__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

THE CANADIAN MEN’S MAGAZINE

EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW

ANTONI POROWSKI TV’S FOOD EXPERT THE

CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE $8.99 DISPLAY UNTIL AUGUST 31ST, 2020


THE SPRING/SUMMER CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE Cover Story Antoni Porowski: Canadian turned International TV Personality and Food & Wine Expert Art & Design Japandi: The Hot New Japanese x Scandinavian Design Trend Design Profile: Discover Montreal’s D’Armes For the Love of Art: Interview with Collector-Philanthropist William Bruce Currie Bailey Business Conferences: The Best Conferences to Attend in 2020 Lio Malca: Interview with the Businessman and Art Curator Cars Top 3 Luxury Convertibles: Convertibles to Ride in Style this Summer The Turbo S-E Hybrid Porsche Panamera: Discover the New 2020 Model 2020 Chevrolet Corvette: The New 2020 Corvette Stingray Porsche Ice Experience: A Unique Test Drive Experience THE SPRING SUMMER BOSS COLLECTION

Film Sundance 2020: Must-See Films from the Sundance Film Festival Her Barbara Fialho: Get to Know the Victoria’s Secret Brazilian Bombshell Gastronomy The Future of Canadian Gastronomy: Get to Know the Chefs Changing Canadian Cuisine Top Chefs: Discover the Top Chefs Working in Montreal’s Luxury Hotels

TOP CONVERTIBLES

Lifestyle Best of Montreal and Toronto: New Hotspot Bars and Restaurants You Have to Visit Best Canadian Style Spots: The Best Places to Up Your Style Game Music Hozier: The Irish Musician’s Life After Take Me to Church Vinyl Review: The Best New Vinyl Releases Reviewed Style Top 5 Luxury Sneakers: The Best High-End Kicks for the Summer London Nostalgia: English-inspired Tailored Elegance Modern Vibes: Minimal Streetwear Meets Cool Pastel Breaking the Wave: Head to Toe Boss Collection Style Report: Style Inspired by the British Gentleman Tech Best Tech Gadgets 2020: Best New Gadgets to Try Travel Bordeaux: The Best of the Hip French City Menorca, Balearic Islands: The Mediterranean’s Hidden Gem The Dominick Hotel: A New York City Luxury Hotel to Discover Sport Plant Power: Plant-Based Athletes Thriving in Their Fields The Gallery: How 62-Year-Old George Hood Planked for 8 Hours

BRAZILIAN TOP MODEL BARBARA FIALHO

Watches Brilliant Blue Watches: Sleek Blue Toned Pieces Gold & Leather: Classic and Bold Gold and Leather Watches Aging Gracefully: Cartier’s Santos de Cartier Watch Through Time

Cover Credits: Rings VITALY at MAISON SIMONS. Top VERSACE. Boss Hugo Boss: Clothing: Full look BOSS. Photography MALINA CORPADEAN. Fashion editor RANDY SMITH at HUMANKIND MANAGEMENT. Assistant stylist JULIA DEBARTOLO. Model ANTONI POROWSKI. Make-up and hair STEVEN TURPIN at MGMT.

DTK MEN - SPRING/SUMMER 2020


1307 Sainte-Catherine Street West


SPRING/SUMMER 2020 N ̊ 13 President: Kathia Cambron C.E.O.: Shervin Shirvani Editor-in-Chief: Sylvain Blais Editorial Directors: Sylvain Blais, Kathia Cambron Commercial Chef Officer: Cinthya Chalifoux Senior Content Editor: Jason Gorber

PRODUCTION

Copy Editing and Proofreading: Luisa Tarantino Production Interns: Jérémie Ladouceur, Joyce Nalaband

ART DEPARTMENT

Creative Director: Sylvain Blais Art Director: César Ochoa Graphic Designers: Hagar Moussalli, Robin Westfield On-Set Art Directors: Sylvain Blais

ART AND DESIGN

Design Editor: Azamit Writers: Azamit, Stéphane Le Duc

BUSINESS

Writers: Cinthya Chalifoux, Aaron Joseph-Cunningham

CINEMA

Cinema Editor & Writers: Jason Gorber

CULTURE AND LIFESTYLE

Lifestyle Editor: Marie-Ève Venne Writers: Stéphane Le Duc, Marie-Ève Venne

GROOMING

Grooming Editor: Steven Turpin

CULTURE AND LIFESTYLE

Lifestyle Editor: Marie-Ève Venne, Lauren Walker-Lee Writers: Stéphane Le Duc, Marie-Ève Venne, Lauren Walker-Lee, Jason Gorber

MUSIC

Editor & Writers: Jason Gorber

PHOTOGRAPHERS

Richard Bernardin, Jean-Claude Lussier, Brian Ypperciel, Royal Gilbert, Malina Corpadean

CARS

Rides Editor: Shervin Shirvani Writers: Benjamin Yong, Pierro Facchin

SPORTS

Writer: Braydon Holmyard

STYLE

Stylists: Jay Forest, Martin Boucher, Jérémie Ladouceur Writers: Benjamin Yong

TECHNOLOGY

Writer: Aaron Cunningham

TRAVEL

Writers: Marie-Ève Venne, Christine Elizabeth Laprade, Luisa Tarantino

WATCHES

Watch Editor: Shervin Shirvani Writers: Carol Beslor, Luisa Tarantino

COMMUNICATIONS

info@dresstokillmagazine.com

ADVERTISING

Cinthya Chalifoux cinthya@dresstokillmagazine.com 514 272-6187

WEB DEPARTMENT

Creative Director: Shervin Shirvani Art Director: César Ochoa Editorial Director: Sylvain Blais Editors: Lauren Walker-Lee, Luisa Tarantino

SUBSCRIPTION

www.store.dresstokillmagazine.com

DISTRIBUTION

info@dresstokillmagazine.com

DTK MEN

5555 De Gaspé, Suite 214, Montréal (Québec) Canada, H2T 2A3, 514-272-6187 DTK MEN is a DTK MEDIA INC Publication PRINTED BY TRANSCONTINENTAL in Canada P.P. : 41883012 - ISSN 1923-0869 KILL - ISSN 1923-0877 Dress to KILL

dresstokillmagazine.com Disclaimer: All content for this issue was shot and produced before COVID-19 isolation measures.

twitter.com/dtkmen

@dtkmen

facebook.com/dtkmen


Do you like our style?

LET OUR PASSION BE THE DRIVING FORCE OF YOUR SUCCESS, AND SURROUND YOURSELF WITH A HIGH PERFORMING TEAM OF TALENTED VISIONARIES.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY CHRIS NICHOLLS

CREATIVE AGENCY / CREATIVE DIRECTION / PHOTOGRAPHY / VIDEO / CONTENT CREATION / CONSULTING / BRANDING / CUSTOM PRINTING / COPYWRITING / EVENT / SPEAKING / GRAPHIC DESIGN

DTKSTUDIO.COM


Contributors

Randy Smith STYLE EDITOR

Malina Corpadean PHOTOGRAPHER

Aaron Cunningham

WRITER

Azamit

DESIGN EDITOR

Braydon Holmyard WRITER

Jérémie Ladouceur

PRODUCTION ASSISTANT

P.8

Randy’s extensive career in fashion as stylist, photographer, and art director has spanned over 30 years in New York, LA, Miami, Montreal and Toronto. He has had and still has a prolific and vibrant career, having worked with Simons, Holt Renfrew, Harry Rosen and the Hudson’s Bay, as well as styled a variety of A-list celebs such as David Bowie and Justin Timberlake, and worked with prestigious international publications such as Vogue and ELLE. As a Fashion Editor for Dress to Kill Magazine, his latest creative endeavours can be seen in each issue. Having completed studies in Art History from McGill University and in Art Business at the Sotheby’s Institute of Art, Malina Corpadean’s passions for fashion, art, and all things pertaining to beauty drew her into the world of fashion, through which she became one of Canada’s premier photographers. Her academic pursuit of and fascination with the arts have always informed her visual choices. In 2012, she won the P&G Photographer of the Year Award and more recently earned a CAFA nomination for Image-Maker of the year.

RANDY SMITH

MALINA CORPADEAN

Aaron Cunningham is a Canadian-born artist and musician currently working as a photographer in Berlin, whose work focuses on technology, 3D, video, and music. He has been featured on Boiler Room and VICE and was nominated for a Prism Prize Award in 2015-2017 for his outstanding work in music and video, and has credits as a co-writer on the Billboard charts. Azamit is a Montreal style icon, brand builder, and creative connector. With a distinct background in fashion, curation, and events, she creates unique design encounters that transcend the senses and imprint revelation for the viewer. Her multi-layered interests in the design world has led her to create In Toto – a visual storytelling firm with an invitation to elevate and celebrate contemporary design and aesthetics. Her constant quest and relentless pursuit of incubating new ideas has led her to become a champion of localness, wherever that may be.

AZAMIT

AARON CUNNINGHAM

While his day job is with the Toronto Star, Braydon has been writing sports features for DTK over the last three years. He likes to showcase the community and humanity in sports through his writing. You can usually find him standing in a field with a baseball in his hand. Having studied at Marsan College, Concordia University and OCAD University, Jérémie Ladouceur has years of experience as a photo assistant. His passion for image-making shows through his love for the entire production process; the experience keeps him alive and motivated to work in the fields of fashion and photography. Wanting to broaden his skills and explore another aspect of his fascination for publications and editorials, the next logical step for him was to join the team at Dress to Kill.

BRAYDON HOLMYARD

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE

JÉRÉMIE LADOUCEUR


Online Store + Event

Online marketing and shipping, including all photography material GET QUALITY BRAND VISIBILITY AND CONNECT WITH AFFLUENT CLIENTELE

EDITORS’ PICKS FEATURING THE BEST IN FASHION, JEWELLERY, BEAUTY, DÉCOR, AND DESIGN Online for 6 months from August to February Retail Pop-up in Toronto from September to December* And in Montreal in Decembe*

Info@dresstokillmagazine.com

*If the COVID-19 situation permits

ing s t p e Acc ission subm


EDITORIAL

In these dark times, it’s the perfect timing to get back to what is essential to us – that which gives us hope, comfort, and allows us to explore our passions. When something difficult is happening in your life, it’s important to have resilience and take the opportunity to make something positive out of it. Such was our mindset in the production of this issue – luckily for us, almost all of the production for this issue was already completed before the storm hit, and we are extremely happy to even be able to present this issue to you. For this issue, we decided to focus on culture, and by the same occasion, the lifestyle that goes with it, because culture is something that is absolutely essential in our lives. We had the chance to feature a man that is a great inspiration for many – TV Personality and Food and Wine Expert, Antoni Porowski. He is inspiring not only because of what he has been able to accomplish so far in his career, making it from Montreal to televisions worldwide, but because through his role in the limelight, he is someone who supports, uplifts, and brings joy to others. In the same vein, and for that reason, this issue touches on all sorts of sources of inspiration. For the culinary side of this issue, we follow Chefs who are paving the way for Canadian cuisine and leading us into the future of gastronomy. On the sport side of things, ex-Marine George Hood talks us through setting a Guinness World Record, perseverance, and how to stay motivated to reach your goals. For some reprieve and entertainment that is much needed in our times, we turn to what keeps us sane – art in all its forms, whether it be fashion, film, music, and more. Read our interviews with legendary art collectors and philanthropists, find incredible new films and music to discover, and look forward to what summer has to offer. Even though we’re stuck indoors, these art forms will make things better. Remember: it’s imperative to keep your morale, despite it all. Stay safe.

Sylvain Blais

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

P.10

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE


Subscribe to DTK Men for the best in men’s style, culture, and lifestyle. DTK Men stays ahead of the curve.

If you’re looking for the perfect gift for your girlfriend, get her a subscription to Dress to Kill Magazine.

Subscribe online www.store.dresstokillmagazine.com facebook.com/dtkmen

@dtkmen


CARS

P.12

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE


CARS

TOP 3 LUXURY CONVERTIBLES WARMER WEATHER IS ON THE HORIZON, AND IT’S TIME TO TURN OUR ATTENTION AWAY FROM SEAT HEATERS AND TOWARDS CONVERTIBLE TOPS. HERE ARE THREE OF THE FINEST EXAMPLES OF CLASSY OPEN-AIR VEHICLES IN DEALERSHIPS RIGHT NOW.

By Benjamin Yong

McLaren 720S SPIDER

For drivers who prefer a little extra wind in their face whilst cruising in their ‘verts, the McLaren 720S should do the trick. This British-built vehicle, constructed mostly of lightweight carbon fibre, houses a 4.0-litre twin-turbocharged V8 outputting an astounding 710 horsepower and 568 lb-ft of torque, perfect for reaching a speed of 0 to 200 km/h yes, 200 km/h - in just 7.9 seconds. Aggressive is an adjective that doesn’t do the 720S justice. LED headlights are embedded inside smoked “eye sockets” cut deep into the front fenders, complementing a blacked-out splitter below. Double-skinned dihedral doors feed air to radiators, helping cool the mighty mid-mounted mill. A nifty active rear spoiler provides some much-needed downforce at higher speeds. The power retractable hardtop (RHT) features an available glazed electrochromic glass panel capable of automatically tinting, helping keep the interior cool on hot days. Lowering or raising the RHT is whisper quiet and takes only 11 seconds, and can be performed even when traveling 50 km/h. When stowed away, the back window rises up to act as a wind-blocker so on-road conversations may remain at a civilized volume.

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE

P.13


CARS

Rolls-Royce

DAWN BLACK BADGE Nothing epitomizes luxury like a Rolls-Royce. And nothing epitomizes luxurious topless motoring like a RollsRoyce Dawn Black Badge. Just take a look at this special edition’s interior. The sleek, monochromatic interior was inspired by stealth aircraft, created using 14-millimetrediametre threads of aluminum woven together and bonded in carbon fibre, which are then finished with six coats of lacquer and hand polished to a mirror finish. Mandarin detailing lends a touch of contrast to the plush, night-coloured leather seating for four. For example, a subtle strip of orange circles the cabin at hip height, evocative of the sunset (or perhaps dawn?) as passengers are immersed in darkness. Driving the rear wheels of the 2360-kilogram behemoth is an equally impressive 6.6-litre bi-turbo V12, generating 593 horsepower and 620 lb-ft of torque, mated to an eight-speed automatic transmission. The large displacement engine means propulsion is buttery smooth, and the sound? Otherworldly, particularly after pressing the “low” button located next to the steering wheel, causing the dynamic sports exhaust to open up and produce a deep baritone note upon acceleration

P.14

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE


CARS

Jaguar

F-TYPE CHEQUERED FLAG There is arguably no upscale convertible more fun than the Jaguar F-TYPE. And in celebrating 70-plus years of sports car production, all started by the 1948 reveal of the then record-breaking XK 120 with a top speed of 120 mph, the British manufacturer has released a limited Chequered Flag variant for 2020. Based off the R-Dynamic grade that boasts highlights such as a black roof and polished 20-inch wheels, there are a number of accoutrements unique to the model as well. Just a few include flag badging on the grille, rear bumper, headrests and steering wheel; six-spoke “6003” design alloys, and a whole bunch of red accenting found on the illuminated door scuff plating, big brake calipers, seatbelts and, as a nod to classic motorsport, at the top of the steering wheel to mark the 12 o’clock position. The centre console trim is also finished in a cool dark brushed aluminum. Consumers have a choice between two powertrains: a turbo Ingenium 2.0-litre four cylinder producing 296 horsepower and 295 lb-ft of torque, or a supercharged 3.0-litre V6 pumping out 380 horsepower and 339 lb-ft of torque. Both are paired to a quickshifting eight-speed automatic gearbox.

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE

P.15


CARS

P.16

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE


CARS

The Turbo S E-Hybrid

PORSCHE PANAMERA IT’S HARD TO BELIEVE OVER A DECADE AGO PORSCHE INTRODUCED THE WORLD TO ITS FIRST GRAN TURISMO ENTRY, THE PANAMERA, IN 2009. AMONG ALL THE SEVERAL VARIANTS PRODUCED SINCE THEN, PERHAPS THE MOST EXCITING AND INNOVATIVE TO COME OUT OF THE FACTORY IN STUTTGART HAS BEEN THE INTRODUCTION OF THE HYBRIDS.

By Benjamin Yong “As a technology platform for innovations that were By Benjamin Yong later transferred to other models, the Panamera has played a significant role in shaping the past ten years of the brand’s history,” says Michael Steiner, member of the executive board of research and development, in a press release. “With its high-performance hybrid variants, it is now above all a trailblazer for electromobility at Porsche,” adds Steiner, previously serving as the first Vice President of the now famous product line. The latest offering, the Turbo S E-Hybrid, is the most powerful one yet. As if utilizing the twin-turbocharged 550-horsepower 4.0-litre V8 found in the gasoline model wasn’t enough, designers have shoehorned in a supplementary electric motor together, creating a combined output of 680 horsepower and 626 lb-ft of torque — meaning within the lineup only the 918 Spyder hyper car is faster. In other words, nothing to sneeze at. Both a quick shifting eight-speed Porsche Doppelkupplung (PDK) dual-clutch automatic transmission and all-wheel drive system with Porsche Traction Management are standard, helping the four door rocket get from 0 to 100 km/h in just 3.3 seconds, up to a top speed of 309 km/h.

