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INTRODUCTION

Welcome to the Dream Team! Thank you so much for your willingness to invest your time, passion and energy into Dream Outside the Box! This program started as the dream of a 17 year old rodeo cowgirl in a freshman dorm room at the University of Missouri, troubled that the vivid experiences she had were drastically different from those of students in (what we now call) “dream deserts.” I was that freshman, wanting to contribute to the community but with no plans for the idea to be an organization, certainly not a “real” nonprofit and never imagined this national movement with incredible people like you. Despite all odds, over the course of time, through sheer will and love, we have worked with countless children, thousands of volunteers and cultivated immeasurable dreams. As I always say, you can only dream what you’ve seen. Through the introduction of engineering, fencing, ballet, dairy farming and so much more, our Little Dreamers have seen new opportunities every step of the way and we have seen firsthand the indescribable impact. I believe in the kids of tomorrow. I believe in the power and impact of college students. I believe people like you will change the world. Marian Wright Edelman says, “Service is the rent we pay for living.” Thank you for choosing to pay yours through volunteerism with Dream Outside the Box. It should be fun. It should be a learning experience. It should make your day each week. If at any point it does not, I am happy to help in any way that I can. It is going to be an amazing year and never forget to DREAM BIG!

-KP of DOTB kamphillips@dreamoutsidethebox.org

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HOW TO READ We have painstakingly compiled what we feel is every resource needed to change lives the DOTB way. Begin with the introductory section, which has information for all leaders and then proceed to your respective position’s chapter. All forms referenced throughout the book can be found in the final chapter. Below is a key to the special formatting found throughout the guide: Bold Text

Info that can be found in the App or Google Drive Printable documents can be found in Google Drive

[Bracketed Text]

Replace bracketed text with tailored responses

Center-aligned italics Narrative that will not be found on the printable documents

Name

Abbreviation

Definition

Dreamers

K-5 children we work with

VB

A college student who attends weekly

Demo Buddy

DB

A college student who presents programming with their student organization

Youth Service Organization

YSO

A youth-centered organization, such as elementary schools and after-school facilities

SHIP

College Executive Board. Short for LeaderSHIP, meaning “Success Happens in Partnerships”

Little Dreamers Volunteer Buddy

College Leadership Team

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TABLE OF CONTENTS Preface: About DOTB 3 Sample Day At DOTB 4 DOTB: The App 5 Volunteer Rules 6 Steps to Cultural Competence 7 Recognizing Your Privilege 8 Adverse Childhood Experiences 9 Power of Connection 10 Connecting Rituals 11 Trauma Informed Approach 12 SHIP Descriptions 13 Benefits of DOTB 14 Why We Do What We Do 15

Chapter 1: Campus Chapter Founder 18 Chapter 2: Campus Executive Director 28 Chapter 3: Campus Program Coordinator 44 Chapter 4: Campus Finance Coordinator 62 Chapter 5: Campus Volunteer Coordinator 68 Chapter 6: Campus Statistician   82 Chapter 7: Campus PR Coordinator 96

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ABOUT DOTB

Background Dream Outside the Box (DOTB) was founded as a college student organization in Columbia, MO in 2009. When DOTB, 74% of boys K-5 aspired to be rappers, professional athletes, or both. In 2012, headquarters were established in Fort Worth, Texas where surveys showed approximately 83% of K-5 boys at a local youth service organization indicated “Police Officer� as their #1 pre-DOTB aspiration. As the mission of DOTB spreads, students are chartering chapters on their campus in effort to destroy dream deserts across the nation. What is a Dream Desert? Just as a food desert is a place where people lack access to nutritious and affordable fresh fruits and vegetables, a dream desert is an area where students lack access to educational and extracurricular opportunities. In order for an area to qualify as a dream desert, DOTB considers percentage of children on free and reduced lunch, percentage of first generation college students, and access to mentorship and enrichment programming. Funding DOTB is a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt nonprofit organization funded through grants, corporate giving, in-kind contributions, and donations from individuals who believe in the power of dreaming beyond the box. In the future, DOTB will supplement cost through campus fundraisers and e-commerce such as t-shirts and mission related merchandise. 3


SAMPLE DAY AT DOTB The goal of each day is to broaden horizons, expose kids to experiences they wouldn’t otherwise have and form positive relationships for both little dreamers and college students. So, a typical day would go something like this:

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“Outside the Box” Time

The kids have been at school all day and recess time is limited. Their energy levels will be high prior to programming and structured play time releases serotonin and creates bonding time with buddies.

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Table Talks

Table Talks help set the Path of the Day. We have designed conversation starters and questions to introduce the topic of the day to the Dreamers.

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Wrap-Up

Programming

It’s Dream time! The main attraction! This is the time we work to engage children in hands- on experiential activities. So, if it’s journalism, we may turn a classroom into a newsroom and have the kids report “live”. If we’re teaching agriculture, we may bring in live animals, for forensics, extract DNA from strawberries. No two days are the same!

It’s always important to debrief. We chat either as a group or at our tables about the activity of the day. If appropriate, students will write in their Dream Journals and complete any applicable pages. Every day in DOTB should be fun and this is a time to share just how much fun we all had but more importantly, what we learned and what we’ll take away. 4


DOTB: THE APP The app is everything! Available on both iPhone and Android, we use this weekly for training, curriculum, sign-ups and outcomes. Anything that you need is likely in the app and if you think of something that should be in there that is not, there’s even a space for that too! Here’s an overview of the app and a QR code to scan to download it above. Training (Videos & Quizzes)

Curriculum

Leading a training? Use this portal for instructional videos

Trying to tell someone about DOTB? Pull this tab for informational and promotional videos.

These are for leading the discussion of the Path of the Day each day. Great to view beforehand.

For future learning, you can print these for the kids to take home

Each activity is in the app. Familiarize yourself with the Path of the Day before programming

Every child needs a role to feel valued and included. Here are job charts and descriptions.

Learning your role as a volunteer? Look here

Need a visual on an activity? Watch how-tos here

Schedule 1. The first screen will have each chapter’s logo. Select your school.

2. Second, a schedule will pull up of remaining, confirmed activities for your site. Select the day you’d like to sign-up for. 5

Forms 3. Each week will have a description of the activity, location and times. 4. Click the sign-up link to confirm your attendance.

The first screen will have your positionSHIP member, Volunteer Buddy or Demo Buddy. Select your group.

Everything you need for membership, readings, surveys and any other outcome evaluation is all within this section. If we ask you to fill anything out that is not a sign-up, you will find it here.


ng f ay o .

VOLUNTEER RULES We are so honored to have you volunteer, here are some ground rules for a great year: DOTB should be really fun, but if it’s ever unsafe, please tell someone. Our dreamers will love you right away, but eye-to-eye you should stay. SPRING 2016

DOTB

They will want to jump on your back, but for safety we must keep them on track.

Volunteer Rules

We are so honored to have you Please help dreamers keep their bottoms in a chair, and please do not letas a volunteer, here are some them braid your hair. guidelines for a great year: 

If we say, “Chicka Chicka” please say “Boom Boom.” We need your help to control the rowdy room. If a leader is talking please help ustell keep the room quiet, please someone. if you model good actions, the kids will try it. eye­to­eye

Sometimes conflicts may arise, like when dreamers don’t want to share supplies. Help diffuse the situation, by fostering group communication. safety

If you want to be on your phone, perhaps youbottoms should stay at home. It may sound harsh but it’s true, these dreamers need in a chair braid every ounceyour of you. hair.

names,

We know you have a rockin’ bod but short shorts, leggings, and see through clothes don’t get the approval nod.

phone,

control the rowdy room.

Our dreamers are highly impressionable and gravitate toward sassy, so all thatroom we do,quiet, should keep it classy.

every ounce of you.

clothes

share supplies.

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STEPS TO CULTURAL COMPETENCE As ambassadors of DOTB within your dream desert, it is crucial that every member of your chapter is able to effectively interact with children and families of different cultures and socioeconomic backgrounds. Before beginning cultural competence activities it is essential to establish a safe space with your fellow volunteer buddies. Below are a few helpful tips. 1. BE VULNERABLE: We can’t effectively understand others and ourselves without letting our guard down. When working with DOTB, being an open and honest volunteer buddy will create an atmosphere of compassionate understanding. 2. ACTIVE LISTENING: As active listeners we are able to attentively take in, process, and understand what is being said; opposed to waiting for our turn to speak. Active listening also helps us ask questions regarding topics that we don’t clearly understand. This is a great skill to teach our little dreamers. 3. COURAGEOUS CONVERSATION: Engaging in difficult dialogue allows us to challenge ourselves as well as our fellow volunteer buddies. These conversations are not always easy, being brave enough to speak our truths creates an environment of willingness and trust. 4. USE “I” STATEMENTS: When explaining an experience, it is imperative that we address our role in a situation. It is important to remember that we only represent ourselves and can only speak from our own experience. 5. LOOK UP, LOOK AROUND (DOUBLE L): As volunteer buddies it is essential for us to be aware of what is going on in the room. At times when you feel comfortable pan the room and notice how participants are reacting to a topic or activity. This can be used during cultural competence activities and while working with little dreamers. 6. MAKE YOUR OWN NEED LIST: It is important to make sure all voices are included. With your fellow volunteer buddies, grab a large sheet of paper and have volunteers call out what they need to establish an effective safe space.

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RECOGNIZING YOUR PRIVILEGE Peggy McIntosh created the “White Privilege Checklist”. As a causcasian woman, she recognized that their things she took for granted in every day life which shaped her view of the world. Read the follow statements and acknowledge whether or not they apply to you. Now, consider, how they might apply to the children in our programming.

I can if I wish arrange to be in the company of people of my race most of the time.

I can be pretty sure that my neighbors in such a location will be neutral or pleasant to me.

If I should need to move, I can be pretty sure renting or purchasing housing in an area which I can afford and in which I would want to live. I can be sure that my children will be given curricular materials that testify to the existence of their race.

I am never asked to speak for all the people of my racial group.

I can go shopping alone most of the time, pretty well assured that I will not be followed or harassed.

If a traffic cop pulls me over, I can be sure I haven’t been singled out because of my race.

I can be pretty sure that if I ask to talk to “the person in charge,” I will be facing a person of my race.

I can choose blemish cover or bandages in flesh If I go into a color and have hairdresser’s shop them more or less I can count on match my skin. finding someone When I am told about our who can cut my national heritage or about hair “civilization,” I am shown that people of my color made it I can turn on the what it is. television or open to the front page of the I can easily buy posters, paper and see people of postcards, picture books, my race widely greeting cards, dolls, toys, and children’s represented. magazines featuring people of my race.

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ADVERSE CHILDHOOD EXPERIENCES ACEs stands for Adverse Childhood Experiences. Many of the children we serve, have experiences more than one of the ACEs listed below. As a result of this, traumatic experiences impact their abilities to form relationships, feel a sense of security and can impact their long-term trajectory. The following pages are designed to highlight the importance of acknowledging and understanding ACEs.

ADVERSE CHILDHOOD EXPERIENCES (ACE)

According to the Center for Disease Control, the ACE Study was one of the largest studies ever conducted to assess the correlation between childhood trauma and adult health and well-being. Of the 17,000 participants, more than 50% reported being exposed to at least one traumatic experience before age 18. The study proved that childhood trauma is associated with short and long term health factors.

TRAUMA

• Trauma results from events or circumstances that are experienced by an individual and has lasting adverse effects on the individual’s functioning and physical, social, emotional, or spiritual well-being • Change the structure of the brain and the way a brain works • Childhood trauma has been associated with: emotional impairments, behavioral issues, social problems, physical & mental health problems, overwhelming feelings of anxiety and reduced ability to focus • Adversity is closely related to trauma and has a biological impact on children’s development through the mechanisms of stress

THE 10 ACES 1. Emotional abuse 2. Physical abuse 3. Sexual abuse 4. Mother treated violently 5. Substance abuse in the home

6. Mental illness of a family member 7. Parents divorced/separated 8. Family member incarcerated 9. Emotional neglect 10. Physical neglect

LIFESPAN IMPACTS OF ACES Chronic Disease, Psychiatric Disorders, Impaired Cognition, Work/School (Attendance, Behavior, Performance), Obesity, Alcohol, Tobacco, Drugs, Risky Sex, Crime, Poverty, Intergenerational Transmission, Disparity

Chemical & Sensitive Developmental Periods

BRAIN DEVELOPMENT Electrical, Chemical, Cellular Mass

Genetics 9

ADAPTATION Hard-Wired into Biology

Adverse Childhood Experiences

How does your role as a Buddy have an impact on ACEs and their outcomes?


POWER OF CONNECTION The states of the brain impact our ability to form connections and solve problems. Here are the states of the brain at play for your students each week.

STATES OF THE BRAIN

SURVIVAL STATE Safety - Through self-regulation, enhances children’s ability to recognize and manage physiological and emotional upset.

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CONNECTING RITUALS Connection requires four critical elements.

EYE CONTACT Get down on the child’s level to achieve eye contact for a brief moment. When eyes meet, a wireless connection is created between the orbital frontal areas of the prefrontal lobes. From this connection, we download inner states into one another. The eyes contain nerve projections that lead directly to key brain structures for empathy and matching emotions.

PRESENCE Being present in the moment means your mind and body are in the same place. Your mind is free from chatter. You are still enough to see the beauty in the child. Presence is about acceptance as we join together to share the same moment. The present moment is where joy lies. Relax into it.

TOUCH Touch is the only sense we cannot live without. The skin and brain are made up of the same embryonic tissue. The skin is the outside layer of the brain. Touch creates a hormone that is essential to neural functioning and learning. If we want smart, happy kids, then we need to provide more appropriate, caring touch.

PLAYFULNESS Playfulness helps build bonds and creates a biochemistry in the brain for dopamine. Dopamine says, “Pay attention, stay focued.” Playful situations strengthen the dopamine system, increase attention spans and boost social development.

