artist, she unhinges the painterly strategies implicit in Concretism’s impersonal structures to arrive at a broader meaning of the term rupture.

In Lauand’s working method, we find the artist’s resourceful manipulation of space in the singular calibrations of line, color, and surface. Like many of her contemporaries, she exhaustively analyzed and adapted her artworks in gouache, linocut, textile, and painting. She was equally drawn to the experimental use of industrial and synthetic polymer paints in neutral colors that amplified illusory surfaces of gloss and matte and reduced the gestural mark. At times, the only noticeable distinction between two images is the surface and medium, where a design might be duplicated, for example, in canvas as well as on slender boards projecting off the wall like a shallow relief. Furthermore, numerous sketchbooks, recently uncovered, are filled with the artist’s careful studies, with accompanying notes, measurements and colors, corresponding to existent pieces. For a preparatory draft of Concreto 33 (1956), Lauand loosely paints a chessboard repetition of circles in white, red, and blue-green with an annotated list of colors in the upper right corner (fig. 3). In its subsequent construction, sixteen circles skillfully cut into a square black board resemble a mechanical template, however any standardized pattern is counteracted by the syncopated rhythm of apertures and enamel laid underneath distributing color and light (pl. 4). Likewise, individual studies explore an endless repertoire of modular grids and serial latticework, radiating vertices and optical patterns, to which she returned faithfully throughout her oeuvre (fig. 4 & 5). Lauand methodically executed the expanding and contracting spirals in Concreto 66 (1957) (pl. 8–10) in linocut and gouache as well as glossy enamel on board; viewed together, the repetition of jagged lighting bolts produces a rotating plane at full tilt (fig. 6).

Figure 4 Untitled study, c. 1950s, Parchment paper, 13 ½ x 19 ¼ inches (35 x 49.5 cm) Figure 5 Untitled study, c. 1950s, Parchment paper, 13 ½ x 19 ¼ inches (35 x 49.5 cm)

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In 1959, Lauand summarized her approach in an interview for the popular newspaper Folha da Manhã that covered a group exhibition of her paulista colleagues at the Galeria de Arte das Folhas (fig. 7 & 8): “[Painting] has no philosophical, literary, social basis whatsoever— it is based on elements inherent to painting itself: form, space, color and movement.” She asserted, further, “A work of art does not represent anything. A work of art is.”6 Here, Lauand offers a direct pedagogical line to the Dutch artist Theo van Doesburg’s signification of “concrete” art as “devoid” of external references beyond the pursuit of pure plastic elements.7 Lauand’s exposure to the Concrete proposals and debates set forth in Brazil by Max Bill, the Swiss artist and industrial designer, and local critics, including Mário Pedrosa, closely Figure 6 Concreto 66, 1957, Linocut plate, followed her family’s move to the city of São Paulo in 1952. More broadly, it reflected the 8 11/16 inches (22 cm diameter) enormous changes in immigration, commerce, and urban planning experienced throughout a modernizing nation. Rio de Janeiro had claimed the country’s cultural and literary center with the realization in 1948 of the Museu de Arte Moderna (MAM-RJ), while São Paulo’s artistic scene in the late 1940s and early 1950s provided successive opportunities for both transnational and local dialogue through the establishment of two important modern art museums: the Museu de Arte de São Paulo Assis Chateaubriand (MASP) in 1947, and the Museu de Arte Moderna de São Paulo (MAM-SP). Under Juscelino Kubitschek’s presidency (195661), the country’s ostensible progress and industrial infrastructure was manifest on a global stage at the nation’s political capital, Brasília. Lauand’s swift immersion in Concretism compelled the artist to abandon her own previously figurative and expressive paintings executed at the Escola de Belas-Artes de Araraquara, where she graduated in 1950.8 Later in her career, she articulated this profound shift from figuration as one of “total” absorption and “integration.” In her alignment with Max Bill’s earlier distinction between abstraction and Concretism, Lauand offered that the concrete was the opposite of abstraction’s foundation in “analytical thinking,” which essentially transposes forms from nature: “‘Concrete art is a thought that has become visible’ …. It derives from concise thought or a mathematical idea.”9 At her first individual show in São Paulo at Galeria Ambiente in 1954, Lauand presented, along with some loosely derived abstractions, geometric compositions that included the strikingly bold and industrial pattern in green and black gouache shown on the gallery brochure cover, later conceived as a wall textile (fig. 9). By 1960, Bill included Lauand’s gouache Concreto 122, Captação do Espaço (1958) in his international retrospective, Konkrete Kunst: 50 Jahre Entwicklung (Concrete Art: 50 Years of Development) in Zurich. Lauand’s aesthetic syncretism with her fellow São Paulo-based Concrete artists was fully realized at the fourth edition of the Salão Paulista de Arte Moderna, held at Galeria Prestes Maia in 1955, at which she displayed two paintings among the artists associated with Grupo Ruptura. Subsequently, she was invited to join the movement by the Figure 7 group’s mercurial spokesman, Waldemar Cordeiro, which provided a Exhibition catalogue, Prêmio Leirner de Arte Contemporânea: Seis Concretistas (Leirner Award for Contemporary Art: Six significant network for her to exchange ideas and to exhibit as the only Concretists), held at the Galeria de Artes das Folhas, São Paulo, 1959