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE

P.17


CARS

But the best part? Up to 50 kilometres can be travelled in a zero emissions mode for fuel-free driving around town. When the gas engine kicks in, the car has an average fuel consumption rating of 3.0 L/100 km in mixed city and highway conditions. Charging the high voltage 14.1-kilowatt-hour battery takes approximately 12 hours using household Level 1 charging, or less than three via 240-volt Level 2. For anyone who hasn’t been in a Porsche in awhile, a lot has changed connectivity-wise. The interior features

P.18

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE


CARS

a next-generation 12.3-inch Porsche Communication infotainment system responsible for controlling most important vehicle functions, and displaying hybrid-specific information. Doing away with the previous myriad of confusing physical switches, users can adjust the stereo, climate and much more by touch. The five-seater doesn’t look half bad, either. The body was completely overhauled in 2017, closer aligning the aesthetic with that of the iconic 911. Cue the four-point signature LED daytime running lights, steeply sloped roofline, sporty side window shape, powerful fender flares, thin taillights connected by a single LED bar and 21-inch 911 Turbo Design wheels. Additional exterior highlights include the quad exhaust pipes and lime green brake calipers gripping standard Porsche Ceramic Composite Brakes. Like the regular version a hidden adaptive rear spoiler splits as it opens to generate extra downforce on the rear axle at higher speeds. The 2020 Porsche Turbo S E-Hybrid starts at $214 600. There are also two more partially electrified models available: a similarlyspecced wagon-esque Sport Turismo ($219 800), and a 4 E-Hybrid ($117 800) making 462 horsepower and 516 lb-ft of torque.

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE

P.19


Watches

Brilliant

BLUE WATCHES CARTIER

Santos-Dumont Stainless Steel and Navy

Part of Cartier’s timeless and legendary Santos de Cartier Collection, this stylish stainless steel and navy edition comes with the iconic 43.5 mm rectangular case and a bold, 18mm leather alligator strap in navy with an ardillon buckle. Ornamented by blued-steel sword-shaped hands, a satin-brushed silver dial, and a sapphire crystal face, the Santos-Dumont is sleek, sophisticated, and modern. LIGHTEN UP YOUR STYLE WITH THE COMING OF THE NEW SEASON. THESE INCREDIBLE WATCHES WITH BLUE DIALS ARE SUITABLE FOR BOTH LAVISH EVENTS AND CASUAL STREETWEAR. NO MATTER HOW YOU WEAR THEM, THESE LUXURIOUS BLUE WATCHES ARE IMPECCABLE ADDITIONS TO YOUR COLLECTION.

Edited by Shervin Shirvani Text by Luisa Tarantino


ROLEX

IWC

PANERAI

Submariner Date White Gold Blue Ceramic

Portugieser Annual Calendar Blue

Radiomir 1940 Blue Dial

The Rolex Submariner Date Oyster, which comes in a 40 mm Oyster architecture in 18ct white gold, references divers’ watches, being part of Rolex’s long lines of Submariner and Oyster timepieces. Having a striking blue dial, the dial is manufactured in house to ensure perfection – a mastery of iconic Rolex aesthetics. An absolute staple to your collection, this watch will be like having a sapphire jewel on your wrist.

A 44.2mm stainless steel model, this incredibly stylish watch features a midnight blue sunray dial with a white printed railway minute track and Arabic numerals. For all watch lovers, the Portugieser comes with a combination of an annual calendar and a 7-day caliber. A black leather strap and arched sapphire glass give the watch a classic elegance perfect for all occasions.

The largest model, being 47 mm in diameter, the Radiomir offers a strong minimalist design, having a lightly domed sapphire crystal protecting the dial. Characterized by a satiné soleil finish with darker tones toward the outside, this watch is both slick and wearable. Having a guarantee of three days power reserve, the watch is also water resistant for up to 100 meters.

Super Avenger Chronograph 48 Night Mission

Classic Fusion Blue Titanium

HUBLOT

AUDEMARS PIGUET

For a sportier or more casual look, the Super Avenger Chronograph 48 Night Mission is the one to go with. With a titanium case and a diameter of 48 mm, this watch looks strong and powerful. It’s stylized by a blue dial with red accents and template numbers, an anti-reflected sapphire blue crystal on both sides, and a blue military strap with a black pin buckle.

Offering an undeniably classic look, the Hublot Classic Fusion Blue Titanium 45mm is polished and sleek. With a satin-finished titanium case and a stylish blue alligator strap, the blue dial is adorned by rhodiumplated hands and index hour markers. If you love simple yet elegant, the Blue Titanium is perfect for you.

One of the newest additions to the Piguet Royal Oak Collection, the 15500 comes in a 41mm diameter stainless-steel case, a glare proofed sapphire crystal and case back, as well as a screw locked crown. The “Grand Tapisserie” patterned blue dial, the white gold applied hour markers, and Royal Oak hands with a luminescent coating make this watch look sophisticated and luxe.

BREITLING

15500 Blue


Watches

Leather &

GOLD WATCHES PATEK PHILLIPE Nautilus

For the rogue and stylish man alike, this strong Patek Phillipe stands out due to its octagonal bezel shape and the ingenious porthole construction of its case. The brown alligator leather strap adds a warmth and an edge, and the rose gold case and black brown dial with gold details add refinement. At 40 mm, the Nautilus is water resistant for up to 60 metres and has a power reserve of minimum 38 hours.

THERE IS NOTHING AS CLASSIC AS GOLD – OR LEATHER. THESE EXQUISITE WATCHES WITH GOLD AND LEATHER DETAILS ARE EQUAL PARTS BOLD AND CLASSIC, MADE FOR ADVENTUROUS AND TRADITIONAL MEN ALIKE.

Edited by Shervin Shirvani Text by Luisa Tarantino


CARL F BUCHERER Manero Flyback

Stylish and cool, this version of the Manero Flyback comes in 18k rose gold with a double domed sapphire with anti-reflective coating on both sides. With a black dial, a dark gray kudu leather strap, and an 18k rose gold pin buckle, this watch has impeccable aesthetics. Coming in at 43mm, the Manero Flyback has a power reserve of 42 hours and a unique flyback function.

JAEGER-LECOULTRE

AUDEMARS PIGUET 15500 Gold

VACHERON CONSTANTIN Les Cabinotiers

This Audemars Piguet Royal Oak pink gold self-winding watch with a hand stitched alligator strap comes with some new details – wider indexes, increased legibility and cleanliness, and changes to the minute track. The dial is still slick and beautiful, adorned by the “Grande Tapisserie” pattern. With a case size of 41 mm, the watch is likewise water resistant for up to 50 metres.

A one-of-a-kind minute repeater perpetual calendar timepiece, this slender 42 mm diameter gold cased watch is a work of art. For lovers of Haute Horlogerie, this new Les Cabinotiers pays tribute to its prestigious past. From its 36 jewels to its 1731 QP Caliber movement and 65-hour power reserve, Les Cabinotiers is a unique asset for your collection.

Reverso Classic Large Duoface

Fifty Fathoms Automatique

BLANCPAIN

CARTIER

Featuring two time zones on both dials as well as charming small seconds on the front, this Jaeger Lecoultre watch lives up to the Maison’s supreme sophistication, boasting gorgeous pink gold and a sleek leather strap. Embodying the Art Deco style emblematic to the Reverso collection, which lends the watch a touch of classic modernity, this is the sort of watch that can make any man ten times more confident.

A reinterpretation of its classic Fifty Fathoms watch and a stunning addition to the timeless collection, this Blancpain gold and leather number is still sporty and distinguished, yet chic and high-tech, coming with a red gold case and ceramic dial. An impressive power reserve of 120 hours and a water resistance of 30 bar make this watch a total powerhouse.

Part of the iconic Cartier watch collection, the Santos is a Cartier top seller, having defied the hands of time. It remains a classic watch, and with its strong geometric shapes and exposed screws, this watch is for the rule breakers and risk takers. Available in a variety of different coloured leather straps, this luxurious watch is made of 18k gold, having gold sword-shaped hands and a sapphire crystal case back.

Santos de Cartier


CARS

AGING GRACEFULLY Cartier’s Santos de Cartier Wristwatch Improves with Age BEFORE THE WRISTWATCH WAS INVENTED, MEN CARRIED ONLY POCKET WATCHES. MEN, THAT IS, WHO WORE WAISTCOATS, WITH THE APPROPRIATE POCKETS TO STORE WATCHES THAT WERE OFTEN AS BIG AS A HOCKEY PUCK. ONLY WOMEN OF ROYALTY OR ARISTOCRATIC WEALTH WORE WATCHES ON THEIR WRIST, AS IT WAS CONSIDERED A FORM OF ADORNMENT, A TYPE OF BRACELET.

By Carol Besler

England's Queen Elizabeth I is said to have worn the first bracelet watch in 1580 during a visit from the Pope. The Queen of Naples commissioned a Breguet wristwatch in 1810, and Countess Koscowicz, a Polish noblewoman, had one made by Patek Philippe some years later.

P.24

Men were less inclined to so adorn themselves until 1904, when Brazilian socialite and aviator Alberto Santos-Dumont stepped up to stop the nonsense. He asked his friend Louis Cartier to create a hands-free watch that he could use while flying his aircraft, something that would

DTK MEN |THE SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE


strap to his wrist so he wouldn’t have to let go of the controls to pull out a pocket watch in order to navigate. Soon afterward, Cartier marketed the Santos watch to the public at large, and so the “pilot watch” was born. It was as un-pocket-watch is it could get, with a square case shape – designed to mirror the four sharp corners of the Eiffel Tower – and a screw-set bezel. It was also a more manly option than the heretofore “bracelet watch,” and by the 1940s, the pocket watch all but disappeared in favor of the growing number of more practical wrist versions. The Santos has remained in the Cartier collection ever since, with the basic design remaining intact through various updates. It was most recently refreshed last year with new in-house movements and self-changing strap attachments that allow the wearer to switch from leather to rubber to a steel bracelet at the press of a button. The new skeletonized Noctambule, with its Super-LumiNova coated bridges carved into Cartier’s signature Roman numerals would have lit up the cockpit like a disco light and would surely have amazed and delighted Alberto Santos-Dumont. The new monopusher chronograph would have consolidated the collection as entirely masculine – although women have been known to covet the watch, the present writer included. The Santos de Cartier is assembled, calibrated and tested by the Cartier Swiss workshops for resistance to variations in position, humidity, temperature, pressure and exposure to impact and acceleration, all of which can interfere with the accuracy of the watch. Thus, the new Santos is calibrated for robust, everyday wear: it should be good to go for at least another 115 years.

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE

P.25


DTK CITIES

TORONTO'S BEST BARS AND

RESTAURANTS A VENICE, ITALY AND VENICE, CALIFORNIA MASH-UP? A HIDDEN COCKTAIL BAR/ART GALLERY? YES AND YES. WHEN IT COMES TO FOOD AND DRINK, THERE IS NO SHORTAGE OF OPTIONS IN TORONTO, CANADA’S LARGEST AND MOST COSMOPOLITAN CITY. HOT NEW OPENINGS AND EVEN A FEW SUDDEN CLOSURES HAPPEN WEEKLY, KEEPING FOODIES AND COCKTAIL AFICIONADOS ON THEIR TOES. HERE IS A ROUND UP OF THE ADDRESSES THAT VISITORS AND LOCALS ALIKE SHOULD TRY TO SNAG A TABLE AT IN THE BIG SMOKE.

By Lauren Walker-Lee

BAR CHEF ILLUMINATED EUCALYPTUS COCKTAIL © LEANNE NEUFELD PHOTOGRAPHY.

BAR CHEF

472 Queen Street West

There are cocktail bars and then there’s Bar Chef. The dimly lit, intimate hangout offers very creative cocktails, with over 5000 house-made bitters. This is a premier spot for wellcrafted drinks executed perfectly by master mixologists.

ALOBAR

162 Cumberland Street

Restaurant and cocktail bar from the team behind ALO (the #1 restaurant on Canada’s 100 Best list), Alo Bar serves an à la carte menu in the upscale Yorkville neighbourhood.

© STEPHANIE MADEIRA.

P.26

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE


STYLE

APRÈS WINE BAR

1166 Queen Street

An all-natural wine bar with chic minimalist decor, Après serves some of the best and rare natural wines in the city. Their food includes a changing menu of sharing plates.

APRÈS WINE BAR SNOW CRAB DISH.

EL REY

2a Kensington Ave

A no reservations spot in Kensington Market serving Mexican small plates and, of course, amazing Mezcal’s and Tequilas. For some authentic dishes and Mexican Mezcal and Tequila, this spot is perfect for a night out with friends.

TRES LECHES © RICK O'BRIEN.

EL REY BAR © AJ FERNANDO.

LA PALMA

849 Dundas Street West

Inspired by both Venice, California and Venice, Italy, La Palma provides a light and airy space with Instagram worthy murals by artist Madison van Rijn. Have a lazy lunch, get some take away, or have an epic evening meal with sexy cocktails.

LA PALMA © ROBIN SASSI.

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE

P.27


FOOD

CHEF SEAN REEVE

CANADIAN GASTRONOMY THE FUTURE OF

CANADA IS A BIG NATION, WITH A BIG HUNGER FOR INTERESTING DINING EXPERIENCES. IF WE LOOK FROM COAST TO COAST, WE SEE THAT DESPITE THE VAST DISTANCES BETWEEN US, CHEFS ALL OVER CANADA ARE WORKING TO PUT CANADIAN CUISINE ON THE MAP.

By Aaron-Joseph Cunningham

P.28

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE


THE SIMPLE KITCHEN

To begin with, many of us might be thinking ‘what is Canadian cuisine?’ To be Canadian means embracing so many varied cultural backgrounds that it is sometimes hard to define what it is that makes our food uniquely Canadian. But this is also exactly what sets us apart from everyone else. Canada is a ‘new’ country with a diverse cultural heritage that creates a fertile ground for culinary experimentation and hybridization. All of this means that we are moving towards a bright future for Canadian Cuisine. So, what are some of the big trends in gastronomy in Canada this year? Coming in on top is health and nutrition. We have seen a surge all over the country, from plant-infused beverages to meals featuring “superfoods.” Ingredients many hadn’t heard of a few years ago like camu camu, spirulina, and yerba mate have become common ingredients in many trendy cafés. Pushing things even further, we can expect to see an even deeper dive into the science of health with new stressfighting, mood-boosting, energy-enhancing adaptogens like macadamia milk, ashwagandha, and MCT.

THE NOMAD COOK

Restaurants, like The Simple Kitchen on Roncesvalles in Toronto, have stepped up to meet the demand from health-conscious consumers, with drinks like “The Adaptogen Hot Chocolate,” which features ingredients like Reishi, Cacao, Coconut Palm Sugar, Cinnamon, Stevia, Mesquite, Lucuma, Maca, Goji, Ginseng, Eleuthera, Cordyceps, Beekeepers Naturals Cacao Honey, and a choice of Milk to help you power through your day. Speaking of feeling good, the next trend on everyone’s tongue in Canada is Cannabis-infused food and Chef Travis Petersen is leading the way. The former MasterChef contestant has been travelling from province to province hosting private cannabis dinners under the name ‘The Nomad Cook’, which he started on 4/20 (of course). Petersen has quickly cemented his spot as Canada’s leading cannabis chef.

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE


FOOD

RAYMOND’S RESTAURANT Petersen discovered his talented for cannabislaced edibles a few years ago. He started cooking with cannabis after turning his house into a pop-up restaurant back in April of 2018. Over the course of four days, he had 164 guests attend in groups of five. What was meant to be a one-off experience quickly grew into a cross-country tour. To understand what you’re in for with Petersen’s cooking, you can check out his Instagram feed where he regularly posts pictures of his most recent creations, like Smoked White Asparagus, Infused Uni Emulsion, Caviar, Scallions, Pickled Radish & Crispy Leeks with 20mg of THC. Although rarely in the same place for long, you can see if Petersen might be coming to a city near you soon. Many chefs across Canada have been focused on defining what “Canadian Cuisine” means. For many, the answer is simple, locally sourced natural ingredients. One of the people leading this fresh food revolution is Chef Jeremy Charles. Charles’ cuisine focuses on the fresh produce, game, and fish that are so plentiful to Newfoundland. He knows that Newfoundland is “blessed in having access to some of the best seafood, wild game, and produce in the world.” He focuses on bringing his customers “a truly sustainable ap-

P.30

proach to fine dining – foraging and sourcing locally-grown ingredients from independent purveyors.” A seven-course tasting at his Raymond’s Restaurant in St. John’s might be comprised of something like locally sourced lobster, salmon, rabbit, pork, and lamb. Hop on a jet to the other side of Canada to Vancouver. There, we see top chefs with the same focus on fresh, locally sourced food. Chef Sean Reeve of Say Mercy on Fraser Street in Vancouver is making a name for himself for his field-to-fork fare. Some of Reeve’s stand out dishes are the Showstopper salad, which features more than 30 farm-fresh ingredients, and his Chicken of the Sea, a sea urchin pâté with hazelnut, pear, and squid ink brioche.