Credits: This page is directly sourced from Concious Discipline. © Loving Guidance, Inc. 11


TRAUMA INFORMED APPROACH Let’s address a Trauma Informed Approach and how positive brain growth impacts prevention.

Peaceful

WHY IS PREVENTION IMPORTANT?

• Improves short and long term, positive outcomes for children • Impacts cognitive development • Promotes healthy relationships and lifestyle choices • Prevention while working with Dreamers can be seen through: • Positive attitudes • Being self-aware of your actions during programming • Staying eye-to eye • Promoting group communication • Attentiveness to diverse needs of all Dreamers

Creative

Reasoning

POSITIVE BRAIN GROWTH

Emotion Numbers

Visual Imagine

Hearing Music

Language Discover Happiness Achieve

Realizes impact of diversity

Responds by integrating knowledge

TRAUMA INFORMED APPROACH

Seeks to actively resist re-traumatization

Recognizes symptoms and signs

1. How we handle stress 2. The way we perceive the world 3. How we organize our memories into mental models to anticipate in the future 4. Our capacity for interpersonal communication 5. Ability to focus and sustain attention

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SHIP DESCRIPTIONS Campus Executive Director As Captain of the SHIP, CEDs have the opportunity to use leadership skills to truly make an impact on each campus, each YSO and eventually, the nation. CEDs work to create synergy amongst their team, uphold DOTB’s standard of dynamic programming, and make each week special for our Little Dreamers. Campus Program Coordinator The entire mission of DOTB lies in the hands of the Campus Program Coordinator. No pressure! Their ability to form partnerships, recruit exciting demonstrators and come up with creative programming makes them the automatic MVP on the SHIP (but shhhh, that’s just between us!) They will: 1) Dream up great experiences 2) Make them happen 3) Watch your programs change lives! Campus Volunteer Coordinator We pride ourselves on having the most energetic, passionate, and committed volunteers around, and the Campus Volunteer Coordinator helps recruit, train, and keep them informed. Their amazingness coupled with the fact that we strive for a 1:1 Little Dreamer: Volunteer Buddy ratio sets DOTB apart from the rest. Campus Statistician If something amazing happens at a YSO and no one is around to capture it, did it really happen? Unfortunately, in the nonprofit world, the answer is no. In order to continue our mission, we have to be able to answer questions from supporters such as: How many children did we serve? How many Volunteer Buddies invested their time? How many kids are now college bound? Making sure we have the answers to all of these questions is where the Campus Statistician comes in. Campus Finance Coordinator From spaghetti for engineering to ice cream for etiquette dinners, DOTB programming requires funds. The Campus Finance Coordinator makes this possible: coordinating fundraisers, acting as treasurer, thanking donors, and anything else that keeps our chapters out of the red. They will put the fun in FUNdraising to make each semester a success! Campus Public Relations Coordinator Some pretty incredible moments happen at DOTB each week and we have got to make sure the world can see. The Campus PR Coordinator works to spread the mission of DOTB through every outlet possible. We want to document every moment and tell the world how legit each program is – tweet, tag, type- whatever it takes!

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BENEFITS OF DOTB We know you didn’t sign up for DOTB to make yourself look great, but we want to give you the tools to communicate that you are developing skills that will make you more marketable to internships and jobs. As a SHIP member, you have likely experienced many, if not all, of the action words listed in your position. Consider these carefully cultivated verbs as you attempt to articulate your role with DOTB on your résumé.

Campus Executive Director/Campus Program Coordinator/Founder: Coordinated Evaluated Supervised Delegated Managed Facilitated Developed Organized Instructed Directed Oversaw Motivated Enhance Planned Taught Established Produced Collaborated

Public Relations: Advertised Communicated Marketed Publicized Collaborated Presented Promoted Utilized Trained Created Generated Developed

Statistics: Evaluated Analyzed Measured Conducted Collected Systematized Implemented Interpreted Tested

Volunteer: Coordinated Organized Recruited Managed Motivated Implemented Trained Executed Created

Campus Finance Coordinator: Balanced Generated Calculated Managed Developed Planned Raised Collaborated Executed

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WHY WE DO WHAT WE DO “He likes that other kids that are older give him courage that he can reach any goals he has in life” - DOTB Parent “Dream Outside the Box makes me feel smart. Like, I could go help other kids who are not in DOTB find things they could do with their life too.” -Dreamer “Dream Outside the Box changed my life and ignited a passion for community service that I have upheld ever since. It’s truly a life-changing experience.” - DOTB Volunteer “I’m going to be a judge. First, I’m going to go to college. Then I’m going to law school. After that, I will be able to get my family out of poverty.” -Dreamer “graduate”

“I would not be a ninth grade teacher if it weren’t for Dream Outside the Box.” -DOTB Alum

“We learn to never stop dreaming. I love when we get [Dream Delivered] boxes. “ -DOTB Dreamer

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Woot! Woot! You read through the introductory chapter! If you already know your role, head straight to your respective chapter. If you are the Founder or Campus Executive Director, you are encouraged to read the entire book to be fully versed on roles of everyone on your SHIP. After the intro chapter, which applies to everyone, each chapter is broken down by position with a unique pattern in the heading. These include:

Quick Reference

FOUNDER

Page 10 CAMPUS FINANCE COORDINATOR

Page 50

CAMPUS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Page 18 CAMPUS VOLUNTEER COORDINATOR

Page 58

CAMPUS PROGRAM COORDINATOR

Page 30 CAMPUS STATISTICIAN

Page 68

CAMPUS PR COORDINATOR

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CAMPUS CHAPTER FOUNDER

“The ones who are crazy enough to think they can change the world, arethe ones that do.” - Steve Jobs

Table of Contents Chapter 2: Campus Chapter Founder Getting Started 19 Building A SHIP 20 Student Organization Application Questions 22 Youth Service Organizations 23 Interest Meeting Guidelines 24 Founder’s Tools 25 Table Talks 26

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GETTING STARTED This is it! Time to put the dream into action. First things first:

1 1. Register on your campus

• Locate your campus’ student organization registration guidelines, noting any necessary prerequisites and deadlines • Make sure to have the minimum number of initial members (think friends, dorm mates, classmates, etc...) • Secure an on-campus advisor who fits the requirements of your campus guidelines • Utilize the Student Organization Application Questions for help completing your application and/or OrgSync profile • Tailor the Sample Constitution to your campus guidelines • Contact National Office if a fee, interview, or presentation is required for staring a new organization • Attend any necessary orientations, presentations, or trainings • Confirm the YSO with National Office, including location and primary points of contact

22. Recruit volunteers

• Begin to recruit freshmen and a diverse group of Volunteer Buddies • Speak at chapter meetings for greek, athletic and student organizations • Attend any volunteer and involvement fairs on campus • Initiate your @DOTB[Campus] Twitter presence by following other organizations and tweeting about involvement opportunities

3 3. Host an interest meeting • Utilize the Interest Meeting Guidelines to host a meeting for all new recruits interested in

volunteering • Set a date and reserve a room for Volunteer Interest Meeting

4. Start volunteering 4 • Begin to volunteer at your partner YSO

• You do not need to have programming initially- volunteering in advance helps break the ice the new members, earn respect of Little Dreamers and create a routine and culture of service in your chapter

55. Solidify Campus LeaderSHIP Team

• Have those interested in leadership positions complete the Campus LeaderSHIP Application • You will likely inherently serve as the Campus Executive Director • In the event that you have a co-founder, one should be CED and another should assume the role of Campus Program Coordinator

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BUILDING A SHIP The leaderSHIP team or simply “SHIP” is the most important component of an effective DOTB chapter. If you have not done so already, DOTB will provide you with a code to take the StrengthsQuest assessment and your results will help familiarize you with StrengthsQuest and its themes (which are detailed in the Clifton StrengthsFinder Themes Guide). As you pull your SHIP together, DOTB will provide StrengthsQuest codes for your team as well. SHIP stands for Success Happens In Partnerships, and while the traits below are not requirements for these positions, they are a resource to consider as you identify partners to fill each position. For descriptions, see overview on Page 4. Campus Executive Director (CED) Common Themes Identified in CEDs: Achiever Adaptability Developer Communicator Deliberative Positivity Woo

So, basically… The Campus Executive Director is the kind of leader dreams are made of. CEDs are detail oriented go-getters who have the passion and charisma to inspire others and can “put out fires” without breaking a sweat. Campus Program Coordinator (CPC) Common Themes Identified in CPCs: Activator Adaptability Arranger Futuristic Strategic

So, basically… The Campus Program Coordinator dreams outside the box to create imaginative experiences for students, sends emails like nobody’s business, and is skilled enough to always has a Plan B in their back pocket. Campus Volunteer Coordinator (CVC) Common Themes Identified in CVCs: Harmony Includer Empathy Individualization Woo Developer So, basically… Volunteer Coordinators charmingly recruit and maintain happy volunteers, are able to create legit procedures to ensure kids are safe, and keep everyone on the same page and amped to make DOTB a success each week.

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BUILDING A SHIP Campus Statistician (CST) Common Themes Identified in CSTs: Analytical Competition Context Focus Maximizer Empathy So, basically... Statisticians are the type who love numbers, statistics and schnazzy charts and graphs (bonus: they’ve probably read Freakonomics). They are organized, detail oriented, and want the world to know the impact we have each and every week. Campus Finance Coordinator (CFC) Common Themes Identified in CFCs: Adaptability Empathy Deliberative Focus Strategic So, basically... Think of a treasurer and fundraiser combined when considering the CFC position. This should be someone who not only has the ability to manage money but can effectively raise it, lead a team to plan and execute fundraisers, and is organized enough to report everything to DOTB at year’s end. Hint: start with the accounting, nonprofit management, and business majors- this is great for their résumé. Campus Public Relations Coordinator (CPR) Common Themes Identified in CPRs: Communication Connectedness Empathy Includer Positivity So, basically… You know the person who is a whiz at social media and knew the difference between hashtags and hashbrowns before anyone else? The person who picks the perfect Instagram filter on the first try? This is the Public Relations Coordinator. CPRs are also skilled with words and could craft a meaningful message with anything from chalk on the sidewalk to a press release to make sure that everyone around your school knows about your great work.

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STUDENT ORGANIZATION APPLICATION QUESTIONS When chartering a chapter on your campus, your school may ask for standard information about the org. We’ve compiled information that may be helpful to you in completing the campus application. If there’s something they ask that you need help with, don’t hesitate to let us know! Name of the Organization Dream Outside the Box: [Campus Abbreviation] Acronym DOTB: [Campus Abbreviation] Organization Email [Campus Gmail] and/or info@dreamoutsidethebox.org Website www.dreamoutsidethebox.org Mission/Purpose Statement Every Dream Outside the Box program is designed for dual impact: to propel youth in dream deserts toward higher education while cultivating leadership skills among collegiate volunteers. By producing imaginative programming in dream deserts, college students broaden the horizons of K-5 youth while developing skills to contribute toward the disruption of cyclical poverty. Composed of/ Open to All students and employees Month Officers Elected End of second semester of start date, serving Summer, Fall, and following Spring semesters Group Affiliations Yes, Dream Outside the Box (national organization) Nondiscrimination Clause In accordance with Federal law, this organization does not discriminate on the basis of age, race, color, gender, religion, political affiliation, disability or national origin. How are you going to define your organization? Non-profit organization aimed at helping children attend college through exposure to career and extracurricular activities. What are your proposed goals? To propel underserved youth in dream deserts onto higher education; involve college students in leadership opportunities through child relationships and mentorship. 22


YOUTH SERVICE ORGANIZATIONS Use this worksheet to help get us started in identifying the perfect partner organization for your chapter. YSO Criteria 1. Dream Desert (see box) 2. At least 40 kids on regular basis (you will likely only work with 15-30) 3. 15 minutes or less from campus 4. There is a need and desire for enrichment programming. Examples: Elementary Schools, small afterschool programs at community centers, Boys and Girls Clubs, YMCAs

What’s a “Dream Desert”? Just as a food desert is an area with little or no access to fresh and affordable fruits and vegetables, a dream desert is an area with little or no access to educational institutions thtat offer innovative extracurricular opportunities. • For an area to qualify, DOTB considers: Percentage of students on free/reduced lunch • Percentage of First Generation college students • Access to mentorship and enrichment programming

Identify Potential Places

1

You may immediately know places that would be great to volunteer with. Other times, it takes a bit of digging but your knowledge of the city and community (e.g; how far one area of town would be from your school) helps to expedite the process. YSO

Contact Information

Notes

2

Schedule a meeting with National Office to discuss options.

3

National Office will begin process to identify and sign an agreement with them

Once you have your partner solidified, the YSO will dictate what is required (background checks, etc...) before you can begin volunteering to get to know the kids.

