Page 1


Fall in love again 365 NIGHTS A YEAR.

Holder of the Royal Warrant from Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, Hypnos is the only mattress supplier to all the royal palaces. Hypnos Bespoke is legendary for comfort and longevity using only the world’s finest natural materials.

The Most Comfortable Beds in the world available at:

5230 HOLLYRIDGE DRIVE, RALEIGH, NC 27612 OAK PARK SHOPPING CENTER ON GLENWOOD AVE

(919) 521-5566 • WWW.THEORGANICBEDROOM.COM


Imagine your home, totally organized! s

40% Plus Free Installation unit order of $900 or more. With incoming order, at time of purchase only.

Call for a free in home design consultation and estimate

919-850-9030

www.closetsbydesign.com Licensed and Insured

9MAG

Follow us


Spend the Holidays with Theatre In The Park!

TOP

AS

THE

Fun for the whole family!

T

20

EVENTS

I

N

ONE OF TH ED

E

NAM

The Hit Musical comedy! SOUTH

E

*Ira David Wood IV will play Scrooge at select shows

DEC 5-9

DEC 12-16

DukeEnergyCenterRaleigh.com

DPACnc.com

DPAC

Based on characters by Charles M. Schulz

DEC 14-15, 21-22 - 8 PM DEC 16 & 23 - 3 PM Theatre In The Park TheatreInThePark.com

NOV 30, DEC 7 - 7:30 PM DEC 1 & 8 - 11 AM, 2 PM, 5 PM DEC 2 & 9 - 3 PM Theatre In The Park TheatreInThePark.com


What’s Inside 17

Another Big Year for Bluegrass Huge Annual Raleigh Celebration Breaks Attendance Record Again

19

‘Cookin’ with Grass’ Cookbook Features Recipes From Many Bluegrass Artists

30

Hassle-Free Entertaining 25 Tips to Guarantee Successful Holiday Party, Event, Get-Together

34

‘A Christmas Carol’ With a Twist Ira David Wood III’s Iconic Show Thrills Big Audiences in the 919

36

A Symphony to Your Senses Ambiance, Service, Great Food Part of the G58 Cuisine Experience

56

Leaving LRHS With Pride A.J. Muttillo Recounts His Great Memories with Leesville students

39

A Business Mentoring Honor Julianne Walther Receives ATHENA Guidance, Support

67

Happy Holly Days Performances, Music and Theater Bring Fall Fun to Southwest Wake

69

Prestigious Wake Tech Honor Apex Fire Lt. Howard Miles Named as a Scott Scholar

70

Advice From Liberty Mutual It’s Smart to Shop For Best Insurance Rates

72

A Passionate Advocate Rolesville Middle’s Epps 2018 WCPSS Counselor of the Year

F E AT U R E S

20

A Passport to Winter Fun How to Enjoy North Carolina’s Exceptional Wine Experience

28

Exploring the Future

30

Hassle-Free Entertaining

Whether Backpacking or Filmmaking, Ramond Youman Shows Real Passion

25 Tips to Guarantee a Successful Holiday Party, Event or Get-together

919 Stuff 16 32 80 80-81 82

Publisher’s Note Holiday Events, Activities Advertisers Index 919 Deals By The Numbers

November/December 2018

64 www.919Magazine.com

Helping Children When They Need It Most

Holly Springs’ Jim and Terri Wasley Launched Meg’s Smile Foundation 13


and Information

COMMUNITY NEWS

November/December 2018

MORRISVILLE/CARY/RTP/DURHAM Starting on Page 39

A Look at “Scary Morrisville”

Annual Tree Lighting in Morrisville

New Durham Child Food Hub

RDC Marathon in Durham

Park West Village’s Winter Wonderland Parkside Town Commons Sparkle Night Bedlame Vodka Tours Planned

“Sharpen Your Skills” Workshop

BRIER CREEK/RDU Starting on Page 50

Earth Fare Grand Re-opening

BC Elementary Positivity Project

Red Carpet One-year Celebration

RDU Sees Increase in Traffic

Brier Creek Commons Tree Lighting

Pump It Up Raleigh Special Events

Brier Creek Cupcake Run

BC Community Center Events

NORTH RALEIGH/LEESVILLE Starting on Page 56

Perry’s Opening Near Crabtree Mall

New Owner at The Organic Bedroom

Lynnwood Grill Expansion

Astronomy Nights Event

Brewery Partnering with Wake Tech

Durant Nature Park Special Event

Golf Galaxy Donation

Survival Skills at Forest Ridge

APEX/HOLLY SPRINGS Starting on Page 64

HSHS Presents “The Nutcracker”

Community Band Performances

DDASC Plans Lock-in Event

Apex Holiday Home Tour

HS Main Street Christmas

Christmas on Salem Street

Jazz Orchestra Performs

Happy Holly Days Parade

NORTH WAKE/WAKEFIELD/ROLESVILLE/ WAKEFOREST Starting on Page 72 HSHS Presents “The Nutcracker”

Community Band Performances

DDASC Plans Lock-in Event

Apex Holiday Home Tour

HS Main Street Christmas

Christmas on Salem Street

Jazz Orchestra Performs

Happy Holly Days Parade

www.919Magazine.com

15


919 | PUBLISHER’S NOTE

PUBLISHER Suzy Beth Sarver

Keep Your Shine This Holiday Season

This time of year, people can get a little crazy. We are overworked, over-worried and spending at a record pace. We are trying to cook, shop, entertain and, for many, still volunteering and working. 2018 has been one of those years I will look back on with some happy tears and a little trepidation. I’m counting my blessings that I made it through somewhat unscathed. There were many twists and turns, both personally and professionally. I witnessed friends and family go through their own challenges, our nation become more divided than ever, and we witnessed way too many tragedies in our world than I care to mention here. Sometimes it can be difficult moving forward; however, that is just what we must do. For instance, in this issue we feature a Holly Springs family that lost their child -- but found the strength to go on, start a foundation, and now provides support to other families in times of great sorrow and uncertainty. They’re just another example of many people in the 919 who shine, even in the midst of grief and sorrow. And we’re proud to tell their story in 919 Magazine. We also feature a new local business in this issue. G.58 Cuisine, which recently opened in Morrisville, appears poised for explosive growth. Local businesses need support and a shoulder to lean on, and 919 Magazine will continue to share their stories with our readers. We bid a happy farewell to Dr. A.J. Mutillo of Leesville Road High School and share in the joy as he embarks on a new path. We also introduce a former LRHS student, Ray Youman, now attending NC State and who soon will be interning with 919 Magazine. This issue is packed with so much there is to go, see and do right here in the 919 – and this is what we are all about. Keeping the spotlight on all that is good and right in our world and our community. We even take you over to the Yadkin Valley in our continuing series, All Things Carolina, for the Winter Wine and Beer Passport Program. Perhaps you can plan some “downtime” with your family and friends and check it out. I also want to thank our team at 919 Magazine and all of our advertisers, who are amazing people who support their community and this publication. Because of you, we keep our publications FREE and available to our readers throughout the 919. I also want to thank our local schools, coaches, colleges and all those organizations that continually reach out to 919 Magazine and share their events, their stories and their support. With the launch of two new zones this fall, we are pleased to welcome readers in the Apex and Holly Springs communities to our family. Thank you for opening your homes and businesses to 919 Magazine. Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays. And, please, keep on shining

16

www.919Magazine.com

GRAPHIC DESIGN Myra Ray Tyler McElhaney PRODUCTION Preston Reins Jenny Smith Georgina Dukes MARKETING Lisa Boneham Matt Ernst EJ Joseph PHOTOGRAPHY Catherine Davis Photography CONTRIBUTORS Buffy Mac G. Cleveland Kilgore Tildon Dunn BACK ISSUES A limited number of back issues of various editions are available. $3.99 postage and handling for 1 copy $1.00 for additional copies (limit 2 Call 919-893-0060 Email: info@919Magazine.com MAILING ADDRESS 919 Magazine PO Box 13574 Durham, NC 27709 www.919Magazine.com SUBSCRIPTIONS Annual subscription to 919 Magazine are available for $24.99 (six issues), plus postage and handling. Call 919-893-0060 to subscribe, and guarantee home delivery of every issue. VOLUME 7, NUMBER 6 © Copyright 2018 919 Magazine Reproduction without permission is prohibited. 919 Magazine is published locally six times per year by pitchGirl Productions. Information provided by advertisers - or other companies or individuals - does not represent an endorsement or verification of accuracy, and is entirely the responsibilty of advertisers. 919 Magazine assumes no responsibility of liability for the content of advertising placed in the publication or on 919Magazine.com website. November/December 2018


BLUEGRASS | UPFRONT | 919

Another Big Year for Bluegrass in Raleigh Huge Annual Celebration Continues Through 2021

T

his year, again, the entire World of Bluegrass was literally and figuratively in Raleigh in late September. And, again, it was wildly successful. The International Bluegrass Music Association, the Nashville-based nonprofit professional organization for the global bluegrass community, and its Raleigh partners – The Greater Raleigh Convention and Visitors Bureau, Pinecone – The Piedmont Council of Traditional Music, and the Raleigh Convention Center – once more combined for downtown Raleigh’s largest annual event. World of Bluegrass, a gathering that consists of a business conference, showcases, awards show, and the largest urban bluegrass festival in the world, has steadily grown in scope since moving to North Carolina. And 2018 was no different, attracting 223,320 people and generating an estimated $12.7 million in direct economic impact, according to Visit Raleigh. “This year’s IBMA World of Bluegrass was another incredible week filled with music, energy and generosity everywhere you turned in downtown Raleigh. We are delighted to see greater numbers of young musicians and fans taking part among the record number of people in attendance overall,” said IBMA Executive Director Paul Schiminger.

2018 was the final year for the Sir Walter Raleigh Banjostand at the World of Bluegrass. The iconic symbol for years at the event will be reconfigured and put on permanent display inside the Raleigh Convention Center. Continues on Page 18 November/December 2018

www.919Magazine.com

17


919 | UPFRONT | BLUEGRASS Continued from Page 17

‘Thousands of visitors from all over the world come to Raleigh for this event and take home lasting memories from their experiences here each year.’

WILLIAM LEWIS Pinecone Executive Director

With the 2018 figures, Visit Raleigh estimates more than $51 million in direct visitor spending to the greater Raleigh area annually, and drawing more than 1 million total attendees since moving from Nashville to the City of Oaks in 2013. And those numbers will continue to increase further, since the agreement for the event to stay in Raleigh continues through 2021. “We couldn’t be more excited to hold IBMA’s World of Bluegrass in Raleigh through 2021. We continue to find new ways to celebrate bluegrass music we didn’t know were possible until being embraced by this community,” said Schiminger. “World of Bluegrass is our genre’s biggest annual event, where we help our professionals connect and learn, where we shine a bright light on our best, and where we share our great music with so many new and lifelong fans! Our deepest gratitude goes out to the City of Raleigh, Mayor McFarlane, the City Council, the Local Organizing Committee and Pinecone, along with Wake County and its Commission, and to the people of Raleigh for the exuberant welcome we have received here.” And the community has embraced IBMA and bluegrass and looks forward

to the whole week of events each year, no doubt contributing to Raleigh’s growing reputation as a leading live music destination here in the Southeast, said William Lewis, executive director of the Raleigh-based non-profit Pinecone, co-chair of the Local Organizing Committee, and IBMA Board Member. “Thousands of visitors from all over the world come to Raleigh for this event and take home lasting memories from their experiences here each year,” he said. “IBMA members call World of Bluegrass a ‘homecoming’, and we’re glad they all consider Raleigh a second home.” More information about World of Bluegrass and the Wide Open Festival is available by visiting ibma.org or pinecone.org.

IBMA 2018 Emerging Artist of the Year, the Po’ Ramblin’ Boys Left: Pinecone – The Piedmont Council of Traditional Music – exhibiting in the Raleigh Convention Center Below: 919 Magazine again sponsored the World of Bluegrass Youth Stage, located at the entrance to the Raleigh Convention Center. Crowds at the stage have grown significantly each year of the festival.

An estimated crowd of more than 200,000 attended the 2018 World of Bluegrass this year in downtown Raleigh

18

www.919Magazine.com

November/December 2018


BLUEGRASS | UPFRONT | 919

Cookin’ With Grass Cookbook Features Recipes From Many Favorite Bluegrass Artists

B

ecky Cantrell is well known on the bluegrass music circuit. A lovely woman with a smile as wide as the Blue Ridge Parkway, Cantrell has compiled a hefty cookbook filled with homegrown recipes by well-known recording artists in the bluegrass genre. She also happens to be the wife of Kyle Cantrell, known by many bluegrass fans as the voice of SiriusXM Radio’s Bluegrass Junction. Becky’s book is a treasure of recipes passed down for generations from family to family by bluegrass entertainers. How about Grandma Malloy’s Delicious Rolls by Becky Buller (Page 110) or Claire Lynch’s Pecan Pie (Page 190)? Or Steep Canyon Rangers’ Woody Platt shares Rivers’ Sweet Hot Chicken (Page 6)? The book features more than 200 pages of easy-to-read recipes broken down into sections starting with Appetizers, Soups and Salads, Entrees, Breads, Side dishes and rounded up with Desserts. This cookbook is the perfect gift for any bluegrass fan or cookbook lover. For more information or to purchase a copy, contact Becky directly on Facebook (@cookingwithgrass). November/December 2018

www.919Magazine.com

World Of Bluegrass Short Takes • Lots of highlights at the 29th Annual International Bluegrass Music Awards (a really fun event that 919’rs can attend event at the Duke Energy Performing Arts Center just by buying a ticket), but the biggest was probably Ricky Skaggs receiving the highest honor in bluegrass music. Skaggs was inducted into the IBMA Bluegrass Hall of Fame (along with Paul Williams, Tom T. Hall and the late Dixie Hall). • North Carolina-based Balsam Range won the coveted Entertainer of the Year Award for 2018 in Raleigh. The group also won the award in 2014. • The International Bluegrass Music Association Foundation announced a new scholarship opportunity to recognize developing academic scholars researching or studying bluegrass music. The $500 cash award for 2019-2020 academic year was named after bluegrass historian Neil Rosenberg. • Kristin Scott Benson received the 2018 Steve Martin Prize for Excellence in Banjo and Bluegrass. Benson – the banjo player for The Grascals – received a $50,000 honorarium and a limited edition art piece by Eric Fischl as a trophy. • If you thought it was just about music at the World of Bluegrass, then you missed: The North Carolina Whole Hog Barbecue State Championship, the Dance Tent and the WOB Art Market. • The Trailblazers (from Rowan County, North Carolina) won the 2018 Momentum Band of the Year Award. The Momentum Awards selection process differs from other IBMA awards because it recognizes professionals in the early stages of their careers.

19


919

20

|

ALL THINGS CAROLINA

www.919Magazine.com

November/December 2018


ALL THINGS CAROLINA | 919

A Passport to Winter Fun How to Enjoy North Carolina’s Exceptional Wine Experience

T

he Yadkin Valley Winter Wine & Beer Passport provides a fun and economical way to experience North Carolina wine country this winter.

Continues on Page 22

November/December 2018

www.919Magazine.com

21


919 | ALL THINGS CAROLINA

Continued from Page 21

Each passport serves as a ticket to tastings at 10 award-winning wineries and two craft breweries in Surry County, located in the heart of the Yadkin Valley wine region. The program has expanded to 12 tasting opportunities this year, thanks to the additions of Shelton Vineyards and Old North State Winery. Passport holders also receive a keepsake wall-mounted cork holder, specials at six lodging properties convenient to the vineyards, and discounts at 20 restaurants and shops. The passports are valid for nearly four months, starting Nov. 23 of this year and running through March 20, 2019. “It’s an enjoyable way to celebrate winter – a treasure map to great wineries and breweries throughout Surry

Wine tastings are a big part of the Yadkin Valley experience

What To Know About Winter Wine Passports Passports for winter 2018-2019 are valid from Nov. 23, 2018, through March 20, 2019. Simply make a onetime purchase of the Yadkin Valley Winter Wine & Beer Passport and enjoy 12 wine and beer tastings, a commemorative keepsake, and discounts at local merchants, restaurants, and accommodations. 22

Passport features include: • Tastings at 10 wineries • Tastings at two breweries • Keepsake wall-mounted cork holder • Lodging discounts at six properties • Discounts at local restaurants and retailers www.919Magazine.com

Early bird purchase price is $54 for an individual passport and $89 for a couples passport through Nov. 22. Regular pricing of $64 for individuals and $99 for couples begins Nov. 23. Estimated value of each passport is $225. Passport holders receive their keepsake wall-mounted cork holder during their first tasting. Passports may be purchased at yadkinvalleync.com or at participating wineries and breweries. For more information, call 336-526-1111. November/December 2018


ALL THINGS CAROLINA | 919

County,” said Louis Jeroslow, winemaker at Elkin Creek Vineyard. Participating wineries for the winter of 2018-19 include Adagio Vineyards, Carolina Heritage, Elkin Creek, Grassy Creek, Old North State, Roaring River, Round Peak, Shelton Vineyards, Slightly Askew and Stony Knoll. The breweries on tap this winter are Angry Troll and Skull Camp. “This is the ninth year we’ve offered the program, and people love it,” said Pat Colwell of Carolina Heritage Vineyard & Winery. “And it makes a popular Christmas gift for people who like wine and beer.” Price for the passport (after Nov. 23) is $64 for individuals and $99 for couples. The estimated value of each passport is $225. For details or to purchase a passport, visit yadkinvalleync.com or call the Yadkin Valley Chamber of Commerce at 336-526-1111.