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE


FOOD

Fusing his formal chef training in Italy with his love of all things smoked and barbequed. He combines those flavours in dishes like his Barbecue Bolognese, which combines a rich Italian style Bolognese sauce with smoked pork butt, over fresh spaghetti.

SAY MERCY

But where do you go when you’re done eating all this yummy food? How about a trip to a ‘sober bar’? An emerging trend that is part of our growing health awareness is bars that offer more nonalcoholic drink alternatives and even bars that do not sell alcohol at all.

wanted to create a space with a distinct ‘bar vibe’ featuring non-alcoholic cocktails, live music, and DJs. They plan to go beyond sodas and juice by creating cocktails with flair containing syrups that incorporate herbs, spices, and other infusions. They will also be selling alcohol-free beer and wine. Not that long ago, the idea of a vegetarian restaurant seemed absurd to most people, and now they are popping up everywhere. Perhaps MindfulBar will start a similar trend.

One place leading this trend is Montreal’s MindfulBar, a bar that gives non-drinkers a space to hang out and relax. Co-owner Isabel Tames feels you can actually have fun with no alcohol and

In such a vast place as Canada, it’s great to know that wherever you travel, from the Atlantic to the Pacific, there is always an interesting new dining experience just on the horizon.

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE

P.31


LONDON NOSTALGIA BEHOLD THE MYSTERIOUS ELEGANCE OF THE LONELY LONDON TRAVELLER, THE GENTLEMAN AT THE BAR IN AN IMPECCABLY TAILORED SUIT, STOIC AND REFINED.

Photography Brian Ypperciel Fashion Editor Martin Boucher

This page: Full look PRADA. Opposite page: Full look VERSACE.

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE


DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE

Turtleneck ($1520) TOM FORD at OGILVY. Blazer ($4570) TOM FORD at OGILVY. Trousers ($1490) TOM FORD at OGILVY. Watch ($699) CORNICHE at TOZZI


STYLE

GUCCI

BLACK AND WHITE HOUNDSTOOTH FEDORA HAT $815

LOUIS VUITTON SUN SONG

EAU DE PARFUM $295

HERMÈS ÉCHARPE FORMES

DRAKE’S LINEN JACKET $1400

ARTICULÉES $820

DRAKE’S

LINEN-SILK POLO $495

GUCCI

BORDEAUX LEATHER LUG SOLE HORSEBIT LOAFER $1185

HERMÈS ALFRED BESACE BAG $7650

ALEXANDER MCQUEEN BEIGE TROMPE L’OEIL LAYERED TRENCH COAT $3070

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE


Shirt ($575) NEIL BARRETT at MAISON SIMONS. Belt ($69) LE 31 at MAISON SIMONS. Trousers ($550) PAUL SMITH at MAISON SIMONS.

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE

P.35


Scarf ($29) LE 31 at MAISON SIMONS. Sweater ($380) FRADI at HARRY ROSEN. Jacket ($2495) PAUL SMITH at OGILVY

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE


This page: Full look DIOR. Opposite page: Full look PRADA.

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE


STYLE

VERSACE

EDWARD SEXTON CREAM FOX FLANNELS

PINSTRIPE BLAZER $2950

DOUBLE BREASTED JACKET $2245

VALENTINO

SHIRT WITH VLOGO PRINT $770

HERMÈS DOMINO TIE $250

DIOR

DIOR HOMME EAU DE PARFUM $122

TOM FORD

SUEDE BUCKLEY WEEKENDER $3950

CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN EYGENY $995

SALVATORE FERRAGAMO FERRAGAMO EAU DE TOILETTE $122

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE


Shirt ($228) BOSS at OGILVY. Blazer ($699) and Trousers ($250) BOSS at MAISON SIMONS. Watch ($699) CORNICHE at BOUTIQUE TOZZI.

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE

P.39


Sweater ($1530) TOM FORD at OGILVY. Blazer ($4990) TOM FORD at OGILVY. Pocket Square ($80) ETON at HARRY ROSEN. Trousers ($1720) TOM FORD at OGILVY. Watch ($699) CORNICHE at TOZZI. Socks ($10) SIMONS at MAISON SIMONS. Loafers ($495) TO BOOT NEW YORK at HARRY ROSEN. Photography BRIAN YPPERCIEL. Art Direction SYLVAIN BLAIS. Fashion Editor: MARTIN BOUCHER. Assistant Styliste: Styled by Paul. Grooming & hair: ALEXANDRE DESLAURIERS.

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE


DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE

P.41


LIFESTYLE

BEST OF MONTREAL

NEW BARS & RESTAURANTS

STEP ASIDE NEW YORK. MONTREAL IS MOST DEFINITELY THE CITY THAT NEVER SLEEPS, WITH ITS MYRIAD OF NEW AND EXCITING BARS AND RESTAURANTS TO TRY. NO MATTER IF YOU’RE IN THE MOOD FOR A FANCY NIGHT SIPPING COCKTAILS AT A HIDDEN BAR OR LOOKING TO TANTALIZE YOUR SENSES WITH FLAVORFUL DISHES, OUR ROUND UP WILL MOST DEFINITELY LEAVE YOU SATISFIED.

By Marie-Ève Venne

TBSP. AT THE W MONTREAL

901 Rue du Square-Victoria

The brand-new restaurant inside the W Hotel is about to become your new favourite gourmet hot spot. Named Tbsp., the restaurant showcases Italian-inspired cuisine stamped with modernity and celebrates local fresh products. Inside the restaurant, the only non-local foods are olive oil and balsamic vinegar in which the homemade focaccia is soaked - even the yuzu that perfumes the table salt comes from Laval. A must-taste on your visit: gnudinis with parmesan and rapinis, bursting with flavors. This new kind of pasta invented at Tbsp. was born of a culinary error, but we most definitely don’t hold it against them.


LIFESTYLE

MUCCA

236 Rue Saint-Zotique Est Owned and managed by husbandwife team Pasquale Martone and Karine Massicotte, this Italian restaurant offers grass-fed beef and house-made charcuterie, as well as homemade breads, pastas, and a vegetarian-friendly menu. They also serve a range of Northern Italian vegetable dishes, like polenta crostini with gorgonzola and pomodorini. Mucca’s wine list is influenced by Italy’s northern regions — think Veneto, Piemonte, Liguria and Toscana, among others. They also serve classic cocktails such as Negroni and Sbagliato.

STILL LIFE

640 Rue Saint-Paul Ouest The first thing that grasps you as you walk through Still Life’s door is the stunning 2400 square foot space. Much of the bar is built on concrete, and a large metal and glass partition allows them to split the space if needed. The menu comes in key ingredients that change with the seasons. For the liquor menu, mixologist and co-owner Andrew Whibley was inspired by Italian aperitivi. He has mounted a map that is easily accessible from 5 p.m., when the offices are emptying, until the end of the evening. One of the central ideas of this project is sustainability, which is why cocktails are built around four fruits - pineapples, pears, strawberries and tomatoes - so that the entire fruit is used when possible.

THE FARSIDES

690 Rue Notre-Dame Ouest In case you’ve been sleeping under a rock for the past two years, it is my pleasure to inform you that the 90s are definitely having a moment. Jumping on the trend, The Farsides delivers some tropical food and drink options in a ‘90s hip-hop theme. They serve a mix of Thai and Hawai’ian cuisines created by Chef Athiraj Phrasavath (who is also behind Laotian food hall stand Thip Thip, at Le Central) and feature fancied up versions of classic street food dishes such as Drunken Noodles with yellow curry sauce, lobster, and, in an unusual touch of decadence, cognac.

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE

P.43


BUSINESS

Following our Intuitions

LIO

ALCA

CASA MALCA © CASA MALCA

BUSINESSMAN, PHILANTHROPIST, ART CURATOR, ADVISOR AND COLLECTOR, LIO MALCA TAKES SOME TIME OFF HIS BUSY SCHEDULE TO ANSWER OUR QUESTIONS AND SPEAK ABOUT PASSION, ART, AND DESTINY. THE CREATOR OF THE LIO MALCA GALLERY IN NYC, LA NAVE IN IBIZA, AND CASA MALCA IN TULUM, MEXICO, MALCA DOESN’T INTEND TO APPROACH THE TOPIC OF ART IN A CONVENTIONAL MATTER AND THAT IS SOMETHING TO BE GRATEFUL FOR.

By Cinthya Chalifoux

P.44

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE


BUSINESS

LIO MALCA © COURTESY OF CASA MALCA AND VITORINO

Some moments change the course of a lifeline; can you recollect your first contact with art? It was in 1990 after I graduated from University in Boston. I had moved to NYC to explore career opportunities. At that time, I was unsure exactly what I wanted to do, but I knew I wanted to stay in NYC. I ended up visiting a distant relative, Jose Mugrabi, who was involved in the art market and living in NYC. Jose and my father were planning to open a healthy Italian fast food chain in the US. They hired me to help with this fast food project, which gave me the opportunity to work from Jose’s office at The Crown Building on 5th Avenue and 57th street. It was at Jose’s office when I first came in contact with art. I would be at the office every day, exposed to artworks from his collection. He would ask me to help with random duties - unpack artworks, sometimes deliver artworks to important collectors. Jose and I would also visit auction houses and galleries.

Fortunately, the healthy Italian fast food company didn’t work out. I say fortunately because I knew exactly at that moment what I wanted to do for the rest of my life: art, art, art! This experience with Jose changed my life path completely, and I am forever grateful and thankful to him. And as they say back home: “Looking for Peter, I found Paul.” Since the early ‘90s you have been showing the world extensive collections of modern masters Jean-Michel Basquiat, Keith Haring, and Kenny Scharf, to name of few. When did you start collecting this incredible body of work? I started collecting this body of work in the early 1990s. It started from my experience at Jose Mugrabi’s office. I had the time to look at auction catalogs. I discovered I preferred the artists from my generation – the ones I related to; Basquiat, Haring and Scharf.

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE

P.45


BUSINESS

RAVINDER REDDY

You are now a key lender and advisor to Basquiat and Haring exhibitions happening worldwide. How do you see yourself within this role? I feel fortunate that I can be a key lender and advisor to museums worldwide – to help make these artworks accessible to the public. When I collect a specific artist, I like to learn about the artist’s life, to go deeper than most. I feel that when you get to understand and know each work – the different facets, periods, colors, techniques, influences – then I can really help the curators and scholars organize a museum show.

“I FEEL FORTUNATE THAT I CAN BE A KEY LENDER AND ADVISOR TO MUSEUMS WORLDWIDE – TO HELP MAKE THESE ARTWORKS ACCESSIBLE TO THE PUBLIC.” We have seen great changes in the way we value secondary marketplaces for art. Do you feel like you have been part of a democratization process? We all are. Dealers, galleries, auction houses, and more importantly collectors that, without them willing to pay those prices, there would be no secondary market. The machinery is too big, and we are all part of it. Talking about democratization, you have un-dertaken quite a ‘give back’ gesture to the Ibiza community by creating La Nave Foundation. Can you tell us more about this concept and how it came to life? I have been visiting Ibiza for several years. The island has a vibrant energy and I’ve had a special connection and experience with the island. I came across La Nave, which is an old warehouse along the water that was built to store the salt in Ibiza. It was abandoned for years. I had wanted to do something to give back to the island and the

P.46

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE

JITISH KALLAT


BUSINESS

LA NAVE © LA NAVE SALINAS

community. When I saw La Nave, I thought it was the perfect space to create an exhibition space for the community. My goal  at  La  Nave Foundation  is to  showcase a broad range of art and create dynamic installations. I felt the local community in Ibiza, as well as the visitors, were ready for this type of cultural experience.  As an art dealer and a collector, I feel it’s an  obligation to share works and masterpieces from my collection with the public. At La Nave, my goal is to bring art to the island with the hopes that everyone can come and view.  People can come directly from the beach into  La  Nave and enjoy works of art that have been on display in museums across the world.  As a real passionate individual, you are the main curator for all your exhibitions and projects. Have you always envisioned yourself being invested in creating experiences? For me, it’s all about the story and the storyteller. I like to curate an exhibition by transforming a space to showcase amazing artworks in an extraordinary setting.  Speaking about unconventional choices, you have chosen to show art pieces in settings that aren’t typical.

What type of challenges did you meet in the making of Casa Malca?I like to create experiences. To have artworks live outside of white walls. To have mediums like art, music, and film crossover in an environment. It creates an interesting dialogue for the visitor outside of their normal expectations. I’m attracted to projects that defy categorization. I have to be daring and take chances. Art sure takes a center stage in your business endeavors; how do you approach concept and integration? Visualization. On a personal level, what sparks your interest toward an artist or a specific piece of art? If the piece of art or artist sparks some type of deep emotion inside me. If the art piece is calling at me, either by whispering in my ear or screaming very loud, I know I can’t walk away from it. If you were to give one advice to a future art collector, what would it be? For me collecting is based on intuition and emotions. Those are the  tools I use when acquiring new pieces. As I mentioned before, these tools go hand-in-hand with having the knowledge of the artist’s historical career and insights into their life.

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE

P.47


Cinema

mUST-See FiLmS FROm

SUNDANCE FILM FESTIVAL

SUNDANCE, THE ANNUAL CELEBRATION OF INDEPENDENT FILM IN PARK CITY, UTAH, IS UNDERGOING A TRANSITION AS DRAMATIC AS THE WORLD OF CINEMA ITSELF. WHAT STARTED IN 1978 AS A GATHERING BY ROBERT REDFORD AND FELLOW CINEPHILES IN A SMALL SKI RESORT HAS GROWN TO ONE OF THE MOST PRESTIGIOUS FESTIVALS IN THE WORLD. 2020 SAW A DRAMATIC SCALE-BACK IN REDFORD’S PARTICIPATION (WHICH BEGAN LAST YEAR), AND EVEN HIS LONG-TIME RIGHT-HAND MAN JOHN COOPER HAS TRANSITIONED AWAY FROM THE ORGANIZATION.

By Jason Gorber

This comes at a time where streaming services dominate, international press numbers are down, and audiences are simply not making the trip in the same numbers – unofficially, the number I heard was a 40% reduction in attendees. The gulf between features and docs felt even larger this year. A few decent fiction films were there to be enjoyed, but over a dozen absolute knockout documentaries had their world premieres. Docs continue to be a space where, at Sundance, the world is watching, and with Boys State being sold for a kingly $12 million to A24 and Apple, this meant that documentaries garnered headlines as well. Take a look at the Oscars for this season – the majority of the top docs were represented by Sundance prems, while the features were films that were highlighted at Cannes, TIFF, Venice and the like. Here are five films to watch out for that came out of this year’s Sundance Film Festival.

BLACK BEAR

In a dark, wintery season where ennui rules, and films like The Safdie Brothers’ Uncut Gems are lauded for inducing discomfort for hours at a time, it was the actions of a minor character flipping pages in Black Bear that left me shaking and anxious more than any other film in the last year. Part thriller, part black comedy, part relationship drama, Lawrence Michael Levine’s acerbic tale set in the Adirondack Mountains features stellar performances by Christopher Abbot, Aubrey Plaza, and Canada’s Sarah Gadon. Told in two halves, the film plays with emotions as much as it does our expectations, presenting like a cracked prism a vision of love and betrayal in ways that resonate long after the screen goes dark.

THE NEST

Told with the cold sophistication of a horror film, Sean Durkin (Marcy May Marlene) returns to Sundance with this icy look at a family in transition. Set during the 1980s, the film stars Jude Law and Carrie Coon as a husband/wife trying to build a stable home for their family. She raises horses while he toys in the international finance playground, each in their own way trying to tame very different beasts. When the family is uprooted to follow the hope of success in Britain, things get even more awry, yet the film avoids any easy answers, subverting expectations throughout. The performances are ace – Coon in particular is astonishing, and Toronto serves as New York City in this UK/Canadian co-production. The Nest is a bird of a different feather, an exceptional drama that manages to soar.