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woman artist participating in the group. Soon thereafter, she exhibited at the third São Paulo Biennial of 1955 (appearing once again as a gallery monitor) and the 1st Exposição Nacional de Arte Concreta (1st National Exhibition of Concrete Art) in São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro, in 1956 and 1957. The universal and objective vocabulary declared in the Ruptura Manifesto, presented at the exhibition Grupo Abstracionista at MAM-SP in 1952, espoused “intelligent” principles in art that would determine not only “new forms” but a new concept of reality, embraced contemporary ideas of “space-time, movement, and matter,” and identified the potential for “practical development.”10 Notwithstanding Lauand’s frequent arguments with Cordeiro, she identified with his early proposals for a materialbased productive art—an object—where “the content is not a point of departure, but the point of arrival.”11 Lauand’s sustained interest in the structural relationships of “plural forms” advanced an understanding of Concretism embedded not only in the progressive environment of São Paulo but reflected in the impact of philosophical and phenomenological systems of human visual perception, or the Gestalt, appropriated by many contemporary artists.12 For example, an oblique chain of quadrilateral arrowheads playfully terminates at the uppermost triangle in Lauand’s Sem título (Untitled), Acervo C. 177 (1960) (pl. 17). Many Ruptura artists utilized optical patterns to express non-Euclidean renderings of space and temporal experiences; Cordeiro’s important series Idéia visível (Visible Idea) of 1956 and 1957 delineated the scientific properties of the Golden section and logarithmic spirals, manipulating techniques that gave the illusion of symmetry while maximizing dynamic geometrical relationships. For the unusually descriptive Do Círculo à Oval (From the Circle to the Oval) of 1958 (pl. 11), Lauand commences two overlapping and unwinding sets of rays from one central angle that establishes a mathematical constraint or constant: in counterclockwise rotation, the inner angles are progressively acute by miniscule degrees; analogously, the outer subset of angles are gradually smaller clockwise. As much as Lauand was drawn to the generative potential of logarithmic spirals, it is revealing to point out the artist’s clever use of the ellipse, not the oval, for the curved shape in From the Circle to the Oval. This shape-shifting technique disregards her own title and original postulate, a liberating gesture towards organic growth and intuition in its counterproposal to Concretism’s analytical constructions.13 Correspondingly, Lauand uses color in Acervo 82 (1963) (pl. 18) to invigorate the square’s interlocking key pattern—a central white rectangle grounded by two red symmetrical shapes reflect each other, while opposing blue and black halves propel the vorticular spin of the picture plane. Similarly, she returns to a colorful radial pattern in her later Sem título (Untitled) of 2001 (pl. 30). The five vertical bands ordering the floating palette of circles and ovals—in pink, blue, and purple—create a rhythmic fusion in her earlier untitled tempera of 1967 (pl. 23). Comparatively, the unfolding horseshoe curve of hexagons, pentagons, cubes and triangles is interspersed with eccentric geometries in her later untitled canvas of 1986 (pl. 26). Lauand’s later works of the 1960s and 1970s incorporate hybridized elements of concrete poetry, assemblage, and Cinema Novo to reflect the critical Figure 8 reception of Pop and Neo-Figuration in Brazil. Even as she Grupo Ruptura artists at Galeria de Artes das Folhas, São Paulo, 1959 (pictured left to right: Luiz Sacilotto, Waldemar Cordeiro, Kazmer Féjer, Judith Lauand, and Maurício Nogueira Lima)