Where To Use Your Yadkin Valley Passport BREWERIES Angry Troll Brewing 223 East Main Street Elkin, NC 336-258-2251 angrytrollbrewing.com Elkin Brewery & Restaurant 2000 North Bridge Street Elkin, NC 336-258-8124 skullcampbrewing.com

WINERIES Grassy Creek Vineyard & Winery 235 Chatham Cottage Circle State Road, NC 336-835-2458 grassycreekvineyard.com

Elkin Creek Vineyard 318 Elkin Creek Mill Road Elkin, NC 336-526-5119 elkincreekvineyard.com Roaring River Vineyards 493 Brewer Mill Road Traphill, NC 336-957-2332 roaringrivervineyards.com Shelton Vineyards 286 Cabernet Lane Dobson, NC 336-366-4724 sheltonvineyards.com Round Peak Vineyards 765 Round Peak Church Road Mount Airy, Nc 336-352-5595 roundpeak.com Slightly Askew 913 North Bridge Street Elkin, NC 336-835-2700 slightlyaskewwines.com Carolina Heritage Vineyard & Winery 170 Heritage Vines Way Elkin, NC 336-366-3301 carolinaheritagevineyards.com Adagio Vineyards 139 Benge Drive Elkin, NC 336-258-2333 adagiovineyards.com Old North State Winery 308 North Main Street Mount Airy, NC 336-789-9463 oldnorthstatewinery.com Stoney Knoll Vineyards 1143 Stoney Knoll Road Dobson, NC 336-374-5752 stonyknollvineyards.com

The Yadkin Valley Winter Wine & Beer Passport offers a fun, economical way to experience North Carolina wine country November/December 2018

www.919Magazine.com

23


919 |

ALL THINGS CAROLINA

Old North State Winery Founded in 2002 by Ben Webb, who studied both Viticulture and Enology in college, and -- upon graduating -began his quest to make outstanding North Carolina wines by planting a 10-acre vineyard on his family farm in Eastern NC. As the vines matured, he then planted 18 more acres in the Yadkin Valley. It would be the grapes from these early plantings that Webb would use to create an outstanding list of award-winning wines. In addition to his wines, Webb wanted to do something to help the entire Mount Airy economy. So, rather than house the winery at the Wine tastings at Old North State are in a fun, upbeat atmosphere

vineyard, he located Old North State in downtown Mount Airy – with the goal of re-establishing the downtown area as a vibrant, growing economic center. Housed in a former Hardware store built in 1890 on Main Street, Ben and his wife, Ellie, created a fun, hip, upbeat atmosphere combining wine tasting tours, a cool ambiance, outstanding food, live entertainment and events to create a true entertainment and dining destination -- featuring locally grown and freshly prepared specials by world-renowned chef Chris Wishart. 308 N. Main St. Mount Airy, NC 336-789-9463 oldnorthstatewinery.com

Roaring River Vineyards Situated on a scenic river near Stone Mountain State Park, Roaring River Vineyards offers the unique opportunity to sip wine overlooking the flowing water in the North Carolina foothills. With amazing views of the river and historic Brewer Mill, the winery 493 Brewer Mill Road Traphill, NC 336-957-2332 roaringrivervineyards.com

features Chez Josephine Restaurant, lodging, trout fishing, and an event venue for meetings, weddings and other special occasions, near the Blue Ridge Parkway. An outdoor fireplace is available for making s’mores, sipping wine, or simply watching the flames dance.

Roaring River’s Tom Silvey during a wine tasting

Elkin Creek Vineyard A hidden gem, Elkin Creek Vineyard offers an inviting tasting room in a creek-side setting, with special weekend offerings that include hand-madeto-order pizzas baked in an authentic wood-fire brick oven. Elkin Creek Vineyard features hand-made-toorder pizzas baked in an authentic wood-fire brick oven on weekends 24

www.919Magazine.com

The venue has a wedding/special event venue, and four private, creekside cabins with luxury amenities. 318 Elkin Creek Mill Road Elkin, NC 336-526-5119 elkincreekvineyard.com November/December 2018


ALL THINGS CAROLINA | 919

Carolina Heritage Vineyard &Winery Located in the heart of the Yadkin Valley along the foothills of the beautiful Blue Ridge Mountains, this fertile, sun-soaked landscape is the perfect place for our Carolina Heritage’s grapes to grow unadulterated. Organically raised and handpicked, the fruit from the winery’s nine acres of hybrid and muscadine winegrapes Entrance to Carolina Heritage’s tasting room

and 1.5 acres of blueberries are used to produce a variety of wines. The winery uses no animal by-products or grains in the production of its wines, resulting in wines that are “vegan friendly” and gluten-free. 170 Heritage Vines Way Elkin, NC 336-366-3301 carolinaheritagevineyards.com

Round Peak Vineyards Round Peak Vineyards features 13 acres of vineyards producing 10 French and Italian varietals – and all wines are estate bottled. 765 Round Peak Church Road Mount Airy, Nc 336-352-5595 roundpeak.com

Skull Camp is now also brewing beer on-site. In addition to tastings, tours are also available of the dog-friendly winery. Both the winery and tasting room are available for weddings, meetings or private events – and two rental units on property are available.

Round Peak offers outstanding views of the vineyards

Shelton Vineyards Founded in 1999 by brothers Charlie and Ed Shelton, Shelton Wineries is the largest family-owned estate winery in North Carolina. The winery features 90 acres of grapes, a state-of-the-art tasting room, an award-winning restaurant, an event pavilion and picnic areas. Shelton uses French, American and Harvest Grill at Shelton Vineyards features gourmet dishes infused with local flavors November/December 2018

www.919Magazine.com

Hungarian oak barrels, housed in three rooms – including a barrel cave that evokes old-world charm. Harvest Grill at Shelton Vineyards features gourmet dishes infused with local flavors, a fireplace in the main dining room, and a vibrant bar. 286 Cabernet Lane Dobson, NC 336-366-4724 sheltonvineyards.com 25


919 | UPFRONT | PLACES

Tips

on Exploring the Wine Region

North Carolina’s Yadkin Valley offers much more to do and to explore, while visiting the wineries. From hiking and other outdoor activities, to enjoying local cuisine and fine dining, to listening to live music – the region offers much for visitors of all ages.

DOBSON The County seat of Surry County, Dobson is proud of its fun, down-home atmosphere and scenic surroundings. The nearby Yadkin River makes Dobson a destination for spending a relaxing afternoon drifting downstream on a canoe, kayak or tube – and the Mitchell River is stocked with brook and trout. Surry Community College in Dobson also offers a unique viticulture and enology degree program that includes five acres of teaching vineyards and a

state-of-the-art bonded winery known as Surry Cellars. As for where to stay, many nearby wineries offer accommodations, bed and breakfasts can be found, and a number of hotels – including the centrally located Hampton Inn & Suites, featuring a lobby wine bar (the only Hampton Inn in the U.S. with a wine bar) serving many Shelton Vineyards varieties. Surry Community College offers a unique viticulture and enology degree program

MOUNT AIRY Mount Airy is the quintessential Southern small town. Of course, it’s known by many as Mayberry, Mount Airy is the birthplace of Andy Griffith and inspired the fictional town depicted on television’s “The Andy Griffith Show.” The “Andy and Opie” statue in front of the Andy Griffith Museum in Mount Airy

And there’s plenty to see that’s Mayberry-themed, from the vintage Ford Squad Cars at Wally’s Service Station (providing guided tours of the sites, including Andy’s childhood home), to Floyd’s Barber Shop and, of course, the Andy Griffith Museum. Next year’s big celebration is Mount Airy is the 30th Annual Mayberry Days, planned for Sept. 23-29, featuring a popular parade, lots of live music and more. Mount Airy’s rich music tradition lives on today with live performances at the Historic Earle Theatre and preserved memories in the Old-Time Music Heritage Hall. The area’s signature old-time sound involves instru-

mental numbers led by the fiddle and banjo. Each Saturday morning, WPAQ (740 AM) broadcasts its live radio show – the second-longest-running live radio show in the nation, trailing only the Grand Ole Opry – from the Earle Theatre stage. Like any good Southern town, Mount Airy has plenty of comfort food, from classic meat-and-threes to smoked pork barbecue. Several local restaurants also serve the county’s signature dessert, a cobbler-like concoction known as sonker. The town also has a number of boutiques, specialty shops and small businesses in its vibrant downtown.

Mount Airy inspired “The Andy Griffith Show”, and downtown includes many reminders 26

www.919Magazine.com

November/December 2018


PLACES | UPFRONT | 919

PILOT MOUNTAIN Pilot Mountain’s namesake Granite Knob has been a landmark for centuries. Native Americans and early settlers used it to determine their location, and today travelers see it as a guide to rest and relaxation. Local stores and restaurants dot downtown, which also is home to charming bed & breakfast inns.

ELKIN The small-town setting becomes a picturesque backdrop for events throughout the year in Elkin, such as monthly art hikes, classic car cruise ins and the annual Yadkin Valley Pumpkin Festival. Downtown is filled with boutiques, antique stores and other charming shops – and also the newly restored art deco Reeves Theater, which features live music, seating for 252 people, and a café. More than 20 wineries are within 20 miles of downtown Elkin, which is also home to Angry Troll Brewing. Elkin is home to a trailhead for the Overmountain Victory National Historic Trail, a North Carolina Civil War Trails site, a portion of the Mountainsto-Sea Trail, and newer improved trail that leads to Carter Falls. And tubing, kayaking and canoeing are popular activities on the Yadkin River that runs through town. Elkin provides access to several trails, including a newer one that leads to Carter Falls

November/December 2018

Pilot Mountain State Park, just south of town, is home to the mountain that rises more than 2,000 ft. in elevation, as well as a 49-site campground and miles of trails. Traverse those trails by foot, bicycle or horseback. The Yadkin River Canoe Trail flows through the park and is ideal for paddling. The park’s rocky cliffs offer challenging terrain for rock

climbing and rappelling. Other outdoor adventure in the area includes soaring through the treetops on a zip line or teeing it up at the local golf club, where Pilot Mountain’s signature peak is visible on more than half of the 18 holes.

Surry County is the Center Of North Carolina’s Popular And Growing Wine Region More than a dozen of the 40-plus wineries in the Yadkin Valley are located in Surry County, making it the center of this popular wine region. In fact, the Yadkin Valley American Viticultural Area was born in Surry County in 2003, spearheaded by Charlie and Ed Shelton of Shelton Vineyards. That prestigious designation solidified the Yadkin Valley as a bona fide wine region and spurred growth of wineries in the valley. Thirteen wineries now operate in the county: Adagio, Carolina Heritage, Elkin Creek, Grassy Creek, Herrera Vineyards, Hutton Vineyards, JOLO, Old North State, Round Peak, Shelton Vineyards, Slightly Askew, Stony Knoll and Surry Cellars. Two more wineries, Jones von Drehle and McRitchie, are located just outside the county and work closely with their counterparts in Surry County. “The wines get better and better every year as the vines age. Because of that, our wines are winning more awards and we’re getting more exposure,” said Surry County Manager Chris Knopf. “People traveling to a wine destination want to have a lot of options. We have that in Surry County.” Each of Surry’s wineries has an interesting story, from the state’s first www.919Magazine.com

certified organic winery at Carolina Heritage Vineyards to the officially-designated North Carolina Century Farm at Stony Knoll Vineyards, which has been in the same family since 1896. Shelton Vineyards, meanwhile, is the state's largest family-owned estate winery. Another strength of Surry wineries is location. The Yadkin Valley features a temperate climate, loamy soil, and latitudes similar to Napa Valley. Elevations range from 800 to 1,200 feet, ideal for growing French vinifera grapes. These grapes, also known as European vinifera, make up roughly 70 percent of the area’s grapes, with muscadines making up much of the remainder. This differentiates the Yadkin Valley from other North Carolina regions, where muscadines are predominant and produce sweeter wines. Yadkin wines showcase the classic varietals, such as: Chardonnay, Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon, Syrah, Sauvignon Blanc, Cabernet Franc, Pinot Grigio, Viognier and Riesling. Malbec and Tannat also play an important role in the valley, along with some hybrid grapes, such as Cynthiana, Traminette and Chambourcin. SOURCE: yadkinvalleync.com 27


919 | STUDENT

Exploring the Future By TILDON DUNN 919 Magazine Writer

919 Magazine Photos by Catherine Davis Photography

Whether Backpacking, Camping or Filmmaking, Ramond Youman Shows He Has a True Passion

Youman on campus at North Carolina State University

28

www.919Magazine.com

November/December 2018


STUDENT | 919

R

amond Youman really enjoys the outdoors. “When it’s time to disconnect, backpacking and camping is definitely the way to go,” the 18-year-old college freshman said. “And Raleigh is great for that.” Youman has spent about 10 years in the 919, including attending elementary and middle schools in the Wake Forest area and – after a stint with his family in Oregon – graduated from Leesville Road High earlier this year. He now attends North Carolina State University in Raleigh, majoring in political science.

‘When it’s time to disconnect, backpacking and camping is definitely the way to go.’

RAYMOND YOUMAN LRHS Graduate

“I think a really cool thing about (Raleigh) is how many opportunities there are to explore,” he said. “You can check out the museums downtown or decide to (visit) Falls Lake for a multi-day backpacking adventure only 20 minutes away.” Youman emphasized that he loves anything that gets him outside and exploring. “That’s why filmmaking has always been a central hobby of mine,” he emphasized. “I get to shoot scenes in unique locations with like-minded people.” Youman’s father, Chris, works in market intelligence -- and mother, Renee, is an interior designer. His sister, Erika, is a senior at Leesville Road High. The family lives in North Raleigh’s Boulder Creek neighborhood. At LRHS, Youman said he especially enjoyed history and media classes, including writing video announcements and newspaper segments as part of classwork. In addition to consistently making the Honor Roll, he was involved in several programs and honors societies on campus – and was named a North Carolina Academic Scholar through the completion of the academically challenging AP coursework. Youman considers one of his greatest accomplishments was gaining his certificates of completion through teaching English in Nagykanizsa, Hungary, during two summers. “Teaching to kids abroad in a fun, camp environment really helped open my eyes to how

amazing other parts of the world are,” he noted. “I still talk to several of them every day; they’re so cool!” As for the future, he knows with certainty that – no matter his vocation – he will be a filmmaker in some capacity. “That’s a passion that will never fade for me,” Youman said. “Big or small screen, I want to make movies that I am proud of and make others think.” His father agrees. “He’s always been very curious and up for creating, writing, telling or filming a good story,” Chris Youman said. “He’s pretty funny, too.”

Youman was a North Carolina Academic Scholar at Leesville Road High in North Raleigh

RAYMOND YOUMAN PROFILE AGE: 18 RESIDENCE: Raleigh (Boulder Creek neighborhood) HIGH SCHOOL: Leesville Road High (graduate) COLLEGE: North Carolina State (class of 2022; Political Science) PARENTS: Chris and Renee Youman SIBLING: Erika, 17 (LRHS senior) INTERESTS: Mountain biking, backpacking, skateboarding, outdoors activities, basketball, filmmaking, photography, music making November/December 2018

www.919Magazine.com

29


919 |

H O L I D AY E N T E R TA I N I N G

Hassle-Free Entertaining 25 Tips To Guarantee A Successful Holiday Party Or Get-Together By SUZY BETH SARVER 919 Magazine Writer

M

y mother has always been the expert party hostess. For years I have watched her lay out impressive holiday spreads and entertain large groups effortlessly. Her work has been worthy of her own show or entertainment book. I too enjoy every aspect of entertaining -- the planning, the food prep, the decorating and -- okay, maybe not the cleanup; however, over the years, I have added many of my own party touches and learned some ways to make it a great time and hopefully a memorable experience for my guests. Here are simple tips to make your holiday gathering a success:

• Set the dining room table two days before the holiday meal or buffet layout. Locate your serving dishes and utensils and arrange as you plan to have it on the event day. • Use sturdy shoe boxes, inverted bowls and other items to add height to your buffet display. I work with two or three table cloths. The main base color and then a secondary one to cover the boxes that will hold serving platters and other food items. 30

• Wash and polish wine glasses, goblets and glassware the day before. • Prep as much food as you can 2-3 days before your party. • Use ice cube trays to freeze orange slices, maraschino cherries for festive holiday drink add-ons. • Stock your bathrooms with extra toilet paper, fresh towels or holiday throw away towelettes. • Always have bar napkins available -- this is a hostess must! Nobody wants to stand around holding a slippery wet cocktail glass. • Use fresh-cut pine sprigs to liven up your guest bathrooms. • Hire a high school student to serve as greeter and to take coats for your arriving guests. • If your driveway connects to your walkway, keep a side of your driveway clear so guests may access your front door safely. Candle luminaries are an excellent way to section off a portion of your driveway for pedestrian traffic and they look so pretty and inviting. • Always make more ice than you think you will need. www.919Magazine.com

November/December 2018


H O L I D AY E N T E R TA I N I N G | 9 1 9

• Pipe holiday music outside on the porch. Simple to do with a Bluetooth wireless speaker, and it’s a great way to greet your guests. • Print your home address on a 3 x 5 card and keep it near your front door for anyone who may need an Uber driver. • Establish a #hashtag for your party -- if that’s your thing. Guests posting pictures on social media can participate with your event. Simply place a few cards around with your #hashtag identified. • Forget the high priced “photo booths”. Create your own by rolling holiday wrapping paper across a section of wall space. Place a side table with hats, glasses and other holiday props for an excellent photo and “selfie station”. • Place trivia cards around the house for guests to use as ice-breakers and conversation starters. Topics can include facts about how the host and hostess met, fun facts about other guests and a little holiday history trivia. • Eliminate ugly plastic water bottles scattered around your party by renting or investing in a large, glass countertop water dispenser. Add lemon and lime slices and place with small acrylic water cups. Does the job and cuts down on waste. • Get the kids and teens into the party planning action by making easy-homemade coasters. Get a group of cardboard Christmas cards together and use scalloped edged scissors (scrapbooking shears) to create circle and square cut outs. Unique and disposable. • Use cinnamon sticks, cloves and fresh orange slices in a pot of water on a low back burner to gently scent your kitchen -- and always be sure to add water and check routinely. November/December 2018

www.919Magazine.com

• Cut your thermostat back substantially prior to guest arrival. A house filled with people heats up quickly. Have a window ready to be cracked or a fresh air source available with an adjacent lanai, garage or covered party space. • Establish a specified area to place gifts from arriving guests; a small table or counter space works great. • Keep a small first aid kit handy in your kitchen cabinet stocked with bandages, antiacids, headache medicine -- anything you might need for yourself or a guest (and this helps avoid leaving your party to track down such items). • Inexpensive small “thank you gifts” are a wonderful gesture for friends and family to take home (think cocoa mix with a candy cane, a small bag of wrapped cookies, chocolates, a sprig of mistletoe or a tree ornament, just to name a few). • Miniature, throw-away clear plastic appetizer cups from your local party supplier (with or without demi spoons) are an excellent choice for easy tray passing items and they look so impressive. Suggestions include tasty items like shrimp and grits, chocolate mousse, a few stalks of celery and carrots standing upright in a dollop of ranch dressing, mini-meatballs in Cheerwine sauce, pretzel sticks in pimento cheese, or just get creative. • And, most important, make sure you and your family get plenty of rest and stay hydrated. You want to look and feel your best for your special event. Post your pictures this holiday season at #919Party2018 we will select a few favorites for our next issue of 919 Magazine.