P.48

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE


BOYS STATE

Boys State, which is an absolutely magnificent documentary. Boys State is about a kind of brief summer camp for politically active kids. For decades the American Legion has run the event as a way of teaching kids about the processes of campaigning and the machinations of the political system, and in today’s divided age where ideology is weaponized by tweets, it’s never been a more salient endeavor. Following some remarkable teens, Moss and McBaine manage in no short order to expose the Machiavellian machinations of contemporary politics, providing a mix of sporting completion, Shakespearean drama, and deep insight into current divides. One of the biggest sales of the fest, this doc provides the basis for an entire constellation of future projects, from following this particular group through of teens, to an expanded look at how pretend proves even more evocative than what takes place in capitols throughout the land.

THE PAINTER AND THE THIEF A story too strange to be fiction, this documentary follows an artist who, after two of her major paintings were stolen, finds herself drawn to the person arrested for their theft. The two form an aesthetic and emotional bond, a dynamic that settles somewhere between a muse and a symptom of self-destruction. Structured with the sophistication of a Hollywood thriller, the film plays with its temporal organization in order for the audience to witness the same events from multiple perspectives, making it an accomplished feat of documentary excellence.

DICK JOHNSON IS DEAD

Dick Johnson’s descent into dementia could easily be a simple matter of somber reflection, but the Johnsons instead dive into a playful, irreverent look at death and its ramifications. An excuse to tell a deeply autobiographical story, Johnson manages through both verité and over-the-top glitz to talk about different ways of passing, how lives well lived don’t always have such grand conclusions, and how a man whose life has been spent listening to others finds his own voice being silenced. It’s a movie made all the more moving by its wry nature, avoiding over sentimentality while still providing the most fitting obituary imaginable. A celebration of life, and the celebration of a life, Dick Johnson Is Dead is an absolute delight.

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE

P.49


MUSIC

HOZIER The Life After Take Me to Church

IT WAS 2014 AND THE RADIO WAS BLASTING TAKE ME TO CHURCH ON A LOOP, SPITTING ITS TRUMP HATE AND ANTIRELIGIOUS MESSAGE. BY THE END OF THAT YEAR, IT HAD REACHED NUMBER TWO ON THE BILLBOARD HOT 100, WHERE IT SAT FOR THREE WEEKS. IT DIDN’T TAKE LONG TO REACH NUMBER ONE ON BILLBOARD’S U.S. ADULT TOP 40 AND US HOT ROCK SONGS.

By Marie-Ève Venne

At the same pace, a shy Irish singer from Dublin went from low-key gigs in small venues to star slots on international TV shows such as The Ellen Show and The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon. The world was in awe of Hozier and there was no place for him to hide anymore. The Irish singer-songwriter’s second full-length, Wasteland, Baby!, was released on March 1st 2019. Accompanied by a cover painting that has the artist literally underwater, the title speaks to the record’s themes of hope amidst global struggles. A few hours before his performance at the latest edition of Osheaga Music & Arts Festival, we had the chance to catch up with him to learn more about his most recent album and what comes after a hit song. “You have a hit song, and everybody knows your face, and everybody knows your name. You don’t feel any different. You’re just confronted with this totally new reality,” he says, hiding behind a pair of round sunglasses. “I wasn’t fully prepared for it. I had dropped out of college and it was the first song I ever released, so it was a total surprise. I don’t think I really know how to deal with fame, even now. For me, it’s just about focusing on what you want to achieve with your work. All of the noise that’s created around you and projected onto you, you keep that at a distance,” he adds. Following his instant success, he had to be on the road for a long time, jumping from one country to another, with few moments for himself or to reflect. “It’s tough. You don’t get a lot of sleep for that period. And there are sacrifices to be made – plus the realization that you’re going to be away from loved ones for years. But when it’s your dream, you don’t really have a choice. Also, I don’t really write while being on the road. For the songs on my new album, I had to find a six–to-12-month period after touring. I was living in a bungalow in Ireland. I was ready for these ideas to come out.” he says. He took almost four years to come back with a new album, refusing to engage with the pressure of writing a song for the sake of writing a hit. “To do that, I would probably have to compromise things I wasn’t willing to compromise. The one pressure was self-

P.50

contained – to make sure I was writing music that moved me and I felt I needed to write. I wanted to approach the writing of the record the same way I approached the first album,” Hozier explains. There is a strong introspective mood on his new album, highlighting the major changes that the world has uncovered over the last six years. His new music seems to speak to that upheaval. After all, he wrote Wasteland, Baby!’s title track after reading how threats of nuclear war caused the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists to move our doomsday clock ahead 30 seconds—an event that resulted in the BBC using the word “apocalypse” in a headline. “There are a few lyrical themes on the record, references throughout the album to the seas rising and some of those concerns. With regards to the cover [painted by Hozier’s mother, the artist Raine Hozier-Byrne], there’s something peaceful and yielding to it. At the same time, the image of someone being in a room filling with water that they can’t leave is sort of oppressing,” he explains. “A lot of these songs on Wasteland, Baby! were written with the intention ‘these are going to be really fun live.’ I am touring with an eight-piece band. Everyone on stage is a singer. Everyone can play an instrument. There’s a little mini-choir up there,” says Hozier, suddenly excited. On his latest opus, Hozier jumps from soothing lullabies to growling rock anthems to more upbeat tracks in an effort that seems absolutely effortless. “Nina Cried Power” contains a bluesy, gospel-like element that exudes brightness over a playful drumbeat and soothing guitar rhythm. Lyrical themes range from doom (“No Plan,” “As It Was”) and intimacy (“Movement,” “Nobody”) to honoring love (“Shrike”) and facilitating ideological, political, and societal change (“Be”). Despite the serious subjects painted by the lyrics, the album almost gives an overall feel of joy and hope. “I think there’s this joy that people are capable of. That’s what a lot of the songs on the record were trying to reach for. It’s a record that’s hopeful and optimistic. I’ve also already started to work on my next album. I have a few ideas in my back pocket that I’ve been playing with, and once you get into the mode of writing it’s quite a bit of a drug.”

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE


MUSIC

HOZIER AT OSHEAGA © JHON LONDONO

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE

P.51


STYLE

Best Fashion Spots for Men

TIME TO STOP SHOPPING WHERE EVERYONE ELSE DOES AND CHECK OUT THESE THREE AMAZING BOUTIQUES. FROM STYLISH SIGNATURE LINES TO CREATIVELY CURATED COLLECTIONS, THESE STORES HAVE THE KIND OF CLOTHES YOU SIMPLY WON’T FIND AT MOST LOCAL MALLS.

By Marie-Ève Venne

CALGARY

Gravitypope - 1126 17 Ave SW This place has not only won the Best Menswear Store award but has snagged the number one spot for Best Shoe Store in the city multiple times. Independently owned, the Calgary location is an example of what carefully selected, handcrafted collections of clothing and accessories look like. Although known predominantly for their footwear, gravitypope has definitely made an impression on Calgary’s elite since moving into menswear. Their clothing, shoes, and accessories can be seen on some of the city’s most stylish influencers. Browsing their menswear collection, take in the highquality items, stylish pieces, and unique designs adorning the store.

P.52

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE


STYLE

VANCOUVER

Stefano Ricci - 1139 West Georgia Street Ultra-luxury Italian brand Stefano Ricci has opened its first Canadian store in Vancouver. The 2600 square foot boutique is located at 1139 West Georgia Street, next to the new Trump Tower in the city’s expanding ‘Luxury Zone.’ The store features Stefano Ricci's pricey menswear as well as fragrances, accessories (such as leather goods and cuff links), and home goods such as porcelain and crystal dinner services, silverware, and luxury linens. Every item in the store is made by hand in Italy, using the highest quality of materials.

TORONTO

Uncle Otis – 329 Spadina Avenue The store, which first opened in 1991, has musical roots. The original owner, Roger O’Donnell, is an English keyboardist and former member of the rock band The Cure, who named the store after American singer Otis Redding. The current owner, Donnell Enns, worked as a salesclerk before he bought the business back in 2000. With known brands like Maharishi, Mr. Gray, Norse Projects, OrSlow, and Krammer & Stoudt, a shopping trip to Uncle Otis will get you ready for your place on the list of Best Dressed Men. Another bonus of shopping at Uncle Otis is its location in Toronto’s bustling and vibrant Chinatown.

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE

P.53


Full look BOSS.


BREAKING THE WAVE DYNAMIC, CONTEMPORARY, AND EFFORTLESSLY COOL, THE BOSS COLLECTION IS WHERE SPORTY STREETSTYLE MEETS CHIC. COLOR, STYLE, AND COMFORT COME TOGETHER FOR FRESH NEW LOOKS.

Photography Jean-Claude Lussier Fashion Editor Jay Forest Creative Direction Sylvain Blais


STYLE

P.132

DTK MEN | THE WINTER STYLE ISSUE


STYLE

This page: Full look BOSS. Opposite page: Full look BOSS.

DTK MEN | THE WINTER STYLE ISSUE

P.133


This page and Opposite page: Full look BOSS. Photographer


This page: Full look BOSS. Opposite page: Full look BOSS. JEAN-CLAUDE LUSSIER. Fashion editor JAY FOREST at FOLIO. Creative direction SYLVAIN BLAIS. Model ADAM BUTCHER at ANOTHER SPECIES MODELS and WILLIAM D at FOLIO Make-up & hair STEVEN TURPIN at TEAMM MANAGEMENT. Assistant photographer WILLIAM LANGLAIS and LE GRAND MATHIEU.


TECHNOLOGY

BEST TECH GADGETS 2020

SOMEWHERE DEEP, DEEP DOWN IN OUR DNA LIVES A VERY POWERFUL DRIVE TO COLLECT MORE GADGETS. WITH SO MANY REVOLUTIONARY NEW GADGETS, PRODUCTS, AND TOOLS BEING RELEASED EVERY DAY THAT WOULD MAKE OUR CAVE-DWELLING ANCESTORS FAINT, IT CAN BE A BIT HARD TO FILTER THROUGH EVERYTHING. LUCKILY FOR YOU, DTK DID SOME OF THAT FILTERING FOR YOU. SO, WHAT ARE THE COOLEST NEW GADGETS, TOOLS, AND DEVICES IN 2020 THAT WILL MAKE OUR LIVES EASIER, MORE PRODUCTIVE, AND MORE FUN? WE’VE COMPRISED A LIST OF SOME OF THE COOLEST NEW SMART GLASSES, GAMING DEVICES, ELECTRIC CARS, AND EVEN SOMETHING TO HELP YOU UPGRADE YOUR GRILL.

By Aaron Joseph Cunningham

LG

SIGNATURE OLED TV R LG has designed a television that disappears when you’re not using it. It transitions from horizontal to non-existent by rolling down into the base when not in use. LG debuted the OLED 4K HDR smart television at CES, one of the world’s largest consumer trade shows, and just announced the Signature OLED TV R will go on sale in 2020. So, start saving your pennies because you will need a rumoured $75 000 if you want this 65-inch TV in your man cave. Yes, that’s right, $75 000 for a TV that is so thin and flexible, it can safely roll away into the base, leaving you with an unobstructed view. Perhaps we may wait a few years for the more consumer-friendly model.

Vue

SMART GLASSES

Vue has designed the first pair of smart glasses that are virtually indistinguishable from a normal pair of glasses. Their concept was simple; they wanted to design a pair of smart glasses that were stylish and functioned exactly like normal prescription frames. They come loaded with a lot of interesting features to enhance your life. The frames come with built-in wireless bone conduction speakers that actually send sound waves directly to your ears through your skull. Bone conduction speakers mean that your ears are free to hear surrounding ambient noise. Now, if you decided to ride your bike, or even walk down the street, you will be able to hear important signals from cars, allowing you to stay safe while still listening to your favourite songs.

P.62

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE


TECHNOLOGY

Weber

CONNECT SMART GRILLING HUB This one may not revolutionize your life as much as a personal assistant robot but it’s still a lot of fun and it may even be a must-have for the self-proclaimed grill masters out there. Weber invented a device that attaches your smartphone to your BBQ. It sends real-time temperature info to your phone to make sure you have the perfect temperature for your summer grill sessions, so you don’t burn those burgers and hotdogs.

Valve

INDEX VR

Samsung

BALLIE

Looking for a new robot friend? The Samsung Ballie is designed to follow you around your home, kind of like your own BB-8 from Star Wars. The Ballie is an interesting combination of smart home device and robot companion, equipped with cameras and sensors used to follow you around, as well as take photos, and send you updates about your home when you’re away. It can also control various smart home features and even act as a personal fitness assistant and security robot.

VR lovers will be lining up to get their hands on the next-generation VR headset. The Index has an ultra-crisp display that runs well even with older GPUs, a wider field of view, higher refresh rate, and Valve’s knuckle controllers that track the movement of every finger. Although the Index is twice as expensive as many of its competitors, it may be worth the cost for the true VR aficionados.

Dell Alienware

CONCEPT UFO

The new Dell Alienware Concept UFO is to PC gaming what the Nintendo Switch is to console gaming. In other words, you can bring your favourite PC game with you on the go, with an Intel-powered handheld gaming device. The Portable Windows PC features an 8-inch display, a kickstand, detachable controllers, and support for external devices like displays, or a keyboard and mouse. As of now, it’s still a concept device but the rumours are that we may be seeing more ‘UFOs’ on the horizon in 2020.

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE

P.63


HER

BARBARA FIALHO T H E B R A Z I L I A N B O M B H I T S N E W YO R K

BARBARA FIALHO IS A BRAZILIAN MODEL AND SINGER WHO HAS GRACED PRESTIGIOUS RUNWAYS AND MAGAZINE COVERS, AS WELL AS WALKED THE VICTORIA’S SECRET FASHION SHOW, MAKING HER A VETERAN IN THE INDUSTRY. EQUAL PARTS GRACIOUSLY WARM AND FIERY, BARBARA FIALHO IS FAR FROM DONE EXPLORING AND PURSUING HER PASSIONS.

Photographer Richard Bernardin Fashion Editor Zeina Esmail


Earrings (Price available upon request) JENNIFER FISHER at JENNIFER FISHER. Top, Belt, Pants and Shoes (Price available upon request) GUCCI at GUCCI.


Earrings (Price available upon request) JENNIFER FISHER at JENNIFER FISHER. Dress and Boots (Price available upon request) SAINT LAURENT at SAINT-LAURENT.


HER

DURING A SHOOT IN NEW YORK CITY, DTK MEN CAUGHT UP WITH THE BRAZILIAN BOMBSHELL, TOUCHING ON HER MODELLING AND MUSIC CAREER, HER LOVE FOR MUSIC, AND WHAT’S NEXT FOR HER.

By Luisa Tarantino To start, can you tell us about the journey that has led you to where you are now, from Brazil to becoming a world-renowned model? I started modeling at 15 after being scouted in my hometown, Montes Claros, the countryside of Brazil. It was difficult to leave my family and friends behind and move to the big city, but it was a challenge that I was ready for. Things started to take off quickly, my first job was walking in São Paulo Fashion Week, and I immediately fell in love with modeling. Soon after walking in my first fashion week in Brazil, I moved to Paris and began working and traveling between Europe and Japan as a high fashion model. I moved to New York when I was 20 years old and was completely inspired by my new city. My life changed soon after moving to the states when I began working with Victoria’s Secret. I built an incredible relationship with their creative team, and it led me to walking in their show for seven consecutive years. By this point, you’re a Victoria’s Secret veteran. What did you love most about walking in the show? I was able to develop a very close relationship that felt like family with the creative design team at VS because I worked with them for so many years. I was the brand’s fit model, they created all of the show looks on me and I was able to watch the designs go from a sketch on a piece of paper to real piece walking down the runway. I loved getting to spend time with the team and also the sleepless nights, where I tried on every angel wing for the show. I’m honored to have had the opportunity to walk in the Victoria’s Secret Fashion Show for so long. For many VS models, their stories are inspiring. What has it meant for you to have had the opportunities and the platform that you currently have? Walking for Victoria’s Secret changed my life and gave me a great platform and the ability to have more of a voice and connect with people around the world. It opened so many doors for me, both personally and artistically for my music career as well. Has music always been your passion? What made you want to pursue it? Love has made me pursue it. I’ve always been focused on my modeling career, so my dive into the music industry happened later on in life, though I’ve played the guitar and flute since I was nine years old. It’s now how I spend most of my time – studying, writing, and creating projects where I can combine my two passions, fashion and music.

Is a love for music something that you will instill in your children? Absolutely! My family has always been very musical, which is why I’m so passionate about it. Music played a big role in my education and it made my childhood a lot more fun growing up, given my reality at the time. I hope to share my passion for music with my daughter and everyone around me.