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continually re-defined her relationship to Concretism, she was clearly engaged in this era’s proto-feminist dynamics and politics that addressed the censorial policies of Brazil’s prolonged dictatorship and military regime.14 While respecting the serious “open work” of Lygia Clark and Hélio Oiticica, she nevertheless rejected the experimental and theoretical ideas explored by her fellow Concrete artists aligned with Grupo Frente in Rio de Janeiro, and later pursued in Neo-Concrete systems posited beyond the institutional frame of art. However, like her peers from both cities, Lauand evolved a prolific and ambitious practice formulated on her own set of mathematic constraints that were invariably disrupted by the natural laws of chaos and entropy.

Figure 9 Exhibition brochure, Galeria Ambiente, São Paulo, 1954

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NOTES 1

My gratitude to the Judith Lauand Archives, São Paulo, for granting me access to the artist’s artwork and documents, and to the Fundo Arquivístico /

Instituto de Arte Contemporânea, São Paulo for its gracious assistance in providing photography. I would also like to thank Celso Fioravante for discussing his vast knowledge of Lauand with me. 2

From September-October 1954, Lauand worked as a gallery monitor or docent for the exhibition Da Caravaggio a Tiepolo, Pittura Italiana del XVII e

XVIII Secolo, curated by Gilberto Ronci at the Museu de Arte Moderna de São Paulo (MAM-SP), to honor Italy’s important contributions to Brazil. See Celso Fioravante, Judith Lauand: os anos 50 e a construção da geometria (São Paulo: Instituto de Arte Contemporânea, 2015), 69. 3

For a historic development of the early biennials and their national impact in Brazil, see Adele Nelson, “Monumental and Ephemeral: The Early São

Paulo Bienais,” in Constructive Spirit: Abstract Art in South and North America, 1920s-50s, ed. Mary-Kate O’Hare, exh. cat. (Petaluma, CA: Pomegranate and The Newark Museum), 127-142. 4

Lauand, cited in Paulo Herkenhoff, “Judith Lauand: Arte de delicadezas concretistas,” in Judith Lauand: Obras de 1954-1960 (São Paulo: Sylvio Nery

da Fonseca Escritório de Arte, 1996), n.p. 5

For an expanded discussion of geometric abtraction and the gendered relationships among South and North American women artists, see my essay,

“The Masquerade of Geometry: Identity and Abstraction in the Americas,” in Constructive Spirit, 104-126. 6

Lauand, quoted in “Judite Lauand entre os concretistas que vão export na Galeria de Arte das ‘Folhas,’” Folha da Manhã (São Paulo), January 7, 1959,

p. 9. See also, “Judith Lauand,” in Projeto construtivo brasileiro na arte, 1950-1962, ed. Aracy A. Amaral, exh. cat. (Rio de Janeiro: Museu de Arte Moderna do Rio de Janeiro; and São Paulo: Secretaria da Cultura, Ciência e Tecnologia do Estado de São Paulo, Pinacoteca do Estado, 1977), 214. 7

Theo van Doesburg, “Base de la peinture concret,” Art Concret: AC (April 1930): 1.

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Lauand produced skilled landscapes and portraits at the Escola de Belas-Artes de Araraquara, under the direction of teachers Quirino Campofiorito,

Mário Ybarra de Almeida, and Domenico Larrazini, among others. In group exhibitions, she had won first prize at the fifteenth Salão de Belas Artes de Araraquara in 1952, and she was critically recognized at an exhibition of Young Painters from the School of Fine Arts (Jovens Pintores da Escola de BelasArtes) at the Museu de Arte Moderna de São Paulo (MAM-SP). 9

Lauand, “Da figuração para a abstração,” manuscript in preparation for a lecture, potentially at Galeria de Arte do SESI, São Paulo, SP, in Judith