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INTEREST MEETING GUIDELINES As Founder, you will plan the first Interest Meeting to recruit a team of people to help carry out the mission. This timeline will help guide you through the process. Before the Interest Meeting • Select a date and request a classroom or meeting room with at least 1 table • Publicize the interest meeting throughout campus using campus appropriate communications and your @DOTB[Campus] social media accounts. • Print: • Sign in Sheet (capture name and email for listserve) • SHIP Descriptions (long version) • Volunteer Info Packet (pass out to interested) • Volunteer Application • YSO Paperwork • SHIP Info Packet (pass out to SHIP applicants) • SHIP Descriptions (condensed version) • Campus LeaderSHIP Application • Infographic

1

2

Day of Interest Meeting • Send a reminder email to anyone already on your listserve • Tweet a reminder using your @DOTB[Campus] account • Gather pens for volunteers to fill out paperwork

3

During the Interest Meeting • Go over the history of DOTB, play a video of DOTB in action and articulate your vision for DOTB on your campus • Lead attendees through a sample activity • Go over SHIP Descriptions • Interested parties fill out any necessary YSO Paperwork

4 As meeting concludes

• Schedule a meeting with anyone interested in a leadership position • Have aspiring leaders complete YSO Paperwork as well as the Campus LeaderSHIP Application 24


FOUNDER’S TOOLS Here’s a rundown of the tools you’ll find in Google Drive that we’ve mentioned so far: Student Organization Application Questions: Your school will likely require you to complete an application to establish DOTB as an official campus student organization. We’ve made it easy for you by compiling answers to frequently asked questions to tailor as needed. Sample Constitution: Most campuses also require a constitution or by-laws. We have provided a template for a constitution that you can tweak as needed for your school. Campus Founders Database: As you embark on this adventure, you may want to communicate with fellow Founders on other campuses. In the database, you will find bios, contact information and some of their helpful tips. Volunteer Information Packet: You will want to add as many people to your team as possible and this packet has all of the paperwork to do so, as well as helpful tips for being marvelous Volunteer Buddies. This includes the VB Application and YSO Paperwork. SHIP Application: You will need a team of rockstars to fulfill leadership positions and in order to do so, an application is provided. YSO Paperwork: Many youth service organizations require paperwork for any volunteers to work with Little Dreamers. This paperwork is important to keep children safe and comply with any regulations required by the YSO.

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TABLE TALKS Table Talks help dreamers understand the pathway of the day and provide a foundation for each’s week’s lesson.

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CAMPUS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

“Every great dream begins with a dreamer. Always remember you have within you the strength,the patience, and the passion to reach for the stars to change the world.� - Harriett Tubman

Table of Contents Chapter 3: Campus Executive Director Executive Director Timeline 29 DOTB 1-2-3 31 Sample Programs 32 Sample Program Schedule 33 Sample Program Schedule Template 34 Sweat Equity 37 Sample Field Trip Locations 38 Preparing for a Field Trip 39 Shopping for Supplies -Tax Exempt Letter 40 Levels For Behavior 41 Job Charts 42 28


EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR TIMELINE The time has finally come to begin working with the Little Dreamers. As Captain of the SHIP, you will lead your team to a phenomenal year. Get excited… This is the best part of it all!

1

Before you begin programming

• Have an introductory meeting to get to know the Director and staff of your YSO

2 At least 4 weeks before the first day • Choose a day of the week, time, any breaks and confirm these choices with your partner YSO

• Oversee (and if needed, assist with): • The Volunteer Coordinator’s recruitment of freshmen and a diverse group of Volunteer Buddies • The Volunteer Coordinator with the Interest Meeting logistics • The Program Coordinator brainstorming potential student organizations to build the Program Schedule • Any campus events or organization fairs to publicize DOTB and recruit volunteers

3 At least 3 weeks before the first day • Check–in with YSO to stay on track about date, time and any logistics

• Ensure the Volunteer Coordinator has started the process for completing any YSO Paperwork and distributing the Volunteer Buddy Application • Distribute Dreamers Application through YSO • Review and submit Program Schedule completed by the Program Coordinator and the Funding Request Form and Budget Breakdown forms completed by the Finance Coordinator to the National Office for approval

4 At least 2 weeks before the first day

• Share the approved schedule with SHIP & YSO

5 At least 1 week before the first day

• Make sure the Volunteer Coordinator collects and turns in necessary YSO Paperwork and Volunteer Buddy Application • Check with the Campus Statistician on the printing of all evaluations

6 Each week

29

• Implement DOTB’s Six Steps to Success (found in DOTB 1-2-3)


EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR TIMELINE

• Assist the Campus Statistician in the distribution and collection of outcome evaluation documents.

7

No later than three weeks after programming

8

Things to keep in mind

• Review and submit Budget Breakdown prepared by the Campus Finance Coordinator to the National Office

• In your first semester with students, week 1 is Icebreaker week. In this week, your team will introduce yourselves, DOTB procedures, outcome evaluations and classroom expectations. This is a great opportunity for the VBs to begin establishing a relationship with the Little Dreamers, so you do not have to schedule a DB group for this week. • At least one week per series, you will need to provide an opportunity for the Little Dreamers to contribute sweat equity (a service project) to “pay” for the program. • Week 8 is the culmination of each series. You will want to do something that allows your students to reflect on the lessons of the semester such as an etiquette dinner, monologues or college tour. Feel free to contact the National Office for brainstorming ideas.

30


DOTB 1-2-3 Working with Lil’ Dreamers is as easy as 1, 2, 3!

11.

Create a routine Our programming is anything but routine. Having a system in place helps to create an atmosphere of controlled creative chaos and maximizes the learning environment. Over the course of time, you will develop a routine you are comfortable with for how students come in and begin, how you introduce DBs and how you communicate and maintain control. The following steps are effective procedures Dreamers should habitually follow:

DOTB’s Six Steps to Success 1) Opening Procedure a. Statistician checks in the Dreamers b. CED welcomes the students and volunteers c. Group photo 2) Introduce and Define “Path of the Day” 3) Introduce “What does this have to do with college?” 4) Have a blast with the “Path of the Day” 5) Outcome Measurements 6) Closing Procedure a. Have the Dreamers thank the volunteers b. Pass out anything that needs to be signed or seen c. Buddy Walk- have a VB walk the Dreamer to the door/car

22.

Establish an attention grabber At the beginning of the semester, have your Little Dreamers weigh in on a call and response attention grabber. Upon the shouting of your phrase, the Dreamers will collectively shout theirs back and become silent. A few favorites are:

SHIP: Chicka! Chicka! SHIP: 1-2-3, eyes on me! Dreamers: Boom! Boom! Dreamers: 1! 2! Eyes on you! SHIP: Mac and cheese! SHIP: Ba da ba ba ba Dreamers: Everybody freeze! Dreamers: I’m loving it!

33. Have fun!

31

If for some strange reason the day is not fun…. step up and make it a blast! Both you and the kids will be glad you did!


SAMPLE PROGRAMS How many different ways can you inspire a child to go college? What student organizations exist to broaden horizons? The sky’s the limit but here are some ideas to get you started: 3-D Printing

Chemistry

Forensic Accounting

Mock Trial

Agriculture

Cinematography

Forensics & CSI

Music Production

Animal Science

Coding

Forestry

Nutriton

Anthropology

Dentistry

Golf

Photography

Archaeology

Entrepreneurship

Gynmastics

Physics

Archery

Etiquette

Herpetology

Poetry

Architecture

Environmentalism

Improv

Political Science

Astronomy

Fashion Design

Invention Convention

Public Speaking

Ballet

Fencing

Journalism

Robotics

Ballroom Dancing

Financial Literacy

Kinesiology

Sports Agency

Biology

Floral Design

Medical Studies

Surgical Science

Botany

Food Science

Meteorology

Theater

My Ideas

32


SAMPLE PROGRAM SCHEDULE Chapter: TCU Date & Time of Programming: Wednesday, 5:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. Safety Notes:Will need to look at each week of programming and see if this applies Materials Needed (PER DREAMER or TABLE in ziploc bags, account for ALL materials) : Pre-Program Prep (Completed prior to programming or on site): Special Modifications (separate rooms, younger dreamers): Brain Start Smart (BSS): 1. Greeting 2. Connecting 3. Uniting 4. Calming 5. Commitment Name Tags & Brain Start Smart Greeting

Recess: Stations & Large Group Activity (BSS Connecting)

Activity Path & Summary:

Week 1

Name Tags and choose Greeting between “Fish” or “Fist Bump”

Basketball, Jump Rope, Foursquare. Large group activity: Captain’s Coming

Dream Journals: Great first day activity both for Dreamers and Volunteer Buddies to get to know one another

Week 2

Name Tags and choose Greeting between “Bear Hug” or “Smile”

Basketball, Jump Rope, Soccer. Large group activity: Freeze Tag

Marble Run: Physics allows Dreamers to build sample “rollercoasters” while learning principles of physics and energy.

Table Talk:

Writing

Activity Intro:

Demoing sample Dream Journal to whole group

Physics

Demoing sample Marble Run to whole group

Phy

Medical Sciences

Demoing “Surgical Supplies” and showing completed “Banana peel”

Nu om

Week 3

Name Tags and choose Basketball, Indoor BowlGreeting between “Ro- ing, Foursquare. Large bot Dance” or “High group activity: Pac Man Five”

Banana Surgery: Medical Sciences. Dreamers learn “sutures” and practice on banana peels

Week 4

Name Tags and choose Greeting between “Funky Monkey” or “Wiggly Handshake”

Soccer, Ring Toss, Foursquare. Large group activity: Captain’s Coming

Art Exploration: Dreamers will explore art history and chemistry by making their own watercolors

Basketball, Jump Rope, Hula Hoops. Large group activity: Freeze Tag

Engineering Egg Drop: Dreamers will test their engineering skills by building a structure to support their “egg” and then see how it holds up.

Sweat Equity Floral Design: Dreamers will create floral Community Service Show completed floral arrangement masterpieces to donate to nursing home and understand “in-kind donations”

Week 5

Name Tags and choose Greeting between “Smile” or “Bear Hug”

Week 6

Name Tags and choose Greeting between “Wink” or “Robot Dance”

Basketball, Tic Tac Toe Toss, Foursquare. Large group activity: Pac Man

Week 7

Name Tags and choose Greeting between “Fist Bump” or “Funky Monkey”

Basketball, Jump Rope, Foursquare. Large group activity: Head, Shoulders, Knees, and Toes

Carpentry & Tiny Homes: Dreamers will learn about carpentry by completing a blueprint and building their own tiny home

Name Tags and choose Greeting between “Smile” or “Wiggly Handshake”

Basketball, Jump Rope, Foursquare. Large group activity: Bean Bag Toss

Owl Pellet Dissection: Dreamers dissect an owl pellet and learn about animal science

Week 8 33

B

Art Exploration

Engineering

Carpentry

Animal Science

Demoing “watercolors” that have been made previously on watercolor paper Show completed “egg” structure

Show sample “Tiny Home” complete with blueprint

Ar

En Gro

Ca En gr

Show sample Vete bones pulled from on an owl pellet


SAMPLE PROGRAM SCHEDULE

Demo Buddies:

mple nal to up

none

mple n to up

Physics group or none

urgiand pletpeel”

Nurses, Anatomy Club, or none

wahat made on aper

eted ture

Art Club or none

Engineering Group or none

eted ment

None

“Tiny plete rint

Carpentry or Engineering group, none

Materials:

Prep Materials:

Dream Journals:

Closing Stats & Dismissal:

Dream Journal pages Binding materials (pipe cleaners, yarn) Decorative Materials (glue, stickers, feathers etc.)

Sort Dream Journal pages into handouts to easily handout to dreamers

Complete at least first 2 pages in journal

Collect Name Tags and final review path of the day.

Poster board (thick), paper, tape, playdoh

Cut poster board in half for each pair of dreamers

Adding onto pages if Collect Name Tags and final review path time allows of the day.

Confirm with YSO regarding Surgical supplies (thread, plastic food policy and food allergies. lacing needle, mask, gloves) all inside ziploc bag, bananas, and paper Sort surgical supplies and place in towels. ziploc bag

Adding onto pages if Collect Name Tags and final review path time allows of the day.

2 oz. containers, small popsicle sticks, jumbo popsicle sticks, baking soda, vinegar, corn syrup, food coloring, watercolor paper, paint brushes, table cloths, paper towels

Sort art supplies into groups for dreamers to easily grab or handout

Adding onto pages if Collect Name Tags and final review path time allows of the day.

Imagination Station: think of materials that are “out of the box” that dreamers can use to build a sturdy structure. Examples: cups, bowls, feathers, tape, paper towels. Eggs.

Arrive at YSO early to set up “Imagination Station.” Keep an eye on supplies when dreamers are choosing and take away supplies when running low.

Arrive at YSO early to set up Thriller, Filler, Spiller (1 per dream“Floral Design Stations” Refer to er), potting soil, plastic bowls, plastic curriculum for layout. Remove plates, tablecloths, decorative mateflowers from plastic containers. rials, duct table glue. Set up a few trash cans around the room for easy access. Small colored popsicle sticks, glue, jenga wood pieces, blueprint hand- Prep tiny home bags: jenga wood pieces, colored popsicle sticks, out, small balls of playdoh if times glue all in ziploc bag allow

Owl Pellet Dissection Bags: tweeple Veterinary group zers, skewer, gloves, owl pellet, “bone from on campus or dissection handout” none et

Prep dissection bags prior to programming

Adding onto pages if Collect Name Tags and final review path time allows of the day.

Adding onto pages if Collect Name Tags and final review path time allows of the day.

Adding onto pages if Collect Name Tags and final review path time allows of the day.

Dream Catcher page

Collect Name Tags and final review of the semester. 34


SAMPLE PROGRAM SCHEDULE TEMPLATE This is the most important piece of DOTB! The main attraction. The big Kahuna. Use the following template to create your program schedule. You’ll submit this information through the app. Upon approval from the national office, your program schedule basics will be uploaded to the app for volunteers to sign-up for each week.