“I FEEL AS THOUGH WHEN

MUSIC AND MODELING ARE COMBINED, THEY COME TOGETHER EVEN STRONGER.” Do you see a connection between modeling and music? I believe music and fashion have always gone handin-hand, especially today, with such visual platforms of expression and communication in both arts. I feel as though when music and modeling are combined, they come together even stronger. I hold on to this when creating music, being a veteran on the modeling side, and still starting out on the music side.

Who are your musical inspirations? And your inspirations in the modeling world? There are just so many, so I will name musicians whose fashion also inspires me: David Bowie, Johnny Cash, and Nina Hagen, to name a few. Caetano Veloso, Rita Lee, Gal Costa, and João Gilberto are Brazilian musicians that I also look up to. What are you working on right now? What’s next for you? Right now, I am working on a TV show in Brazil where I will be singing and celebrating the musicians that have inspired me the most. It’s Brazil’s biggest audience and it will be an incredible opportunity for me to grow as a performer. I will be releasing some more compositions and an EP during the project as well. What are your favorite things to do when you’re not modeling, and you want to wind down and relax? Where are your favorite places to travel to? When I am not working, all I want to do is spend time with my daughter and listen to music. Any place with her is my favorite place in the world. I love traveling to the countryside of Brazil, as the culture is just incredible. I’m grateful to be able to experience it at this stage in my life, after spending so many years away from home. I feel like I’m recharging my batteries and also so excited for what’s to come.

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE

P.67


Earrings (Price available upon request) JENNIFER FISHER AT JENNIFER FISHER. Dress (Price available upon request) GRETA CONSTANTINE at GRETA CONSTANTINE.


This page: Full look LOUIS VUITTON. Opposite page: Full look LOUIS VUITTON. Photographer ROYAL GILBERT at VISUAL DPT. Creative direction SYLVAIN BLAIS. Assistant photographer MITCH WRIGHT, EMILY V GILBERT. Fashion editor JAY FOREST. Model MAX, RACHIDE at DNA MODELS. Make-up & hair PATRICK G. NADEAU using SCHWARZKOPF PROFESSIONAL.

This page: Earrings (Price available upon request) JENNIFER FISHER at JENNIFER FISHER. Dress and Shoes (Price available upon request) CHANEL at CHANEL. Opposite page: Bodysuit and Pants (Price available upon request) THE BLONDS at THE BLONDS. Shoes (Price available upon request) CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN at CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN. Photography RICHARD BERNARDIN. Fashion Editor ZEINA ESMAIL at P1M. Model BARBARA FIALHO at MARILYN NYC. Makeup GENEVIEVE HERR at SALLY HARLOR. Hair DJ Quintero at THE WALLGROUP. Hair Assistant HANNAN SIDDIQUE. Post-Production PATRICIA SINCLAIR. Special thanks to THE DOMINICK HOTEL for the location.


P.71


SPORT

A GUINNESS WORLD RECORD FOR

GEORGE HOOD

WITH THE FLICK OF A SWITCH, GEORGE HOOD CAN BRING TIME TO A STANDSTILL. HIS BODY WILL BEG HIM TO STOP. HIS RATIONALE WILL TELL HIM WHY HE SHOULD. BUT HIS MIND TURNS A BLIND EYE TO ALL THE NOISE — BRINGING A SENSE OF CALM AND COMFORT WHILE HE PUSHES HIMSELF FAR BEYOND WHAT SHOULD BE HUMANLY POSSIBLE.

By Braydon Holmyard

Hood, who set a new Guinness World Record for longest male plank in February with a time of eight hours, fifteen minutes and fifteen seconds, has a remarkable recollection of every meaningful set he’s done over the years — and there have been a lot of them. Ask him 10 years from now what he remembers about his final planking event, and he’ll list off every moment of joy and agony he experienced during a gruelling eight-plus hours at 515 Fitness club in Plainfield, Illinois. The event has already been uploaded to his gallery. “I have a hell of a memory, brother,” he says over the phone on an afternoon in March. “I have a mind that is unbelievably powerful. And in that head of mine are stored countless images and details that’ll probably blow the average person away.” In a day and age where many people can hardly sit still for five minutes — let alone eight hours — Hood has found a way to

P.72

hold the plank position for hours on end, over and over again, under dire circumstances. He’s 62 and says he’s physically in the best shape of his life. But the physical aspect is only half the battle. So, on February 15, as he crossed the finish line with his victory song “Sweet Caroline” blaring in the background, Hood was also adding another chapter to the album in his head. “I refer to it as my gallery. I have images and thoughts and desires and things only I can think about. That would be like daydreaming. And when you daydream, if you do it correctly enough, you totally forgot about time. I open the gallery up on event day.” Hood always does his plank events in front of big crowds and support staff. He will talk to people, take selfies and joke around. There’s only one rule for anyone in attendance: Don’t tell him the time. “I’m superstitious about the clock. I always have to make sure I don’t see it. I’ll take every

DTK MEN | THE SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE

precaution necessary,” he says. “We block out my phone and black out anywhere you can see the time. We put tape on everything and all the clocks in the venue come down. But sometimes invariably someone will walk in that venue and say ‘hey, you just crossed the three-hour mark!’” Hood only did about six hours of planking the week after he broke the record. For the average person, where a two-minute plank is enough to leave one breathless and exhausted, six hours in a week is unfathomable. But for the former Marine from Naperville, a suburb on the west side of Chicago, Illinois, it was nothing more than a walk in the park. “I’m usually knocking down 30 to 35-hour weeks. It is a nice break, I have time in the day to do things now,” Hood says. For 18 months leading up to his new Guinness record, he was committed to four to five hours a day in plank pose. He also did 700 push-ups, 2,000 sit-ups, 500 leg squats, and 300 arm curls a day.


SPORT The plank is a core exercise that holds a push-up position for as long as possible. The torso is sustained in a horizontal position, anchored by the toes on one end and the forearms on the other. Much of Hood’s plank work was spent on an elevated platform in his apartment, which was conjured up with a piece of plywood sitting on sawhorse legs and covered with a combination of rubber mats, yoga mats and the most important material of all: lambskin. “It’s actually a Peruvian lambskin from the Alps in South America, and it’s only harvested once a year because of the altitude,” Hood says. He can barely hold in his laughter. “I’m kidding, I can’t let you print that. Being an undercover cop back in the day, I can make up a good story.” With a training regimen as time consuming as a regular work week, Hood often had no choice but to move his office into the great outdoors. He’s planked on top of picnic tables at the local park, while soaking up a back tan at the neighbourhood pool, and even among the rolling hills of Montreal’s Mount Royal, where he was training with Canadian Dana Glowacka, who holds the world record for longest plank by a woman at four hours and 20 minutes. Even for a man full of confidence and selfbelief, times of self-doubt also creeped in over the last year and a half. The road to his final planking record before retiring at 62 years of age had its ups and downs. It all came to a head on the Saturday before Christmas, when plans for the big event were nearly derailed just a few short months before the big day. “I was pretty beat up. Physically you know you’re not gonna last much longer,” Hood said. He was doing one of his long practice planks and struggled to get through it. “It really threw the crew into a tailspin because now I’m in crisis mode. I’m in survival mode. I know I’m not gonna make goal, so we have to find an alternative solution.” That original goal was to not only surpass the Guinness record held by long-time rival and Chinese police officer Mao Weidong, but to blow it out of the water by beating his personal best and international record of 10 hours and 10 minutes. His team took

a break, regrouped, then relapsed again. He remembers feeling “physically shot,” but with the help of his cognitive coach, he was able to turn those setbacks into motivation. “She flew here all the way from Australia to be with me because she knew what was at stake. And she knew that psychologically I wasn’t always feeling it at my training venue,” Hood says. “She helped me get through a lot of that. She knew it was just a small setback to the whole training cycle.”

the last ten years, he led the evolution of a quirky gym exercise into an international symbol of strength and resilience. The first plank he ever did was five minutes long. Six months later he set the Guinness World Record at one hour and 20 minutes. He’s been breaking records and starring in viral videos of unbelievably long planks ever since. The plank was even adopted into the official training program for the Marine Corps.

The long training program was demanding and exhausting, which was nothing new for the former Marine, police officer and DEA agent. His time in Afghanistan changed his outlook on life. It was also the reason why his record-setting plank in Chicago raised money for mental health awareness. “I’m tired of seeing good cop friends of mine and our first responders, and guys coming back from fighting overseas struggle,” he says. “I saw some Canadian soldiers have to come home in a casket and I certainly remember the Marines that we lost. You don’t forget those moments.” “When you’re around a lot of death and dying during a career, and I’ve seen my fair share of that stuff, you have to learn how to process that.” Hood says his personal transition back to civilian life was manageable. Between exercise and the odd visit to the chapel, he was able to find his place back home. He brings his memories of serving with the Marines to every plank he does. At every event he does a dedication for Alberto Francesconi, who died in 2009 in Afghanistan when a land mine ended his young life. Hood says he will never forget that early morning on January 1. “I came back with a different attitude and outlook on the sacrifice that was made. And I deliver that message to my events and I do those dedications,” Hood says. He has plans to see the street that was named after Francesconi in the Bronx and meet his brother. “That’s what I am making reference to. It changed me over there, it really did. People come back from that fight with real issues.” Hood has become sort of the leading expert of the plank around the world. Over

DTK MEN | THE SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE

Whether he likes the title or not, Hood truly is the Grandfather of the plank pose, and he has always used his platform to inspire others. “I tell people we are each sitting on a gold mine. Resources are endless. Visualize that you are on a gold mine, it’s yours, and how long you dig every day for another gold nugget will attest to your value as a human,” he says. “I want to take every day and keep digging. I’m not done yet.” Hood is comfortable with walking away from the record-setting planks now. He’s already proven everything he can and raised plenty of money for charity along the way — and he’s not done that aspect of it quite yet. His next goal is to set the Guinness World Record for most pushups completed in one hour, which currently stands at 2,806. The next time a strong, shirtless man is doing push-ups on a picnic table, by the pool or in the rolling hills of Mount Royal, just be sure to follow the rules. Don’t tell him how many push-ups he has left.

P.73


SPORT

Plant-Based

ATHLETES PAUL LANDINI REMEMBERS WHEN PEOPLE USED TO MOCK HIS FOOD CHOICES. HOW COULD HE FORGET? IT WAS ONLY 13 YEARS AGO, AND IT WOULD HAPPEN WHILE HE WAS LIFTING WEIGHTS AT THE GYM, AFTER SPARRING IN THE BOXING RING OR REALLY ANYWHERE ELSE WHERE FOOD WAS A TOPIC OF CONVERSATION.

By Braydon Holmyard A decade ago, the words “plant-based diet” were taboo in the fitness and athletic communities. Claiming allegiance to a vegan or plant-based lifestyle would automatically generate a groan and an eye roll from anyone who was listening. But Landini, a personal trainer from Ajax, Ontario, didn’t let the negative reactions to his choices stop him from being conscious of what he was putting into his body. “No one was actively discouraging me from my choices, but you get the comments,” Landini says. “You get the people talking crap. And it’s all misinformation.” Landini, who owns and operates his personal training business Paul Landini Strength Training in Toronto and is a contributing fitness columnist to The Globe and Mail, was never one to puff out his chest and respond to criticism of his diet by trying to change someone’s views. He would typically clap back with reasonable explanations and health facts in an effort to better inform those who were dismissing his diet, which in the fitness world was well outside the norm. “2007 was a vastly different world in terms of awareness. We’ve learned a lot over the last 13 years about what a healthy diet can look like,” Landini says. He feels grateful for how fortunate he was to grow up in a household that was extremely health conscious. “And when it comes to performance, there weren’t really a lot of examples to draw upon — to look up and say,

P.74

‘hey, look at this guy, he’s doing it. Look at this woman, she’s excelling at her sport and she’s on a strictly plant-based diet too.’” Times have certainly changed. The conversation surrounding the plant-based lifestyle has evolved rapidly since Landini first dabbled with it 13 years ago. These days, all he needs to do to defend his decisions is point to a television screen. “Now there are so many more examples of powerful individuals from every sport,” Landini says. “You can get examples of plant-based athletes who are excelling, and that’s something that’s changed quite a bit.” The plant-based craze has grabbed a firm hold on the sports world in recent years, with some of the most dominant athletes of this era proudly touting the diet, which consists mostly or entirely of foods derived from plants, including vegetables, grains, nuts, seeds, legumes and fruits, and with few or no animal products. One of the most recent additions to the long list of elite athletes to consume mostly plant-based foods is 10-time NBA all-star Chris Paul. Paul took to Instagram last year to share with his nearly 10 million Instagram followers that he was feeling “pretty damn good” since adopting a plantbased diet. The caption supporting his new food habits was posted alongside photos from his appearance in last year’s ESPN Body Issue.

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE


SPORT

As more and more elite athletes reduce meat consumption — something that studies say can lead to better cardiovascular health and recovery time — the more we see their stories being shared with the world. Just a decade ago, Landini says it was difficult for him to find answers to even the simplest questions on the internet. Today, plant-based athletes are plastered on the front covers of health magazines, appearing on talk shows, and starring in Netflix documentaries. One film in particular has garnered major international attention, and like most productions that push plant-based foods, has come with its fair share of controversy. The Game Changers, a film released in 2018, in which basketball player Paul was an executive producer, showcased elite athletes, special ops soldiers, and visionary scientists in an effort to change the way people eat and live. Plant-based fitness and health advocates like Landini used to look up to lesser known public figures like mixed martial artist Mac Danzig in the early 2000s. Despite being one of the original vegan public personas to make it in one of the world’s toughest sports, Danzig has just a few thousand followers on social media. There’s no understating the impact he’s had as one of the trailblazers of this movement, but it’s also an indication of just how much plant-based role models have blossomed into a star-studded cast. Seventeen-time Grand Slam tennis champion Novak Djokovic, five-time Formula 1 World Champion Lewis Hamilton, six-time Super Bowl champ Tom Brady, 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup champ Alex Morgan, MMA star Nate Diaz and power-lifting record holder Patrik Baboumian are on that list. Landini has had a front row seat to watch them climb aboard the plant-based train. “It’s just growing and growing. People are trying it,” he says. “It’s not as hard as maybe it looks on the surface, and

there are so many resources on how to do it right. Before it was very hard to find out how to get this done. What do you eat for breakfast? What should you avoid? You can find all that now within five minutesBy ofJason beingGorber on the internet, whereas it took a lot more effort before.” Making the switch to a plant-based diet can be intimidating, and Landini says that as a personal trainer who has clients with all types of diets, he never tries to force his personal choices on anyone. If a client is interested, it’s something he will help them ease into at their own pace. “Whenever people ask me about this stuff, I always say just take baby steps. Take it slow. Enjoy the process and ask yourself why you’re doing it, what are your values, and why does this matter to you?” he says. “There’s the stereotype, ‘how do you know someone’s vegan? Because they’ll tell you in five minutes.’ People get excited. People get stoked. It’s a new journey and they come into contact with like-minded people. They hear facts about the good they are doing for the environment, the animals and their health, and they want to share it. I’ve been there too.” The plant-based diet is not for everyone, but the misconception that plants can’t produce power is fading away. The accessibility of plant-based alternatives in restaurants, grocery stores and even fast-food chains has at least given people an easy way to try it. Many who do don’t go back. “My dad is an Italian immigrant pushing 80-years-old who loves lamb. I got him on these meat-free Gardein chicken fingers, and he eats them all the time now,” Landini says. Does he still eat lamb? Landini laughs. “Lamb doesn’t come into our house very much anymore.”

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE

P.75


CULINARY

Montreal's Top Luxury Hotel Chefs

RICCARDO BERTOLINO Maison Boulud

The Ritz-Carlton Montreal CULINARY EXPERIENCES HAVE BECOME AN INTEGRAL PART OF MODERN CULTURE AND, IN THE WORLD OF HOSPITALITY, INTIMATE ACCESS TO WORLDRENOWNED CHEFS CAN SET A HOTEL APART. LUXURY HOTELS HAVE BECOME ENCHANTED WITH CHEF RESIDENCIES AS A WAY TO INTRODUCE NEW CULINARY CONCEPTS AND PLEASE THE DIFFICULT CROWD OF FOODIES POPULATING CITIES LIKE MONTREAL. THE FOLLOWING CHEFS ARE EXECUTING THEIR MAGIC AT THE POSHEST HOTELS IN TOWN, ADDING THEIR DISTINCT SIGNATURE TO EVERY DISH LEAVING THEIR KITCHEN.