Lauand Archives, São Paulo; cited in Fioravante, Judith Lauand: os anos 50 e a construção da geometria, 6. See also, Max Bill, “Konkrete Gestaltung,” in Zeitprobleme in der Schweitzer Malerei und Plastik, exh. cat. (Zurich: Kunsthaus, 1936). 10

It was also reprinted in the supplement of the local newspaper Correiro Paulistano in 1953. The original Ruptura members, an interesting group from

international backgrounds and disciplines in graphic design, photography and communications, included Waldemar Cordeiro (1925-73), Leopoldo Haar (1910-54), Geraldo de Barros (1923-98), Kazmer Féjer (1923-89), Luiz Sacilotto (1924-2003), Lothar Charoux (1912-87), and Anatol Wladyslaw (1913-2004), with later members Maurício Nogueira Lima (1930-99) and Hermelindo Fiaminghi (1920-2004). 11

See Waldemar Cordeiro, “O objeto,” Arquitetura e Decoração (São Paulo), no. 20 (November-December, 1956): n.p.

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See Ana Maria Belluzzo, “Ruptura e Arte Concreta / Rupture and Concrete Art,” in Arte construtiva no Brazil: Coleção Adolpho Leirner / Construc-

tive Art in Brazil: Adolpho Leirner Collection, ed. Amaral, exh. cat. (São Paulo: DBA Arte Gráficas, 1998), 118-19. On Gestalt theory, see Rudolf Arnheim, “Gestalt and Art,” Journal of Aesthetics and Criticism 2, no. 8 (1943): 71-75. 13

Lauand was drawn to mathematics from a young age, and she often used the public libraries to study where she had access to Einstein’s writings.

Changing her focus, from the spiral to the cube, for example, was considered too great a departure by her fellow Ruptura artists, who preferred that she pursue one dominant motif. Lauand, interview with the author, October 10, 2012, São Paulo. 14

For a further discussion of Lauand’s relationship to feminism and politics, see my essay, “Rupturing the Plane: Judith Lauand’s Infinite Constructions,” in Judith

Lauand: Brazilian Modernist, 1950s-2000s, exh. cat. (New York: Driscoll Babcock Galleries), 9-19.

All artworks © 1956-2008 Judith Lauand Archives; Courtesy Fundo Arquivístico / Instituto de Arte Contemporânea, São Paulo

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Plate 1

CONCRETO 245, 1955 Gouache on paper 4 x 4 inches (10 x 10 cm) Plate 2

SEM TĂ?TULO (UNTITLED), 1955 Gouache on paper 4 x 4 inches (10 x 10 cm)

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Plate 3

SEM TÍTULO (UNTITLED), c. 1958 Oil on canvas 24 x 24 inches (60 x 60 cm)

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Plate 4

CONCRETO 33, 1956 Enamel on cut particle board 20 x 20 inches (50.3 x 50.3 cm)

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Plate 5

SEM TÍTULO (UNTITLED), 1956 Collage on canvas 4 x 4 inches (10 x 10 cm) Plate 6

SEM TÍTULO (UNTITLED), 1956 Woodcut on rice paper 4 x 4 inches (10 x 10 cm)

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5

6

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Plate 7

CONCRETO 53, ACERVO 192, 1957 Gouache on paper 19 x 20 inches (48 x 52 cm)

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Plate 8

CONCRETO 66, 1957 Enamel on particle board 15 ž inches diameter (40 cm diameter)

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Plate 9

CONCRETO 66, 1957 Gouache on paper 5 ½ inches diameter (14 cm diameter) Plate 10

CONCRETO 66, 1957 Linocut on rice paper 8 ½ inches diameter (22 cm diameter)

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Plate 11

DO CÍRCULO À OVAL (FROM THE CIRCLE TO THE OVAL), 1958 Paint and stucco on particle board 24 x 24 inches (60 x 60 cm)

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Plate 12

CONCRETO 139, 1958 Ink on paper and eucatex 18 x 14 inches (45 x 36.5 cm)

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Plate 13

ACERVO 183, C 117, 1958 Gouache on paper 25 x 19 inches (64 x 48 cm)