31


9 1 9 | H O L I D AY E V E N T S

Holiday Events

RALEIGH • 11/17: 74th Annual Raleigh Christmas Parade, presented by Shop Local Raleigh; 9:40 am to 12 pm; downtown Raleigh (televised live beginning at 10 am on ABC11). Info: facebook.com/raleighchristmasparade. • 11/30: Tree Lighting Party, 6:30-8:30 pm; free event featuring a chance to meet Santa, carriage and train rides, face painting and more; Brier Creek Commons, Brier Creek Parkway in North Raleigh. Info: shopbriercreekcommons.com. • 11/30-12/9: ‘The Santaland Diaries”, presented by Theatre in the Park; check website for times, ticket information; Theatre in the Park, 107 Pullen Rd, Raleigh. Info: 919-8316058 or theatreinthepark.com. • 12/1: An Evening with Elves, 6-8:30 pm; museum play, holiday activities, s’mores outdoors, festive food, snowflake fairy; members adv tickets: $25 ($30 non-members); Marbles Kids Museum, 201 E Hargett St, Raleigh. Info: 919-8344040, marbleskidsmuseum.org.

Raleigh Christmas Parade on Saturday, Nov. 17 Downtown The 74th Annual Raleigh Christmas Parade is 9:40 a.m. to 12 p.m. on Saturday, Nov 17 in downtown Raleigh. The largest Christmas parade on the East Coast between Washington DC and Atlanta, the free Raleigh event is presented by Shop Local Raleigh and sponsored by ABC11, which will broadcast the parade live beginning at 10 a.m. (and again on Christmas morning). The parade begins on Hillsborough Street at St. Mary’s Street and travels to the State Capitol, turns right onto Salisbury Street, turns left onto Morgan Street, and turns right onto Fayetteville Street before continuing to Lenoir Street and disbanding. For more information, visit facebook.com/raleighchristmasparade.

• 12/6-9, 11-16: Holiday Express, featuring a holiday wonderland, sledding on snow covered hill, train ride, carousel rides, crafts and visits with Santa, 4-9 pm; $11.29 per person (age 2-under free); benefit for Crabtree Rotary Foundation, presented by Raleigh Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Resources; Pullen Park, 520 Ashe Ave, Raleigh. Info: raleighnc.gov/holidayexpress. • 12/5-9: “A Christmas Carol” by Ira David Wood III, presented by Theatre in the Park; Duke Energy Center for the Performing Arts, 2 E South St, Raleigh. Info: 800-653-8000 for performance times and ticket information. • 12/8-9: 47th Historical Oakwood Candlelight Tour, 1-7 pm; walk through history, as about a dozen homeowners open their doors to visitors; $25 in advance, $30 after 12/2; The Tucker House, 418 N Person, Raleigh. Info: historicoakwood.org. • 12/12: A Choral Family Christmas, 6:30 pm; featuring the North Carolina Master Chorale; Meymandi Concert Hall, Duke Energy Center for Performing Arts, 2 E South St, Raleigh. Info, tickets: 919-996-8700, dukeenergycenterraleigh.com. 32

• 12/13: Holiday Blast, 7 pm; featuring the Triangle Brass Band; Meymandi Concert Hall, Duke Energy Center for Performing Arts, 2 E South St, Raleigh. Info, tickets: 919996-8700, dukeenergycenterraleigh.com. • 12/14-23: ‘The Santaland Diaries”, presented by Theatre in the Park; check website for times, ticket information; Theatre in the Park, 107 Pullen Rd, Raleigh. Info: 919-831-6058 or theatreinthepark.com. • 12/14-23: “The Nutcracker”, performed by the Carolina Ballet; various times and ticket prices; Memorial Auditorium, Duke Energy Center for Performing Arts, 2 E South St, Raleigh. Info, tickets: 919-996-8700, dukeenergycenterraleigh.com. • 12/15-16: Raleigh Ringers Holiday Concert, Meymandi Concert Hall, Duke Energy Center for Performing Arts, 2 E South St, Raleigh. Info, times, tickets: 919-996-8700, dukeenergycenterraleigh.com. • 12/21-22: Holiday Cirque Spectacular; part of the North Carolina Symphony Pops Series; Meymandi Concert Hall, Duke Energy Center for Performing Arts, 2 E South St, Raleigh. Info, times, tickets: 919-996-8700, dukeenergycenterraleigh.com. • 12/23: A Candlelight Christmas, 7:30 pm; North Carolina Symphony, with the NC Symphony Children’s Chorus; Meymandi Concert Hall, Duke Energy Center for Performing Arts, 2 E South St, Raleigh. Info, tickets: 919-996-8700, dukeenergycenterraleigh.com. • 12/31: iHeartMedia Triangle’s Official New Year’s Eve, 9 pm-2 am; 3 ballrooms, 3 DJs, full bars, champagne toast, party favors, more; tickets, $40-$350; Sheraton Raleigh Hotel, 421 S Salisbury St, Raleigh; info: 860-800-2016, nyedowntownraleigh.com.

www.919Magazine.com

November/December 2018


H O L I D AY E V E N T S | 9 1 9

MORRISVILLE • 11/16-18: Park West Village’s Winter Wonderland, 5-9 pm; 3-day celebration of the season, featuring activities, entertainment and more; front of the Stone Theatre-Park West 14 Village Market Place, The District at Park West Village, 3400 Village Market Place, Morrisville. Info: 919-467-8880, parkwestvillage.net. • 11/30: Town of Morrisville’s annual Christmas Tree Lighting, 7-9 pm; hot chocolate, cookies, arts and crafts, trackless train rides and visits with Santa; free; Indian Creek Trailhead, 101 Town Hall Dr. Info: 919-463-7110, townofmorrisville.org. • 12/3: Morrisville Senior Christmas Party, 12-3 pm; holiday music, catered lunch, gift exchange, more; $3 fee; age 55over; Cedar Fork Community Center, 1050B Town Hall Dr. Info: 919-463-7110, townofmorrisville.org. • 12/5: Morrisville Chamber of Commerce Holiday Reception, featuring fun, food and networking; 5-7:30 pm; free to employees of member organizations; District Station, 2312 Bristol Creek Dr. Info: 919-463-7155, morrisvillechamber. org.

• 12/6: O’Holly Night, 5-7:30 pm; games, raffles, silent auction, food, performances and more; Holly Springs Elementary, 401 Holly Springs Rd, Holly Springs. Info: 919-5572660, wcpss.net/hollyspringses. • 12/7: Main Street Christmas, 6-8 pm; free; downtown Holly Springs. Info: 919-557-3930, hollyspringsnc.us. • 12/8: Route 55 Jazz Orchestra presents “Santa Dance”; 7:30 pm; $10 (adults), $7 (seniors, students); Holly Springs Cultural Center, 300 W Ballentine St. Info: 919-567-4000, hollyspringsnc.us. • 12/8: Happy Holly Days Christmas Parade, 11 am; free; downtown Holly Springs. Info: 919-552-6221, hollyspringsnc.us. • 12/15: 5th Annual Suggly Sweater 5K and Fun Run, 9:30 am-12:30 pm; benefit for Meg’s Smile Foundation; come dressed in your favorite ugly sweater; Sugg Farm Park, Grigsby Ave, Holly Springs. Info: sugglysweater5K.com • 12/15: Holly Springs Community Band presents “Winter Wonderland”; 7:30 pm; $5 (adults), $3 (seniors, students); Holly Springs Cultural Center, 300 W Ballentine St. Info: 919-567-4000, hollyspringsnc.us.

APEX/HOLLY SPRINGS • 11/30: Christmas on Salem Street; Friday Night Christmas Tree Lighting, Caroling, Sleigh Rides – and Santa and Mrs. Claus. Info: apexdowntown.com. • 12/1: Apex Rotary Christmas Parade, 5-8 pm; route is from intersection of Ambergate Station and The Peakway, then down Salem Street, and ending at the Apex Public Works buildings on Upchurch Street. Info: apexrotary.org. • 12/1: Christmas Make and Take, 9 am-12 pm and 1-4 pm; age 6-8; $10 (residents); join Santa’s elves and make a Christmas decoration, hot chocolate and cookies; Bass Lake Park, 900 Bass Lake Rd. Info: 919-557-2496, hollyspringsnc. us. • 12/2: Historic Home Tour, 1-5 pm; sponsored by Apex Historical Society; check website for list of homes, ticket information. Info: apexhistoricalsociety.com.

WAKEFIELD, ROLESVILLE, WAKE FOREST • 11/30: Lighting of Wake Forest; 6-8 pm; free; Centennial Plaza, Wake Forest Town Hall, 301 S Brooks St, Wake Forest. Info: 919-435-9415 or visit wakeforestnc.gov. • 11/30, 12/1-3: Walk Through Bethlehem, a living nativity program to benefit Tri-Area Ministries; 6-9 pm; Wake Forest Presbyterian Church, 12605 Capital Blvd. Info: wakeforestpres.org. • 11/30: Schmoozapalooza Mega Networking, sponsored by Wake Forest Area Chamber of Commerce; 9-11:30 am; $20 for members, $25 for non-members; The Mill Room at The Factory, 1839 S Main St. Info: 919-556-1519, wakeforestchamber.org. • 12/1: Downtown Holiday Open House; 10 a.m.; downtown Wake Forest; free event includes special offers and complimentary refreshments at participating shops and restaurants, activities, and much more. Info: wakeforestnc. gov. • 12/1: Pictures With Santa, and face painting; 10 am-3 pm; The Cotton Company Event Gallery (2nd floor), 306 S White St, Wake Forest. Info: wakeforestnc.gov. • 12/1: Christmas Historic Home Tour; 1-7 p.m.; tickets, $20 (must purchase in advance). Info: wakeforestnc.gov. • 12/1: 3rd Annual Wake Forest Holiday Artisans’ Market, 9 am-3 pm; showcasing items handmade by 40-plus North Carolina artisans and crafts people; free; Wake Forest Renaissance Centre, 405 S Brooks St. Info: wakeforestnc.gov. • 12/2: Rolesville Christmas Parade; 2-3 pm; free; downtown Rolesville (along Main Street). Info: 919-562-7069, rolesvillechamber.org. • 12/3: Community Christmas Dinner; 6:30 pm; tickets, $15; The Forks Cafeteria, 339 S. Brooks St, Wake Forest. Info: wakeforestnc.gov. • 12/7, 14, 16, 18: Visit with Santa; 6-8 pm (except 12/16 (2-4 pm); free; Rolesville Chamber of Commerce, 200 E Young St, Rolesville. Info: 919-562-7069, rolesvillechamber. org. • 12/8: Wake Forest Christmas Parade; 1 p.m.; free; South White Street and South Brooks Street. Info: Lynnette Beadle, 919-435-9416. 33


9 1 9 | H O L I D AY E V E N T S

‘A Christmas Carol’

that he become director of the school Christmas pageant. Charlie Brown accepts, but this proves to be a frustrating endeavor. When an attempt to restore the proper holiday spirit with a forlorn little Christmas fir tree fails, he needs Linus’ help to discover the real meaning of Christmas.

With a Twist

Performances Planned For Raleigh and Durham Throughout December Theatre in the Park closes out 2018 with a robust schedule of entertainment –including the iconic and world-renowned Ira David Wood III’s “A Christmas Carol” -- guaranteed to entertain and engage audiences, Cited as “one of the most successful shows in North Carolina theatre history,” A Christmas Carol” has enjoyed critically acclaimed tours to England and France. With more than one million people having experienced the magic of “A Christmas Carol” throughout the years, the show regularly sells out. A few of its honors include being named one of the “Top 20 Events In The Southeast,” the Metro Ovation Award, the Triangle Arts & Entertainment Reader’s Choice Award, proclamations from the Mayor of Raleigh and the Governor of North Carolina, proclamations from Compiegne, France and Kingston-Upon-Hull, England, and the distinct privilege of being the first theatrical production at Durham Performing Arts Center. 34

• Ira David Wood III’s “A Christmas Carol” is scheduled Dec. 5-9 at Duke Energy Center for the Performing Arts in Raleigh. A musical comedy adaptation of the Dickens classic, the show has been performed annually since 1974 and has been named one of the “Top 20 Events in the Southeast.” Call 800-653-8000 for performance times and ticket information. • “A Christmas Carol” continues Dec. 12-16 at Durham Performing Arts Center in Durham. or 919680-2787 for performance times and ticket information in Durham. Other holiday-themed shows planned at Theatre in the Park include: •

“A Charlie Brown Christmas” is scheduled Nov. 30-Dec. 9: When Charlie Brown complains about the overwhelming materialism he sees among everyone during the Christmas season, Lucy suggests www.919Magazine.com

“The Santaland Diaries” is planned for Dec. 14-23. Jesse Gephart returns for the 12th year spreading holiday cheer as ‘Crumpet the Elf’. This one man show relives an outof-work, young actor’s brief stint as an elf in Macy’s department store during the holiday season. Based on David Sedaris’ short story, Santaland is filled with highly charged, politically incorrect, irreverent commentaries of fellow elves, Santa’s true colors, and the raucous adults and children who come to visit St Nick each year. Come laugh, drink and be merry as you join us for this adult’s only holiday treat that is sure to make your spirits bright

For more information on all shows and performances, call 919-831-6058 or visit theatreinthepark.com. Theatre in the Park is located at 107 Pullen Road in Raleigh. November/December 2018


919

|

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Ambiance, Impeccable Service, And Delightful Food Make Dining At G58 Cuisine a True Experience

A Symphony 36

To Your Senses www.919Magazine.com

November/December 2018


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION | 919

‘Our dishes are prepared by master chefs from China, each bringing unique talents, experiences and creativity to the food of the eight Chinese culinary regions.’ JULIA LI General Manager, G58 Cuisine

G

58 Modern Chinese Cuisine is a symphony to your senses. The delightful aromas wafting through the dining room, the impeccably plated cuisine, the phenomenal Sichuan and Cantonese flavors, and the design of the space and incredible art that adorns the walls all synergize together to create a truly memorable experience. “When our guests walk in, I would love for them to feel instantly transported,” said Julia Li, G58 Cuisine General Manager. “I want them to know that we are here to deliver a luxurious and elegant meal, and to make their night incredible.” G58 Cuisine opened in Morrisville in late summer 2018, and serves lunch on weekdays – along with dinner nightly. “The concept was the perfect combination of our love of our native Chinese cuisine with our passion for design, and the desire to share it with the community that we now call home and that we’ve fallen in love with,” said Li. “It was our goal to serve this cuisine in a setting that's perfect for celebrations and special occasions; a place you could dress up for while enjoying great company and delicious food.” Li said the G58 Cuisine team is extremely dedicated and extremely

November/December 2018

www.919Magazine.com

37


919

|

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

‘Our mission is to turn every meal into a special occasion.’ JULIA LI General Manager, G58 Cuisine

passionate extremely about the food – constantly sharpening their craft and striving to be better. “Our dishes are prepared by master chefs from China, each bringing unique talents, experiences and creativity to the food of the eight Chinese culinary regions,” she explained. “Our staff is dedicated to constantly innovating while still honoring the traditional methods of cooking,” Li added. “For example, our signature Peking Duck is prepared by a chef with 15 years of training making the dish. We want to make not only an excellent first impression, but to constantly improve to better serve our customers.” The same care and meticulous planning went into the restaurant’s design.

G58 MODERN CHINESE CUISINE YEAR OPENED: 2018 OWNER: Farrah Li GENERAL MANAGER: Julia Li ADDRESS: 10958 Chapel Hill Road Morrisville BUSINESS HOURS: Mon-Sat: 11am-2:30 pm Mon-Thu: 5 pm-9:30 pm Fri-Sat: 5 pm-10 pm Sun: 4:30 pm-9:30 pm WEBSITE: g58cuisine.com EMAIL: g58cuisinenc@gmail.com PHONE: 919-466-8858 38

“We had a lot of fun using our design backgrounds to decorate the inside of the space. Our dining room with floor-to-ceiling windows was decorated with fine imported artwork from China. Every piece has a story,” Li said. “I had a vision for the design of the space, but some of the touches were added as everything began to come together and the space began to take on a life of its own.” Among the additional unique aspects of G58 Cuisine: • The name “G58” has special inspiration. According to Li, the Chinese characters for “G”, “5”, and “8” hold a special meaning when combined: To wish good fortune and prosperity to both our team and our guests.

the experience, the ambiance and the beauty and flavor of the food. “Our mission is to turn every meal into a special occasion,” she said. “We serve classic Chinese dishes with a contemporary approach, and our goal is to exceed expectations.” G58 Modern Chinese Cuisine is located at 10958 Chapel Hill Road in Morrisville. For information, call 919-4668858, email g58cuisinenc@gmail.com, or visit g58cuisine.com.

• Customers can see many instances of cloud imagery in the G58 space. Li said the Chinese symbol for “cloud” is synonymous with luck or good fortune, “and that’s what we ultimately wish for all of our guests.” • G58 offers two VIP dining rooms for private parties and special functions. Each room seats up to 14 guests, but can be combined to accommodate 28. Diners are offered a unique menu that can be customized according to their guests’ needs, according to Li. But, Li stressed, most important is www.919Magazine.com

November/December 2018


C A RY | 9 1 9

ATHENA of the Triangle Julianne Walther Receives Business Mentoring Honor

A

thena of the Triangle-ATHENA Powerlink recently selected Julianne Walther as its 2018 mentoring program recipient. Walther -- owner of the Cary Quilting Company – is the mother of four busy teenagers, and enjoys running, Crossfit and has been quilting for the past 25 years. She is a member of the Capital Quilters Guild in Raleigh and the Piecemeal Quilters Bee. Her passion for quilting has carried over to her thriving business that operates in a 6,000 sq. ft. facility in Cary, which offers fabric, classes and quilting services. The business is located in the Northwoods Shopping Center at 935 North Harrison Avenue. ATHENA Powerlink is a business-mentoring program designed to help local women business owners increase their growth and profitability. A national program with a local chapter here in the Triangle that is run by a panel of volunteers, ATHENA helps bring business owners together to act as mentors and advisors for one year at no cost to the candidate. According to the organization’s website, candidates involved in ATHENA can expect outstanding success with these types of results post one-year in the program: • Increase in sales by 88 percent • Increase in business net income by 37 percent • Increase in personal net income by 56 percent • Increase full time employees by 36 percent November/December 2018

For more information about ATHENA of the Triangle, visit athenatriangle.org or call 919-342-8404. To contact Cary Quilting Company, call 919-238-9739 or visit caryquilting.com. www.919Magazine.com

ATHENAof the Triangle-ATHENA Powerlink mentoring recipient Julianne Walther

39


919 | MORRISVILLE

Scary Morrisville!