Name Tags & Brain Start Smart Greeting

Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 Week 6 Week 7 Week 8

35

Recess: Stations & Large Group Activity (BSS Connecting)

Activity Path & Summary:

Table Talk:

Activity Intro:

D


o:

SAMPLE PROGRAM SCHEDULE TEMPLATE Chapter: Date & Time of Programming: Safety Notes: Materials Needed (PER DREAMER or TABLE in ziploc bags, account for ALL materials) : Pre-Program Prep (Completed prior to programming or on site): Special Modifications (separate rooms, younger dreamers): Brain Start Smart (BSS): 1. Greeting 2. Connecting 3. Uniting 4. Calming 5. Commitment Demo Buddies:

Materials:

Prep Materials:

Dream Journals:

Closing Stats & Dismissal:

36


SWEAT EQUITY In DOTB we strive to cultivate a community of dreamers who recognize the importance of “paying it forward”. Sweat equity is our special way of bringing service full circle. We encourage you to get creative with service experiences that are kid-friendly. Examples • Teach botany through the creation of floral arrangements for local nursing home residents • Encourage artistic expression by crafting for a local children’s hospital or for the troops • Learn about veterinary medicine and then volunteer at an animal shelter • Team up with your campus a cappella group to have children sing songs to senior citizens The possibilities are endless! However, working in dream deserts requires us to be careful about some volunteering opportunities that may seem otherwise harmless. Some experiences could hit “too close to home” for our students. For example, it could be construed as insensitive to ask students who are food insecure to prepare meals for “the hungry” at a food bank. Other experiences may be fine for college students but are not appropriate environments for small children. Areas to avoid • Working with the homeless • Food banks • Locations that could be hazardous such as construction sites (i.e.; Habitat for Humanity) • Health clinics • Any place where children would be a hindrance and not a help

My Ideas

37


SAMPLE FIELD TRIP LOCATIONS Sometimes, taking children out of their box is the best way for them to experience the field and to get excited about a career or collegiate pathway. Here are some ideas to get you started:

Agriculture & Zoology

• Animal farms (i.e.; dairy, alpaca, etc…)

• Behind-the-scenes with Zoologists • Production farming (i.e.; cranberry, etc…)

Media

• News station

• Photography studio • Music production studio • Radio station Arts

• Glassblowing

• Clay pot making • Museums with hands-on activities • Shakespeare play • Music studio Technologies

• Airplane manufacturing

• Electric car manufacturing • Wind turbine farms • Natural gas exploration • Robotics manufacturing My Ideas

38


PREPARING FOR A FIELD TRIP Field trips are an extraordinary way to broaden horizons beyond the box of your YSO. However, you will need the full support of your YSO to execute a field trip including, likely, their transportation and staff. In the event that you have their full support, here are a few things to keep in mind as you prepare to take children out of their dream deserts. Oh the places you’ll go! But before you do‌ Make reservations as needed Check with field trip destination for paperwork that can be printed in advance Check insurance coverage for the field trips and vehicles Arrange for transportation and certified driver(s) as needed Create a backup plan for inclement weather or other cancellation possibilities Create a field trip itinerary to provide all volunteer and chaperones, leaving a copy at the partnership location and with the driver Inform participants and families of the trip (when they will need to arrive; what they will need to bring the day of; are there any clothing requirements) Give out and collect Field Trip Friday Permission Slip to Dreamers Make sure that you have complete emergency forms, emergency medication, First Aid Kit, and release forms for Dreamers per YSO protocol Maintain a 1:3 volunteer to Little Dreamer ratio Ensure volunteers or parent chaperones are background checked and trained Create a list of all participating volunteers, chaperones, and Dreamers (if applicable) cell phone numbers to keep with each group on the trip Create a plan for identifying participants in a crowd (are shirts or nametags needed) Create a plan for snacks (should we provide sack lunches; are lunches allowed in your field trip facility; do you need a cooler to carry them) Create a plan for water access (should participants bring their own; will they have water fountain access; will you bring water for participants and volunteers) Print directions for the driver and have the correct address if the driver uses GPS Confirm reservations for the site and transportation the day before the field trip

Now that you have read through these steps, use the Field Trip Checklist as a resource to make sure that you have a superb yet safe excursion. Have fun!

39


SHOPPING FOR SUPPLIES Anytime you purchase anything for DOTB (i.e. materials for programming), always remember to: 1) Take a copy of the Tax Exempt Letter (below) to insure that you do not pay tax on any purchases. 2) Keep the receipts to be submitted to the National Office on the Expense Report.

40


LEVELS FOR BEHAVIOR The level system is based on behavior and classroom management techniques. Each week may look different and that is OK. You may be on a Level 1 one week and can do any activity and then be short volunteers another and be a Level 3 and need to do a more simplified activity that is more manageable to successfully execute. Be honest with your assessment, as it’s meant to serve your students in the most meaningful way. Factors of Classroom Management: • Noise level • Dream Family: Building relationships between buddies and dreamers with TRUST and RESPECT at the center. • Systems in place each week, rituals (attention getters, recess, homework help) • Students able to stay on track without intervention and repeated commentary

LEVEL 1: • Little to no behavior issues, a few classroom management techniques needed.

LEVEL 2: • Rambunctious dreamers but they respond to classroom management techniques redirecting back to activity.

• Ratio of dreamers to volunteers 1:1 or up to 1:3

•Ratio of dreamers to volunteers 1:4 or up to 1:6

LEVEL 3: • Little to no classroom management with dreamers. • Ratio of dreamers to volunteers 1:7 and up. •Need assistance from DOTB National Office 41


JOB CHARTS Jobs Charts establish a role for each child in order to promote self confidence, their feeling of worth and value in the classroom and to strengthen their connection to the Dreamer community. This is an explanation of each role. Dream Leader Pathway & Activity Announcer • Explains Path of the Day and related jobs • Helps fellow Dreamers stay on task Check in Coordinator Name Tag Extraordinaire • Helps disperse name tags at the beginning of programming and collects at the end of programming Counselor Helping Hand • Helps fellow Dreamers if a conflict arises • Asks Volunteers for further assistance or help Facilities Manager Trash & Clean Up Superstar • Picks up trash around table after programming activity is over • Helps arrange or straighten room after programming ends Material Manager Chief Supply Distributor • Hands out materials from SHIP • Collects materials at end of programming and gives back to SHIP Statistician Number Crunching Whiz • Asks closing “Stats” questions to fellow dreamers • Share responses with SHIP for final “Stat” count of the day

42


43


CAMPUS PROGRAM COORDINATOR

“Don’t be afraid of the space between your dreams and reality. If you can dream it, you can make it so.” - Belva Davis

Table of Contents Chapter 4: Campus Program Coordinator Program Coordinator Timeline 45 Contact Log 46 Sample Program Schedule Template 47 Sample Program Schedule 49 Demo Buddy Opportunity Email 51 Sample Field Trip Locations 52 Sweat Equity 53 Sample Programs 54 Funding Request Form 55 Shopping for Supplies- Tax Exempt Letter 56 DOTB Approach for Demo Buddies 57 Demo Buddy Thank You Email 58 Preparing for a Field Trip 59 Reflection 60

44


PROGRAM COORDINATOR TIMELINE As programming approaches, use this timeline to make sure that all your ducks are in row!

1

At least 6 weeks before the first day

• Brainstorm with your SHIP programming ideas and begin to contact Student Organizations for a Demo Buddy opportunity • Attend any events or organization fairs to recruit DBs • Update Program Schedule as each DB confirms • Communicate with DBs to see what supplies, if any, they need for the week • Work with the Finance Coordinator to complete a Funding Request Form to get funding for materials from the National Office

2 At least 3 weeks before the first day • Finalize completed Program Schedule and submit to CED

3

• Ensure the Funding Request Form has been submitted to the CED

At least 1 week before each activity

• Send DB Confirmation Email to the DBs main contact • Make sure that you have all supplies needed for the upcoming week’s programming • Share any information with Volunteer Coordinator that he/she may need to relay to volunteers so that they are prepared for the day

4

Each week

• Have all Demo Buddies sign-in • Go over the DOTB Approach for DBs and review the planned activity • Send the DB Thank You Email within 24 hours

5 Things to keep in mind • In your first semester with students, week 1 is Icebreaker week. In this week, your team will

45

introduce yourselves, DOTB procedures, outcome evaluation documents and classroom expectations. This is a great opportunity for the VBs to begin establishing a relationship with the Little Dreamers, so you do not have to schedule a DB group for this week. • At least one week per semester, you will need to provide an opportunity for the Little Dreamers to contribute sweat equity (a service project) to “pay” for the program. • Week 8 is the culmination of each series. You will want to do something that allows your students to reflect on the lessons of the semester such as an etiquette dinner, monologues or college tour. Feel free to contact the National Office for brainstorming ideas.


CONTACT LOG To really build a great semester, you’ll want to cast a wide net. This log is intended to keep track of who you have contacted and what the status of your communication is. As you may have guessed, this will be helpful to pass along to the next Program Coordinator.

Org

Contact

Email

Notes

46


SAMPLE PROGRAM SCHEDULE TEMPLATE This is the most important piece of DOTB! The main attraction. The big Kahuna! Use the following template to create your program schedule. You’ll submit this information through the app. Upon approval from the national office, your program schedule basics will be uploaded to the app for volunteers to sign-up for each week.

Name Tags & Brain Start Smart Greeting

Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 Week 6 Week 7 Week 8

47

Recess: Stations & Large Group Activity (BSS Connecting)

Activity Path & Summary:

Table Talk:

Activity Intro:

D


o:

SAMPLE PROGRAM SCHEDULE TEMPLATE Chapter: Date & Time of Programming: Safety Notes: Materials Needed (PER DREAMER or TABLE in ziploc bags, account for ALL materials) : Pre-Program Prep (Completed prior to programming or on site): Special Modifications (separate rooms, younger dreamers): Brain Start Smart (BSS): 1. Greeting 2. Connecting 3. Uniting 4. Calming 5. Commitment Demo Buddies:

Materials:

Prep Materials:

Dream Journals:

Closing Stats & Dismissal:

48


SAMPLE PROGRAM SCHEDULE Chapter: TCU Date & Time of Programming: Wednesday, 5:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. Safety Notes:Will need to look at each week of programming and see if this applies Materials Needed (PER DREAMER or TABLE in ziploc bags, account for ALL materials) : Pre-Program Prep (Completed prior to programming or on site): Special Modifications (separate rooms, younger dreamers): Brain Start Smart (BSS): 1. Greeting 2. Connecting 3. Uniting 4. Calming 5. Commitment Name Tags & Brain Start Smart Greeting

Recess: Stations & Large Group Activity (BSS Connecting)

Activity Path & Summary:

Week 1

Name Tags and choose Greeting between “Fish” or “Fist Bump”

Basketball, Jump Rope, Foursquare. Large group activity: Captain’s Coming

Dream Journals: Great first day activity both for Dreamers and Volunteer Buddies to get to know one another

Week 2

Name Tags and choose Greeting between “Bear Hug” or “Smile”

Basketball, Jump Rope, Soccer. Large group activity: Freeze Tag

Marble Run: Physics allows Dreamers to build sample “rollercoasters” while learning principles of physics and energy.

Table Talk:

Writing

Activity Intro:

Demoing sample Dream Journal to whole group

Physics

Demoing sample Marble Run to whole group

Phy

Medical Sciences

Demoing “Surgical Supplies” and showing completed “Banana peel”

Nu om

Week 3

Name Tags and choose Basketball, Indoor BowlGreeting between “Ro- ing, Foursquare. Large bot Dance” or “High group activity: Pac Man Five”

Banana Surgery: Medical Sciences. Dreamers learn “sutures” and practice on banana peels

Week 4

Name Tags and choose Greeting between “Funky Monkey” or “Wiggly Handshake”

Soccer, Ring Toss, Foursquare. Large group activity: Captain’s Coming

Art Exploration: Dreamers will explore art history and chemistry by making their own watercolors

Basketball, Jump Rope, Hula Hoops. Large group activity: Freeze Tag

Engineering Egg Drop: Dreamers will test their engineering skills by building a structure to support their “egg” and then see how it holds up.

Sweat Equity Floral Design: Dreamers will create floral Community Service Show completed floral arrangement masterpieces to donate to nursing home and understand “in-kind donations”

Week 5

Name Tags and choose Greeting between “Smile” or “Bear Hug”

Week 6

Name Tags and choose Greeting between “Wink” or “Robot Dance”

Basketball, Tic Tac Toe Toss, Foursquare. Large group activity: Pac Man

Week 7

Name Tags and choose Greeting between “Fist Bump” or “Funky Monkey”

Basketball, Jump Rope, Foursquare. Large group activity: Head, Shoulders, Knees, and Toes

Carpentry & Tiny Homes: Dreamers will learn about carpentry by completing a blueprint and building their own tiny home

Name Tags and choose Greeting between “Smile” or “Wiggly Handshake”

Basketball, Jump Rope, Foursquare. Large group activity: Bean Bag Toss

Owl Pellet Dissection: Dreamers dissect an owl pellet and learn about animal science

Week 8 49

B

Art Exploration

Engineering

Carpentry

Animal Science

Demoing “watercolors” that have been made previously on watercolor paper Show completed “egg” structure

Show sample “Tiny Home” complete with blueprint

Ar

En Gro

Ca En gr

Show sample Vete bones pulled from on an owl pellet


SAMPLE PROGRAM SCHEDULE

Demo Buddies:

mple nal to up

none

mple n to up

Physics group or none

urgiand pletpeel”

Nurses, Anatomy Club, or none

wahat made on aper

eted ture

Art Club or none

Engineering Group or none

eted ment

None

“Tiny plete rint

Carpentry or Engineering group, none

Materials:

Prep Materials:

Dream Journals:

Closing Stats & Dismissal:

Dream Journal pages Binding materials (pipe cleaners, yarn) Decorative Materials (glue, stickers, feathers etc.)

Sort Dream Journal pages into handouts to easily handout to dreamers

Complete at least first 2 pages in journal

Collect Name Tags and final review path of the day.

Poster board (thick), paper, tape, playdoh

Cut poster board in half for each pair of dreamers

Adding onto pages if Collect Name Tags and final review path time allows of the day.

Confirm with YSO regarding Surgical supplies (thread, plastic food policy and food allergies. lacing needle, mask, gloves) all inside ziploc bag, bananas, and paper Sort surgical supplies and place in towels. ziploc bag

Adding onto pages if Collect Name Tags and final review path time allows of the day.

2 oz. containers, small popsicle sticks, jumbo popsicle sticks, baking soda, vinegar, corn syrup, food coloring, watercolor paper, paint brushes, table cloths, paper towels

Sort art supplies into groups for dreamers to easily grab or handout

Adding onto pages if Collect Name Tags and final review path time allows of the day.