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Plate 14

C 108, ACERVO 202, 1958 Gouache on paper 12 ½ x 12 ½ inches (32 x 32 cm)

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Plate 15

C 118, 1958 Ink on paper 25 ½ x 29 inches (58 x 66 cm)

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Plate 16

SEM TÍTULO (UNTITLED), ACERVO 187, 1959 Ink on paper 23 x 19 inches (59 x 48 cm)

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Plate 17

SEM TÍTULO (UNTITLED), ACERVO C. 177, 1960 Oil on canvas 34 x 53 ½ inches (86 x 136 cm)

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Plate 18

ACERVO 82, 1963 Oil on particle board 18 x 18 inches (45 x 45 cm)

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Plate 19

SEM TÍTULO (UNTITLED), ACERVO 124, 1965 Tempera on canvas 24 x 24 inches (60 x 60 cm)

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Plate 20

SEM TĂ?TULO (UNTITLED), 1965 Fabric and thumbtacks on canvas 12 x 12 inches (30 x 30 cm)

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Plate 21

SEM TÍTULO (UNTITLED), 1967 Tempera on canvas 29 ½ x 29 ½ inches (75 x 75 cm)

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Plate 22

SEM TĂ?TULO (UNTITLED), 1967 Tempera on canvas 30 x 30 inches (75 x 75 cm)

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Plate 23

SEM TÍTULO (UNTITLED), 1967 Tempera on canvas 29 ½ x 29 ½ inches (75 x 75 cm)

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Plate 24

SEM TÍTULO (UNTITLED), 1976 Oil on canvas 24 x 24 inches (60 x 60 cm)

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Plate 25

SEM TÍTULO (UNTITLED), 1978 Acrylic on cardstock 7 ½ x 11 inches (19 x 28 cm)

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Plate 26

SEM TÍTULO (UNTITLED), 1986 Acrylic on canvas 31 x 31 inches (80 x 80 cm)

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Plate 27

SEM TÍTULO (UNTITLED), 1990 Oil on canvas 31 ½ x 31 ½ inches (80 x 80 cm)

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Plate 28

SEM TÍTULO (UNTITLED), 1993 Oil on canvas 31 x 31 inches (80 x 80 cm)

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Plate 29

SEM TÍTULO (UNTITLED), 1993 Oil on canvas 31 x 31 inches (80 x 80 cm)

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Plate 30

SEM TÍTULO (UNTITLED), 2001 Oil on canvas 31 x 31 inches (80 x 80 cm)

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Plate 31

SEM TÍTULO (UNTITLED), ACERVO 485, 2008 Oil on fibre board 16 ½ x 12 ½ inches (42 x 32 cm)

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JUDITH LAUAND SELECTED SOLO EXHIBITIONS 2017

Driscoll Babcock Galleries, New York, Judith Lauand: Brazilian Concrete Abstractions

2015

Instituto de Arte Contemporânea, São Paulo, Brazil, Judith Lauand: os anos 50 e a construção da geometria

2014

Driscoll Babcock Galleries, New York, Judith Lauand: Brazilian Modernist, 1950s-2000s

2013

Stephen Friedman Gallery, London, England, Judith Lauand: the 1950s

2012

Galeria Berenice Arvani, São Paulo, Brazil, Judith Lauand: Guaches, Desenhos e Colagens Anos 50

2011

Museu de Arte Moderna, São Paulo, Brazil, Judith Lauand: Experiências

2008

Galeria Berenice Arvani, São Paulo, Brazil and Palacete da Esplanada das Rosas, Araraquara, São Paulo, Brazil, Judith Lauand – 65 Anos de Arte – Xilogravuras

2007

Galeria Berenice Arvani, São Paulo, Brazil, Judith Lauand – 50 Anos de Pintura

1996 Sylvio Nery da Fonseca Escritório de Arte, São Paulo, Brazil, Obras de 1954-1960 1994

Casa de Cultura Manoel de Vasconcelos Martins, Pontal, São Paulo, Brazil

1992

Museu de Arte Contemporânea – USP, São Paulo, Brazil

1986

Choice Galeria de Arte, São Paulo, Brazil

1977

Museu de Arte Contemporânea – USP, São Paulo, Brazil

1971

Galeria Alançia Francesa, São Paulo, Brazil

1965

Galeria NT – Novas Tendências, São Paulo, Brazil

1962

Galeria Aremar, Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil

1954

Galeria Ambiente, São Paulo, Brazil

SELECTED GROUP EXHIBITIONS 2017-18 The Getty Center, Los Angeles, CA, Making Art Concrete: Works from Argentina and Brazil in the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros 2014