It was another successful year for the Morrisville Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services’ annual “Trick or Treat the Trail & Trunk or Treat” free family event at Morrisville Community Park in October. The special activities included cos-

40

Photos Courtesy of Town of Morrisville

tumed characters passing out goodies along the quarter-mile Hatcher Creek Trail – plus bounce houses and food trucks. In addition, the Town of Morrisville Police and Fire/Rescue departments participated in the family-oriented event.

www.919Magazine.com

November/December 2018


MORRISVILLE | 919

Park West Village’s Winter Wonderland Planned for Nov. 16

Morrisville Short Takes

Park West Village’s Winter Wonderland is a three-day celebration of the season, featuring activities, entertainment and more. Scheduled for 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. on Nov. 16-18 in front of the Stone Theatre – Park West 14 Village Market Place, the free event includes: • Magical Winter Paintscaping Lights • Train rides • Carolers • Sledding slopes • Story-time with Santa Additionally, during the Holiday Season, visit the TROSA tree lot, to choose a tree, wreaths and garland for the holidays. The District at Park West Village is located at 3400 Village Market Place in Morrisville. For information, visit parkwestvillage.net.

Annual Tree Lighting Event Features Music, Crafts, Santa, More Town of Morrisville’s annual Christmas Tree Lighting is 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 30 at Indian Creek Trailhead, located at 101 Town Hall Drive. The family-oriented event includes musical entertainment, crafts for the children, train rides, a visit from Santa and refreshments (cookies and hot chocolate!). Schedule for the free evening includes: • 7 p.m. – Lighting of the Tree • 7:15 p.m.-9 p.m. – Hot chocolate, cookies, arts and crafts, trackless train rides and visits with Santa Parking is located at the Morrisville Chamber of Commerce (260 Town Hall Drive) and Cedar Fork Community Center (1050 Town Hall Drive), which will have shuttle service from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.

• The Chef’s Academy in Morrisville recently closed, following the closure of Indiana-based Harrison College – which had 11 campuses in three states. • Winestore features a free wine tasting at 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. every Thursday at its Park West Village location. • Café Fount Coffee + Kitchen plans to open in the Marketplace at Perimeter Park in Morrisville in December. Locally owned and operated, Café Fount will feature Counter Culture Coffee; 100 percent gluten-free small dishes; organic ingredients; and locally brewed beers and fine wines. • Trivia at Ruckus Pizza, Pasta & Spirits offers prizes and giveaways every Tuesday in December, beginning at 8:30 p.m. at the Park West Village in Morrisville location. • Parkside Town Commons’ Big Sparkle Night is 4-7 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 10, featruring a Christmas tree and Menorah lighting; Santa visits; bounce houses; face painting; games and prizes; trackless train rides; music and more. Parkside Commons is located at I-540 and NC 55 in North Cary. Visit parksidecommons.com for more information. • Lenovo’s new Speaker Series launched in October at Wake Technical Community College’s RTP Campus in Morrisville, with students and Information Technology professions gathering to hear Veronika Stolbikova discuss cyber security. • Clinipace, a global full-service contract research organization, named industry executive John Cargill as chief commercial officer and Hampton Corley as the company’s new vice president of business development, clinical analytics. • Make plans now to attend the 7th Annual East Meets West Festival in Morrisville next year, scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 14 at Park West Village. • Smoothie King Friday throughout December offers $5 regular smoothies all day each Friday of the month. Be sure to pick up your copy of 919 Magazine when you drop in to the Park West Village location.

Submit Your Events And Activities Items To 919 Magazine At: info@919magazine.com

For information, call 919-463-7110 or visit townofmorrisville.org. November/December 2018

www.919Magazine.com

41


919 | MORRISVILLE

Parkside Town Commons Plans Big Sparkle Night

Chamber’s ‘Sharpen Your Skills’ Workshop Planned for Dec. 4

Parkside Town Commons holiday season begins at 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 10 with many special events. Among the activities, attendees can enjoy: • Lighting of the Christmas tree and Menorah • Visits with Santa • Bounce houses • Face painting • Games and prizes • Trackless train rides • Music • “Snow Effect” and more Special guest, Cary Mayor Harold Weinbrecht, will flip the switch to begin the holiday celebration. Plus, attendees can “Donate A Coat” and enter a chance to win a $250 gift card.

The next Morrisville Chamber of Commerce’s Sharpen Your Skills Workshop is 7:30 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 4, at Lenovo in Morrisville. The Intersection of Community Involvement and Company Culture” features Blake Alford, President, CEI: The Digital Office and Anna Groblewski, Marketing and Project Manager, CEI: The Digital Office, as they discuss how to create a corporate community involvement platform, while further defining company culture Admission is free for members ($15 for non-members). Lenovo is located at 1009 Think Place, Bldg. One, in Morrisville. Topics covered include: • How to implement changes internally and externally to rebrand culture and reflect change in the community. • Steps management takes to change their own perspectives, and more.

Parkside Town Commons is located at I-540 and NC 55 in Cary. For more information, visit parksidecommons.com.

42

For more information, visit morrisvillechamber.org or call 919-463-7155.

www.919Magazine.com

November/December 2018


MORRISVILLE

Morrisville Senior Christmas Party Planned Dec. 3

Morrisville Events & Activities

Morrisville’s annual Senior Christmas Party is at 12 p.m. to 3 p.m. on Monday, Dec. 3, at the Cedar Fork Community Center. The event for residents age 55 and older includes holiday music, a catered lunch, a gift exchange (plan to bring a wrapped gift ($5-$10 value) and more. Fee to attend the event at Cedar Fork Community Center is $3 for Morrisville residents. Cedar Fork Community Center is located at 1050B Town Hall Drive in Morrisville. For information, call 919-463-7110 or visit townofmorrisville.org.

Chamber Holiday Reception Slated For December 5 Morrisville Chamber of Commerce’s annual Holiday Reception is 5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Dec. 5, at District Station in Morrisville. Attendees can enjoy an evening of fun, food and great networking -- while celebrating another great year with local leaders and the business community. The event is free to Chamber members. District Station is located at 2312 Bristol Creek Drive in Morrisville. In addition to District Station, sponsors for the event include Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina, CEI: The Digital Office, and Credit Suisse. For more information, visit morrisvillechamber.org or call 919-463-7155. Reservations are requested by Nov. 28. November/December 2018

• 11/10: Parkside Town Commons’ Big Sparkle Night; 4-7 pm, Christmas tree and Menorah lighting; Santa visits; bounce houses; face painting; games and prizes; trackless train rides; music and more. I-540 and NC 55, Cary; parksidecommons.com. • 11/16-18: Park West Village’s Winter Wonderland, 5-9 pm; 3-day celebration of the season, featuring activities, entertainment and more; front of the Stone Theatre-Park West 14 Village Market Place, The District at Park West Village, 3400 Village Market Place, Morrisville. Info: 919-467-8880, parkwestvillage.net. • 11/27: Town Council Meeting; 6:30-9:30 pm; open to the public; Morrisville Town Hall, 100 Town Hall Dr. Info: townofmorrisville.org. • 11/27: Adventures in Orienteering; 1-3 pm; age 6-13; adventure focused on map reading, using a compass, and testing skills; Lake Crabtree County Park, 1400 • Aviation Pkwy, Morrisville; wakegov.com/parks. • 11/30: Town of Morrisville’s annual Christmas Tree Lighting, 7-9 pm; hot chocolate, cookies, arts and crafts, trackless train rides and visits with Santa; free; Indian Creek Trailhead, 101 Town Hall Dr. Info: 919-463-7110, townofmorrisville.org. • 11/30, 12/7, 14, 21, 28: Senior Fridays, 9:30 am12 pm; dominoes, cards, and other games/activities; age 55-up; free; townofmorrisville.org. • 12/1, 1/5: Birding with Vernon; 8:30-10 am; all ages; an easy walk while looking and listening for feathered; Lake Crabtree County Park, 1400 Aviation Pkwy, Morrisville; wakegov.com/parks. • 12/3: Morrisville Senior Christmas Party, 12-3 pm; holiday music, catered lunch, gift exchange, more; $3 fee; age 55-over; Cedar Fork Community Center, 1050B Town Hall Dr. Info: 919-463-7110, townofmorrisville.org. • 12/4: Sharpen Your Skills Workshop -- The Intersection of Community Involvement and Company Culture, sponsored by Morrisville Chamber of Commerce – featuring Blake Alford, President, CEI: The Digital Office and Anna Groblewski, Marketing and Project Manager, CEI: The Digital Office as they discuss how to create a corporate community involvement platform, while further defining company culture; Lenova, 1009 Think Place, Bldg. One, Morrisville; free admission for members ($15 for non-members); 7:30-10 a.m. Info: 919-463-7155. • 12/5: Morrisville Chamber of Commerce Holiday Reception, featuring fun, food and networking; 5-7:30 pm; free to employees of member organizations; District Station, 2312 Bristol Creek Dr. Info: 919-463-7155, morrisvillechamber.org.

www.919Magazine.com

43


9 1 9 | R E S E A R C H T R I A N G L E PA R K

Cary Events & Activities

RTP Events & Activities

• 11/30-12/3: Cary Players presents ‘A 1940s Radio Christmas Carol’, check website for times; Cary Arts Center, 101 Dry Ave, Cary. Info: 919-462-2055, caryplayers.org. • 12/1: 8th Annual Gingerbread House Competition, 10 am-4 pm; creations on display during December; Cary Arts Center, 101 Dry Ave, Cary. Info: townofcary.org. • 12/1: Santa’s Workshop, 10 am-12 pm; youths can enjoy craft stations and visit with Santa; Cary Teen Council accepting non-perishable food items or cash donations; Herbert C. Young Community Center, 101 Wilkinson Ave, Cary. Info: townofcary.org. • 12/1: Page-Walker Holiday Open House, 3-6 pm; Page-Walker Arts & History Center, 119 Ambassador Loop, Cary. Info: townofcary.org. • 12/1: Town of Cary Christmas Tree Lighting, 6-7 pm; featuring actors, singers, and musicians from the community; Town Hall Campus; 316 N Academy St, Cary. Info: townofcary.org. • 12/4: ‘Ten Years of Terrible’, presented by the Really Terrible Orchestra of the Triangle; an evening of music and humor; Cary Arts Center, 101 Dry Ave, Cary. Info: 919-462-2055, rtoot.org. • 12/6: Menorah Lighting, 5:30-6:30 pm; music, dreidel, tasty treats; Cary Arts Center, 101 Dry Ave, Cary. Info: 919-460-4963. • 12/7: Holiday Potluck Celebration, 11:30 am-1:30 pm; age 55-up; admission is potluck lunch; special entertainment, gift exchange ($5-10 value). Cary Senior Center, 120 Maury Odell Pl, Cary. Info: townofcary.org. • 12/8: Grinch Candy Cane Hunt; age 6-12; Fred G Bond Metro Park, 801 High House Rd, Cary. Info: townofcary.org. • 12/8: Arbolito de la Esperanza/Tree of Hope Lighting; 1-3 pm; free; Herbert C. Young Community Center, 101 Wilkinson Ave, Cary. Info: townofcary. org. • 12/8: Holiday Pops Concert, presented by Concert Singers of Cary; 7:30-9:30 pm; Cary Arts Center, 101 Dry Ave, Cary. Info: 919-462-2055, concertsingers. org. • 12/9: ‘Tis the Season’, presented by Triangle Wind Ensemble; 3-5 pm; Cary Arts Center, 101 Dry Ave, Cary. Info: 919-462-2055, trianglewind.org. • 12/14-16, 21-22: ‘The Nutcracker Suite’, presented by Cary Ballet; check website for times; Cary Arts Center, 101 Dry Ave, Cary. Info: 919-481-6509, caryballet.com. • 12/28: Kwanzaa, presented by Town of Cary; 11 am-5 pm; Cary Arts Center, 101 Dry Ave, Cary. Info: 919-469-4069. 44

• 11/28: Abundance with Adele, an innovative and complimentary live monthly business workshop series for women entrepreneurs and team leaders, 11:45 am-1:15 pm; The Frontier (Fusion Room), 800 Park Offices Dr, Research Triangle Park. Info: rtp.org or adelemichal.com. • 11/28: 1 Million Cups, 9-10 am; hosted by Research Triangle Park, in partnership with Kauffman Labs; free coffee and entrepreneurial support as one new startup presents their idea; The Frontier, 800 Park Offices Dr, Research Triangle Park. Info: 1millioncups. com/rtp. • 11/28: RTPFit Yoga, 11:30 am-12:30 pm; free; designed for beginners and intermediate students; Atrium at The Frontier, 800 Park Offices Dr, Research Triangle Park. Info: rtp.org. • 11/28: GDG RTP DevFest, including a Machine Learning Crash Course; The Frontier, 700 Park Offices Dr, Research Triangle Park. Info: rtp.org. • 11/29: Finding Solutions Through Science, Scholars and Survivors Luncheon, 11:15 am-1:30 pm; highlights the impact of Susan G. Komen’s National Research Program on local breast cancer research; Dr. George W. Sledge Jr, featured speaker; The Triangle, 3001 Cameron Blvd, Durham. Info or purchase tickets: komennctc.org. • 11/30: Pups & Trucks at Friday RTP Food Truck Rodeo, 11:30 am-1:30 pm; enjoy food and join Yadid’it Dog Training to interact with adoptable dogs; The Frontier, 700 Park Offices Dr, Research Triangle Park. Info: rtp.org. • 12/5, 12, 19, 26: 1 Million Cups, 9-10 am; hosted by Research Triangle Park, in partnership with Kauffman Labs; free coffee and entrepreneurial support as one new startup presents their idea; The Frontier, 800 Park Offices Dr, Research Triangle Park. Info: 1millioncups.com/rtp. • 12/5, 12, 19: RTPFit Yoga, 11:30 am-12:30 pm; free; designed for beginners and intermediate students; Atrium at The Frontier, 800 Park Offices Dr, Research Triangle Park. Info: rtp.org. • 12/10: Networking with LinkedIn, 9-11 am; sponsored by Connect to Clients, featuring Debra Mathias; $99 fee; The Frontier (Fusion Room), 800 Park Offices Dr, Research Triangle Park. Info: connect-to-clients.com. • 12/13: 4th Annual Mistletoe Market, 4-7 pm; benefit for Code the Dream; complimentary beer and wine while shopping dozens of Triangle-based artisans; The Frontier, 800 Park Offices Dr, Research Triangle Park. Info: rtp.org.

www.919Magazine.com

November/December 2018


R E S E A R C H T R I A N G L E PA R K | 9 1 9

New Child Food Hub Opens Inter-Faith Food Shuttle Efforts Feed Hungry Kids Inter-Faith Food Shuttle recently opened its new Child Food Hub – a 7,000 sq. ft. facility planned to help fight childhood hunger in the Greater Triangle. Dave Koch, President/CEO of Inter-Faith Food Shuttle and Steve Schewel, Mayor of Durham led the dedication ceremony of the new warehouse, located at 2436 South Miami Boulevard, Suite 200-9, in South Durham. The facility will house Inter-Faith Food Shuttle’s child hunger programs, specifically BackPack Buddies and School Pantries, as well as partner, PORCH-Durham. In the next five years, the new space is expected to expand BackPack Buddies by more than 50 percent and increase School Pantries by 44 percent. Currently, the Food Shuttle delivers nearly 2,500 BackPack Buddies each week and supports 25 pantries. The warehouse will immediately boost those outputs by 300 ad-

ditional bags per week and two additional school pantries by the end of the school year. “If there is one thing we can all agree on it’s that child hunger is unacceptable,” Koch said. “The new Child Food Hub represents our commitment to feed as many children as possible.” One in five children are hungry across North Carolina and more than 118,000 in the Food Shuttle’s seven-county service apply for free and reduced-price lunch. This new warehouse is a long-term commitment from the Food Shuttle and PORCHDurham to fight against child hunger as Raleigh, Durham, and surrounding communities experience rapid growth. Inter-Faith Food Shuttle pioneers innovative, transformative solutions designed to end hunger in our community. As a member of Feeding America, the Food Shuttle distributes nearly 6 million pounds of food per year, 40 percent of which is fresh produce.

H

T 8 L 2 A U ANNETING ME

E T A D E H T E V A S

RG BER.O CHAM E L IL ISV MORR

H

T 28 UAL ANNETING E M

November/December 2018

www.919Magazine.com

45


919 | DURHAM

2nd RDC Marathon, Three Other Races Benefit ALS Research The 2nd Annual Raleigh-Durham Chapel Hill Marathon and Half Marathon is planned for Saturday and Sunday, Nov. 10-11 at The Streets at Southpoint shopping mall in South Durham. Presented by FS Series and sponsored by the Durham Sports Commission -- a collaboration of the City of Durham, the County of Durham, the Greater Durham Chamber of Commerce and the Durham Convention & Visitors Bureau -the event will donate a portion of the proceeds to fund ALS research. The RDC Marathon’s USATF-certified Boston Qualifier courses will feature the scenic American Tobacco Trail and start and finish at The Streets at Southpoint in Durham, giving participants and spectators the opportunity to wine, dine, shop, and run.