Imagination Station: think of materials that are “out of the box” that dreamers can use to build a sturdy structure. Examples: cups, bowls, feathers, tape, paper towels. Eggs.

Arrive at YSO early to set up “Imagination Station.” Keep an eye on supplies when dreamers are choosing and take away supplies when running low.

Arrive at YSO early to set up Thriller, Filler, Spiller (1 per dream“Floral Design Stations” Refer to er), potting soil, plastic bowls, plastic curriculum for layout. Remove plates, tablecloths, decorative mateflowers from plastic containers. rials, duct table glue. Set up a few trash cans around the room for easy access. Small colored popsicle sticks, glue, jenga wood pieces, blueprint hand- Prep tiny home bags: jenga wood pieces, colored popsicle sticks, out, small balls of playdoh if times glue all in ziploc bag allow

Owl Pellet Dissection Bags: tweeple Veterinary group zers, skewer, gloves, owl pellet, “bone from on campus or dissection handout” none et

Prep dissection bags prior to programming

Adding onto pages if Collect Name Tags and final review path time allows of the day.

Adding onto pages if Collect Name Tags and final review path time allows of the day.

Adding onto pages if Collect Name Tags and final review path time allows of the day.

Dream Catcher page

Collect Name Tags and final review of the semester. 50


DEMO BUDDY OPPORTUNITY EMAIL Customize the following template to invite students organizations to serve as Demo Buddies. Most campuses have a student organization database or an OrgSync system for locating points of contact. Demo Buddies are not required and only encouraged if they would significantly enhance the day’s programming.

To: [Organization’s Primary Contact Email Address] From: [Campus Program Coordinator’s School Email Account] Subject: [Student Organization] Volunteer Opportunity with DOTB [Campus Abbreviation]

[Primary Contact’s First Name],

I am emailing to invite [Student Organization] to volunteer with Dream Outside the Box this semester. Each week, we mobilize student organizations to work with youth in dream deserts (what some call “at-risk youth”) to put our Little Dreamers on a pathway to college. When we started in 2009, 74% of our boys K-5 wanted to be rappers or pro athletes. As a result, hundreds of students have volunteered to engage the kids in activities like fencing, engineering, ballet and so much more- things the children would not ordinarily have the opportunity to experience. We believe [potential Path of the Day] could be the activity that inspires a child to go to college.

DOTB programming takes place at [YSO] on [Day of Week]s at [Beginning Time]. As an organization, we’d love to have your members share their passion for [potential Path of the Day] in a fun, hands-on activity. You do not have to have experience with kids- just willingness to invest an hour of your time. We’ll help you prepare for the day with everything from curriculum to crowd control. It’s a small investment with huge returns for everyone involved.

If you’d like to see DOTB in action, you can do so on our website (hyperlink to media page). Otherwise, please do not hesitate to let me know if you have any questions, and I hope to hear from you soon.

Dream Big! [Program Coordinator] Campus Program Coordinator DOTB: [Campus Name] 51


SAMPLE FIELD TRIP LOCATIONS Sometimes, taking children out of their box is the best way for them to experience the field and to get excited about a career or collegiate pathway. Here are some ideas to get you started:

Agriculture & Zoology

• Animal farms (i.e.; dairy, alpaca, etc…)

• Behind-the-scenes with Zoologists • Production farming (i.e.; cranberry, etc…)

Media

• News station

• Photography studio • Music production studio • Radio station Arts

• Glassblowing

• Clay pot making • Museums with hands-on activities • Shakespeare play • Music studio Technologies

• Airplane manufacturing

• Electric car manufacturing • Wind turbine farms • Natural gas exploration • Robotics manufacturing My Ideas

52


SWEAT EQUITY In DOTB we strive to cultivate a community of dreamers who recognize the importance of “pay it forward” – especially when they don’t technically “pay” for their programming. Sweat equity is our special way of bringing service full circle. We encourage you to get creative with service experiences that are kid-friendly. Examples • Teach botany through the creation of floral arrangements for local nursing home residents • Encourage artistic expression by crafting for a local children’s hospital or for the troops • Learn about veterinary medicine and then volunteer at an animal shelter • Team up with your campus a cappella group to have children sing songs to senior citizens The possibilities are endless! However, working in dream deserts requires us to be careful about some volunteering opportunities that may seem otherwise harmless. Some experiences could hit “too close to home” for our students. For example, it could be construed as insensitive to ask students who are food insecure to prepare meals for “the hungry” at a food bank. Other experiences may be fine for college students but are not appropriate environments for small children. Areas to avoid • Working with the homeless • Food banks • Locations that could be hazardous such as construction sites (i.e.; Habitat for Humanity) • Health clinics • Any place where children would be a hindrance and not a help

My Ideas

53


SAMPLE PROGRAMS How many different ways can you inspire a child to go college? What student organizations exist to broaden horizons? The sky’s the limit but here are some ideas to get you started: 3-D Printing

Chemistry

Forensic Accounting

Mock Trial

Agriculture

Cinematography

Forensics & CSI

Music Production

Animal Science

Coding

Forestry

Nutriton

Anthropology

Dentistry

Golf

Photography

Archaeology

Entrepreneurship

Gynmastics

Physics

Archery

Etiquette

Herpetology

Poetry

Architecture

Environmentalism

Improv

Political Science

Astronomy

Fashion Design

Invention Convention

Public Speaking

Ballet

Fencing

Journalism

Robotics

Ballroom Dancing

Financial Literacy

Kinesiology

Sports Agency

Biology

Floral Design

Medical Studies

Surgical Science

Botany

Food Science

Meteorology

Theater

My Ideas

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FUNDING REQUEST FORM As you develop the Program Schedule, you will need to work with the Campus Finance Coordinator to create a budget for each activity, which can be found in the app. While it is technically the CFC’s responsibility to complete the budget and submit to the Campus Executive Director, they will need your assistance to understand the needs of each program.

55

1

2

3

Complete basic info so that we know who to attribute the request to.

Break down everything that you need. If you don’t know how much something is, Google is your best friend here.

If you have already spent the funds and are seeking reimbursement, upload your receipt here.


SHOPPING FOR SUPPLIES Any time your chapter purchases anything for DOTB (i.e. materials for programming), always remember to: 1) Take a copy of the Tax Exempt Letter (below) to insure that you do not pay tax on any purchases. 2) Keep the receipts to be submitted to the National Office on the Expense Report.

56


DOTB APPROACH FOR DEMO BUDDIES You’ve put in the hard work to schedule dynamic leaders and now comes the fun: it’s programming time! In order to maximize your presenters experience and the impact we have on the Little Dreamers, go over these guidelines with each set of presenters before you begin programming.

Spread out

Show School Spirit

Disperse amongst the kids.

Introduce yourself and your college.

Voluteers new to DOTB or old friends with one  another naturally tend to stick together on the  periphery. The closer proximity you are to the Dreamers, the more they can learn from you.

We are working to put our Little Dreamers on the pathway to college and want to reinforce your connection to college as much as possible.

Get Silly!

Let your guard down.

Getting outside your comfort zone helps to encourage a child to do the same! You do not have to be a child whisperer to have a successful program.

Go With the Flow

In case you don’t know...

The kids are inquisitive and if they hit you with a question you are uncomfortable answering, simply direct them to the nearest DOTB leader.

Have Fun

It’s about the process, not the end result.

Engage with the Dreamers to encourage handson activity. Show them why you love what you are presenting. The kids vibe off of your vibes, so the more energetic, enthusiastic, and excited you are, the more willing they will be to engage and use their imagination. Messes = Memories in our book. 57

Know That You’re Appreciated

We are so appreciative of your time!

If we invited you, it is because you represent an experience our Dreamers have likely never had before. The kids will enjoy your experiences so much. Whether or not it is obvious, the Dreamers appreciate you and are impacted by the fact that you cared enough to come.


DEMO BUDDY THANK YOU EMAIL Within 48 hours of each presentation, you should email the DBs a thank you. As an added bonus, you may opt to send creative thank-yous either via email such as Constant Contact with photos from the day or handwritten notes from Little Dreamers. Showing appreciation is a crucial step in forging continuous relationships with Demo Buddies to be able to call on them in future semesters.

Dear _____,

You are what making a difference looks like. Your impact was truly immeasurable! One hour of interaction with our students can translate to a profound perception of pathways that can last a lifetime. We are honored that you shared your special skill set with us and hope to see you again. Thank you so much for taking time to volunteer with DOTB.

With gratitude, The Dream Team Dream Outside the Box

P.S. Â If you have any questions or comments about your experience with us, please feel free to email info@dreamoutsidethebox.org (or INSERT CAMPUS GMAIL)

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PREPARING FOR A FIELD TRIP Field trips are an extraordinary way to broaden horizons beyond the box of your YSO. However, you will need the full support of your YSO to execute a field trip including, likely, their transportation and staff. In the event that you have their full support, here are a few things to keep in mind as you prepare to take children out of their dream deserts. Oh the places you’ll go! But before you do‌ Make reservations as needed Check with field trip destination for paperwork that can be printed in advance Check insurance coverage for the field trips and vehicles Arrange for transportation and certified driver(s) as needed Create a backup plan for inclement weather or other cancellation possibilities Create a field trip itinerary to provide all volunteer and chaperones, leaving a copy at the partnership location and with the driver Inform participants and families of the trip (when they will need to arrive; what they will need to bring the day of; are there any clothing requirements) Give out and collect Field Trip Friday Permission Slip to Dreamers Make sure that you have complete emergency forms, emergency medication, First Aid Kit, and release forms for Dreamers per YSO protocol Maintain a 1:3 volunteer to Little Dreamer ratio Ensure volunteers or parent chaperones are background checked and trained Create a list of all participating volunteers, chaperones, and Dreamers (if applicable) cell phone numbers to keep with each group on the trip Create a plan for identifying participants in a crowd (are shirts or nametags needed) Create a plan for snacks (should we provide sack lunches; are lunches allowed in your field trip facility; do you need a cooler to carry them) Create a plan for water access (should participants bring their own; will they have water fountain access; will you bring water for participants and volunteers) Print directions for the driver and have the correct address if the driver uses GPS Confirm reservations for the site and transportation the day before the field trip

Now that you have read through these steps, use the Field Trip Checklist as a resource to make sure that you have a superb yet safe excursion. Have fun!

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REFLECTION We’re all about learning from what works and doesn’t work. Use this sheet to detail general feedback from kids and volunteers so that your chapter (and all of DOTB) can continue to improve!

Kid Feedback

Volunteer Feedback

Notes

Week 1 Date: Path: Week 2 Date: Path: Week 3 Date: Path: Week 4 Date: Path: Week 5 Date: Path: Week 6 Date: Path: Week 7 Date: Path: Week 8 Date: Path:

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61


CAMPUS FINANCE COORDINATOR

“You get in life, what you have the courage to ask for.” - Oprah Winfrey

Table of Contents Chapter 5: Campus Finance Coordinator Finance Coordinator Timeline 63 Funding Request Form 64 Donation Request 65 Fundraising Ideas 66 Shopping for Supplies - Tax Exempt Letter 67

62


FINANCE COORDINATOR TIMELINE The fun stuff is upon us! Use this timeline to insure that all programming is properly funded. Let the fun begin!

1

At the beginning of the semester

2

At least 4 weeks before the first day

3

At least 2 weeks before the first day

• Work with National Office to make sure that you have a bank account set-up and the information is shared with the national Chief Operating Officer so that funding can be allocated in a timely manner

• Begin dialogue with Campus Program Coordinator as they receive Demo Buddy confirmations to determine any materials needed for the Funding Request Form and Budget Breakdown • Begin to send out Donation Request letters to supplement programming costs

• Complete and submit the Funding Request Form and Budget Breakdown forms to your Campus Executive Director • Decide on a system to maintain receipts. For example: • iPhone users may opt to use a receipt management app such as OneReceipt or Shoeboxed to track purchases and then export data for final Expense Report

4 Over the course of the 8 week programming series • Work with Program Coordinator to purchase supplies for each week

• Maintain receipts for every purchase (note: always use the Tax Exemption Letter to make sure you never pay taxes as the National Office is tax-exempt and will not reimburse for taxes)

5 No later than three weeks after the series • Complete and submit Expense Report to Campus Executive Director

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FUNDING REQUEST FORM In order to receive funding each series from the National Office, your Campus Executive Director will need to submit your Funding Request Form. Work with Program Coordinator to complete this. If you do not have expenses for the week, that’s great - you will just put “n/a”.

1

2

3

Complete basic info so that we know who to attribute the request to.

Break down everything that you need. If you don’t know how much something is, Google is your best friend here.

If you have already spent the funds and are seeking reimbursement, upload your receipt here.

64


DONATION REQUEST The first ever day of Dream Outside the Box was in September 2009, we made ice cream, taught the children French and it was completely funded by one $30 gift card from Wal-Mart. No matter how big we get, we want to remain true to our roots and recognize that our funding needs should be minimal. It is always wise to seek the support of local corporations to supplement the cost. The more you are able to get donated, the more we are able to invest in programming across the nation. Customize this letter to request funding from businesses near you.

Dear [Organization],

I am emailing as the [SHIP Position] for [Campus]’s chapter of Dream Outside the Box in hopes of receiving an in-kind contribution for our youth programming. Dream Outside the Box mobilizes college students to engage youth in dream deserts in career-focused hands-on experiences to propel K-5 students toward higher education. Dream Outside the Box was founded after surveys of K-5 boys at an after school center found that 74% aspired to be a rapper or football player. As a result, college students cultivate their leadership skills by sharing their interests with “Little Dreamers” in areas such as engineering, accounting, mock trial, and more.

Dream Outside the Box was created by college students to operate on a very minimal budget. However, occasionally, it is necessary to acquire supplies for programming. For example, when introducing engineering, our students use materials such as spaghetti and marshmallows to build imaginative bridges.