Museu de Arte Moderna, São Paulo, Brazil, Vontade Construtiva na Coleção Fadel

2012

Dan Galeria and Centro Brasileiro Britânico, São Paulo, Brazil, Concretos Paralelos / Concrete Parallels

Galeria Berenice Arvani, São Paulo, Brazil, Do Concretismo ao Pop Anos: 50, 60 e 70

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2010-11 Fundação Iberê Camargo, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul and Pinacoteca do Estado de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil, Desenhar o Espaço 2010

Austin Desmond Fine Arts, London, England and Matteo Lampertico Arte Antica e Moderna, Milan, Italy, Abstraction-Creation: Post-War Geometric Abstract Art from Europe and South America

Newark Museum, New Jersey, Constructive Spirit: Abstract Art in South and North America, 1920s-50s

Galeria Berenice Arvani, São Paulo, Preto no Branco, do Concreto ao Contemporâneo

2009-11

Museum of Latin American Art, Long Beach, California; Es Baluard Museu d’Art Modern i Contemporani de Palma, Palma de Mallorca, Spain; and Kunst und Ausstellunghshalle der Bundesrepublik Deutschland, Bonn, Germany, The Sites of Latin American Abstraction: Selections from the Ella Fontanals-Cisneros Collection

2009

Galeria Berenice Arvani, São Paulo, Anos 50 50 Obras

2008

Galeria Berenice Arvani, São Paulo, Ruptura Frente Ressonâncias Musée de Saint-Tropez, France, Art Cinétique et Mouvement

2006

Museu de Arte Moderna, São Paulo, Brazil, Concreta 56: A Raiz da Forma

Instituto Tomie Ohtake, São Paulo, Brazil, Pincelada: Pintura e Método

Dan Galeria, São Paulo, Brazil, Concretismo e Neo-Concretismo

2004

Galeria Brito Cimino, São Paulo, Brazil, Versão Brasileira

2002 Paço Imperial, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Caminho do Contemporâneo 1952-2002

Collección Patrícia Phelps de Cisneros, Museu de Arte Moderna, São Paulo and Museu de Arte Moderna, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Paralelos: Arte Brasileira da Segunda Metade do Século XX em Contexto

2001

Fogg Art Museum and David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Sudies, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, Geometric Abstraction: Latin American Art from the Patricia Phelps de Cisneros Collection

2000

Fundação Bienal, São Paulo, Brazil, Brasil + 500 Mostra do Redescobrimento: Arte Moderna e Arte Contemporânea

Centre d’Art Contemporain, Mouans-Sartoux, France, Un Siècle d’Art Concret

1999 Jo Slaviero Galeria de Arte, São Paulo, Brazil, Década de 50 e seus Envolvimentos 1998

Museu de Arte Moderna, São Paulo, Brazil, Arte Construtiva no Brasil – Coleção Adolpho Leirner

1997

Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, 2o Bienal do Mercosul

Casa das Rosas, São Paulo, Brazil, Desexp(l)os(ign)ição


1996 Sylvio Nery da Fonseca Escritório de Arte, São Paulo, Brazil, Concretos Neo-Concretos

São Paulo, Brazil, 1o Salão de Arte Contemporânea de São Caetano do Sul

MAC, Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil, 3o Salão de Arte Contemporânea

Centro Cultural Banco do Brasil, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Tendências Construtivas no Acervo do MAC-USP

Galeria de Arte do SESi, São Paulo, Brazil, Bandeiras: 60 artistas homenageiam a USP

1966

Museu de Arte Brasileira da FAAP, São Paulo, Brazil, Premissas 3

1994

Pavilhão da Bienal, São Paulo, Brazil, Bienal Brasil Século XX

Galeria Prestes Maia, São Paulo, Brazil, 15o Salão Paulista de Arte Moderna

1991

Galeria Choice, São Paulo, Brazil, Mostra Coletiva

MAC, Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil, 2o Salão de Arte Contemporânea