By Marie-Ève Venne

P.76

Cooking is something that Chef Riccardo Bertolino has been doing almost all his life. Enrolled in a cooking school in Northern Italy at the age of 14, he has made his way into several major Italian cuisines. It was at the prestigious London Baglioni Hotel that Riccardo made his first stay outside Italy. In 2006, he moved Paris, first at Il Carpaccio at the Royal Monceau and then in the famous cuisine of the Hotel Meurice. “I worked at the Meurice Hotel for almost three years and it was at that time that we got three Michelin stars. So, in Paris, I mainly worked in Michelins restaurants, like the Royal Monceau. It was a fantastic school. In 2008, I decided to go to the U.S., where I started at the DANIEL restaurant in New York,” he explains. From 2008 to 2012, he worked successively at DANIEL, then became sous-chef at DBGB Kitchen and Bar, and executive sous chef at Café Boulud, before becoming executive sous chef at db Bistro Moderne in Singapore.

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE

“I stayed six months in Singapore and then Daniel informed me that he was working on opening Maison Boulud at The Ritz Carlton Montreal. I came to Montreal in February 2012. Daniel fully trusted me from the beginning,” explains Riccardo. Maison Boulud, a fine dining restaurant, quickly became a must-visit in Montreal and one of the best restaurants in Canada. The restaurant offers cuisine inspired by French tradition, but also reflects the chef’s years of cooking in Italy, England, and New York. Maison Boulud’s menu changes with the seasons, putting Quebec’s products forward as much as possible. Whether we’re talking about the classic breakfasts and brunches, the exceptional lunches, or the evening or tasting menu, you will most certainly enjoy a very refined, contemporary, and tasty cuisine.


JORIS LARIGALDIE TBSP.

Hotel W After the W Montreal announced last year that they were finally opening a permanent restaurant named Tbsp., many were curious to learn who would take over this new project. With the appointment of Joris Larigaldie as Executive Chef, it seems like the new restaurant is on the right path to success. “I started in Paris, in my mother’s restaurant,” he says at the outset. “Then there were the Alps, Provence, the UK, Copenhagen, and the Eastern Townships. For me, the goal is to always continue to improve myself, to discover, and to confront novelty.” Joris Larigaldie is instinctively attracted to institutions where he can both develop on a human level and put his experience as a leader into practice. “When you feel a little too comfortable in a situation, it’s important to get out of your comfort zone,” he says. After working in various places (Restaurant Le XVI XVI, Europea Group, Auberge Ripplecove), Joris has been perfecting the concept of the restaurant with his team, showcasing Italian-inspired cuisine rooted in modernity that celebrates local fresh produce.

“We didn’t want to make a classic Italian restaurant but to promote modern Italian cuisine, while putting forward Quebec products. Even with my suppliers, I simply get inspired by what they have to offer to me. It’s a collaborative effort. The only non-locally produced products we have are olive oil and balsamic vinegar in which homemade focaccia is soaked - even the yuzu that perfumes our table salt comes from Laval,” he explains.

His team even prepares for winter, to cook as locally as possible for as long as possible, a practice that is part of the restaurant’s desire to be a sustainable establishment. The results are well-seasoned dishes that are presented with contrasting colors and simplicity over complexity. As an appetizer, you absolutely have to taste this specialty: a plate of fondant gnudinis with parmesan and rapini.

DAVID PELLIZZARI Le Boulevardier

Le Germain Centre-Ville

When David Pellizzari closed the beloved Lili.Co in 2018, the news created a mourning shockwave in the city’s foodie scene. A year later, David Pellizzari is back behind the stoves, this time as the chef of the brand-new restaurant Le Boulevardier. “My friend Clarah Germain contacted me. She told me it was a big project and asked if I wanted to be a part of it. It’s really a big opportunity. I’ve always worked in small private restaurants like Lili.Co. My last few months have been busy building menus and gathering the best team around me,” he says. And when it comes to picking up his kitchen brigade, David Pellizzari has a truly special way to proceed. “When it came the time to pick my team for Le Boulevardier, the kitchen wasn’t even ready. I didn’t see the point of asking people to bring their knives and show me their skills. So, I asked them instead to pick a place anywhere in the world they would like to travel to and why. You can learn so much about a

person by getting inside their head and learning about their passions,” he explains. “In my kitchen, I want people to have fun and feel at home. The time when a Chef was some type of tyrant yelling at everyone is over. This is not how you get good work done.” Regarding the type of food you can find at his new restaurant, Le Boulevardier is paying tribute to the classics of French cuisine, allowing guests to rediscover some emblematic dishes. Think frog legs, rabbit royale, snails, or even leeks vinaigrette.

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE

Dishes so classic that they almost never appear on the menus of restaurants that call themselves French.

P.77


Design

Rings VITALY at MAISON SIMONS. Top VERSACE.


COVER STORY

F O O D F O R T H O U G H T: AN INTERVIEW WITH QUEER EYE’S

ANTONI POROWSKI ANTONI POROWSKI IS A MAN OF PASSIONS AND CONTRADICTIONS. BORN IN MONTREAL, HE MOVED TO WEST VIRGINIA AS A 12-YEAR OLD, MOVED BACK TO MONTREAL TO GO TO SCHOOL, AND THEN MOVED TO NEW YORK TO PURSUE A CAREER, SPENDING TIME IN NUMEROUS RESTAURANTS ALONG THE WAY. CAST AS ONE OF THE CORE MEMBERS OF THE QUEER EYE CAST AS THE FOOD AND WINE EXPERT, HE QUICKLY BECAME THE FOODIE ON THE SHOW, STEERING HIS EXPERIENCE AND ENTHUSIASM TO THE GASTRONOMIC ARTS.

By Jason Gorber

Photographer: Malina Corpadean Fashion Editor: Randy Smith


COVER STORY

He’s parlayed this interest into writing a New York Times Best Selling cookbook, Antoni in the Kitchen, a warmly realized dive into food from around the world, each introduced with a personal story that relates the dish to Porowski’s own backstory. DTK spoke to Antoni for an exclusive interview by phone, and he proved to be even more charismatic and erudite than he already appears on TV. The following has been edited for clarity and concision. How did you go from studying psychology in Montreal to talking about food in New York? It’s not like the food wasn’t there before! It’s just that I wasn’t pursuing it in a professional or educational capacity. It’s just something that came out of practice. I only realized that I actually made a bit more of a shift to food during the casting process for Queer Eye. Some of the network execs were a little confused because they saw I had many different interests. I studied psychology then I moved to New York to study theatre at a conservatory. I worked in restaurants for about 10 or 11 years. When I was in college, the first job I had was in a Polish restaurant. When I was living in New York and was in school and I had a limited amount of time to work, again, restaurant jobs. And when I graduated and had plenty of time on my hands as a struggling actor, I was back in restaurants. That was sort of my survival job. I always saw it as something temporary. There wasn’t any conscious, strategic planning that was really involved. But when I was studying psychology in Montreal, that was something I was very serious about at the time. And something that I really wanted to pursue, but I think I realized rather quickly how competitive the field was and how many years were needed in school and all in all I wanted to be in entertainment. That was something that was still calling my name, and so I moved to New York for it. Not to put words in your mouth, but it sounds like the entertainment industry wants to put

you in a particular compartment. They want to see a simple pitch of who you are and what you do. I think the same thing can be said for food in general - people want something very specific, whereas it seems that what your love of food does is initiate you as a well-rounded storyteller. You can use food as a way of bringing lots of different cultures and lots of different facets of your life together to tell different narratives. To your point of people putting people in categories, with my years of auditioning, it made it a lot easier for people. People heard that I had a Polish name, or they found out that I spoke French, and they just immediately assumed that French was my first language, or that I could only play certain European characters. But tying it into food and the work that I did on Queer Eye and with the cookbook as well, what I learned is that there is a dance between that specificity and then also the universality of it as well. And you get to universality through specificity. When you read through your cookbook, there’s obviously culinary narrative, but there’s also explicit autobiographical narrative like the fact that you got to Julia Child through Meryl Streep, or that your friend Arjun made you think of chickpea masala. Was that always at the core of this book - both to give greater insight into you, but also give context to these dishes so that it can be read not only as a preparation manual, but sort of as a journey through your own life through food? With the nature of the show and the way Instagram is set up now, people want to know about us as individuals as we’re not playing characters on the show. I always joke that I’m basically playing a more caffeinated version of who I am in real life - you’ve got to keep up with these other four guys because they’re all type As. When the first cookbook was written, I was at a point where people were still getting to know me, and I had an opportunity to tell my story. A few of my castmates have written their own memoirs. That’s something that I’m not comfortable with right now at this stage in my career.


Design

Trench Coat DRIES VAN NOTEN at MAISON SIMONS. Pants ACNE. Shoes HERMÈS.

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE

P.81


COVER STORY

ANTONI IN THE KITCHEN COOKING BOOK.

QUEER EYE SEASON 4.

QUEER EYE SEASON 4.

I feel like I have more living to do, but where I do have stories to tell is through food. I learned through Queer Eye how I didn’t really know how much I was going to connect with all of these heroes through the telling of stories and sharing parts of myself. So, I wanted to continue that with the book but show my own version of it. Look, I know my demographic - I get very clear statistics about age and gender and location, and a thing that I was really fascinated by while touring the cookbook was that the tour kind of reinforced all that. I get a lot of young people coming to get the book signed and they’re all telling me, ‘this is the first cookbook that I’ve ever bought. I barely have a hot plate and I’m in college.’ As sad as it is for me to admit, a lot of them don’t even care about

P.82

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE

food, but they’re just excited about the way that I talk about it and they’re fans of Queer Eye. But it’s an incredible opportunity to get them excited about it. Just like when I meet a hero on the show, if I personalize it for them and figure out how to bring that emotional component of what food means to them, and what it’s meant to me in my life, there’s something that’s infectious there that people can make their own. I think that was kind of the mission of the book. One of the greatest artists that has taken food as a fundamental aspect of culture and used that as a way in to how people think and feel and believe was Anthony Bourdain. Could you talk about the effect that he had on your career and what his travels and his loss has meant to you personally? Gosh, I loved watching him so much and I still continue to. When I was read-


COVER STORY

QUEER EYE SEASON 4.

ing Kitchen Confidential there’s something about him that I thought was so attractive. He was trained in very traditional French cuisine, but there was a casualness to him that was so perfectly imperfect. He was just cool, and he took away from the elitism of it. That’s something I’ve always related to. Especially when I was younger, I liked nice things but at the same time, I appreciated really good food, but it wasn’t this pretentious thing. What he did with his show, and just the kind of person that he was - he didn’t make it pretentious or obnoxious. He had conversations around food. I really feel like he used food as a vehicle. He was definitely a chef even though he didn’t refer to himself as one by the end of his career, but there was still just something very clever in the way that he wasn’t so in your face. He was having real conversations with people and there was a relatability and an international appeal that he had that I think is just so incredibly attractive. I guess it’s charisma. Obviously, there’s a very similar story for you. You don’t claim to be a chef, yet here you are presenting food. Can you talk about on the one hand, not being subsumed by the pretensions and the ostentation of the culinary world, but on the other hand, respecting those whose preparations have gone on for hundreds of

years? In my first interviews, when the show came out, I didn’t put too much thought into the whole ‘do I refer to myself as a chef or not?’ And I did a few speaking engagements where they immediately just referred to me as a chef and that made me uncomfortable for more than one reason. First, I’ve worked the front of house of a restaurant, and there is a very sort of delicate dance that goes on with front of house and back of house. Knowing chefs and people who’ve gone to culinary school, knowing the hours that they’ve put in, it felt disrespectful and kind of shitty to refer to myself as that. There’s something that didn’t feel very authentic to it. Second, by not referring to myself as a chef, I feel like I’m not owned by the chef community. It’s kind of like when people ask me, ‘how do you identify in terms of your heritage or culture.’ When I was in Canada, I would refer to myself as Polish Canadian. In West Virginia, I referred to myself as Canadian with a little bit of Polish, but I was kind of American. Now in the States, although I’m Canadian, I’m still a little more American, because I’ve lived a significant part of my life here. I find myself always sort of changing that because I realize that I never want to feel like I’m really owned by any one thing. And if you’re not owned by something, then you kind of get to do whatever

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE

P.83


COVER STORY

you want, and you have a bit of that freedom. I think part of that is a bit of a rebellious nature, but with food, by not referring to myself or pretending to be a chef. I get to have the freedom to just be. Food has been a constant and it’s something that I am passionate about. Regarding notions of identity: one of the things that Queer Eye has done is change what, particularly in different parts of America, it means to be a gay man. Yet, does that in some way subsume other parts of your identity? As you say, you’re not only Polish-Canadian, or Polish-American, but you’re a queer man who is talking about this. Your sexuality becomes part of the brand which you are selling. Yet, like avoiding taking on the mantle of “chef,” your sexual preference is being put out as representative of that community in a way that has to be both enlightening and at times constricting. Another good question! That’s also why I don’t really refer to myself as gay. The closest thing that I don’t feel super uncomfortable with would be either queer or fluid, because that’s how I’ve always identified. The same way that I view my place in the culinary world is how I navigate my personal life and my relationships and my sexuality as well. I’ve had more relationships with women than I’ve had with men! There are many meals to have, metaphorically. Exactly! That’s the only way that I’ve ever known to be. In my personal life, a lot of people will refer to me as a gay man, and I don’t feel the need to correct people if it’s easier for them to stomach or understand. I don’t really care, and maybe I could be more of an activist, but sometimes I just can’t really be bothered with it and I just try to focus on other things. With the whole representative of a community thing, that part makes me uncomfortable, but it just leads back to what I try to focus on the most - the praise and the nicest things people tell me when they bump into me in an airport or in any public space about Queer Eye is always about specific instances. In Season 1, I talk about the fact that I’ve dated both women and men. I didn’t have this clear, linear path that a lot of gay men have, but that often gets portrayed. There’s no right or wrong way of doing it, just like as many people as there are in this world who are LGBTQ, there are just as many coming out stories and versions of them. Could you talk about your collaborators, the people who actually assist you in making sure the actual food data is right? I wrote the book with Mindy Fox while I was in Kansas City, Missouri, filming seasons three and four. Mindy is based in Portland, Maine, so we actually had never met until the book

P.84

was completed. She’s amazing and we’re working on a few different things together. Editing is so incredibly important and I tend to overcomplicate things, not only in my personal life, but with recipes and cooking often as well, and she was there to remind me that, like, I see that you want to use sumac in this recipe, but let’s remember that people in Wisconsin sometimes don’t have access to these kinds of spices.

“IF YOU’RE NOT PART

OF SOMETHING AND YOU’RE NOT OWNED BY SOMETHING, THEN YOU KIND OF GET TO DO WHATEVER YOU WANT.” These are your recipes - you did not offshore the recipes as it were? No, 100%. If you read the headnotes for the recipes, every single dish in there has a personal story. The only recipes that were originally somebody else’s are my desserts. I make no secret of the fact that I do not bake. It’s not my forte! I love the direct manipulation of an open flame over a burner or even a stove, and with desserts, it’s just like photography - way too many rules! So that section was an homage to the women and two special men in my life who made desserts for me at certain key points in my life. Is there one restaurant, one meal, that completely rocks your world in such a fundamental way, something that if it went away, you would miss it desperately? Oooh. That’s a good question. I don’t know if I’ve ever referenced this dessert before, but I was visiting with my boyfriend in Montreal over the holidays and he loves French food, and my number one favourite French restaurant in the world, outside of France, is L’Express on St. Denis in Montreal. Though I love everything there, the lemon tart is just perfection. You know when you eat something delicious and you just start laughing over how delicious it is and it’s so stupid how good this is? That was the sentiment that we had. If it had to be savory, it would have to be the roasted bone marrow with the crispy savoy cabbage and I would have it with my sister Karolina. She sucks on those bones and gets every single little drop off and I’m the exact same way. We both love bone marrow! If you’d like to try one of Antoni’s delicious recipes yourself, you can buy Antoni’s book, Antoni in the Kitchen at Indigo, McNally Robinson, and on Amazon. The latest season of Queer Eye is available exclusively on Netflix.

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE


Top and Pants DIOR. Photographer MALINA CORPADEAN. Fashion editor RANDY SMITH at HUMANKIND MANAGEMENT. Assistant stylist JULIA DEBARTOLO. Model ANTONI POROWSKI. Make-up & hair STEVEN TURPIN at MGMT.

COVER STORY

P.85


ART

P.86

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE


ART

For the

LOVE OFART WILLIAM BRUCE CURRIE BAILEY IS ONE OF THOSE PEOPLE FOR WHOM ART IS A REFUGE, A SOURCE OF HEALING AND PEACE. LAWYER BY TRAINING, THIS GREAT COLLECTOR LIVING A TURBULENT AND EXCITING LIFE, NOT ONLY ACCUMULATES GREAT WORKS, BUT HE ALSO HELPS YOUNG CANADIAN ARTISTS FIND THEIR PLACE IN THE COMPLEX WORLD OF CONTEMPORARY ART. A TRUE DANDY, BAILEY IS LIKEWISE ONE OF THE GREAT PATRONS OF THE MONTREAL MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, EVEN GOING SO FAR AS TO ORGANIZE THE FIRST FUNDRAISER IN ONTARIO FOR A QUBEC CULTURAL INSTITUTION.