46

Additional sponsors for the event include 919 Magazine, BreakThrough Physical Therapy, HomeAdvisor, Mizuno Running, Hoist Rapid Hydration, 1-800-PackRat, Diamond Springs Water, Sprouts Farmers Market, Bull Durham Beer Co., Coldwell Banker-Howard Perry and Walston, Fleet Feet Carrboro-Durham, and ABC11. For more information, registration and updates about the RDC Marathon and Half Marathon, visit runrdc.com, email info@ rdcrun.com, or call 919-376-9441. Streets at Southpoint is located at 6910 Fayetteville Road in Durham.

www.919Magazine.com

November/December 2018


DURHAM | 919

Durham Events & Activities

Bedlam Vodka Plans To Begin Public Tours Of Durham Distillery Bedlam Vodka, distilled and bottled by Graybeard Distillery, plans to begin public tours of its Durham facility in the near future. Guests will have a chance to see how the distiller takes the rice from 2,000-pound totes all the way through the distillation process and into the bottle; learn a little about the history of distilling in general, and the history of the Bedlam spirit that became Bedlam Vodka; and, finally, enjoy a sampling of Bedlam neat, and Bedlam aged – and receive the souvenir tasting shot glass to take home. At the tasting, people will also get a chance to purchase exclusive Bedlam tour items (shirts, glasses, bottles of Bedlam) and bar equipment to recreate any cocktail demonstrations observed at the end of the tour. Other news and happenings involving the Bedlam Vodka team: • In addition to continuing branded shirts, Bedlam is offering new bottle toppers through the holidays on selected bottles at ABC stores throughout North Carolina: Silicone, unbreakable, branded shot glasses. • The team will travel to Oklahoma in November to throw an amazing tailgate party in Norman for the Bedlam Game between the University of Oklahoma and Oklahoma State, featuring DJs, bands, mechanical bulls, t-shirt canons, and more.

• 11/10-11: RDC Marathon, Half Marathon, 10K and 5K – Running to Cure ALS; start and finish at The Streets at Southpoint, 6910 Fayetteville Rd, Durham. Info: 919-376-9441, runrdc.com. • 11/30: American Tobacco Water Tower Lighting; 6 pm; free; Tree of Lights, choral music, Santa and more; American Tobacco Amphitheater, downtown Durham. Info: americantobaccocampus.com. • 11/30: Durham Tree Lighting; 8 pm; free; music, merriment, self-guided window display competition, more; CCB Plaza, downtown Durham. Info: americantobaccocampus.com. • 12/4-9: Elf the Musical; various times and ticket options; Durham Performing Arts Center, 123 Vivian St, Durham. Tickets, info: 919-680-2787, dpacnc.com. • 12/7: Christmas by Candlelight, 6:30-9:30 pm; an 1870s North Carolina Christmas, featuring storytelling, cookies and cider, live music, singing, dancing, and candlelit tours with historic costumed interpreters; $6 (adults), $3 (youths), via eventbrite.com; Duke Homestead State Historic Site, 2828 Duke Homestead Rd, Durham. Info: dukehomestead.org. • 12/8: GeekCraft Expo RDU Holiday Market, 10 am-5 pm; free, with registration (eventbrite.com); unique handmade gifts for “geeks and nerds”; Durham Armory, 220 Foster St, Durham. Info: geekcraftexpo.com. • 12/12-16: Ira David Wood’s A Christmas Carol; various times and ticket options; Durham Performing Arts Center, 123 Vivian St, Durham. Tickets, info: 919-680-2787, dpacnc.com. • 12/17: The Beach Boys, Reason for the Season Christmas Tour; 7:30 pm, various ticket options; Durham Performing Arts Center, 123 Vivian St, Durham. Tickets, info: 919-680-2787, dpacnc.com. • 12/18-19: Mannheim Steamroller Christmas, by Chip Davis; 7:30 pm, various ticket options; Durham Performing Arts Center, 123 Vivian St, Durham. Tickets, info: 919-680-2787, dpacnc.com. • 12/29-30: Carolina Ballet’s The Nutcracker; various times and ticket options; Durham Performing Arts Center, 123 Vivian St, Durham. Tickets, info: 919-680-2787, dpacnc.com.

• Bedlam was forced to reschedule the Dreamville Festival due to hurricane weather, but the event is now planned for April 2019. Stay tuned for details. • And, to celebrate a successful 2018, plans to share the love by reducing the price of Bedlam Vodka in North Carolina through the holidays. For updates on when tours will begin or to get additional information, visit bedlamvodka.com or email info@graybearddistillery.com. November/December 2018

www.919Magazine.com

Submit Your Events And Activities Items To 919 Magazine At: info@919magazine.com 47


919 | MORRISVILLE

TIP-OFF LUNCHEON

Triangle Sports Commission sponsored the annual Women’s Basketball Tip-off Luncheon in October at the Sheraton Imperial Hotel in Durham. The special event featured a group of head coaches from throughout the 919. Moderated by Mary Dunleavy of WRAL, the event panelists included Sylvia Hatchell, UNC Chapel Hill; Joanne McCallie, Duke University; Wes Moore, NC State; and Trisha Stafford-Odom, NC Central. Hatchell even posed with her very own copy of 919 Magazine.

EAST MEETS WEST Among the visitors to the 919 Magazine booth at the recent East Meets West Festival were Morrisville Mayor TJ Cawley (with 919 Matt and 919 EJ), some of Morrisville’s first responders, and an adult cheer team.

48

www.919Magazine.com

November/December 2018


JOLLY JUMP

Mrs. Claus is coming to Pump It Up for a special Sing-A-Long event this December! Kids, bring your wish list and enjoy spending some time with Mrs. Claus during our special Jolly Jump Event! We will be spreading the holiday cheer, bouncing, and even making some reindeer food. It is sure to be a jolly good time!

Sunday, 12/16 / Friday, 12/21 / Saturday, 12/22 10:00am-12:00pm

Reserve your spot today! Pump It Up of Raleigh 919.828.3344 pumpitupparty.com/raleigh-nc


919 | BRIER CREEK

Earth Fare Event Features Special Deals, Giveaways

BC Commons Kicks Off Holiday Season With Santa, More

Earth Fare locations in Brier Creek and Morrisville held a special customer appreciation event and Grand Re-Opening on Saturday, Oct. 20. In addition, customers were provided samples and demonstrations, raffles, kids’ activities, special deals and free gift cards. The Brier Creek store is located in the Brierdale Shopping Center at 10341 Moncreiffe Road in North Raleigh, while the Morrisville location is located at 951 Morrisville Parkway at Park West Village.

50

Brier Creek Commons shopping center celebrates the Christmas season in with its annual Tree Lighting Party. Scheduled for 6:30 pm. to 8:30 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 30, near the Brier Creek Commons Clock Tower, free event featuring a chance to meet Santa, carriage and train rides, face painting and more. Participants can also help judge the Brier Creek Merchants Christmas Tree Decorating Contest. For additional information, visit shopbriercreekcommons.com Brier Creek Commons is located on Brier Creek Parkway in North Raleigh, just off I-540.

Special Holiday Event at Pump It Up

Pump It Up Raleigh plans special Jolly Jump events at 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. on Dec. 16, 21, and 22, featuring Mrs. Claus, singing, bouncing and reindeer snacks. Info: 919-828-3344 or pumpitupparty.com/Raleigh-nc.

www.919Magazine.com

November/December 2018


BRIER CREEK | 919

Brier Creek’s Red Carpet Self Storage Celebrates 1 Year

Brier Creek Short Takes

Red Carpet Self Storage Facility Managers Mindy and Bill Houston welcomed customers, friends and potential tenants to an open house celebrating their one-year anniversary in Brier Creek in late October. In addition to giveaways and door prizes, a wide array of snacks and treats were available. The Brier Creek facility offers a wide range of storage units, including Climate Controlled, Drive-Up, Contractor Bays, Enclosed RV Parking and Office Suites. Amenities for tenants include a conference/meeting room, laptop stations, free WiFi, and package delivery acceptance. In addition, U-Haul Truck rentals are available, along with a range of boxes and packing supplies. Red Carpet Self Storage is located at 10520 Little Brier Creek Lane in North Raleigh. Regular business hours are 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Saturday. For information, call 984-459-8100, email briercreek@redcarpetstorage.com or visit redcarpetselfstorage.com.

November/December 2018

• Pickleball – a combination of tennis, badminton and table tennis is a fast-paced, easy to learn indoor sport – is open to the public at 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. on Mondays and 3 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. on Sundays at Brier Creek Community Center. Drop-ins can participate, or use a multi-month pass ($10), which includes Lake Lynn, Method and Optimist community centers. The center includes a variety of cardiovascular and strength-training equipment. The center is located 10810 Globe Road in North Raleigh (attached to Brier Creek Elementary). For information, call 919-420-2340 or visit parks.raleighnc.gov. • For the first half of 2018, the number of people boarding airplanes at Raleigh Durham International Airport is up 10.5 percent over 2017. In addition, July 2018 marked the 53rd consecutive month of growth with 597,686 people departing RDU during the month, a 12.3 percent increase over July 2017. • Brier Creek Community Center Exercise Fitness Center is available seven days a week during regular center hours for individuals age 18 and older. Cost is $5 for drop-in, or $15 for a 30-day pass. The center includes a variety of cardiovascular and strength-training equipment. The center is located 10810 Globe Road in North Raleigh (attached to Brier Creek Elementary). For information, call 919420-2340 or visit parks.raleighnc.gov. • Raleigh-Durham Airport Authority board approved a $1.3 million task order for final design for the build out of Raleigh Durham International Airport Terminal 1. The project includes the infrastructure necessary to house additional airlines in Terminal 1 by providing ticketing, bag handling systems and gate infrastructure. • Age 55 and older in the Brier Creek area? Check out the Brier Creek Senior’s Club, which meets at 10:15 to 12:15 p.m. every Tuesday (September to May) at the Brier Creek Community Center. Open to everyone, and features fun activities, trips and more. For information, call 919-420-2340 or visit parks. raleighnc.gov. • Hey Brier Creek parents…need a little break? Pump It Up Brier Creek offers a special Parents’ Night Out, that includes jumping, games, dinner, and a movie for your children age 4 to 12 at 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. on Fridays. Pump It Up Brier Creek is located at 10700 World Trade Boulevard #112 in North Raleigh. For more information, call 919-828-3344 or visit pumpitupparty.com/raleigh-nc. • Brier Creek Community Center offers table tennis at 5:45 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. for age 18 and older every Friday at 10810 Globe Road in North Raleigh (attached to Brier Creek Elementary).

www.919Magazine.com

51


919 | BRIER CREEK

5th Annual Cupcake

Run

More than 1,000 local participants showed up at Brier Creek Commons recently for the 5th Annual Cupcake Run at Brier Creek benefitting Make-AWish Eastern North Carolina. Originally scheduled for Oct. 13, it was moved to Oct. 20 - due to Hurricane Florence – and the weather cooperated and participants enjoyed a crisp fall day.

52

www.919Magazine.com

November/December 2018


BRIER CREEK | 919

Brier Creek Events & Activities

The event is organized by FSSeries, a local sports/running events company that raises thousands of dollars for various charities in the 919. Sponsored by Brier Creek Commons, 919 Magazine and many other local companies, this exciting race brings out moms, dads, families, friends and co-workers all to raise money for a good cause. At the end of the race, all participants receive a Gigi’s Cupcake and a special medal. The race originated back in 2013 under the leadership of Brier Creek resident and the original owner of Gigis Cupcakes in Brier Creek, Marina Lee. Through her efforts to raise money for critically ill children, she enlisted the support of FSSeries and brought this event to Brier Creek.

November/December 2018

• 11/27-12/18: Kinder Hip Hop; age 4-6 (Tue, 5:306 pm); $38 fee; Brier Creek Community Center, 10810 Globe Rd, Raleigh. Info: 919-420-2340, parks. raleighnc.gov. • 11/27-12/18: Hip Hop Dance: age 7-11; boys (Tue, 6:45-7 pm), girls (Tue 6-6:45 pm); $42 fee; Brier Creek Community Center, 10810 Globe Rd, Raleigh. Info: 919-420-2340, parks.raleighnc.gov. • 11/30: Tree Lighting Party, 6:30-8:30 pm; free event featuring a chance to meet Santa, carriage and train rides, face painting and more; Brier Creek Commons, Brier Creek Parkway in North Raleigh. Info: shopbriercreekcommons.com. • 12/1: Storytime and Activities, featuring “How to Catch A Snowman” (B&N Exclusive Edition), 11 am; Barnes & Noble, Brier Creek Commons, 8431 Brier Creek Pkwy, Raleigh. Info 919-484-9903, barnesandnoble.com. • 12/7: Storytime and Activities, featuring “The Polar Express” (30th Anniversary edition), 7 pm; free cookie and hot chocolate; wear pajamas; Barnes & Noble, Brier Creek Commons, 8431 Brier Creek Pkwy, Raleigh. Info 919-484-9903, barnesandnoble. com. • 12/9: Breakfast with Santa, 10 am; $29 per adult, $15 children 4-11 (3-under free); members and guests; Brier Creek Country Club, 9400 Club Hill Dr, Raleigh. Info: 919-206-4600; briercreekcc.com. • 12/9: Christmas Dinner at Deke’s, 6-9 pm; members and guests; Brier Creek Country Club, 9400 Club Hill Dr, Raleigh. Info: 919-206-4600; briercreekcc.com. • 12/13: Brier Creek Elementary Chorus Club Performance, 7 pm; Crabtree Mall, 4325 Glenwood Ave, Raleigh. Info: 919-484-4747. • 12/15, 21, 22: Jolly Jump, 10 am-12p; Sing-ALong, featuring Mrs. Claus, activities and bouncing; Pump It Up Raleigh. Info: 919-828-3344, • pumpitupparty.com/Raleigh-nc. • Nov/Dec: Parents’ Night Out; jumping, games, dinner, movie; 6-10 pm, Fridays; age 4-12; Pump It Up Brier Creek; 10700 World Trade Blvd #112. Info: 919-828-3344; pumpitupparty.com/raleigh-nc. • Nov/Dec: BC Senior Club; 10-11:30 am, Tue; age 55-up; Brier Creek Community Center; 10810 Globe Rd, Raleigh. Info: 919-420-2340; parks.raleighnc.gov. • Nov/Dec: Beginning Line Dance; age 18-up; 6:307:45 pm; $2 drop-in, $10 pass; Brier Creek Community Center; 10810 Globe Rd, Raleigh. Info: 919-4202340; parks.raleighnc.gov. • Nov/Dec: BC Exercise Fitness Center; age 18-up; $5 drop-in (30-day passes $15); Brier Creek Community Center, 10810 Globe Rd, Raleigh. Info: 919-420-2340, parks.raleighnc.gov. 53


919 | BRIER CREEK

Brier Creek

Positivity Project Brier Creek Elementary School’s Positivity Project will continue in 2019, after a successful first year. The program provides students on all tracks an opportunity to use 24 letters to illustrate a positive attitude – thus, providing examples of the wide range of different positives that young people might have. These rocks show just a few examples.

54

www.919Magazine.com

November/December 2018


A Few of Our Favorite Things Just In Time For the Holidays For unique holiday gift giving, 919 Magazine shares some of our seasonal favorites and picks.

1

Nourish Healthy Meal Delivery Service

2

North Carolina Winter Wine and Beer Passport

Founded in 2014, Nourish Foods Co. delivers healthy, chef-driven and fully prepared meals to your door. The service works well for Keto, Whole 30 and Paleo diets. Choose delicious and flavorful entrees, such as Greek Meatballs with Tzatziki and Asparagus or Spinach Marinara with beef over “Zoodles”. Individual, couples and family plans are available. Sign up for your holiday gift giving and receive 15 percent off the first order. Order online at nourishmeals.com.

Sip your way through the Yadkin Valley wine region and visit 10 select wineries and two breweries -- all just a short drive from the 919. Price is only $99 for two people, or $64 for a single pass that’s valid from Nov. 23, 2018 through March 20, 2019. Each winery offers 10-12 tastings per person. The passport also includes discounts at local restaurants and retailers and lodging at six properties. Get your passport stamped at the first location and pick up your free commemorative keepsake cork holder. Early-bird pricing until November 22 is only $54 for single, and $89 for two people. Makes a great gift for yourself or give to a wine and beer lover. Order passports online at yadkinvalleync. com/winter-wine-passport. November/December 2018

3

My Fifth Avenue

A new fragrance launched from a world-wide favorite, Elizabeth Arden. Be among the first to buy this fragrance that celebrates the unique passion and heart of New York City -- and the world-famous street. The fragrance has crisp citrus notes and feminine florals with the warmth and emotion of musk and woods reflecting a scent of success. Your special person will be one of the very first in the 919 to receive this all new fragrance. Buy alone or with a gift set at your local Elizabeth Arden counter or at ElizabethArden.com.

4

Endure Beauty

Local 919 mother and entrepreneur Nikki Huebner, has recently launched an all-organic skincare line to her company, Endure Beauty. The products are safe and effective, perfect to use around the delicate eye area. The new line offers a cleanser, lash wash and toner -- all that are hypoallergenic, paraben and alcohol free. Other products include Endure Under eye-gel therapy pads, and Endure Organic lash cloths to safely clean lash extensions. As a result of her family’s own personal tragedy and loss of her daughter in 2010, Nikki also gives a back a portion of the proceeds to local charities, including Kids and Cars and he Ronald McDonald House. Purchase her products locally at several lash boutiques, medical spas and beauty locations or online. For a complete list, visit endurebeauty.com.

www.919Magazine.com

55


919 | NORTH RALEIGH

With A.J. Muttillo

New WCPSS Assistant Superintendent for Human Resources (and Leesville Road High Principal for more than six years)

Muttillo Leaving Leesville Road With Pride and Great Memories Wake County Public School System named Anthony J. Mutillo as its new Assistant Superintendent for Human Resources. Since 2012, Mutillo has been Principal at Leesville Road High in North Raleigh. A start date in his new position has not yet been announced

What will your favorite memories be of your time at Leesville Road High?

I will remember the students most. I cherish the opportunities I have to celebrate or witness their successes in the classroom, athletic venues, auditorium, and in the community. Equally important memories include opportunities to support a student in need or simply striking up a conversation in the hallways or cafeteria.

Of all your accomplishments at LRHS, which ones give you the most pride? Improving our graduation rate by 10 points in two years, while also increasing student achievement. The accomplishment was not just the graduation rate, but the fact that it was a goal that applied to all staff members, and we were able to accomplish something positive for our students.

How have things changed for principals in the last 5-10 years? As much as I want to think that schools have drastically changed, so much has remained the same. The ultimate challenge and goal of helping each student achieve academically while remaining happy, healthy, and safe remains our top priority. 56

A.J. Muttillo, new WCPSS Assitant Superintendent for Human Resources Photo Courtesy WCPSS

‘I work with brilliant, hard-working, compassionate, ethical, service-oriented young people every day. I will be proud when they become our next leaders.’

A.J. MUTILLO Wake County Public School System Continues on Page 58

www.919Magazine.com

November/December 2018


919 | NORTH RALEIGH

Continued from Page 56

Are you optimistic about the future of the current high school generation?