We are requesting $[amount] for our [activity] programming. Dream Outside the Box is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit and all donations are tax-exempt. We are happy to provide a contribution receipt or any other documentation your procedures may require. Thank you in advance for your consideration of this investment for our students. We believe “you can only dream what you’ve seen” and we see tremendous programming ahead!

Dream Big, [SHIP Name] [SHIP Position]- [Campus] [Phone Number] [Email Address] 65


FUNDRAISING IDEAS Fundraising is critical in allowing us to provide innovative programming to our Little Dreamers. You will work closely with the Campus PR Coordinator to ensure all fundraisers support the DOTB mission and brand. Below are just a few fundraising ideas to help kick start your year! Have fun and get creative! Gallery Show Use the talents and original works of fellow VBs and Little Dreamers to fundraise! Have DOTB themed art with a DOTB related quote displayed for auction. As always, be sure you have the appropriate releases signed from guardians if any youth drawings or photographs are used. Food Table Sell hot food in a high traffic area on campus! Use a campus kitchen or a portable grill to prepare grilled cheese sandwiches or hot dogs for sale! Employ a fun slogan, such as “Feed yourself & Feed a Dream!” to draw passersby’s attention. Canning Decorate cans with the DOTB logo and solicit donations! Have a group of DOTB VBs in DOTB T-shirts choose a popular, local hangout to gather outside sharing the DOTB mission and asking for donations. Singing youthful songs and DOTB chants is a great way to grab the attention of people as they pass! Block Party Sponsor a DOTB themed block party with a Greek organization! Collaborate with a sorority or fraternity to host a block party, and sell tickets to enter. Examples of DOTB themes include “When I Grow Up”, “You Can Only Dream What You’ve Seen”, and “It’s Never too Late to Dream”. Online Auction Have local entities and community businesses donate services or goods for auction! Get local organizations and/or individuals to donate their goods or services for online auction. For instance, a photography student could donate a photo shoot or a Textile & Apparel Management student could donate custom apparel. Ask a local bakery to donate a cake or ask the local spa to donate a massage! Matching a Gift Ask corporations and individuals to match donations! Use direct contact to ask a corporation or individual(s) to match any donations DOTB collects in a specified amount of time. In exchange, offer acknowledgment via your campus DOTB T-shirt, campus website, and social media outlets. Be sure to create a list of donors and manage donor relations by providing them monthly organization updates.

66


SHOPPING FOR SUPPLIES Anytime you purchase anything for DOTB (i.e. materials for programming), always remember to: 1) Take a copy of the Tax Exempt Letter (below) to insure that you do not pay tax on any purchases. 2) Keep the receipts to be submitted to the National Office on the Expense Report.

67


CAMPUS VOLUNTEER COORDINATOR

“Volunteering is the ultimate exercise in democracy, you vote in elections once a year, but when you volunteer, you vote every day about the kind of community you want to live in.” - Someone Really Wise

Table of Contents Chapter 6: Campus Volunteer Coordinator Volunteer Coordinator Timeline 69 Dates & Notes 70 Interest Meeting Guidelines 71 Volunteer Sign Up 72 Sample Program Schedule 73 Sample Program Schedule Template 75 Volunteer Confirmation Email 77 DOTB Approach for VBs 78 VB Thank You Email 79 Volunteer Rules 80 68


VOLUNTEER COORDINATOR TIMELINE As the series approaches, use this timeline to efficiently mobilize the masses.

1 At least 6 weeks before the first day • Begin recruiting freshmen and a diverse group of VBs

• Discuss Interest Meeting logistics with the Campus Executive Director

2 At least 4 weeks before the first day

• Host an Interest Meeting, distribute the Volunteer Buddy Application and any required YSO Paperwork to any new volunteers • Begin to turn in the Volunteer Buddy Application to the Statistician

3 At least 2 weeks before the first day

• Establish routine and familiarize self with Volunteer Sign-In

4 At least 1 week before each activity

• Send Volunteer Sign Up with an email reminder about that week’s activity • Send any new VBs the Volunteer Buddy Application and YSO Paperwork

5 Volunteers’ first day

• Have first time VBs come in 20 minutes before programming begins • Go over DOTB 1-2-3

6 Each week

• Coordinate carpool if desired by your chapter • Have all Volunteer Buddies sign-in • Ensure that all VBs have turned in their Volunteer Buddy Application and YSO Paperwork (if a volunteer has not turned in their paperwork they canNOT work with the children. NO EXCEPTIONS! Sounds harsh but we have to keep our kids safe) • Go over the DOTB Approach for VBs • Review planned activity • Have VBs assist the Dreamers with the outcome evaluation documents • Send new VBs the VB Thank You Email within 24 hours • At the end of the 8th week of programming, give the VBs a printed copy of the Volunteer Buddy End of Series Evaluation and enter the responses in the Volunteer Buddy End of Series Evaluation (forms) in Google Drive • Email the Volunteer Buddy End of Series Evaluation (live form) to the VBs not in attendance

69


DATES & NOTES As you plan the series, use this space to keep track of important events and ideas. You’ll need to share all of these with your SHIP and volunteers at the appropriate time in the semester.

Fall First day of School

Spring

Organization Involvement Fairs: Service Opportunity Fairs: Interest Meetings: First Day of DOTB: BYE Week: First Day of DOTB: Special DOTB Days (field trips, graduations, etc?): Notes:

70


INTEREST MEETING GUIDELINES As you seek to inspire the masses by having a 1:1 Little Dreamer to Volunteer ratio, Interest Meetings are critical to recruiting a team of people to carry out the mission. Use this guide to host an effective meeting to build your team. Before the Interest Meeting • Select a date and request a classroom or meeting room with at least 1 table • Publicize the interest meeting throughout campus using campus appropriate communications and your @DOTB[Campus] Twitter account. • Print: • Sign in Sheet (capture name and email for listserve) • SHIP Descriptions (long version) • Volunteer Info Packet (pass out to interested) • Volunteer Application • YSO Paperwork • SHIP Info Packet (pass out to SHIP applicants) • SHIP Descriptions (condensed version) • Campus LeaderSHIP Application • Infographic

1

2

Day of Interest Meeting • Send a reminder email to anyone already on your listserve • Tweet a reminder using your @DOTB[Campus] account • Gather pens for volunteers to fill out paperwork

3

During the Interest Meeting • Go over the history of DOTB, play a video of DOTB in action and articulate your vision for DOTB on your campus • Go over SHIP Descriptions • Interested parties fill out any necessary YSO Paperwork

As meeting concludes • Schedule a meeting with anyone interested in a leadership position • Have aspiring leaders complete YSO Paperwork as well as the Campus LeaderSHIP Application

4

71


VOLUNTEER SIGN UP Each week, you are responsible for informing volunteers of the programming, keeping track of who has signed-up and having volunteers sign-in on-site. Your Program Schedule will be automatically populated into the app upon approval and we will create links for volunteers to sign-up through and you will be given access to this spreadsheet at the beginning of the semester. If your campus has an alternative system such as OrgSync or Blackboard, you are welcome to use whichever system is easiest for you.

Select School

View Details

Choose Program

Sign-Up

72


SAMPLE PROGRAM SCHEDULE Chapter: TCU Date & Time of Programming: Wednesday, 5:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. Safety Notes:Will need to look at each week of programming and see if this applies Materials Needed (PER DREAMER or TABLE in ziploc bags, account for ALL materials) : Pre-Program Prep (Completed prior to programming or on site): Special Modifications (separate rooms, younger dreamers): Brain Start Smart (BSS): 1. Greeting 2. Connecting 3. Uniting 4. Calming 5. Commitment Name Tags & Brain Start Smart Greeting

Recess: Stations & Large Group Activity (BSS Connecting)

Activity Path & Summary:

Week 1

Name Tags and choose Greeting between “Fish” or “Fist Bump”

Basketball, Jump Rope, Foursquare. Large group activity: Captain’s Coming

Dream Journals: Great first day activity both for Dreamers and Volunteer Buddies to get to know one another

Week 2

Name Tags and choose Greeting between “Bear Hug” or “Smile”

Basketball, Jump Rope, Soccer. Large group activity: Freeze Tag

Marble Run: Physics allows Dreamers to build sample “rollercoasters” while learning principles of physics and energy.

Table Talk:

Writing

Activity Intro:

Demoing sample Dream Journal to whole group

Physics

Demoing sample Marble Run to whole group

Phy

Medical Sciences

Demoing “Surgical Supplies” and showing completed “Banana peel”

Nu om

Week 3

Name Tags and choose Basketball, Indoor BowlGreeting between “Ro- ing, Foursquare. Large bot Dance” or “High group activity: Pac Man Five”

Banana Surgery: Medical Sciences. Dreamers learn “sutures” and practice on banana peels

Week 4

Name Tags and choose Greeting between “Funky Monkey” or “Wiggly Handshake”

Soccer, Ring Toss, Foursquare. Large group activity: Captain’s Coming

Art Exploration: Dreamers will explore art history and chemistry by making their own watercolors

Basketball, Jump Rope, Hula Hoops. Large group activity: Freeze Tag

Engineering Egg Drop: Dreamers will test their engineering skills by building a structure to support their “egg” and then see how it holds up.

Sweat Equity Floral Design: Dreamers will create floral Community Service Show completed floral arrangement masterpieces to donate to nursing home and understand “in-kind donations”

Week 5

Name Tags and choose Greeting between “Smile” or “Bear Hug”

Week 6

Name Tags and choose Greeting between “Wink” or “Robot Dance”

Basketball, Tic Tac Toe Toss, Foursquare. Large group activity: Pac Man

Week 7

Name Tags and choose Greeting between “Fist Bump” or “Funky Monkey”

Basketball, Jump Rope, Foursquare. Large group activity: Head, Shoulders, Knees, and Toes

Carpentry & Tiny Homes: Dreamers will learn about carpentry by completing a blueprint and building their own tiny home

Name Tags and choose Greeting between “Smile” or “Wiggly Handshake”

Basketball, Jump Rope, Foursquare. Large group activity: Bean Bag Toss

Owl Pellet Dissection: Dreamers dissect an owl pellet and learn about animal science

Week 8 73

B

Art Exploration

Engineering

Carpentry

Animal Science

Demoing “watercolors” that have been made previously on watercolor paper Show completed “egg” structure

Show sample “Tiny Home” complete with blueprint

Ar

En Gro

Ca En gr

Show sample Vete bones pulled from on an owl pellet


SAMPLE PROGRAM SCHEDULE

Demo Buddies:

mple nal to up

none

mple n to up

Physics group or none

urgiand pletpeel”

Nurses, Anatomy Club, or none

wahat made on aper

eted ture

Art Club or none

Engineering Group or none

eted ment

None

“Tiny plete rint

Carpentry or Engineering group, none

Materials:

Prep Materials:

Dream Journals:

Closing Stats & Dismissal:

Dream Journal pages Binding materials (pipe cleaners, yarn) Decorative Materials (glue, stickers, feathers etc.)

Sort Dream Journal pages into handouts to easily handout to dreamers

Complete at least first 2 pages in journal

Collect Name Tags and final review path of the day.

Poster board (thick), paper, tape, playdoh

Cut poster board in half for each pair of dreamers

Adding onto pages if Collect Name Tags and final review path time allows of the day.

Confirm with YSO regarding Surgical supplies (thread, plastic food policy and food allergies. lacing needle, mask, gloves) all inside ziploc bag, bananas, and paper Sort surgical supplies and place in towels. ziploc bag

Adding onto pages if Collect Name Tags and final review path time allows of the day.

2 oz. containers, small popsicle sticks, jumbo popsicle sticks, baking soda, vinegar, corn syrup, food coloring, watercolor paper, paint brushes, table cloths, paper towels

Sort art supplies into groups for dreamers to easily grab or handout

Adding onto pages if Collect Name Tags and final review path time allows of the day.

Imagination Station: think of materials that are “out of the box” that dreamers can use to build a sturdy structure. Examples: cups, bowls, feathers, tape, paper towels. Eggs.

Arrive at YSO early to set up “Imagination Station.” Keep an eye on supplies when dreamers are choosing and take away supplies when running low.

Arrive at YSO early to set up Thriller, Filler, Spiller (1 per dream“Floral Design Stations” Refer to er), potting soil, plastic bowls, plastic curriculum for layout. Remove plates, tablecloths, decorative mateflowers from plastic containers. rials, duct table glue. Set up a few trash cans around the room for easy access. Small colored popsicle sticks, glue, jenga wood pieces, blueprint hand- Prep tiny home bags: jenga wood pieces, colored popsicle sticks, out, small balls of playdoh if times glue all in ziploc bag allow

Owl Pellet Dissection Bags: tweeple Veterinary group zers, skewer, gloves, owl pellet, “bone from on campus or dissection handout” none et

Prep dissection bags prior to programming

Adding onto pages if Collect Name Tags and final review path time allows of the day.

Adding onto pages if Collect Name Tags and final review path time allows of the day.

Adding onto pages if Collect Name Tags and final review path time allows of the day.

Dream Catcher page

Collect Name Tags and final review of the semester. 74


SAMPLE PROGRAM SCHEDULE TEMPLATE This is the most important piece of DOTB! The main attraction. The big Kahuna! Use the following template to create your program schedule. You’ll submit this information through the app. Upon approval from the national office, your program schedule basics will be uploaded to the app for volunteers to sign-up for each week.

Name Tags & Brain Start Smart Greeting

Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 Week 6 Week 7 Week 8

75

Recess: Stations & Large Group Activity (BSS Connecting)

Activity Path & Summary:

Table Talk:

Activity Intro:

D


o:

SAMPLE PROGRAM SCHEDULE TEMPLATE Chapter: Date & Time of Programming: Safety Notes: Materials Needed (PER DREAMER or TABLE in ziploc bags, account for ALL materials) : Pre-Program Prep (Completed prior to programming or on site): Special Modifications (separate rooms, younger dreamers): Brain Start Smart (BSS): 1. Greeting 2. Connecting 3. Uniting 4. Calming 5. Commitment Demo Buddies:

Materials:

Prep Materials:

Dream Journals:

Closing Stats & Dismissal:

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VOLUNTEER CONFIRMATION EMAIL Customize this template to send an email to new Volunteer Buddies before their first day. Do not forget to include the DOTB Approach for VBs.