By Stéphane Le Duc When a dramatic situation like the spread of the Coronavirus happens, does it change the way you perceive life and humanity? I have been through many challenges in my life. I have had more comebacks than Judy Garland in A Star is Born and more costume changes too. This actual situation puts things into perspective that we should be happy to be alive and healthy. In a way, the art exhibition I just had in Montréal is about that. It presented the worst in humanity because there were a lot of war pictures, showing us how awful humans can be towards each other. But it was also about the best of humanity. It gives you a perspective about how difficult it is to be a human. Looking at art can help you. I was just starting to look at a wonderful book about Japanese prints, 100 Aspects of the Moon, by Yoshitoshi. It can be therapeutic in these times. Art can be a refuge and so can nature.

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE

P.87


ART

Do you have a special relationship with the province of Québec? When I was studying law at Queen’s University in Kingston in the ‘70s, I met many Quebecers at my house. I had a front row seat of the referendum, the FLQ, and what René Lévesque and Pierre Elliott Trudeau were thinking. Later, I went to some of the rallies in Montréal and I was disgusted that the English Canadians from Toronto only went to Québec to say, ‘We Love You!’ during the referendum. They had no interest in Québec during the rest of the year. So, I decided one day, if I can, I would do some cultural philanthropy in Québec. Fortunately,

P.88

since the year 2000, I have been involved with the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts. I did an exhibition about Francisco Goya’s prints from The Disasters of War. I officially joined the Museum’s Acquisition Committee in 2010, but I have also been very involved with donations and exhibitions for a long time. It’s been very interesting for me and it’s really enriched my life. One of the things that I am very happy about is that for the first time in Canadian history, we had a fundraiser in Ontario to support a Québec art institution. It was wonderful to bring together the art lovers from Montréal and the art

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE


ART

lovers from Toronto. We had a magical day at my ranch, and it made us realize the importance not only of Québec, but of francophonie. What would we be without Corneille, Molière, and Diderot? It does not matter if we have a different language, culture, or religion when we share so many values. Do you remember your first contact with art? I do! I grew up in a house where there was no art because it was considered a luxury. My first contact was in kindergarten when I was around four years old - we were reading Peter Rabbit by Beatrice Potter. Then when I was 10 years old, we went to Europe because my mother was from Scotland. My father wanted us to be exposed to art. We went to the Louvre and I will never forget it. We went into that great hall and there was that huge painting of Géricault called The Raft of the Medusa. I was just transfixed by the whole scene. The beauty that you find in tragedy. I just could not move, and I did not want to leave. How do you choose a work of art for your collection? I don’t buy things because they are hot in LA or they are going up in value, thinking ‘this is a good investment.’ You should have an emotional connection with the art. You have to buy with

“...WE SHOULD BE HAPPY TO

BE ALIVE AND HEALTHY. IN A WAY, THE ART EXHIBITION I JUST HAD IN MONTRÉAL IS ABOUT THAT.” your eyes and your heart. I have works of art that I have bought that have become very valuable and I have bought other works of art that I paid $200 for. You can hang a million-dollar painting beside a $200 painting because you love both of them. You should not buy art for a trophy or social prestige. If you could meet an artist from the past who would it be? Francisco Goya! What an incredible man! I see him as the first contemporary artist. He exposed the hypocrisy of the church, the brutality of the war. He was anti-establishment and tried to create a better society.

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE

P.89


This page: Full look PRADA. Opposite page: Full look VERSACE.


MODERN VIBES THIS IS THE FUTURE OF THE UNDERGROUND. PASTEL PALETTES, STREETWEAR SLICK, AND MINIMAL MOODS WILL RULE RAVES FROM CITY TO CITY.

Photography Royal Gilbert Fashion Editor Jay Forest


This page: Full look DIOR. Opposite page: Full look PRADA.


This page: Full look BOSS. Shoes NIKE AF1. Opposite page: Full look LOUIS VUITTON.


This page: Full look LOUIS VUITTON. Opposite page: Full look BOSS HUGO BOSS. Shoes NIKE AF1.

DTK MEN | VISIONARY & DESIGN

P.95


This page: Full look LOUIS VUITTON. Opposite page: Full look LOUIS VUITTON. Photographer ROYAL GILBERT at VISUAL DPT. Creative direction SYLVAIN BLAIS. Assistant photographer MITCH WRIGHT, EMILY V GILBERT. Fashion editor JAY FOREST. Model MAX, RACHIDE at DNA MODELS. Make-up & hair PATRICK G. NADEAU using SCHWARZKOPF PROFESSIONAL.


DTK MEN | VISIONARY & DESIGN

P.97


DESIGN

S A LV ATO R I

JAPANDI D E S I G N T R E N D R E P O R T:

AS FAR AS WORDPLAY GOES, JAPANDI IS AS RICH AS IT IS TIMELY. AN ELEGANT MARRIAGE OF NORDIC AND JAPANESE DESIGN, JAPANDI IS A STRONG 2020 TREND THAT ANSWERS TO OUR FASCINATIONS WITH BOTH MINIMALIST DESIGN LANGUAGES. WITH BOTH CULTURES POSSESSING AN INTIMATE RELATIONSHIP WITH NATURE, A STRONG AFFINITY FOR RAW MATERIALS AND A DEEP APPRECIATION FOR CRAFTSMANSHIP AND TRADITION, THEIR UNION CAN ONLY BE HARMONIOUS AND COMPLEMENTARY.

Written by Maya Assouad Design Editor Azamit

© SALVATORI

MENU SOFA

© MENU

Above all, Japandi is compelling; it strikes the optimum balance between Scandinavian practicality and the Japanese art of impermanence, smartly embodying the delicate subtleties and promoting an alternative aesthetic. Muted, calm and earthtoned colour palettes add on to the serene beauty of the clean-lined, sober design of furniture and objects. And though spare in detail, designs are warm and inviting, imbued with a special charm: a touch of Scandinavian hygge and a hint of Japanese wabi-sabi.

P.98

© BIRGITTA WOLFGANG

NORD & SON

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE


© KRISTINA DAM STUDIO

KRISTINA DAM NIKARI © NIKARI

G A B R I E L TA N D E S I G N CHARRED VASES FOR ORIGIN

KEIJI ASHIZAWA DESIGN © JONAS BIERRE-POULSEN

© SANDIE LYKKE

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE

P.99


DESIGN

RA LINE © JEAN SÉBASTIEN SÉNÉCAL

DESIGN PROFILE

MONTREAL’S D'ARMES

ALEXANDRE JONCAS AND GILDAS LE BARS SET UP D’ARMES IN 2016 AND HAVE SINCE CARVED A REPUTATION FOR DESIGNING UNIQUE LIGHTING SYSTEMS WITH A MODERN TWIST. THEIR COVETED TIMELESS DESIGNS ARE DRIVEN BY A BLEND OF INSTINCT AND TECHNIQUE AND A LOVE OF REFINED MATERIALS. THE DYNAMIC DUO EXPLAINS THEIR FORAY INTO DESIGN, SPECIFICALLY LIGHT FIXTURES, AND WHY THEY MOVED THEIR STUDIO FROM MONTREAL TO THE SCENIC LAURENTIAN FORESTS.

Interview by Azamit Words by Maya Assouad What are your respective backgrounds? A: I studied Visual Arts at UQAM, followed by welding. During that time, I worked on several creative collaborations with renowned artists. I was eager and curious to combine art with my manual skills. This resulted in me creating a few lamp prototypes and then joining a Montreal lighting studio for two years.

P.100

G: I have always been engaged both socially and politically. I have a degree in Communications, and Team and Project Management; I worked as a production manager in the very same studio where Alexandre was working. We launched D’Armes with the intention of building a tight-knit team and to design objects that ultimately reflect our values and design ethos.

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE


DESIGN

RA PENDANT © JEAN SÉBASTIEN SÉNÉCAL RA WALL © JEAN SÉBASTIEN SÉNÉCAL

What was the first thing you ever made? Was it a lighting structure? A: That’s right, Gildas and I started with a light fixture! It’s no longer part of our catalogue. It was a natural evolution for me; I was already working with light on several projects during my studies. However, we always maintained that we would remain open to creating other objects. In fact, we have created a chair which will soon be released. What is the importance of light in your daily rituals and in life? G: We chose our new workshop/studio because it is fully glass panelled. The lighting of our creative space is very important to us. It brings us energy and can render everything around us magical or ugly. A: In the morning, I often wear sunglasses while having my breakfast; I have big windows and I refuse to dress them with curtains. I am extremely sensitive and attuned to natural light, entirely hooked and fiercely connected to it.

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE

P.101


DESIGN

HARTAU DOUBLE ET HARTAU SIMPLE © JEAN SÉBASTIEN SÉNÉCAL

P.102

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE


DESIGN

I try to pay homage to it as much as possible in my creations. This is why a luminaire from D’Armes never leaves you indifferent. What influences your designs? A: Light, my workshop, the people I work with, and what has already been accomplished, ––which constantly pushes me to ascertain contradictions. I start from a concept and then I work through the complexities and frustrations that accompany it. And it goes without saying that nature has a powerful sway; I am equally influenced by its beauty and its fragility. And what are your inspirational objects?A: Paper, pencil, and history books. What is your material of choice? G: We don't actually have any preferred materials. We work with different materials for their quality and durability, and we try to use plastic sparingly. Glass is a favourite of ours ––it's pure rock! We love working with solid bronze as well; as a durable material it infuses pieces with a long life. They can be re-polished often and still retain their beauty in a hundred years. What is it like to be a design studio in Montreal right now? Do you feel that there is an interesting design sensibility? G: Montreal has a strong cultural identity based on its diversity. There are many creative talents in the city who work internationally. I find the city is favourable to open-mindedness, but I believe there are many creatives who are not sufficiently aware of the value of their work. We recently moved our studio to the Laurentian Mountains, nestled in a beautiful forest. It enables us to work with Montreal creators while being in the wilderness. A: I agree that Montreal has a strong creative identity, but even though it was designated UNESCO City of Design (2006), I lament the lack of a real support system for its creators. What is your secret spot in Montreal, the space that indelibly left a mark on you? The abandoned building underneath the off-ramp of the Jacques-Cartier Bridge. And in the Laurentians? The former Canadian military base in St-Adolphe-d’Howard, a vestige of the Cold War.

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE

P.103


BUSINESS

Conferences That You Should Attend In 2020 ATTENDING A GREAT CONFERENCE CAN HELP YOU CREATE MEANINGFUL RELATIONSHIPS THAT CAN LAST A LIFETIME, MEET NEW PEOPLE WHO CAN HELP YOU (OR THAT YOU CAN HELP), HELP YOU CLOSE DEALS, AND LEARN FROM LEADING EXPERTS IN YOUR FIELD, ALL WHILE YOU HAVE FUN AND TRAVEL TO NEW PLACES, OR IN AN ERA SUCH AS OURS, ATTEND VIA AN ONLINE PLATFORM ALL IN THE COMFORT AND SAFETY OF YOUR OWN HOME. BUSINESS CONFERENCES CAN LEAD TO UNEXPECTED OPPORTUNITIES TO STAY ON THE BLEEDING EDGE OF TECHNOLOGY AND BECOME A LEADER IN YOUR FIELD. WE TOOK A LOOK AT SOME OF THE BEST AND COMPILED A LIST OF OUR TOP 5 CONFERENCES TO ATTEND (VIRTUALLY OR NOT) IN 2020.

By Aaron Joseph Cunningham

WEB SUMMIT

From November 2-5 in Lisbon, Portugal Web Summit is always one of the biggest and most popular conferences in the world and is run by the same group of people who started Collision. It truly is a global summit for entrepreneurs and thought leaders in a variety of techrelated fields. The conference attracts a diverse list of world-class speakers and facilitates content that both inspires and empowers attendees. Previous years have seen as many as 70 000 attendees from over 160 countries, which should be more than enough to expand your global network.The speakers for 2020 have not yet been listed but past speakers include: Edward Snowden, President at Freedom of the Press Foundation, Brad Smith, President at Microsoft, Katherine Maher, CEO at Wikipedia, and many more.

WORLDZ

Date and location TBA One of the world's flashiest business conferences, Worldz is an annual event that blurs the lines between innovation, recreation, and connection. According to their website, they are placed to “learn the skills needed to thrive in a constantly changing world and connect with senior marketers and proven leaders across industries who are CREATING the future, not chasing it.” The event is not all spectacle and hype. It focuses on building the attendees up with amazing thought-provoking speakers and networking events, as well as one on one mentoring with their “Meet the Masters” programs. Past speakers include: Shaquille O’Neal, 4 times NBA Champion, Hall of Famer, and CEO, Jeremi Gorman, Chief Business Officer at Snap Inc, and Sylvia Earle, Marine Biologist and Founder of Mission Blue among many others.

P.104

DTK MEN |THE SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE


BUSINESS

COLLISION

From June 22-25, Online Event When people think of their “must attend” conference, they often think of Collision. The reason being that Collision has established itself as one of the premier global business and entrepreneurship conferences. Collision is the fastest-growing tech conference in North America. Now in its sixth year, Collision has grown to over 30 000 attendees. Collision showcases the world’s best speakers and curates content that is cutting-edge and thought-provoking. Also, Collision really focuses on building relationships through networking and social events so you can leave feeling inspired, educated, and with a few new names in your network.This year’s speakers include: Thuan Pham, CTO at Uber, Terrell Owens, NFL Player & Entrepreneur at Terrell Owens, Jonah Peretti, Founder at BuzzFeed, and many more!

SUMMIT AT SEA

From May 28-31 in International Waters, sailing from Port Everglades, Florida Summit has made a name for itself as being an “ideas festival.” The festival goes deeper than most conferences and facilitates an environment for attendees to collaborate on big issues facing business and society. The event includes keynote and discussions, as well as workshops surrounding wellness and fostering a connection with others and oneself. Summit will be hosting numerous conferences this year, but we chose Summit at Sea for our list because of its unique venue – a large cruise ship. The event will only hold 1700 attendees and focuses more on quality over quantity. The speakers are yet to be announced.

STARTUP GRIND GLOBAL CONFERENCE

From February 11-12 in Redwood City, California (Silicon Valley) For the past few years, Startup Grind Global Conference has competed ‘neck and neck’ with some of the biggest conferences in the world. Startup Grind claims to be “the most important event for startups, tech leaders, and big brands at the forefront of innovation.” The two-day experience focuses on practical advice from a who’s who list of entrepreneurs, thought leaders, investors, and innovators from Silicon Valley. The conference attracts people who have a shared vision of creating a better future. This year’s conference features: Jaime Bott, Talent Partner at Sequoia Capital, Jaya Kolhatkar, Chief Data Officer at Hulu, Jason Williamson, Vice President of Oracle for Startups at Oracle, and many more. Make sure to check their website to see which events will be taking place online.

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE

P.105


TRAVEL

New York City’s The Dominick Hotel

A LUXURY TO BEHOLD

THE DOMINICK HOTEL THE DOMINIK HOTEL

IDEALLY LOCATED IN THE STORIED SOHO NEIGHBOURHOOD, THE DOMINICK HOTEL FUSES MODERN LUXURY WITH CLASSIC DETAILS FOR A BREATHTAKING UPSCALE EXPERIENCE. FROM ITS PANORAMIC SKYBOX WINDOWS BOASTING THE BEST VIEWS IN NEW YORK CITY TO THE INTIMATE CURATION OF EACH ROOM, THE DOMINICK HOTEL OFFERS A UNIQUE STAY WITH SOME OF THE BEST DESIGN IN THE CITY.

By Luisa Tarantino We all know it’s the inside that counts, but The Dominick Hotel couldn’t be more perfectly located. A stunning 46-story tower defined by its silver glass, The Dominick is just as visually pleasing on New York City’s skyline as it is on the inside. Located in close proximity to delectable restaurants, SoHo’s hippest boutiques, and world-class galleries,

P.106

guests are also gifted with spectacular views of some of the city’s most visited landmarks, such as the Empire State Building and its surrounding neighbourhoods, the Statue of Liberty, and the Brooklyn Bridge among many others. If you’d like, you can plan your own little tour of New York City all from the comfort of your own room.