ANTHONY J. MUTTILLO NEW POSITION: WCPSS Assistant Superintendent for Human Resources PREVIOUS POSITION: Principal, Leesville Road High School NUMBER OF YEARS AT LEESVILLE ROAD: 6½ EDUCATION: College degrees from East Stroudsburg University, NC State, UNC at Chapel Hill PROFESSIONAL BACKGROUND: Entire career with Wake Schools: Teacher and Coach at Martin Middle; Assistant Principal at Martin Middle; Assistant Principal at Wakefield High; Principal at West Millbrook Middle HOMETOWN: Ridgewood, NJ RESIDENCE: Alyson Pond in North Raleigh FAMILY: Wife, Jen (17 years); Anna (9), Carter (7) INTERESTS: Reading, hiking/camping, running, golfing

58

www.919Magazine.com

Absolutely. It seems like students are only highlighted for moments when they aren’t their best selves. I have a unique opportunity to also see high school students at their best. I work with brilliant, hard-working, compassionate, ethical, service-oriented young people every day. I will be proud when they become our next leaders.

What advice can you give parents of students entering high school?

Despite what their words or body language may indicate, they do want and need you involved. While it is important to allow them to be independent and advocate for themselves, the adults in their lives still need to check in on them, talk with them, and spend time with them.

November/December 2018


NORTH RALEIGH | 919

North Raleigh Short Takes

Perry’s Restaurant Opening in New Crabtree Terrace

Artist’s rendering of Perry’s Steakhouse & Grille location at the new Crabtree Terrace in North Raleigh

Perry’s Restaurants, a Texas-based group of award-winning steakhouses, plans to open an operation soon near Crabtree Valley Mall in North Raleigh. Scheduled to begin serving diners in early 2020, the 12,000+ sq. ft. Perry’s Steakhouse & Grille will be located in the planned Crabtree Terrace mixed-use development, across from the mall near Glenwood Avenue and Creedmoor Road. Each Perry’s has unique features – the Raleigh location was designed in partnership with the renowned restaurant architect Aria Group Architects to accommodate approximately 350 guests and include elegant design features such as a towering wine wall, an island bar and four private dining rooms, ideal for corporate and private events. CBRE|Raleigh’s Charlie Coyne and Reagan Crabtree of its Retail Services group represented East West Partners, while Julie Gardner with Katz & Associates represented Perry’s Steakhouse and Grille in the high-profile restaurant deal. Lee Perry with East West Partners is leading efforts for the development, while the project team includes Gensler providing architectural services and Brasfield & Gorrie serving as the general contractor. For more information, visit perryssteakhouse.com.

• Management of North Raleigh’s Lynnwood Grill & Brewing Concern – located in North Raleigh at 4821 Grove Barton Road, near Glenwood Avenue and Lynn Road (think roof deck and live music) – plans to open Wilson’s Eatery at 1053 East Whitaker Mill Road at Dock 1053. • Would you know what to do if you were stranded in the woods? If you’re age 10-12, here’s your chance to learn all about wilderness survival. The session is scheduled for 1-3 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 8, at Forest Ridge Park, located at 2100 Old Highway 98 in Wakefield. Fee is $15 for the hands-on outdoors program. For information, visit parks.raleighnc.gov or call 919-556-6781. • The Pickled Onion sports bar and restaurant – located at 10750 Wakefield Commons Drive, Suite 109, in North Raleigh – is opening a new location soon at 8511 Cantilever Way, just off Glenwood Avenue (The Luxury Box bar and restaurant was located for years at the location, until recently). Call 919-971-0031 or visit thepickledonionrestaurant.com for information. • North Raleigh’s Durant Nature Park hosts a special event, featuring a campfire story and a marshmallow roast at 5:30-6:30 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 14, for youths 6 years and up. Fee for the event – which includes storytelling, nature and marshmallows – is $2. Information at 919-870-2871 or parks.raleighnc.gov.

Matt Durbin New Owner of The Organic Bedroom in North Raleigh As the new owner of The Organic Bedroom in North Raleigh, Matt Durbin hopes to continue and build on the company’s success and history of great products and services. A local resident for over 20 years, Durbin was searching for a business that coincided with his value of health and wellness. The Organic Bedroom was exactly what he was seeking. Bringing awareness to quality products and services that help promote healthy mattresses and a good night’s rest was something he could get behind. “For the past six years, The Organic Bedroom has been the premier supplier of organic and all natural mattresses in the Carolinas,” said Durbin.  “The Organic Bedroom is known for its welcoming environment and an ‘educate first’ November/December 2018

approach to selling mattresses.  We will continue to offer the same great products and world class customer service as we move into The Organic Bedroom’s next chapter.” Durbin said that it has been a pleasure taking over the business that Joey and Vicki Ashley started in 2012.  “They built a great company, and it’s an honor to carry the torch forward,” he stressed. The Organic Bedroom is located at 5230 Hollyridge Drive in North Raleigh’s Oak Park Shopping Center on Glenwood Avenue. For more information visit theorganicbedroom.com or call 919-521-5566.

www.919Magazine.com

59


919 | NORTH RALEIGH

New Wake School Campus Construction Begins on Strickland

Barton Pond Elementary now under construction on Strickland Road

Construction is under way on Strickland Avenue in North Raleigh for what eventually will be the new Barton Pond Elementary School. The 112,598 sq. ft. Wake County Public School System campus will have three classroom wings, with two of the wings being two stories. Moseley Architects and Barnhill Contracting are involved in the project. In fall 2019, the school will be used as swing space for Stough Elementary for one year – and then, beginning in the fall 2020, used as swing space for York Elementary for one year. Barton Pond Elementary will open on its own in fall 2021 at 12004 Strickland Road. New WCPSS campus planned in North Raleigh

For Fun

For Sport

For Health

For Fitness Personal Training & Small Group Classes Friendly, Motivating Workouts in a Cool Environment Expert Trainers All Ages & Fitness Levels Welcome! OFFERING:

Strength Conditioning Functional Fitness Mobility, Yoga & More!

We take the Guesswork out of Fitness! 7209 Creedmoor Rd., Ste. #109, Raleigh, NC 27613 (Corner of Creedmoor Rd. and Stonehenge Dr.) 60

northraleighhtness.com www.919Magazine.com

(919) 841-9586 November/December 2018


NORTH RALEIGH | 919

Brewery Opening Restaurant, Plans WTCC Partnership

North Raleigh Events & Activities

Baton Rouge-based Tin Roof Brewing Co. plans to open a restaurant and brewery in North Raleigh’s 5401 North neighborhood development. Developed by Commercial Properties Realty Trust, 5401 North is located at 7713 Midtown Market Avenue, Raleigh, near Wake Tech Community College – just off I-540. Tin Roof Brewing plans to partner with Wake Tech to advise students on learning how to brew craft beer. Students will have access to the commercial brewing equipment and a brew master will serve as adviser to the faculty and staff at the school. 5401 North is a 400-acre traditional neighborhood development that eventually will include 2,250 homes and more than 1 million square feet of office and retail space. For more information visit 5401north.com or tinroofbeer.com.

• 12/4, 18: Knitting Workshops, 7-8:30 pm; age 14up; $30 fee; Lake Lynn Community Center; 7921 Ray Rd, Raleigh. Info: 919-996-2911, parks.raleighnc.gov. • 12/4: Ideal Weight Strategy, 7:15-8 am; age 18-up; Abbotts Creek Community Center, 9950 Durant Rd, Raleigh. Info: 919-996-2770, parks.raleighnc.gov. • 12/6,13: Musical Concerts (7 pm, 12/6 – Orchestra; 7 pm, 12/13 – Band; Millbrook Magnet High, 2201 Spring Forest Rd, Raleigh. Info: 919-850-8787, wcpss. net/millbrookhs. • 12/6-20: Mommy and Me Movement, 11-11:45 am; age 18-36 mon; $40 fee; participants enjoy the experience of rhythm and dance; Greystone Recreation Center, 7713-55 Lead Mine Rd, Raleigh. Info: 919-996-4848, parks.raleighnc.gov. • 12/6,18: Musical Concerts (7 pm, 12/6 – Orchestra; 7 pm, 12/18 – Band; Sanderson High, 5500 Dixon Dr, Raleigh. Info: 919-881-4800, wcpss.net/sandersonhs. • 12/7, 8: Making Holiday Ornaments, 12:30-1:30 pm; age 3-5; $6 fee; Optimist Community Center, 5900 Whittier Dr, Raleigh. Info: 919-870-2880, parks. raleighnc.gov. • 12/8: Explore a Rock Outcrop, 2-4 pm; age 8-13; $5 fee; Annie Louise Wilkenson Nature Preserve, 5229 Awls Haven Dr, Raleigh. Info: 919-996-4720, raleighnc.gov. • 12/11: Winter Wildlife, 10-11 am; age 2-6; $1 fee; learn about warm winter nests and hibernation; Durant Nature Preserve, 8305 Camp Durant Rd, Raleigh. Info: 919-870-2871, parks.raleighnc.gov. • 12/11, 13-14: Musical Concerts (7 pm, 12/11 – Orchestra; 7 pm, 12/13 – 9th and Concert Band; 7 pm, 12/14, -- Symphonic Band); Leesville Road High, 8410 Pride Way, Raleigh. Info: 919-870-4250, wcpss. net/leesvilleroadhs. • 12/13: Resources for Seniors, 1-2 pm; age 18-up; overview of resources for seniors and their families; Anne Gordon Center for Active Adults, 1901 Spring Forest Rd, Raleigh. Info: 919-996-6764, parks. raleighnc.gov. • 12/21: Solstice Stroll, 4-5 pm; all ages; free; walk the trails at sunset, and then reflect at the campfire; Durant Nature Preserve, 8305 Camp Durant Rd, Raleigh. Info: 919-870-2871, parks.raleighnc.gov.

Submit Your Events And Activities Items To 919 Magazine At: info@919magazine.com November/December 2018

www.919Magazine.com

61


919 | NORTH RALEIGH

BLUEGRASS FANS Bluegrass fans and 919 Magazine volunteers, Karen and daughter, Maddie, at the 919 Magazine tent for Wide Open Bluegrass in downtown Raleigh.

Raleigh Mayor Nancy McFarlane stopped by the 919 Magazine tent to say hello during Wide Open Bluegrass!

MILLION SELLER Local musician Jason Adamo received an RIAA Certified Platinum plaque for his contribution as a songwriter on Brett Young’s debut album, “Brett Young”. The album, on The Big Machine Label Group, surpassed the one million albums sold mark. One of the songs featured on the album is “Beautiful Believer” written by Adamo, Young and Annie Wildgen (while Jason was living in Nashville).

GOLF GALAXY DONATION In September, Golf Galaxy donated $1,000 in gift cards to The First Tee of the Triangle in an effort to support the growth and development of youth golf in the Raleigh-Durham area. Pictured from left to right are Matt Salzer, Golf Galaxy Store Manager; Brandon Baker, Executive Director of First Tee of the Triangle; and James Havens, Senior Community Marketing Manager, DICK’S Sporting Goods/Golf Galaxy. 62

www.919Magazine.com

November/December 2018


North Carolina’s #1 Invisalign Provider ®

WAKE FOREST 2824 Rogers Road, Suite 200

RALEIGH

13271 Strickland Road, Suite 100 510 Glenwood Avenue, Suite 100

919.453.6325

www.gladwellorthodontics.com


9 1 9 | H O L LY S P R I N G S

With Jim and Terri Wasley

Co-founders, Meg’s Smile Foundation

Helping Children When They Need I Holly Springs residents Jim and Terri Wasley started Meg’s Smile Foundation after losing their daughter, Meg, due to an inoperable brain tumor. A major fundraiser for the foundation, the 5th Annual Suggly Sweater 5K and Fun Run, is planned for Saturday, Dec. 15 in Holly Springs.

What was the inspiration for Meg’s Smile Foundation?

Our inspiration for forming Meg’s Smile Foundation is our sweet daughter, Meg Wasley. She was diagnosed at the age of seven with an inoperable brain tumor. We were told upon diagnosis that this was a terminal disease. We set out to fight it any way we could to save our little girl and along our journey we had the opportunity to meet a family that was starting a foundation (Caroline’s Miracle Foundation) for their daughter who passed away from a similar disease. They came in and lifted Meg’s spirits at a time she needed them lifted the most. After Meg’s passing, we knew that we wanted to start a foundation in her name. Drawing from the experience with Caroline’s Miracle Foundation, we created Meg’s Smile Foundation to help kids get a pick-meup and have something to look forward to while they are going through something so difficult.

5th Annual Suggly Sweater 5K is Dec. 15 at Sugg Farm Park in Holly Springs After race events include sledding on real snow, treats, a Christmas Village and more Photos Courtesy of T&T Photography

Continues on Page 66 64

www.919Magazine.com

November/December 2018


H O L LY S P R I N G S | 9 1 9

Holly Springs Short Takes

It the Most

November/December 2018

• Retiree Jan Hargrove is now an Interim Assistant Principal at Holly Springs Elementary. James Baughan, former Assistant Principal at Holly Springs Elementary, was appointed Assistant Principal at Holly Springs High. • Into Medieval swordfighting? Hunt Recreation Center (301 Stinson Ave.) in Holly Springs offers various levels of training, using synthetic swords for techniques, drills, safety training and theory in a fun, supportive, challenging atmosphere. New classes for age 15-up begin in early December. More info: 919-557-9600, hollyspringsnc.us. • Holly Springs High Band plans a concert at 7 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 7, at the school, located at 5329 Cass Holt Road. Call 919-577-1444 for information. • Senior Bingo continues through December at Bass Lake Park. The sessions – for age 55 and older – are planned at 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. on Wednesday, Dec. 5 and Wednesday, Dec. 19. Cost is $1 per card. The park is located at 900 Bass Lake Road. Call 919-5572496 for more information. • Mattress Firm filed Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection and announced the closing of about 700 stores, including the outlet at 7248 GB Alford Highway in Holly Springs. • Buckhorn Creek Elementary’s Winter Choral Concert is at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Dec. 13, at the campus, located at 5651 Honeycutt Rd, Holly Springs. • Holly Springs Chamber of Commerce is hosting a Breakfast Eye Opener event on at 7:45 a.m. to 9 a.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 11, at Zaxby’s, located at 101 Grand Hill Place in Holly Springs. The event – free for members – offers an opportunity to network and learn about fellow Chamber members. Email karen@ hollyspringschamber.org for information. • Holly Ridge Middle plans two special performances in December: A Drama/Chorus Performance at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 18 in the school auditorium; and a Holiday Concert at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Dec. 19. For information, call 919-577-1335. • Carolina Children’s Theatre presents “Babes in Toyland” at 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 1, at Holly Springs Cultural Center, 300 W. Ballentine St. Tickets are $12 for adults; $10 for seniors, students and military; and $8 for children age 8 and under. • Holly Ridge Elementary’s annual Spelling Bee is 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. on Thursday, Dec. 13 at the campus, located at 900 Holly Springs Road, Holly Springs. For information, call 919-577-1300 or visit wcpss.net/hollyridgees.

65


9 1 9 | H O L LY S P R I N G S Continued from Page 64

What are the goals of the Foundation?

Our goal is to help as many seriously ill children that we can, who are treated here in North Carolina. People can help by supporting our events, such as the Suggly Sweater or the Golf Tournament/Silent Auction. Every dollar raised goes to the children. There are no paid positions at Meg’s Smile Foundation, and all of our board members and volunteers do this out of the kindness of their heart to help children in need.

‘When the (Suggly Sweater 5K) event was created our goal was… to create an amazing experience for the community.’

JIM and TERRI WASLEY Meg’s Smile Foundation

SUGGLY SWEATER 5K, FUN RUN WHEN: 9:30 am-12:30 pm; Saturday, Dec. 15 WHERE: Sugg Farm Park, 2401 Grigsby Ave., Holly Springs ACTIVITIES: Christmas-themed celebration with real Snow sledding, festive foods, music and photos with Santa INFORMATION: sugglysweater5K.com

How did the Suggly Sweater 5K event come about?

Five years ago at Hope Community Church, the congregation took part in a campus-wide project with the goal to use money from the church to help the community. Seven families from Holly Springs came up with the idea to start an Ugly Sweater race at Sugg Farm Park and, hence, the Suggly Sweater 5K was created. The first year this event generated about $8,000 benefiting the Meg’s Smile Foundation and had roughly 400 runners in all. Since inception the event has grown year over year and now has more than 1,200 participants and has generated more than $30,000 for Meg’s Smile Foundation. This is our fifth year and we hope to have 1,250-plus runners and raise $40,000 or more, which will put us well over the $100,000 mark in gross donations in the fiveyear history of the event!

What will participants experience at the event?

Why is it important to support the Foundation and this event?

The Suggly Sweater 5K is one of our biggest events here in Holly Springs. It is such a great event; we absolutely love to see the smiling faces of the families and friends who come out to run. It is always a happy cheerful event, despite the chilly weather. We are so fortunate for all the support given to us here in Holly Springs and, actually, all of Wake County. We have been able to help more than 280 children here in North Carolina smile when they need it most.

JIM AND TERRI WASLEY RESIDENCE: Holly Springs

When the event was created our goal was not only to provide funds for charity, but to also create an amazing experience for the community. The current race director, Stephen McFadden, owns a promotional marketing agency in Apex (Perfect Promotions & More), and comes with past experience in event planning. Every year the focus is to “go one step further” with the experiences we provide to runners and spectator both. We started by adding photos with Santa, and having funny signage along the running trail. In future years, we added an entire Christmas village with music, Christmas-themed

66

treats, real snow and sledding hills, carolers at the finish line, a 20 ft. Christmas tree decorated in ugly sweaters, train rides for the kids, merchandise tents selling ugly Christmas sweaters, craft stations for the kids, and so much more. Every runner can expect to receive more than they paid for when it comes to runners merchandise as well. Every year we add something of value to the runners. This year, all runners receive a longsleeve shirt, a race medal, and a beanie for the $35 registration price – thanks to our amazing sponsors and participants. The race trail itself is scenic and beautiful through the woods of Sugg Farm Park too. With decorations spread about the trail, the experience tuly is one of a kind!