Dear [Primary Contact],

Thank you for signing up to be a Volunteer Buddy with Dream Outside the Box (DOTB) at [YSO]! We are so excited for _____ as this week’s Path of the Day. Below is information you may deem necessary for an easy and fun volunteering experience. We work with the kids officially from [beginning to ending time]. Sometimes we get messy, so please dress comfortably but appropriate for an environment with impressionable children (we love for you to wear [School] gear).

We ask that you prepare to arrive to [address] at [10 minutes before programming]. When you enter, I will sign you in and we will have a debriefing time, short training, review the activities planned, and set up for the programming if necessary.

Programming Breakdown: 5-10 Minutes Introductions: DBs and Path of the Day 35-45 Minutes Hands-On Activity with Little Dreamers 5-15 Minutes Complete Weekly Evaluations

Volunteer Buddies (VBs) are there to help the program run smoothly, ensure that children behave respectfully and have a positive experience, and facilitate a fun environment. You are the encouragers that help our kids dream outside of their comfort zone! We are also including “The DOTB Approach for VBs”, some helpful tips to consider before coming this week. Thank you so much again, and we are so excited to have you!

[Name] Volunteer Coordinator [DOTB: Campus] [Phone Number- optional] 77


DOTB APPROACH FOR VBs You’ve put in the hard work to recruit fantastic volunteers and now comes the fun: it’s programming time! In order to maximize the volunteer experience and the impact everyone has on the Little Dreamers, go over these guidelines with each new volunteer before you begin programming.

Spread out

Disperse amongst the kids.

Voluteers new to DOTB or old friends with one  another naturally tend to stick together on the  periphery. The closer proximity you are to the Dreamers, the more they can learn from you

Show School Spirit

Introduce yourself and your college.

We are working to put our Little Dreamers on the pathway to college and want to reinforce your connection to college as much as possible.

.

Get Silly!

Let your guard down.

Getting outside your comfort zone helps to encourage a child to do the same! You do not have to be a child whisperer to have a successful program.

Have Fun

It’s about the process, not the end result.

Engage with the Dreamers to encourage handson activity. Show them why you love what you are presenting. The kids vibe off of your vibes, so the more energetic, enthusiastic, and excited you are, the more willing they will be to engage and use their imagination. Messes = Memories in our book.

Go With the Flow

In case you didn’t know...

The kids are inquisitive and if they hit you with a question you are uncomfortable answering, simply direct them to the nearest DOTB leader.

Know That You’re Appreciated

We are so appreciative of your time!

If we invited you, it is because you represent an experience our Dreamers have likely never had before. The kids will enjoy your experiences so much. Whether or not it is obvious, the Dreamers appreciate you and are impacted by the fact that you cared enough to come. 78


VB THANK YOU EMAIL After his or her first week, each volunteer should receive a thank you email like the following example. As an added bonus, you may opt to crank it up a notch and send creative thank-yous either via email such as Constant Contact with photos from the day or handwritten notes from Little Dreamers. Showing appreciation is a crucial step in having volunteers who come back week after week.

Dear [VB],

Thank you so much for taking time to volunteer with DOTB. Your impact was truly immeasurable! One hour of interaction with our students can translate to a profound perception of pathways that can last a lifetime. We are honored that you shared your special skill set with us and hope to s ee you again.

With gratitude,

The Dream Team Dream Outside the Box

P.S. If you have any questions or comments about your experience with us, please feel free to email [info@dreamoutsidethebox.org or INSERT CAMPUS GMAIL]

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VOLUNTEER RULES We are so honored to have you volunteer, here are some ground rules for a great year: DOTB should be really fun, but if it’s ever unsafe, please tell someone. Our dreamers will love you right away, but eye-to-eye you should stay. SPRING 2016

DOTB

They will want to jump on your back, but for safety we must keep them on track.

Volunteer Rules

We are so honored to have you Please help dreamers keep their bottoms in a chair, and please do not letas a volunteer, here are some them braid your hair. guidelines for a great year: 

If we say, “Chicka Chicka” please say “Boom Boom.” We need your help to control the rowdy room. If a leader is talking please help ustell keep the room quiet, please someone. if you model good actions, the kids will try it. eye­to­eye

Sometimes conflicts may arise, like when dreamers don’t want to share supplies. Help diffuse the situation, by fostering group communication. safety

If you want to be on your phone, perhaps youbottoms should stay at home. It may sound harsh but it’s true, these dreamers need in a chair braid every ounceyour of you. hair.

names,

We know you have a rockin’ bod but short shorts, leggings, and see through clothes don’t get the approval nod.

phone,

control the rowdy room.

Our dreamers are highly impressionable and gravitate toward sassy, so all thatroom we do,quiet, should keep it classy.

every ounce of you.

clothes

share supplies.

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81


CAMPUS STATISTICIAN

“To know even one life has breathed easier because you have lived - that is to have succeeded.” - Ralph Waldo Emerson

Table of Contents Chapter 7: Campus Statistician Campus Statistician Timeline 83 Dream Journal 84 Stats Overview 87 Parent Application 88 Volunteer Buddy Evaluation 91 Table Talks 93 Job Charts 94

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CAMPUS STATISTICIAN TIMELINE As the time comes to begin working with Little Dreamers, your job is incredibly crucial to the growth of DOTB. By tracking how amazing your programs are, we can show the world how DOTB’s special model is changing lives and making a difference. Get excited! This timeline is here to help keep you on track over the course of the semester.

1 At least 8 weeks before the first day

• Schedule an Outcome Measurements training with the National Office

2 At least 6 weeks before the first day

• Complete Outcome Measurements training with the National Office • Communicate with YSO in case there are any special provisions to abide by

3 At least 1 week before the first day • Begin to print the evaluations, if not electronic 4 Each week

• Fill out the Stats Overview at the beginning of programming • Distribute and collect Dream Catchers to Little Dreamers with Executive Director • Distribute and collect Demo Buddy Weekly Evaluation to DBs • Collect the Volunteer Buddy Application from the Volunteer Coordinator for outcome measurements focused on college students • Collect any remaining Outcome Measurements

At-a-glance schedule for forms: Week 1

Week 4

• On-Site Dreamers Application • Parent Application due • Send home Parent Application

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Week 8 • End of Semester Evaluations for Parents and VBs • Collect and code outcome evaluation documents


DREAM JOURNAL Dream Journal help us get to know dreamers and interpret their answers into data we can use to assess the efficacy of our work.� Here are sample pages:

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DREAM JOURNAL

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STATS OVERVIEW Use this template to keep track of basic statistics for each week. You will turn this completed form into your Campus Executive Director at the end of the semester.

Wk

Date

Activity

1

9/25

DOTB 101-

Culinary Arts

# of VBs 27

# of DBs 0

# of Kids

Notes:

27

Multatech is 2 10/2 Architecture 26 3 22 a company

3

10/9

4

5

10/16

10/30

with Multatech

not a student

organization

Forensics with TLUHSC

Improv with TLU SAC

Field trip to Locations

25

10

25

24

9

25

8

0

18

6 11/6 Anatomy with 25 12 15 TLUHSC

Field Trip

A school car- nival resulted in drop in

attendance

7

11/13 Sweat equity- 26 5 25 Site visit-had Floral additional visi- tors from local corporation

8

87

11/20

Etiquette Dinner

25

10

25


PARENT APPLICATION

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PARENT APPLICATION

89


PARENT APPLICATION

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VOLUNTEER BUDDY EVALUATION DOTB is all about dual impact: we want to make sure that we making a difference with your collegiate peers as well. Use a Volunteer Buddy Evaluation to track outcomes with college students. We will also provide you with Evaluations for Demo Buddies and Parents. Volunteer Buddy End of Semester Evaluation This is completely anonymous so please be super honest! Thank you! College Campus _____________________________        Gender:        Male             Female Number of Weeks Participated:        1       2       3       4       5       6       7       8 Major ________________________________________

Class: HS     Fr     So     Ju

Se     Grad

Career Goals and Aspirations ________________________________________________________________________ Has DOTB affected any of these changes?              Y         N Comments __________________________________________________________________________________________ If you had to describe DOTB in one sentence: ______________________________________________________________________________________________________ Do you see your college experience differently after working with DOTB?            Y        N Elaborate (optional): _________________________________________________________________________________ Do you see your community differently after working with DOTB?                Y        N Elaborate (optional): _________________________________________________________________________________ Do you see the world differently after working with DOTB?                                      Y         N Elaborate (optional): _________________________________________________________________________________ Please answer either True or False for the following statements: DOTB positively impacts or benefits the Dreamers                                                 T           F I had an impact on the Dreamers                                                                              T F I would recommend DOTB to others                                                                           T F I feel the experience I gained will assist me in the future                                          T F I plan to volunteer next semester                                                                              T F If not, please explain why ____________________________________________________________________________

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VOLUNTEER BUDDY EVALUATION What is your understanding of the objectives of the program? ________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________ How could we make DOTB better? __________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________ What was your favorite activity? Why? _______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________ Please share any additional comments, suggestions, concerns, and/or feedback. ______________________________________________________________________________________________________ Overall, how satisfied were you with your experience this semester? 0       1             2           3           4           5       6       7       8       9       10 I would never come back! This is the best ever!                      

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TABLE TALKS Table Talks help dreamers understand the pathway of the day and provide a foundation for each’s week’s lesson.

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JOB CHARTS Jobs Charts establish a role for each child in order to promote self confidence, their feeling of worth and value in the classroom and to strengthen their connection to the Dreamer community. This is an explanation of each role. Dream Leader Pathway & Activity Announcer • Explains Path of the Day and related jobs • Helps fellow Dreamers stay on task Check in Coordinator Name Tag Extraordinaire • Helps disperse name tags at the beginning of programming and collects at the end of programming Counselor Helping Hand • Helps fellow Dreamers if a conflict arises • Asks Volunteers for further assistance or help Facilities Manager Trash & Clean Up Superstar • Picks up trash around table after programming activity is over • Helps arrange or straighten room after programming ends Material Manager Chief Supply Distributor • Hands out materials from SHIP • Collects materials at end of programming and gives back to SHIP Statistician Number Crunching Whiz • Asks closing “Stats” questions to fellow dreamers • Share responses with SHIP for final “Stat” count of the day

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CAMPUS PR COORDINATOR

“Reach as high as you can, and then reach a little higher. There you will find magic and possibility. And maybe even cookies.” - Marc Johns

Table of Contents Chapter 8: Campus PR Coordinator Social Media Accounts 97 Social Media Calendar 98 Social Media Calendar Key 99 Communications Kit 100 Style Guide 101 National Branding Tools 102 Collegiate Logos 105 Methods of Communication 106 Getting the Word Out on Campus 107 Email Etiquette 109 Oops, Let’s Not Do it Again! 110 FAQs 111 Notes 113 96


SOCIAL MEDIA ACCOUNTS The Campus PR Coordinator is responsible for maintaining the image and online presence of their DOTB chapter. This includes but is not limited to social media, blog posts, and photos. Continuously update the following online and social media content with your campus events. The login information can be found in your campus’ PR folder in Google Drive.

National Accounts Twitter @dreamoutside www.twitter.com/dreamoutside

Instagram Facebook @dreamoutside facebook.com/dreamoutsidethebox www.instagram.com/dreamoutside Campus Account* @DOTB[Campus Abbreviation]

@DOTB[Campus Abbreviation]

Appropriate Hashtags #DreamBig #DreamDesert #DreamTeam #DreamOutsideTheBox #DOTB #DOTB[Campus Abbreviation] #[Path of the Day] *Once your chapter is approved by the National Office, Twitter and email accounts will be created for you.

My Campus Info

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SOCIAL MEDIA CALENDAR

The only thing worse than not having a social media page, is having a social media page with posts that are 4 months old or don’t have a purpose. In DOTB we believe in the 3 E’s: all posts should engage, educate or entertain. In order to help keep your social media content fresh and updated, we’ve laid it all out with this Social Media Calendar. This example calendar is set-up as if your chapter’s DOTB Day is Tuesday. However, this works for any DOTB Day-simply count back based on the prescribed days before programming and you’re good to go!