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE


TRAVEL

THE DOMINICK HOTEL

THE DOMINICK HOTEL

With 391 residential-style guest rooms, each room in The Dominick feels personalized due to its interior design, a perfect representation of the hotel’s attention to detail and modernity. It’s also the only hotel in all of New York City with custom furnishings by Fendi Casa, such as sofas, chairs, headboards, side tables, and settees, as well as Italian bedding by Bellino. If you book a guestroom, get ready for gorgeous granite countertops and marble bathrooms with marble tubs overlooking a view of the city. Mixing luxury, comfort, and impeccable style, you can indulge in the fantasy of pretending your suite is your very own hip New York place. For all the foodies out there, stay tuned for the highly anticipated opening of Vestry, a new signature restaurant located on the ground floor of the hotel. Headed up by Michelin-Starred Chef Shaun Hergatt, Vestry is inspired by New American cooking. The restaurant will offer an à la carte menu with seasonally inspired dishes using the best local ingredients, largely focused on seafood and vegetable dishes. Innovative and seasonal dishes will be featured like red snapper which comes with soft and fried leeks, daikon, and orange essence. If you’re more of a drinker, spend an evening at the hotel’s bar and lounge Café Mezz, or the outdoor bar at the poolside terrace on the 7th floor, all while enjoying an expertly mixed cocktail and a priceless New York view. If you’re less of a city slicker and more of a homebody, treat yourself to the hotel’s 11, 000 square-

SHAUN HERGATT © LIZCLAYMAN

foot spa. If you want to feel like you’re no longer in New York, indulge in the city’s only luxury Moroccan and Turkish hammams. To get a dose of full body relaxation, try out the chromatherapy experience showers, steam and fauna facilities, as well as their private treatment rooms. You can even work out in their state-of-the-art fitness centre, but we know we’d try the spa first. If you want to experience the iconic city in luxury and comfort, The Dominick Hotel proves to be a unique experience. Get the best New York City views, indulge in a little self-care (we all need some after recent events), and fuel up with food from a Michelin-Starred chef. There’s nothing like New York City in the summer.

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE

P.107


TRAVEL

T H E B E S T F O O D I E S P OT S I N

BORDEAUX THERE IS MORE TO THIS UNESCO CITY THAN NEVER ENDING WINE BARS AND BEAUTIFUL SCENERY. THE FOLLOWING PLACES PROMISE TO MAKE YOU EXPERIENCE THE VERY BEST OF THIS FOODIE PARADISE, BECAUSE LIFE IS MOST DEFINITELY RICHER AND DEEPER IN BORDEAUX.

By Marie-Ève Venne

P.108

CITÉ DU VIN

134 Quai de Bacalan

We can all agree that it would be a little bit strange to skip the mecca of everything wine while visiting Bordeaux. Already compared to the Guggenheim in Bilbao in terms of architecture, the Cité du Vin de Bordeaux claims to be the largest museum in the world dedicated to wine. The building, which consists of 8 floors (four of which are dedicated to offices not accessible to the public), offers several visitor spaces and exhibitions.

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE


Š AXEL FERIS

LE CARREAU

30 Rue du Pas-Saint-Georges

Le Carreau is the opposite of a formal brasserie, and that's what makes it one of the best restaurants in Bordeaux. It has an open kitchen concept, making for a convivial place where you can enjoy a delicious meal cooked by a passionate chef. The cuisine is based around the roots of the south-west and the menu changes according to the market and the seasons.

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE

P.109


TRAVEL

LE POINT ROUGE

1 Quai de Paludate

Located inside a majestic space filled with benches reminiscent of those of some trains of yesteryear and, above all, a majestic bar - arguably the most imposing in Bordeaux - which literally sits on the left part of these old cellars, le Point Rouge is one of the best bars in the city. From gin to vodka to old rums, whisky from unknown lands, and of course wine, we are in the presence of the largest collection of spirits in Bordeaux.

LE TAQUIN

1 Quai Sainte-Croix

This is the kind of place we are always happy to come across, be it by chance or not! The quality of the cuisine served here is impressive: finesse and flavours all over the menu. Add the quality of the service and the dreamy setting of the Quai Sainte-Croix in the friendly Saint-Michel district, and you get a very good bistro type table. The Taquin also prepares its own absolutely delicious cocktails!

P.110

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE


TRAVEL

MARCHÉ DES CAPUCINS

Place des Capucins

The Marché des Capucins went under a great transformation over the past few years. It is now a place where hipsters and people living in the neighborhood blend in in a friendly environment to buy fresh food from local producers. On the weekend, it’s a very nice spot to go for lunch with a couple of friends and enjoy one of the restaurants in the middle of the market. Pro tip: order a delicious, fresh plate of oysters.

LE SYMBIOSE

4 Quai des Chartrons

The Symbiose can be found in the back room of a restaurant open only at lunchtime. Pass behind a clock and fall into a bar with a musical atmosphere that quickly sets the tone. As for cocktails, you can find a curated menu of ten cocktails, from The Happy Apple to the African Queen to the Zombie or the Be Nuts. If you have no idea what you want, you can be (very well) advised by one of the mixologists who will create a personal drink catering to your likes and dislikes and what will be the most pleasing to you (in their expert opinion).

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE

P.111


CARS

P.112

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE


CARS

The New 2020 Chevrolet

CORVETTE AT A TIME WHEN MANY AUTO MANUFACTURERS ARE BECOMING MORE CONSERVATIVE WITH THEIR NEW PRODUCTS, CHEVROLET IS GOING THE OPPOSITE WAY, RELEASING A RADICALLY CHANGED 2020 STINGRAY. FOR THE FIRST TIME, THE ICONIC SPORTS CAR WILL UTILIZE A MID-ENGINE, REARWHEEL DRIVE (MR) CONFIGURATION.

By Benjamin Yong “Corvette has always represented the pinnacle of innovation and boundary-pushing at GM. The traditional front-engine vehicle reached its limits of performance, necessitating the new layout,” says General Motors president Mark Reuss in a press release. “In terms of comfort and fun, it still looks and feels like a Corvette, but drives better than any vehicle in Corvette history. Customers are going to be thrilled with our focus on details and performance across the board.” So why the switch to MR? Similar to other segment examples, putting the engine in the middle creates optimal weight distribution, as there is no hunk of metal imitating an anchor at either end. This also allows the driver to be positioned closer to the forward axle — the cabin has been moved forward 419 millimetres, putting occupants nearly overtop the front wheels — promoting better responsiveness and control. In addition, designers were able to dramatically lower the hood, flat-bottom two-spoke steering wheel and instrument panel, which means occupants get a race car-like view of the road with excellent sightlines. Almost as dramatic as the modification to the layout is that of the exterior. The Stingray’s appearance has always embodied the spirit of motorsport. However, the 2020 model reaches another level, incorporating styling cues from modern-day fighter jets and Formula One machines. Just take a gander at the short nose, and those sculpted, aerodynamic bodylines, low profile projector headlamps, gaping front bumper and rear fender air intakes, handle-less doors and cooling slats on the windowed rear hatch.

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE

P.113


CARS

Like in the cockpit of a plane or F1 car, seats are of the utmost importance. That’s why consumers have no less than three variants to choose from: the Mulan leather-covered GT1 offering optional two-way lumbar support and wing adjustment; heated and ventilated dual-density foam GT2 featuring carbon fibre trim on the headrest and a painted seatback; and the aggressively bolstered Competition Sport.

The heart that beats at the centre of the Stingray is a naturally aspirated 6.2-litre Small Block V8 LT2 motor, mated to an eight-speed dual-clutch automatic transmission manually operable via included paddle shifters. Output is rated at 495 horsepower and 470 lb-ft of torque, enough to achieve a 0 to 100 km/h time of less than three seconds (when equipped with the Z51 Performance Package).

It’s not all business and no fun here — six different interior colour schemes add a splash of colour, and an upgradable 14-speaker Bose Performance Series audio system (10-speaker standard), complemented by stainless steel speaker grills, provide a crystal clear soundtrack to adventures behind the wheel.

Depending on road conditions or driving environment, six dynamic modes are available: Weather, Tour, Sport, Track, MyMode and Z. The last two allow customizable settings to be saved for a tailored experience.

There is extensive use of lightweight materials throughout, such as a largely aluminum main structure, fiberglass-resin front and rear trunk tubs, and an industry-first carbon fibre curved rear bumper keeping the vehicle lithe and nimble. Assisting the cause is a special adjustable coil over suspension setup. The front is capable of lifting up to 40 millimetres to clear obstacles or steep inclines/declines.

P.114

While honing at the track or out in the backroads, the built-in Performance Data Recorder allows the capture of high-definition video for later replay and analysis. A handy auto-on function can essentially turn the recorder into a dash camera. The 2020 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray will start at MSRP $69 998 and sold as both a coupe and convertible with a power retractable hard top.

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE


CARS

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE

P.115


CARS

Slip Sliding Away - Ice Experience

PORSCHE IF SOMEONE WERE TO TELL YOU THAT YOU’D BE DRIVING ON ICE WITH A SPORTS CAR, HOW WOULD YOU REACT? MANY “WHAT IFS” WOULD POP INTO YOUR HEAD, RIGHT? FEAR NO MORE.ENTER PORSCHE; THIS ICONIC BRAND IS NOT SIMPLY ABOUT PRODUCING SOME OF THE MOST SOUGHT-AFTER SPORTS CARS BUT ALSO ABOUT CREATING LIFESTYLE EXPERIENCES.

By Piero Facchin

So, when Porsche invited us to the Porsche Ice Experience, the only one offered in North America, we jumped on the occasion. It involved driving brand spanking new 2020 Porsche Carreras (models 4 and 4S) on ice! That’s right, on ice! Walking on ice can be tricky but driving on ice requires an entirely different skillset. Upon arriving, before any driving is done, the people from Porsche wanted to make sure that we under-

P.116

stood certain laws of physics via a “driver briefing,” in which we learned the fundamentals of driving in slippery conditions. A top-notch instructor broke down the forces we would be dealing with on ice and outlined how these forces would influence our driving techniques. We then headed out to Circuit Mécaglisse, 90 minutes north of Montreal, where we were greeted by a welcoming committee formed by all the instructors

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE


and collaborators for this event, à la ‘Club Med’ style, with high-fives and contagious energy overflowing with enthusiasm in the air. Despite this apparent lightness of being, the instructors are all seasoned motor racing drivers with, to their pedigree, participation and victories in the most prestigious races on the planet, such as the 24 Hours of Le Mans, the 24 Hours of Daytona, and the 12 Hours of Sebring, as well as several championships in multiple series. From the very beginning of this program at Porsche, there was no question about having instructors other than those who had experience in motor racing. This is in line with the very high standards which are an integral part of the philosophy of this famed German brand. Driving position is of paramount importance. Our instructor proceeded to show us how to find a good driving position where our "input" would have a greater efficiency on the behavior of the car. Once settled, we started with the first exercise consisting of a slalom course between cones. Keeping a constant speed and following the advice of our instructor, who was in constant audio contact with us via a walkie-talkie, was absolutely essential. Porsches are nimble and powerful cars, so it is easy to spin the car around if you don’t dose your power adequately. Other exercises included the skidpad, where oversteer becomes the highlight, with the back end of the car swinging out, pushed by 443 horses around a central point. The sound of the engine and the snow flying behind the car made for a memorable experience! There was a full road course as well as other configurable obstacle courses on which many different maneuvers can be practiced but the bottom line is control and safety. All exercises are strictly monitored and guided by the instructors throughout the whole experience. wThere are four program levels: Ice Trial, the base event, Ice Intro, a four-day event, and Ice Experience, Ice Force and Ice Force+ as five-day events, with each level having an increase in detail of ice driving. Forget about ice in your cocktails and let Porsche put some ice under your driving for a truly unique experience.

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE

P.117


STYLE

SNEAKERS TOP 5 LUXURY

BROWSE THE SHOE SECTION OF ANY HIGH-END RETAIL STORE OR WEBSITE AND YOU QUICKLY REALIZE THAT THE WORLDS OF SNEAKERS AND HIGH FASHION HAVE OFFICIALLY COLLIDED. WHETHER IT’S DESIGNER AND ATHLETIC BRANDS PARTNERING TOGETHER, OR THE FORMER RELEASING THEIR OWN LINE OF PRODUCTS, THERE’S SOMETHING FOR EVERY DISCERNING LUXURY CUSTOMER. HERE’S DTK MEN’S TOP FIVE LUXURY SNEAKERS LIST.

By Benjamin Yong

OFF-WHITE

Low Vulcanized Sneakers Label CEO Virgil Abloh first gained worldwide recognition with sneakerheads following the launch of “The Ten,” a series of remixed classic Nike silhouettes. Since then, he’s also become the Artistic Director of Louis Vuitton, and dropped a number of solo projects such as the Low Vulcanized Sneakers. Looking a little like upscale Vans, the low tops feature wrap-around black and white striping and a large contrast Off-White logo, finished off by a signature red zip-tie.

BALENCIAGA

Speed sneakers

These made-in-Italy Speed Sneakers are so popular, rapper Cardi B even shouts them out in her hit song “I Like It.” Immediately recognizable thanks to its knit sock-like construction, they’re super-lightweight and wrap around the wearer’s foot. The black and white model is the most iconic, but buyers can choose from a multitude of other colourways.

P.118

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE


STYLE

VERSACE

2 Chain Reaction Sneakers Although the Versace Chain Reaction ‘dad sneakers’ weren’t originally created with the American hip-hop artist 2 Chainz in mind, the two collaborated on the model together — aptly named 2 Chain Reaction — last winter. All variants reference the fashion company’s history via a Greca pattern imprinted into the chain-link-shaped outsole and a Medusa head on the heel counter.

JORDAN BRAND X DIOR

Air Jordans

Dior already has a portfolio of inhouse creps, but the brand recently announced a highly anticipated collaboration with Nike on a limitededition Air Jordan I High OG. Celebrating both the 35th anniversary of Air Jordan and the debut of the first Dior men’s collection in the United States, this version features supple calf leather, an embossed “Air Dior” Jumpman Wings logo and the Dior Oblique print on the Swoosh.

LOUIS VUITTON

Run Away Pulse Sneakers The latest entry into Louis Vuitton’s athleisure footwear catalogue returns to a more conservative design following the release of the futuristic Archlight in 2018. Continuing to embrace the chunky ‘dad shoe’ trend, the Run Away Pulse sits atop an elevated midsole and utilizes plenty of high quality leather, textured mesh and LV Monogramming.

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE

P.119


MUSIC

Veritable Vinyl

WANT TO FIND THE NEXT BEST THING TO PUT ON YOUR RECORD PLAYER? HERE’S A LOOK AT SOME MORE MUST-SPIN RECORDS TO ADD TO YOUR COLLECTION.

By Jason Gorber

Original Soundtrack

ONCE UPON A TIME IN HOLLYWOOD

Quentin Tarantino has crafted some of the most memorable playlists in cinema history, and his latest Oscarnominated masterpiece is no exception. Weaving classics and estoterica together like a fine tapestry, this remarkable collection incorporates vintage radio performances as well, with certain tracks presented in all their mono broadcast glory. Independent record stores got a nice coloured vinyl version, and a sold-out super deluxe edition came with a slew of posters from the fictional films of Cliff and Rick’s career. Spread over two discs, with everything from Terry Melcher-produced megahits to a song from Los Bravos that absolutely should have been a hit, there’s so much to love about this fabulous selection of songs.

Tame Impala

THE SLOW RUSH

Sigur Rós

After a half decade of waiting, Kevin Parker returns under his Tame Impala moniker with The Slow Rush, a trippy, psychedelic trip that feels equal parts soothing and unsettling. The record feels both retro and timeless, incorporating solid grooves, burbling synths and a sweeping, spacey air that’s evocative of both Disco and Rave culture, yet feels more like after the party has subsided and you’re just basking in the chill. This is contemporary prog-rock, and for all that excoriated that moniker it’s nice to see newer generations embrace both the madness and majesty of the pioneering work done in the 1970s.

ÁGÆTIS BYRJUN

It’s been 20 years since this post-rock, spacey record emerged from Iceland, and the band have assembled a wonderful celebration of this definitive album. Housed in a beautiful, cloth-covered box, the numbered, limited edition set consists of 7-LPs – two for the original album, two of a 1999 concert in Reykjavik, and three consisting of demoes, early versions and assorted additional live recordings. In total it’s as sweeping and epic as the record itself, and heard today outside the nimbus of its success it’s easy to recognize how its ethereal beauty remains everylasting.

P.120

DTK MEN | THE CULTURE & CULINARY ISSUE


WITH EVEN MORE CONTENT, DTK MEN IS THE #1 NEWS DESTINATION FOR THE MODERN MAN.

Get the best in style and lifestyle, culture and entertainment, rides, and DTK cities. DRESSTOKILLMAGAZINE.COM/DTK-MEN facebook.com/dtkmen

@dtkmen


Profile for Dress to Kill Magazine

DTK MEN SS 2020  

For this special Culture & Culinary Issue, Queer Eye's Antoni Porowski graces the cover and talks about his journey to fame and his passion...

DTK MEN SS 2020  

For this special Culture & Culinary Issue, Queer Eye's Antoni Porowski graces the cover and talks about his journey to fame and his passion...

Advertisement