EDUCATION: Both graduates of SUNY Oswego PROFESSIONAL BACKGROUND: Accounting (Jim); teaching (Terri) HOMETOWNS: Vestal, NY (Jim); New Hartford, NY (Terri) FAMILY: Jake (18), Izzy (7) INTERESTS: Biking, coaching lacrosse PHILANTHROPY: Co-founders of Meg’s Smile Foundation

www.919Magazine.com

November/December 2018


H O L LY S P R I N G S | 9 1 9

Happy Holly Days!

Jazz Orchestra Presents ‘Santa Dance’ Dec. 8

HS Main Street Christmas Set For December 7

Route 55 Jazz Orchestra presents “Santa Dance” at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 8, at the Holly springs Cultural Center. The orchestra was founded in the fall of 2006 and its membership consists of community musicians who are serious about their commitment to making authentic Big Band Jazz in the tradition of Basie, Kenton, Miller, and others. Tickets for the performance are $10 for adults, and $7 for seniors and students.

Holly Springs’ annual Main Street Christmas is 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 7, in downtown, with activities at both Town Hall and the Holly Springs Cultural Center. The free event includes: • Visits with Santa (at Town Hall until 7:15 p.m.). • Hayrides in the downtown area. • Gingerbread contest and refreshments at the Coworking Station. • Refreshments at the Cultural Center. • Stories with Mrs. Claus at the Cultural Center. • Crafts at the Cultural Center. The annual Town of Holly Springs tree lighting is planned for 8 p.m. on the Cultural Center lawn.

For information, call 919-567-4000 or visit hollyspringsnc.us.

HS High Dance Program Presents ‘The Nutcracker’

For information, call 919-557-3930 or visit hollyspringsnc.us.

Holly Springs High Dance Program presents its 12th annual performance of The Nutcracker in December. Performances are: • 7 p.m. on Thursday, Dec. 13 • 3 p.m. and 7 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 14 • 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 15 Admission is free, but seating fills up quickly. Runtime is about 90 min., including a 15 min. intermission. This traditional holiday performance has a contemporary twist, including being set to a Duke Ellington arrangement of the Tchaikovsky score. In addition to the traditional audience favorites (Dance of the Snowflakes, Waltz of the Flowers, etc.), the modern dance version also showcases dances from around the world – including Africa, India, Ireland and more. A special “Character Experience” is also planned for youths age 4 to10 at at 11:30 a.m. to 1:45 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 15. Pre-registration is required. A $15 admission includes the event, a souvenir, lunch and reserved seating for the 2 p.m. performance (accompanying adult admission is $5). Holly Springs High is located at 5329 Cass Holt Road. For information, call 919-577-1444, ext23495, email hshs-danceboosters@gmail.com, or visit hshsdanceprogram.wixsite.com. November/December 2018

www.919Magazine.com

67


9 1 9 | H O L LY S P R I N G S

Happy Holly Days Parade December 8 in Downtown

Holly Springs Events & Activities

Happy Holly Days Christmas Parade is at 11 a.m. on Saturday, Dec. 8 in downtown Holly Springs Floats, bands, dancers, decorated vehicles, horses, marching groups and all sorts of entertaining entries are expected to participate in the free event. The parade will travel down Main Street, starting at Holly Springs Road and ending at Ballentine Street. For information, call 919-552-6221 or visit hollyspringsnc.us.

HAPPY HOLLY DAYS CHRISTMAS PARADE WHAT: Floats, bands, dancers,horses, and more WHEN: Saturday, Dec. 8 WHERE: Downtown Holly Springs COST: Free INFO: hollyspringsnc.us

HS Community Band Performs For Holidays Holly Springs Community Band performs “Winter Wonderland” at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 15, at the Holly Springs Cultural Center. The band is an all-volunteer group of musicians whose performances foster an appreciation for every kind of concert band music, including classical, semi-classical, Broadway musicals, movie soundtracks, pop and rock, and marches. For information, call 919-567-4000 or visit hollyspringsnc.us.

DDASC Lock-In Features Bike, Skate Games, More Daniel Dhers Action Sports Complex plans a Lock-In from 8 p.m. to 8 a.m. on Friday, Dec. 7 at its Holly Springs facility. For ages 8 to 17, the event features running games of Bike, Skate and Scoot – along with time trials on the pump track, and additional games and contests throughout the night. DDASC is located at 171 Tradition Trail, Suite 301. For more information, call 919-557-8088 or visit ddasc.com 68

• 12/1: Christmas Make and Take, 9 am-12 pm and 1-4 pm; age 6-8; $10 (residents); join Santa’s elves and make a Christmas decoration, hot chocolate and cookies; Bass Lake Park, 900 Bass Lake Rd. Info: 919-557-2496, hollyspringsnc.us. • 12/1, 15: Holly Springs Farmers Market; Sat, 9:30 am-12 pm; E Center Dr, Holly. Info: 919-567-4010, hsfarmersmarket.com. • 12/2-16, 29: Medieval Swordfighting (Intermediate), 1:30-3 pm (Sundays); age 15-up; $24 (residents); learn medieval weapons in a fun, supportive, challenging atmosphere (using synthetic swords for techniques, drills, safety training and theory; Hunt Recreation Center, 301 Stinson Ave, Holly Springs. Info: 919-557-9600, hollyspringsnc.us. • 12/4-18: Youth Tae Kwon Do, 5:30-6:30 pm (Tue, Thu); age 7-12 (older and younger age classes also available); $65 (residents); Hunt Recreation Center, 301 Stinson Ave, Holly Springs. Info: 919-557-9600, hollyspringsnc.us. • 12/5, 12/19: Senior Bingo, 1-3 pm; age 55-up; $1 per card; Bass Lake Park, 900 Bass Lake Rd. Info: 919-557-2496, hollyspringsnc.us. • 12/6-13: Elementary Drawing, 5:30-6:30 pm (Thursdays); age 6-11; $34 (residents); learn cartoon style drawing, featuring a dog with antlers and a graphic of candy canes; Hunt Recreation Center, 301 Stinson Ave, Holly Springs. Info: 919-557-9600, hollyspringsnc.us. • 12/6: Just Desserts/A Baking Class, 6-7:30 pm; age 8-12; $16 (residents); Holly Springs Cultural Center, 300 W Ballentine St. Info: 919-567-4000, hollyspringsnc.us. • 12/6: O’Holly Night, 5-7:30 pm; games, raffles, silent auction, food, performances and more; Holly Springs Elementary, 401 Holly Springs Rd, Holly Springs. Info: 919-557-2660, wcpss.net/hollyspringses. • 12/7: Main Street Christmas, 6-8 pm; free; downtown Holly Springs. Info: 919-557-3930, hollyspringsnc.us. • 12/8: Route 55 Jazz Orchestra presents “Santa Dance”; 7:30 pm; $10 (adults), $7 (seniors, students); Holly Springs Cultural Center, 300 W Ballentine St. Info: 919-567-4000, hollyspringsnc.us. • 12/8: Happy Holly Days Christmas Parade, 11 am; free; downtown Holly Springs. Info: 919-552-6221, hollyspringsnc.us. • 12/15: Holly Springs Community Band presents “Winter Wonderland”; 7:30 pm; $5 (adults), $3 (seniors, students); Holly Springs Cultural Center, 300 W Ballentine St. Info: 919-567-4000, hollyspringsnc. us.

www.919Magazine.com

November/December 2018


APEX | 919

Apex Short Takes

Apex Fire’s Lt. Howard Miles Receives Wake Tech Community College Honor Apex Fire Department Lt. Howard Miles recently received Wake Tech Community College’s most prestigious honor. Named as one of two 2018 Scott Scholars, Miles – who is a married father of three children – is pursuing an associate’s degree in Fire Science Technology at the school. In addition to his Apex Fire Department position, he works at two other jobs while juggling his online classes. Miles will receive up to $3,500 for tuition, fees and books along with a laptop computer, a summer internship placement, a mentor from senior administration, and opportunities to participate in special events and projects. “The scholarship will help tremendously with finances,” said Miles. “Raising a family and going to college is not cheap.” Miles is a lifelong firefighter who is attending college for the first time to improve his knowledge of fire service and better his career. He also wants to give his kids a valuable lesson. “I want to show them that if you work hard anything is possible.” The other Scott Scholar is Dusti Patterson, a 20-year-old student in Wake Tech’s Engineering program. She serves in the U.S. Air Force Reserves and also volunteers. Patterson’s ultimate goal is to graduate from Wake Tech, transfer to NC State, join the ROTC program, complete a bachelor’s degree, and eventually become an officer in the Air Force. She also wants to give back. “I hope that one day I can contribute to an endowment for Wake Tech. I have absolutely enjoyed my time here.” The Scott Scholars program – a merit-based scholarship designed to provide leadership development opportunities for outstanding students in associate degree programs – is named in honor of Wake Tech’s third president, Stephen C. Scott, who retired last month after 15 years at the helm of the state’s largest community college.

• Infinity Ballet presents “Dances of the Nutcracker” on Nov. 30 and Dec. 1-2 at Halle Culture Arts Center, 237 North Salem Street in Apex. Call 919-2491120 or visit apexnc.org for performance times and ticket information. • Apex Friendship High’s Parent Teacher Student Association meets at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov 27 at the campus, located at 7801 Humie Olive Road. For information, call 919-694-0500 or visit wcpss. net/apexfriendshiphs. • An American Heart Association Heartsaver class for age 11 and older is planned for 9:15 a.m. to 3:15 p.m on Saturday, Dec.15, at the Apex Community Center. Fee is $100 (residents) for the session, which is perfect for babysitters and involves learning CPR and receiving AED training and first aid skills involving medical, injury and environmental emergencies. AHA Certification earned during the course is valid for two years, but space is limited. Call 919-249-3402 or visit apexnc.org for more information. • 6th and 7th/8th Grade bands at Apex Friendship Middle present Winter Band concerts on Wednesday, Dec. 5 at the campus. The 6th Grade event is at 6:30 p.m., with the 7th/8th Grade performance following at 7:30 p.m. The school is located at 7701 Humie Olive Road in Apex. For information, call 919-694-8960 or visit wcpss.net/apexfriendshipms. • Apex High Chorus Winter Concert is 7 p.m. on Thursday, Dec. 20 at the campus, located at 7600 Roberts Road in Cary. For information, call 919-3872208 or visit wcpss.net/apexhs. • A “Wee-Create & Paint” event for children age 2-5 is planned at the Apex Community Center at 9:15 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Mondays, Dec. 3-17. Fee is $26 (residents) plus a $4 supply charge for the three classes, which involve participants creating paint and craft projects to help develop their fine motor skills and learn the foundation of art. The center is located at 53 Hunter Street in apex. For information, call 919-249-3402 or visit apexnc.org. • Lufkin Road Middle’s Parent Teacher Association meets at 6:30 p.m. in the Media Center on campus, located at 1102 Lufkin Road in Apex. For information, call 919-387-4465 or visit wcpss.net/lufkinroadms. • The 2018 Fall Dance at Salem Middle is 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 14, at the campus, located at 6150 Old Jenks Road in Apex. For information, call 919-363-1870 or visit wcpss.net/salemms.

This article courtesy of Michelle Fauver and Wake Technical Community College. November/December 2018

www.919Magazine.com

69


9 1 9 | A P E X - H O L LY S P R I N G S | S P E C I A L A D V E R T I S I N G S E C T I O N

It’s Smart to Shop For Best Insurance Rates

If you are like most people in North Carolina, you have seen home and auto insurance rate go up every year. Most people have been with the same insurance company for 20 years and never shopped their rates because they just assume that they are getting a great rate. You could not be more wrong. I am a native of North Carolina and have been seen people over-pay grossly when I do a free, no obligation comparison for them. I can shop the market with numerous insurance carriers to get you the best policy and rate. • Do you feel like your car insurance is too expensive? • Have you noticed that your mortgage payment is going up? It is usually because your home insurance that is escrowed has gone up. • Does your agent shop the market every year for you to make sure you are getting the best rates? • Did you know that your workplace life insurance goes away if you retire, quit, or get laid off? I have term and whole life insurance plans that can fit any budget. In most cases, there is no medical exam required. Insurance is just like anything else. You really do get what you pay for. If you had heart disease, do you want the cheapest heart surgeon or the best? Insurance works in the same way. If it doesn’t work, then it doesn’t matter how cheap it is. Take a few minutes and make sure you the have the right insurance with the right company. Call or email me for a free no obligation comparison. Warwick has been with Liberty Mutual since 2006. A graduate of Campbell University, he earned a degree in Criminal Justice, with a minor in psychology.

Marcus Warwick, LUTCF Senior Sales Representative Liberty Mutual Insurance 919-985-8714 70

HOLLYFEST 2018 Sights and scenes from HollyFest in October at Jefferson L. Sugg Farm Park at Bass Lake in Holly Springs.


A P E X - H O L LY S P R I N G S | 9 1 9

Christmas Events Include Parade, Salem Festivities Christmas on Salem Street will be celebrated on Friday, Nov. 30 and Saturday Dec. 1 in downtown Apex – with a wide range of activities on Friday and the annual Christmas Parade on Saturday. Nov. 30 festivities include the official annual Apex Christmas tree lighting, caroling, and carriage rides. And, of course, Santa and Mrs. Claus will be on hand to greet the children. More details about Nov. 30 – including a list of activities and events, and specific times – will be available at apexdowntown.com. The annual Apex Rotary Christmas Parade – a tradition for more than 50 years – begins at 5 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 1, in downtown Apex. The special holiday event route starts at the intersection of Ambergate Station and The Peakway, heads down Salem Street and ends at the Apex Public Works buildings on Upchurch Street. Thousands of residents and visitors are expected to line the parade route with stadium chairs and blankets to view more than 100 entries.

Apex Events & Activities • 11/17: Turkey Trot 5K Run; Apex Community Park, 2200 Laura Duncan Rd. Info: apexnc.org. • 11/24: Small Business Saturday, sponsored by Apex Downtown Business Association. Info: apexdowntown.com. • 11/30: Trees and Wreaths for the Holiday Season and Auction for Western Wake Crisis Ministry, 5-8 pm; Halle Culture Arts Center, 237 N Salem St, Apex. Info: apexnc.org. • 11/30-12/2: “Dances of the Nutcracker”, presented by Infinity Ballet; check website for times, ticket information; Halle Culture Arts Center, 237 N Salem St, Apex. Info: apexnc.org. • 11/30: Christmas on Salem Street; Friday Night Christmas Tree Lighting, Caroling, Sleigh Rides – and Santa and Mrs. Claus. Info: apexdowntown. com. • 12/1: Apex Rotary Christmas Parade, 5-8 pm; route is from intersection of Ambergate Station and The Peakway, then down Salem Street, and ending at the Apex Public Works buildings on Upchurch Street. Info: apexrotary.org.

To participate in the parade, get additional information at apexrotary.org. Details are also available by emailing apexrotary@ gmail.com or call 919-303-8338.

Historical Society’s Annual Home Tour Planned Dec. 2 The Apex Historical Society’s 2018 Home Tour is 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Sunday, Dec. 2. The rain-or-shine tour will feature three restored historic homes, a Bed and Breakfast Inn on Kelly Road, the historic 1914 Apex train depot (home of the Apex Chamber of Commerce) and the 1870 Maynard-Pearson House (home of the Apex Historical Society). Advanced tickets are $10 per adult and $5 for children (12-under), and are available at Apex Chamber of Commerce, Antiques on Salem Street, Lynn’s Hallmark , and The Rusty Bucket. Refreshments will be served at the Maynard-Pearson House during tour hours and the Society’s Old Fashion Sweet Shoppe will offer homemade candies for sale to benefit operation of the Maynard-Pearson House. For information, visit apexhistoricalsociety.com. November/December 2018

www.919Magazine.com

71


9 1 9 | N O R T H WA K E

A Passionate Advocate Rolesville’s Epps Named WCPSS Counselor of Year Kinea Epps was selected as the 2018 WCPSS School Counselor of the Year. Epps has served as a school counselor in the Wake County Public School System since 2011 and has been the Lead Counselor at Rolesville Middle School since 2014. She’s Nationally Board Certified and is an American School Counselor Association certified Leadership Specialist. A passionate advocate for students and families, Epps believes school counselors have a vital role in ensuring students’ academic, personal, social and career success. “During my career as a teacher and now as a principal, I’ve grown to understand that the school counselor position is one of the most important roles in a school,” said Rolesville Middle School Principal Tad Sherman. “They are expected to master wide-ranging sets of personal and professional skills, while at the same time balancing the daily demands of their position. Mrs. Epps is the kind of educator – and person – that can master the challenge of finding that balance.” Prior to becoming a school counselor, Epps was an edu-

cation reporter for the News & Observer. She received her Master’s degree in School Counseling from North Carolina Central University. “I changed careers because I’m so passionate about being a strong advocate for our children and there’s no better way to do that than to be a school counselor,” Epps said when accepting her award. Article written by Heather Lawing, courtesy of Wake County Public School System. Photos by Paul Cory of WCPSS. Kinea Epps, 2018 WCPSS Counselor of the Year

‘(School counselors) are expected to master wide-ranging sets of personal and professional skills, while at the same time balancing the daily demands of their position.’

TAD SHERMAN Principal, Rolesville Middle School

Kinea Epps at Rolesville Middle, learning of her award earlier this year

72

November/December 2018


N O R T H WA K E | 9 1 9

Walk Through Bethlehem Set In Wake Forest

North Wake Short Takes

The annual Walk Through Bethlehem outdoor living nativity program is 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. on Nov. 30 and Dec. 1-3 at Wake Forest Presbyterian Church. The event features a cast of more than 150. All performances are free to the public. Monetary and non-perishable donations are accepted to support Tri-Area Ministries and Back Pack Buddies. Wake Forest Presbyterian Church is located at 12605 Capital Boulevard. For more information, visit wakeforestpres.org.

Breakfast With Santa Slated At Masonic Lodge A special “Breakfast with Santa” event is planned at 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday, Dec. 8, at the Rolesville Masonic Lodge. Cost is $7 per person or $20 per family. Sponsored by the Rolesville Masonic Lodge, the event will raise funds for the North East Wake Backpack Buddies. For more information, visit morrisvillechamber.org. The lodge is located at 207 Pulley Street in Rolseville.