1990

Rio Design Center, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Arte Como Construção

1965

Pavilhão da Bienal, São Paulo, Brazil, 8o Bienal Internacional de São Paulo

1987

Fundação Bienal, São Paulo, Brazil, A Trama do Gosto

Galeria Prestes Maia, São Paulo, Brazil, 14o Salão Paulista de Arte Moderna

Museu de Arte Brasileira da FAAP, São Paulo, Brazil, Projeto Arte Brasileira – Anos 50

MAC, Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil, 1o Salão de Arte Contemporânea

Funarte, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Abstração Geométrica 1

Museu de Arte Brasileira de FAAP, São Paulo, Brazil, Propostas 65

1985

Museu de Arte da Pampulha, Belo Horizonte, Brazil, Geometria Hoje

1964

Galeria Prestes Maia, São Paulo, Brazil, 3º Salão Paulista de Arte Moderna

1984

Pavilhão da Bienal, São Paulo, Brazil, Tradição e Ruptura

1963

Pavilhão da Bienal, São Paulo, Brazil, 7o Bienal Internacional de São Paulo

Paulo Figueiredo Galeria de Arte, São Paulo, Brazil, Geometria 84

Galeria NT, São Paulo, Brazil, Coletiva de inauquração da Associação de Artes Visuais Novas Tendências

1983

Centro Cultural, São Paulo, Brazil, Exposição Waldemar Cordeiro

1962

São Paulo, Brazil, Exposição Coletiva no Clube dos Artistas de São Paulo

1978

Museu Lasar Segall, São Paulo, Brazil, As Bienais e a Abstração

1961

Galeria Prestes Maia, São Paulo, Brazil, 10o Salão Paulista de Arte Moderna

Museu de Arte Brasileira da FAAP, São Paulo, Brazil, Objeto na Arte Brasil Anos 60

1960

Helmaus Zürich, Switzerland, Konkrete Kunst: 50 Jahre Entwicklung, curated by Max Bill

1977

Pinacoteca do Estado, São Paulo and Museu de Arte Moderna, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Projeto Construtivo Brasileiro na Arte 1950-1962

Museu de Arte Moderna, São Paulo, Brazil, Contribuição de Mulher às Artes Plásticas do País

2o Salão Feminino de Maio Eucatex Pro, São Paulo, Brazil

Galeria de Arte das Folhas, São Paulo, Exposição de Arte Concreta

1972

Museu de Arte Moderna, São Paulo, Brazil, 2o Exposição internacional de Gravura

Museu de Arte Moderna, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Exposição de Arte Concreta

1970

Porto Alegre, Brazil, 25 Pintores do Acervo do Museu de Arte Moderna de São Paulo, Brazil

1959

Munich, Germany; The Hague, Holland, and Vienna, Austria, Mostra Arte Brasileira Atual

1969

Pavilhão da Bienal, São Paulo, Brazil, 10o Bienal Internacional de São Paulo

Galeria Prestes Maia, São Paulo, Brazil, 8º Salão Paulista de Arte Moderna

Museu de Arte Moderna, São Paulo, Brazil, Panorama da Arte Atual Brasileira

1958

Galeria Prestes Maia, São Paulo, Brazil, 7º Salão Paulista de Arte Moderna

1957

Palácio Gustavo Capanema – MEC, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 6° Salão Nacional de Arte Moderna

Palácio Gustavo Capanema – MEC, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; Buenos Aires and Rosario, Argentina; Santiago, Chile; and Lima, Peru, Exposição Nacional de Arte Concreta

1956

Museu de Arte Moderna, São Paulo and Museum de Arte Moderna, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Exposição Nacional de Arte Concreta