Time of day

Thursday

Friday

4 Days before Programming

3 Days before Programming

2 Days before Programming

1 Day before DOTB Day Programming

Retweet

#Shoutout Partners Build Anticipation

Morning Commute (7-11am)

Afternoon Lunchtime (11am-3pm)

Photo Tweet

#TBT

Evening Commute (3-6pm) Late Evening Primetime Old News Retweet Television (8-10pm) Late Evening Primetime VB/DB Regram Television (8-10pm) Evening Commute (3-6pm)

VB/DB Regram

#Shoutout DBs

Monday

Recruit

Recruit

Build Anticipation

VB/DB Retweet

Recycle

#Shoutout Partners

Backstage Pass

DOTB Regram

Live Video

#Shoutout Partners

Backstage Pass

Build Anticipation

Live Post

Must post

Wknd

Wknd

Backstage Pass Retweet Anticipation Recycle

During Dream Catchers

Tuesday

Wednesday

Free Reign

Photo Live Tweet Recycle

Recycle

Recycle

Upload

Suggested Post

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SOCIAL MEDIA CALENDAR KEY Backstage Pass

Show your followers what the SHIP does to prepare for DOTB, like shopping, meetings over coffee, setup from the week before

Build Anticipation Post clues on the programming theme with pictures of supplies, a riddle, a picture collage or supplementary props DOTB Revine

Share the love and spread the word on what one of the other campuses are doing

Live Post

Post a photo of the event with 5 hashtags (2 DOTB specific, 3 broad)

Live Video

Post a Vine or an Instagram video (and link to Twitter) from the days’ programming

Old News

Post a link to an article featuring DOTB

Photo Live Tweet

Post a picture and/or post Instagram link with 1 or 2 hashtags

Photo Tweet

Post a picture from last weeks programming and/or post Instagram link with 1 or 2 hashtags

Recruit Pub DOTB, mention VBs, seek potential VBs to tweet and ask them to join us for programming Recycle

Recycle appropriate permament messages

Retweet

Share the VB and DB tweets on their expereince at DOTB with your followers

Retweet Anticipation Search for any VBs or upcoming DBs tweeting their excitement to volunteer #Shoutout DBs

Send a big ups to the DB student organization, and mention the main contact

#Shoutout Partners

Give thanks to sponsors or donors, DBs or community partners, restaurants where SHIP meetings occur, awesome VBs

#TBT (Throwback Thursday) post a fun photo of a past event, baby pictures of the SHIP or VBs (post to Instagram) Upload

When Dreamers are completing Dream Catcher, upload into chapter, semester, and week

VB/DB Retweet

Share the VB and DB videos on their expereince at DOTB with your followers

VB/DB Revine

Share the VB and DB videos on their expereince at DOTB with your followers

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COMMUNICATIONS KIT

As the PR Coordinator you are the public voice of your campus chapter and a representative of Dream Outside the Box, Inc. Because of the prevalence of online communication, you may be the first, and perhaps most formative, contact students will have with DOTB. Reaching out to students is an exciting and important part of educating and organizing around our mission. However, this exciting task comes with a great deal of responsibility. In any public interactions it is important to always be “on message.” What does this mean? Ask yourself if your work, from tweets to press releases to t-shirt design is supporting and advancing the goals of DOTB. Together we are the gatekeepers for DOTB’s voice, visual identity and reputation. As DOTB leaderSHIP, we are responsible for ensuring that the brand remains consistent in all of our communication efforts. This Communications Kit is how we seek to effectively utilize communication tools.

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STYLE GUIDE Reference This organization should only be referred to using the following: Primary: Dream Outside the Box Secondary: DOTB* Others: Dream Box logo; “Dream Desert”; “You Can Only Dream What You’ve Seen”; “Dream Big. Dream Outside the Box” Primary Color Palette Our official colors are: Teal- BrownPantone: 7710 U Pantone: 4635 C C: 100 M: 0 Y: 34 K: 0 C: 38 M: 64 Y: 92 HEX Code: 00ABB6 HEX Code: 915E31 R: 0 G: 170 B: 182 R: 145 G: 94 B:49

K: 17

Display / Headline Typography Text Font: Brandon Grotesque Regular AaBbCcDdEeFfGgHhIiJjKkLlMmNnOoPpQqRrSsTtUuVvWwXxYZz 1234567890,./;’[]\-=!@#$%^&*()_+{}|”:?>< Logo Font: Gotham Bold AaBbCcDdEeFfGgHhIiJjKkLlMmNnOoPpQqRrSsTtUuVvW wXxYyZz1234567890,./;’[]-=\][!@#$%^&*()_+ Tagline Font: Pea Kung Fu Manda “You Can Only Dream What You’ve Seen”

*Use secondary once primary is used and secondary is acknowledged.

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NATIONAL BRANDING TOOLS Logos Only the following logos are permissible for identifying Dream Outside the Box: Combination Mark

Logo

Typography

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NATIONAL BRANDING TOOLS Tagline When using the tagline, make sure to capitalize the first letter of each word, and do not remove the apostrophe in “you’ve”.

You Can Only Dream What You’ve Seen Combination Mark with Tagline

You Can Only Dream What You’ve Seen

Typography with Tagline

You Can Only Dream What You’ve Seen

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You Can Only Dream What You’ve Seen

You Can Only Dream What You’ve Seen


NATIONAL BRANDING TOOLS Banner Logo and Typography Banner

Logo, Typography & Tagline Banner

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COLLEGIATE LOGOS Upon approval of your campus chapter, the National Office will provide you with a custom logo to be used on your campus communications including social media accounts, newsletters, and other correspondence.

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METHODS OF COMMUNICATION The following will highlight mediums in which we communicate internally with team members, mediums in which we communicate with out key publics, and the most effective way to utilize communication tools. Methods in Which We Communicate Team Members • Includes everyone from programmers to volunteers that bring the DOTB vision to fruition • Team correspondence is especially important to ensure that everyone is has a clear understanding of DOTB affairs Key Publics • Groups of people that we have a specific message for • DOTB’s key publics are Founding Donors, potential donors, volunteers (VBs and DBs), potential student volunteers, parents, partnering youth service organization, and Dreamers Press Lists • Information of all of the reporters in your area that could run a story • Lists usually include contact info, outlet, title & more

Methods of Communication for Key Publics Electronic Newsletters • A publication to keep your audience abreast on current events, accomplishments, future projects, opportunities to donate, and changes within the organization Press Kits/Media Kits • Pre-packaged set of information and material about a person, company, or organization distributed to media for promotional use Press Releases • Written communication for media outlets announcing newsworthy topic or event Pitch Letters • A brief personal letter, written to accompany press releases, media advisories, and press kits

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GETTING THE WORD OUT ON CAMPUS There are many of methods of reaching students around campus. However, you should identify your campus’ regulations for student organizations including restrictions on publicizing and your University’s trademark policies before usage. Often, campus symbols and seals will be under very strict copyright protection. Chalk Sidewalk chalk is an eye catching and inexpensive way to advertise for events or elections. Make sure to target high traffic areas on campus and use catchy slogans or obvious visual cues. You may even opt to buy spray chalk and create a stencil using an Exacto knife and cardboard. Contests In the past, Dream Outside the Box has been recognized as one of 15 White House Campus Champion of Change finalists. The Top 5 finalist were determined by whomever had the most votes in a week one time span online and were invited to the White House and featured on mtvU. Although we ended up number 6, our powerful use of social media and publicity stunts helped to grow our supporter base exponentially. As a result, we got the opportunity go anyway and take a Little Dreamer to meet the President, which provided invaluable photographs and credibility. The year before, DOTB was recognized as 1 of 3 mtvU “Top of Class” awardees, which resulted in a $5,000 scholarship which was later used to pay for the aforementioned Little Dreamers’ trip to the White House. These are just two examples of how contests can be opportunities for spotlight and increased support. Flyers On some campuses, flyers are still an essential component in getting the word out about service opportunities, meetings and other important events. However, on many campuses, publicity space is limited and often crowded with countless organizations and corporations competing for the same advertising space. DOTB has provided infographics and overview flyers for you online. Should you choose to make your own, here are a couple of tips to make your flyer a competitive campus communicator: • Create a hierarchy of information by deciding what needs to be displayed more prominently. • Keep it simple, sticking to your campus colors scheme and a well spaced layout. Publicity Stunts Publicity “stunts” are typically big public statements that are designed to get maximum attention from those in proximity. Use your creativity and better judgment to present DOTB ideas in new and exciting ways. Examples of “stunts” conducted by DOTB chapters in the past include: • Having the student cheering section at a basketball game hold up posters that spelled out a message about volunteering for DOTB which was broadcast onto the jumbotron. • On Leap Day, one campus’ student activities office put up a Velcro wall in the campus Student Center. The CED took this as an opportunity to get publicity for DOTB and donned a Velcro suit and leaped onto the wall. The leap was broadcast throughout the Student Center with a message along the lines of: “[CED] leaps for DOTB!”. 107


GETTING THE WORD OUT ON CAMPUS Social Media In this day in age, social media is arguably the most effective way to reach some of our key publics. We encourage the use of social media including but not limited to Facebook, Twitter, Vine and Instagram. When using social media, be sure to post mission focused messaging, avoid abbreviation and check for grammar and mechanics. All social media post should follow The Rule of The 3 E’s: • Educate • Share information about meetings, volunteer opportunities, etc... • Entertain • Share fun videos or photos of DOTB programming. • Engage • Create opportunities to connect with followers and fans. Tabling Setting up a table at campus involvement fairs can be a great way to meet new VBs, make connections with other groups as potential DBs and generally establish DOTB as a campus presence. To encourage others to stop by, try projecting a video, passing out candy and infographic cards, or having an

interactive feature. Yard Signs

Like the signs you see in people’s yards during campaign seasons, some chapter have had great success having signs made with simple language such as “Volunteer Today To Encourage A Child to Dream Big” with an email address. National Office staff are happy to help you navigate sourcing signs, design, etc...

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EMAIL ETIQUETTE Whether writing to an individual, a group of people, or administration, email etiquette is necessary across the board to ensure you are communicating effectively and efficiently. Greetings and Salutations Starting with a greeting rather than jumping in shows the recipient that you have taken time to acknowledge them. A few examples: Greetings • Dear, • Good morning/afternoon, • [Recipients Name with Appropriate Title] • First name is acceptable for peer to peer communication. However, if emailing a professor, donor or other Key Publics, titles and last names should be use such as “Dr. Coonrod” or “Mr. Johnson”. Closings • Kindest Regards, • Respectfully, • Thank you, • Dream big, Formatting Bold, Highlight, Italicize, Underline • We communicate some of the most important information via email – dates, times, addresses, assignments, etc. Utilizing these tools will help organize your message so that it coherent and easy to retain content. CC • Carbon copying is helpful in keeping everyone on the same page. • Only those directly involved with the subject should be copied.

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OOPS, LET’S NOT DO IT AGAIN! We are humans and thus, we make mistakes. As communication liaisons, we should always strive to avoid grammatical errors. Here a few examples of common mistakes: Your: Indicates possession You’re: Contraction for “you are” (try not to use the contraction) There: Reference to a place Their: Indicates possession They’re: Contraction for “they are” (try not to use the contraction) Accept: To receive willingly Except: Excluding Effect: Outcome, consequence Affect: To change, transform Principal: Head of a department Principle: General law or code of conduct Where: Reference to a place Were: Past tense for “are” We’re: Contraction for “we are” (try not to use the contraction) Insure: Protect against risk by paying an insurance company Ensure: Make certain something will happen

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FAQS As PR Coordinator, you are the public voice for your chapter. In order to answer questions effectively, we have included frequently asked questions to help you communicate in the best way possible. What is DOTB’s mission? Every Dream Outside the Box program is designed for dual impact: to propel youth in dream deserts toward higher education while cultivating leadership skills among collegiate volunteers. By producing imaginative programming in dream deserts, college students broaden the horizons of K-5 youth while developing skills to contribute toward the disruption of cyclical poverty. How did DOTB get started? Dream Outside the Box (DOTB) was founded as a college student organization in Columbia, MO in 2009. When DOTB, 74% of boys K-5 aspired to be rappers, professional athletes, or both. In 2012, headquarters were established in Fort Worth, Texas where surveys showed approximately 83% of K-5 boys at a local youth service organization indicated “Police Officer” as their #1 pre-DOTB aspiration. As the mission of DOTB spreads, students are chartering chapters on their campus in effort to destroy dream deserts across the nation. Do I have to pay to have my child in the program? No. Dream Outside the Box works very hard to maintain a program that comes at no cost to the child. At this time, students “pay” for their series by volunteering in the community, investing what we call “sweat equity”. What kinds of things will my child do in the program? Dream Outside the Box is all about broadening horizons in a fun, engaging way! Experiences ranging from engineering, mock trial, journalism to fencing and ballet are just a few examples of the kinds of experiences students can expect in each weekly hour of DOTB programming led by college students. We strive to also provide field trips and opportunities for long-term development in each area. What is a “Dream Desert”? Just as a food desert is a place where people lack access to nutritious and affordable fresh fruits and vegetables, a dream desert is an area where students lack access to educational and extracurricular opportunities. In order for an area to qualify as a dream desert, DOTB considers percentage of children on free and reduced lunch, percentage of first generation college students, and access to mentorship and enrichment programming.

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FAQS How can my child participate in Dream Outside the Box? If Dream Outside the Box is offered at your child’s elementary school, the student is nominated by a teacher and approved by a DOTB Site Coordinator. If Dream Outside the Box is offered at your child’ after-school program (i.e. Boys and Girls Club), you can apply at the beginning of the school year. Applications can be obtained at the after-school facility branch or the facility’s Education Director. Why should my child participate in Dream Outside the Box? Can you imagine your child as a notable engineer, a prominent lawyer, or a successful entrepreneur? Dream Outside the Box strives to expose children to a world of opportunity that he or she may not ordinarily have access to. Because of our access to college students, we are able to provide your child opportunities with priceless benefits. Your child will see higher education as an attainable goal, limitless career possibilities, and learn to give back to his or her community in a fun, innovative way. How do I contact DOTB? Donations and Contributions contribute@dreamoutsidethebox.org Expansion/ Campus Chapters info@dreamoutsidethebox.org General Information info@dreamoutsidethebox.org “Contact” tab at dreamoutsidethebox.org How do I donate? You can donate online at dreamoutsidethebox.org or mail a check to our headquarters at 3901 W. Vickery Blvd, Suite 1, Fort Worth, Texas 76107 Why should I donate to Dream Outside the Box? Dream Outside the Box is offered at no cost to the children we serve. Our student participants, also known as “dreamers”, pay for the weekly programming with sweat equity by volunteering in the com- munity. As a startup non-profit, the impact of each dollar is magnified from providing engineering activity supplies to field trips that explore the child’s city to ensuring staff keep the program going.

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NOTES

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NOTES

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Š Dream Outside the Box 2018 Special thanks to Kaitlin Aguilar for designing this book www.tenfoldcreative.co kaitlin@tenfoldcreative.co 817-988-2119

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You Can Only Dream What Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve Seen

www.dreamoutsidethebox.org info@dreamoutsidethebox.org

@dreamoutside

@dreamoutside

facebook.com/dreamoutsidethebox @dreamoutside

DOTB Campus Operations Guide  
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