Rolesville Annual Christmas Parade Downtown Dec. 2 Rolesville’s annual Christmas Parade is 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. on Sunday, Dec. 2 in the downtown area. The free parade will start at Thales Academy, move up Storage Drive, turn left onto Main Street, and then right onto East Young Street before ending at the Rolesville Baptist Church. Of course, Santa will be on hand for the event. For more information, call 919-562-7069 or visit rolesvillechamber.org. November/December 2018

• The Wake Forest Human Relations Council selected Joy Shillingsburg as the 2018 Good Neighbor of the Year. Shillingsburg was nominated by Bob Hill, the Rev. Sarah Phelps and Spencer Renfrow. • Northeast Regional Library at 14401 Green Elm Lane in Wakefield plans a Cookie Houses program on Dec. 2 (2:30-3:30 pm), and Dec. 3, 4, 6 (4:30-5:30 pm). Participants in Grades K-5 (and their families) will create holiday cookie houses using graham crackers, icing and treats. Registration required. Visit wakegov.com/libraries for information. • Wake Forest Parks, Recreation & Cultural Resources Department recently earned accreditation through the Commission for Accreditation of Park and Recreation Agencies and the National Recreation and Park Association. • The Friends of the Northern Wake Senior Center’s monthly information meeting is 3:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 11, at Carillon Assisted Living of Wake Forest, 3218 Heritage Trade Drive. For information, email friendsNWSC@gmail.com. • Gobbler’s Run 5K, which benefits the Wake Forest Boys & Girls Club, is 8 a.m. on Thursday, Nov. 23 in downtown Wake Forest. For information, call 919909-2526 or visit gobblersrun.com. • Wake Forest Church of the Nazarene is now meeting regularly for 10 a.m. Sunday worship services at Wake Forest Middle School. For information, call 919-562-4076 or visit wfnazarene.com • Retiree Charles Langley is now Interim Assistant Principal at Heritage High in Wake Forest. • Rolesville Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services’ 2019 Spring Concert Series begins on Saturday, April 6, at Mill Bridge Nature Park. The free event continues on the first Saturdays of May and June. • “North Carolina Treasures”, a special presentation by the NC Museum of Natural Sciences for seniors at The Lodge at Wake Forest, is at 10:30 a.m. on Dec. 5. Space is limited; call 919-554-4111 to register. The Lodge is located at 1151 S Main St, Wake Forest. • Forest Ridge Park hosts youths age 3-6 at 9-10 am on Wednesday, Dec. 5, to explore the world of young turkeys via games and crafts. Fee is $4. The City of Raleigh park is located near Wakefield at 2100 Old Hwy 98. For information, call 919-556-6781. • Northeast Regional Library at 14401 Green Elm Lane in Wakefield plans a Polar Express Pajama Party at 2 pm to 3:40 pm on Sunday, Dec. 16. Participants in Grades K-5 (and their families) can view the movie on the big screen and enjoy crafts and activities based on the movie. Pajamas encouraged. Visit wakegov.com/libraries for information.

www.919Magazine.com

73


9 1 9 | N O R T H WA K E

WF Community Comes

Alive For s y a d i l o H The Photos by Town of Wake Forest

T

he Wake Forest community truly comes alive this holiday, with a wide variety of holiday events. Among the upcoming activities: • Lighting of Wake Forest (Friday, Nov. 30; 6-8 p.m.); Centennial Plaza, Wake Forest Town Hall, 301 S Brooks St: Wake Forest officially kicks off the holiday season with the Lighting of Wake Forest. The annual event features the lighting of the town’s 30-foot Christmas tree by Mayor Vivian Jones, followed by the arrival of Jolly Old St. Nick (free pictures with Santa offered 6:45-8:30 p.m.). The Lighting event features music and more. For information, call 919-435-9415 or visit wakeforestnc.gov. November/December 2018


N O R T H WA K E | 9 1 9

12/1: Downtown Holiday Open House; Saturday, Dec. 1, 10 a.m.; free event includes special offers and complimentary refreshments at participating shops and restaurants, activities, and much more. “Pictures With Santa” and complimentary face painting will be offered from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. at The Cotton Company Event Gallery (2nd floor), 306 S White St. The Downtown Holiday Open House is free and open to the public. For information, call 919-435-9415 or visit wakeforestnc.gov. Christmas Historic Home Tour (Saturday, Dec. 1, 1-7 p.m.): Wake Forest Historic Preservation Commission and Wake Forest Woman’s Club present their biennial Christmas Historic Home Tour. Offered only in even-numbered years, the Christmas Historic Home Tour is a self-guided tour featuring several Wake Forest homes and other properties decorated for

November/December 2018

the holidays and open for viewing. This year’s event also offers holiday and more. Tickets are $20 each. A limited number of tickets will be sold for this year’s tour and none will be sold on the day of the tour. For information, visit wakeforestnc.gov. 3rd Annual Wake Forest Holiday Artisans’ Market (Saturday, Dec. 1, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.): The free event is open to the public and features a variety of arts and crafts at a wide range of prices. The market will showcase items handmade by 40-plus North Carolina artisans and crafts people. Wake Forest Renaissance Centre, 405 S. Brooks St. For more information, visit wakeforestnc.gov. Continues on Page 76

www.919Magazine.com

75


9 1 9 | N O R T H WA K E Continued from Page 75

Christmas Jubilee Concert (Saturday, Dec. 8, 7:30 pm; Sunday, Dec. 9, 3 pm); A Celtic Angels Christmas (the Sheeva Quintet, Celtic Knights and Angel Dancers with Trinity Band Ensemble of Dublin offer vocal and instrumental seasonal and Irish favorites; check website for tickets; Wake Forest Renaissance Centre, 405 S Brooks St. Info: wakeforestrecen.org. Wake Forest Community Christmas Dinner (Monday, Dec. 3; 6:30 p.m.): The 71st annual event at The Forks Cafeteria, 339 S. Brooks St. Tickets are $15 each and can be purchased at the Wake Forest Area Chamber of Commerce, and the Wake Forest Historical Museum, Forks Cafeteria and other locations. For information, visit wakeforestnc.gov. Wake Forest Christmas Parade (Saturday, Dec. 8; 1 p.m.): The community’s largest community event is along South White Street and South Brooks Street. Community groups and businesses show their creative talents, and Santa makes a grand appearance. For information, contact Lynnette Beadle at 919-435-9416. Calls From Santa (Thursday, Dec. 6; 6-8 p.m.): A phone call from Santa Claus is on every child’s wish

list. Wake Forest Parks, Recreation & Cultural Resources Department makes those wishes come true by offering free calls to kids age 3-9 on Thursday, Dec. 6, from 6-8 p.m. Registration forms are available online and at Wake Forest Town Hall, 301 S. Brooks St. Completed forms must be received at the Parks, Recreation & Cultural Resources office, located in Wake Forest Town Hall, by 5 p.m., Dec. 7. Children’s Choir Holiday Concert (Tuesday, Dec. 11; 6 pm): Wake Forest Children’s Choir and the Wake Forest High School Chorale present an evening of holiday music under the direction of choir director Kasie Brooks. The concert is free and open to the public. Wake Forest Renaissance Centre, 405 S. Brooks St. . For information, call 919-435-9415 or visit wakeforestnc.gov. Santa’s Enchanted Workshop (Friday, Dec. 14; 11 am, 6:30 pm): Tickets $12 in advance and $15 at the door. Wake Forest Renaissance Centre, 405 S. Brooks St, WF. Info: wakeforestrecen.org.

Complete information about town-sponsored holiday events is available at wakeforestnc.org.

Frosty Run 10K (and 5K) Dec. 1 In Heritage Neighborhoods Enjoy a frosty 6.2 or 3.1 mile run that winds through some Heritage neighborhoods at 8 a.m. on Saturday, Dec. 1, in Wake Forest – and support the Tri-Area Ministry Food Pantry, which also we be accepting canned food donations onsite. This is the third annual 10K & 5K Frosty Run (which is USATF Certified and Sanctioned), and is the only 10K run in Wake Forest. The course includes flat roads, trails, a few hills, neighborhoods, and aid stations to keep participant hydrated. 76

The run starts and ends in front of Gatehouse Tavern in Gateway Commons, and concludes with a post-race party including a bounce house, coffee, and snacks for everyone. All participants receive a long-sleeved 2018 Frosty Run tee-shirt, and all finishers of both the 10k and 5k get a newly designed medal. For more information, visit fsseries.com. Gatehouse Tavern is located at 960 Gateway Commons Circle in Wake Forest.

www.919Magazine.com

November/December 2018


N O R T H WA K E | 9 1 9

North Wake Events & Activities

Just Think First 5K, Sunny Turkey Half Marathon The 8th Annual Skinny Turkey Half Marathon and 10K and Just Think First 5K is 7:15 a.m. on Thursday, Nov. 22 at Wakefield High School in North Raleigh. The half marathon course will run through Wakefield Plantation and the Wake Falls neighborhood. The course is a rolling design with a few hills that are sure to test fitness. The companion Just Think First 5K Road Race is the major fundraiser for the WHS Just Think First program. In addition, proceeds from the 5K race also pay for speakers and various activities planned during the school year. Plus, scholarships are awarded to graduating seniors in the spring. For information, visit fsseries.com. Wakefield High is located at 2200 Wakefield Pines Drive.

November/December 2018

• 11/22: 8th Annual Skinny Turkey Half Marathon, 10K and Just Think First 5K, 7:15 am; Wakefield High School, 2200 Wakefield Pines Dr, Raleigh. Info: fsseries.com. • 11/23: Gobbler’s Run 5K, benefitting WF Boys & Girls Club; 8 am; downtown Wake Forest. Info: 919909-2526, gobblersrun.com. • 11/30: Lighting of Wake Forest; 6-8 pm; free; Centennial Plaza, Wake Forest Town Hall, 301 S Brooks St, Wake Forest. Info: 919-435-9415 or visit wakeforestnc.gov. • 11/30, 12/1-3: Walk Through Bethlehem, a living nativity program to benefit Tri-Area Ministries; 6-9 pm; Wake Forest Presbyterian Church, 12605 Capital Blvd. Info: wakeforestpres.org. • 12/1: Downtown Holiday Open House; 10 a.m.; downtown Wake Forest; free event includes special offers and complimentary refreshments at participating shops and restaurants, activities, and much more. Info: wakeforestnc.gov. • 12/1: Christmas Historic Home Tour; 1-7 p.m.; tickets, $20 (must purchase in advance). Info: wakeforestnc.gov. • 12/1: 3rd Annual Wake Forest Holiday Artisans’ Market, 9 am-3 pm; showcasing items handmade by 40-plus North Carolina artisans and crafts people; free; Wake Forest Renaissance Centre, 405 S Brooks St. Info: wakeforestnc.gov. • 12/2: Rolesville Christmas Parade; 2-3 pm; free; downtown Rolesville (along Main Street). Info: 919562-7069, rolesvillechamber.org. • 12/3: Community Christmas Dinner; 6:30 pm; tickets, $15; The Forks Cafeteria, 339 S. Brooks St, Wake Forest. Info: wakeforestnc.gov. • 12/7, 14, 16, 18: Visit with Santa; 6-8 pm (except 12/16 (2-4 pm); free; Rolesville Chamber of Commerce, 200 E Young St, Rolesville. Info: 919-5627069, rolesvillechamber.org. • 12/8-9: Christmas Jubilee Concert (7:30 pm; Sunday, Dec. 9, 3 pm); check website for tickets; Wake Forest Renaissance Centre, 405 S Brooks St. Info: wakeforestrecen.org. • 12/8: Wake Forest Christmas Parade; 1 p.m.; free; South White Street and South Brooks Street. Info: Lynnette Beadle, 919-435-9416. • 12/8: Breakfast With Santa, benefit for North East Wake Backpack Buddies; 9-10 am; $7 per person, $20 per family; Rolesville Masonic Lodge, 207 Pulley St, Rolesville. Info: 919-562-7069, rolesvillechamber.org. • 12/11: Children’s Choir Holiday Concert; 6 pm; free; Wake Forest Renaissance Centre, 405 S. Brooks St, Wake Forest. Info: 919-435-9415, wakeforestnc.gov.

www.919Magazine.com

77


9 1 9 | N O R T H WA K E

WWC FALL FLING Wakefield Women’s Club celebrated the beautiful autumn weather with a Fall Fling getaway to Pinehurst. Thirty-five club members boarded a luxury motor coach from TPC Wakefield for coffee and mimosas with an assortment of fresh pastries during the drive toward the Sandhills. Upon arrival, the club members enjoyed shopping in the village, followed by lunch at Little River Resort -- and then a special wine tasting at the Black Rock Winery. For more information about joining the club, visit wwclub.org.

78

www.919Magazine.com


N O R T H WA K E | 9 1 9

WHS DANCE

Members from the Wakefield High School dance team lent their support recently for participants at the annual Cupcake Run in Brier Creek.

INCREDIBLE FAMILY One Incredible family: Mr. and Mrs. Josh Oliver of Wake Forest celebrating the Halloween season with their �Incredibles� children.

November/December 2018

www.919Magazine.com

79


919 | AD INDEX

919 Magazine............................................................................ 81 Acme Pizza Co........................................................................... 67 Bedlam Vodka........................................................................... 35 Brier Creek Commons................................................... 14, 83 BC Brier Creek Orthodontics.......................................................... 12 Catherine Davis Photography .................................................. 79 Closets by Design............................... 7, 81, 83BC, 84 NR, 84 AH Discount Furniture............................................................... 40, 81 Gladwell Orthodontics.............................................................. 63 FS Series.................................................................................... 75 G.58 Cuisine..............................................................11, 36, 2 MV Holding Oil.......................................................................... 77, 81 Leesville Taproom................................................................ 58, 80 Liberty Mutual Markus Warwick........................................... 70, 71 Linda Craft and Team Realtors (R)........................... 2BC, 2WF, 81 Little Smiles Dental................................................................ 6, 81 Marzella Law Group................................................................... 46 MIXX.......................................................................................... 81 Morrisville Chamber of Commerce........................................... 45 North Raleigh Fitness................................................................ 60 Note in the Pocket.................................................................... 81 Park West Village......................................................................... 3 Poppyseed Market.................................................................... 61 Pump it up Raleigh.............................................................. 49, 81 Red Carpet Storage............................................................. 52, 81 Robin Autopilot...................................................9, 83 WF, 84 MV Sam IT Solutions........................................................................ 42 Sassool...................................................................................... 81 Sir Walter Chevrolet.................................................................... 4 Theatre in the Park...................................10, 83NR, 83AH, 83MV The Organic Bedroom........................................................ 1NR, 5 Thompson and Thompson Family Dentistry....................... 50, 80 Tracy Watson Realtor.......................................................... 1AH, 8 Valerie Preston Dental..............................................57, 81, 84WF

5

$

off

LEESVILLE TAP ROOM any $ 25 Purchase

excludes alcohol & tax - Dine-In Only

13200 Strickland Road • Raleigh NC 27613

919-870-1515

SUBSCRIPTIONS

Annual subscription to 919 Magazine are available for $24.99 (six issues), plus postage and handling. Call 919-893-0060 to subscribe, and guarantee home delivery of every issue. 80

www.919Magazine.com

November/December 2018


DEALS | 919

FREE

MOVING TRUCK FOR CLIENTS & CHARITIES

Clothing Children with Dignity and Love LindaCraft.com 919.235.0007 LindaCraft.com 919.235.0007

8531 Brier Creek Parkway, Suite 115, Raleigh 919-544-6249 ❊ Mixxicecream.com

$25 OFF Classic 25 Weekend Birthday Party

919.439. 9998

919 Magazine Promo! Must mention coupon at booking & present coupon at check-out. May not be combined with other offers/discounts. Socks & signed waiver required to play

919.828.3344

Jenny Tu, DDS • 3735 Davis Dr Suite 125, Morrisville, NC 27560 www.littlesmilesdentalnc.com • 919-439-9998

pumpitupparty.com

November/December 2018

www.919Magazine.com

81


919 | BY THE NUMBERS

Americans Are Flocking To These 10 Cities Where Jobs Are Plentiful And Businesses Are Thriving And…

RALEIGH IS #5 CNBC Make It identified 10 cities where the number of businesses is increasing and the number of paid employees is going up, using data from personal finance site MagnifyMoney’s list of America’s biggest “boomtowns.” Out of the top 50 “boomtowns,” top four places in the U.S. with the strongest business growth over the past five years. Provo, UT, topped the list followed in order by Austin, TX; Nashville, TN; Charleston, SC. On the list after Raleigh (5th) were Orlando, FL; Boise, ID; Ft. Myers, FL; Denver, CO; San Antonio, TX; SOURCE: CNBC Make It

NC #6

North Carolina is among the top states for “Doing Business”, according to a new study. Topping the Areas Development magazine list were Georgia, Texas, Alabama, Tennessee and South Carolina. Louisiana, Mississippi, Indiana and Florida followed North Carolina in the rankings. SOURCE: Area Development magazine

RALEIGH 15th Best Place to Buy a House

Weighing a number of factors, a new analysis includes Raleigh as the15th best city to buy a house, based on home values, property taxes, home ownership rates, housing costs, and real estate trends. The ranking based on data from the U.S. Census, FBI, and other data sources. Plano, TX, and Overland Park, KS, topped the list.

RALEIGH 2nd Best City For Young Professionals

Weighing a number of factors, a new analysis includes Raleigh as the 2nd Best City for Young Professionals. Sioux Falls , SD, finished first on this year’s list. Following Raleigh were San Francisco, CA; Pittsburgh, PA; Seattle, WA; Austin, TX; Minneapolis, MN; Omaha, NB; Arlington, VA; and Anchorage, AK. SOURCE: Smart Asset

AMERICA’S TOP UNIVERSITIES?

DUKE #6 UNC #33 NCSTATE #74 In WalletHub’s new 2019 College & University Rankings – using 30 key measures -- North Carolina landed several schools in the listings of the top 500 institutions nationwide. Massachusetts of Technology, Princeton, Yale, Harvard and California Institute of Technology topped the list. After Duke, Penn, Columbia, Rice, Stanford and UC-Berkeley rounded out the top 10. At 33, UNC-Chapel Hill ranked just behind Virginia and University of California-San Diego and ahead of Emory. NC State, at 74, followed Connecticut – and ahead of New York University and Davidson. Appalachian State in Boone ranked 187, followed by Elon at 273; UNC-Charlotte at 387; UNC-Asheville at 424; UNC-Greensboro at 434.

SOURCE: Niche.com

82

www.919Magazine.com

SOURCE: WalletHub

November/December 2018


919 Magazine Nov/Dec 2018 Holiday issue Holly Springs/Apex  
New