1968 Galeria Prestes Maia, São Paulo, Brazil, 17o Salão Paulista de Arte Moderna 1968

Museu de Arte Moderna, São Paulo, Brazil, Os Concretistas

São Paulo, Brazil, 2o Salão de Arte Contemporânea de São Caetano do Sul

Galeria Espaço, São Paulo, Brazil, Coletiva de pinturas

1967

Pavilhão da Bienal, São Paulo, Brazil, 9o Bienal internacional de São Paulo

Galeria Prestes Maia, São Paulo, Brazil, 16o Salão Paulista de Arte Moderna

Teatro Nacional, Brasília, Brazil, 4o Salão de Arte Moderna Distrito Federal

Museu de Arte Moderna de São Paulo, Brazil, Prêmio de Arte Contemporânea

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1955

Pavilhão da Bienal, São Paulo, Brazil, 3o Bienal Internacional de São Paulo

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 4º Salão Nacional de Arte Moderna

Galeria Prestes Maia, São Paulo, Brazil, 4º Salão Paulista de Arte Moderna

1954

Galeria Prestes Maia, São Paulo, Brazil, 3º Salão Paulista de Arte Moderna

1953

São Paulo, Brazil, 16° Salão de Belas Artes de Araraquara

1952

Salão do antigo Trianon, São Paulo, Brazil, 2° Salão Paulista de Arte Moderna

Museu de Arte Moderna, São Paulo, Brazil, Jovens Pintores da Escola de Belas-Artes de Araraquara

São Paulo, Brazil, 15° Salão de Belas Artes de Araraquara

1945

São Paulo, Brazil, 9° Salão de Belas Artes de Araraquara

SELECTED AWARDS AND HONORS 1964

13° Salão Paulista de Arte Moderna – Prêmio Aquisição

1959

8° Salão Paulista de Arte Moderna – Prêmio Aquisição

1958

7° Salão Paulista de Arte Moderna – Prêmio Aquisição

1955

4° Salão Paulista de Arte Moderna – Pequena Medalha de Prata

1954

3° Salão Paulista de Arte Moderna – Grande Medalha de Bronze

1953

16° Salão de Belas Artes de Araraquara – Prêmio Cidade de Araraquara

1952

15° Salão de Belas Artes de Araraquara – Primeiro Lugar

1945

9° Salão de Belas Artes de Araraquara – Prêmio Estímulo de Desenho

SELECTED PUBLIC COLLECTIONS Fundação do Livro do Cego no Brasil Museu de Arte Contemporânea de Niterói Museu de Arte Contemporânea de São Paulo Museu de Arte Moderna de São Paulo Museu de Arte Moderna do Rio de Janeiro Museu de Arte Moderna de Grenoble, France Museum of Fine Arts, Houston Museum of Modern Art, New York Pinacoteca do Estado de São Paulo

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ABOUT ALIZA EDELMAN Aliza Edelman, Ph.D., is a curator with an art historical focus on the transnational narratives of postwar women artists and abstraction in the Americas. In 2014, she organized the survey Judith Lauand: Brazilian Modernist, 1950s-2000s at Driscoll Babcock Galleries. Her current scholarly writings are included in Women of Abstract Expressionism (Yale University Press and Denver Art Museum) and American Women Artists, 1935-1970 — Gender, Culture, and Politics (Ashgate Press), both 2016. Previously, she was an advisor to the critically acclaimed exhibition, Constructive Spirit: Abstract Art in South and North America, 1920s-50s at the Newark Museum, NJ, for which she contributed an essay to the catalogue. She is a regular contributor to the Woman’s Art Journal.

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Publication © 2017 Driscoll Babcock Galleries, LLC All artworks © 1956-2008 Judith Lauand Archives; Courtesy Fundo Arquivístico / Instituto de Arte Contemporânea, São Paulo Page 70: © Gui Mohallem Driscoll Babcock Galleries 525 West 25th Street New York, NY 10001 +1 212.767.1852 info@driscollbabcock.com www.driscollbabcock.com All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form by any means, whether electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording or otherwise, without the prior written permission of Driscoll Babcock Galleries. Cover image: Judith Lauand (b. 1922), CONCRETO 53, ACERVO 192, 1957, Gouache on paper, 19 x 20 inches (48 x 52 cm) Back cover image: Judith Lauand (b. 1922), SEM TÍTULO (UNTITLED), 1967, Tempera on canvas, 30 x 30 inches (75 x 75 cm) 73


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Judith Lauand: Brazilian Concrete Abstractions  
Judith Lauand: Brazilian Concrete Abstractions  
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