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by Adrienne Earle Pender FEB 10-26 World Premiere Directed by Hope Alexander

"Your legacy is that you're the greatest playwright in America. What's my legacy?" African-American actor Charles S. Gilpin's portrayal of Emperor Brutus Jones was hailed as "revelatory" on Broadway in 1921 and he was named the finest actor of the age. The opening of The Emperor Jones made stars of both he and playwright Eugene O’Neill; it was O'Neill's first commercial success, and Charles Gilpin became the toast of the theater world. But by 1926, O'Neill was a legend and Gilpin was lost to history. N explores the challenging relationship between Gilpin and O'Neill and how it ultimately hinged on one word; a word that lifted one of them to the heights of American theater, and a word that destroyed the other. Playwright (and Theatre In The Park Board Member), Adrienne Earle Pender, was selected for the Eugene O'Neill Foundation's Tao House Fellowshipin 2015. The Foundation holds an O'Neill Festival every year, one of the largest in the country, and her latest play, N, has been selected to receive a workshop and a staged reading at this year's festival in September. It has also been selected as a finalist in the 2016 Dayton Playhouse FutureFest, a festival of new works.

TheatreInThePark.com | 919-831-6058


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Thank you Brier Creek Community For another great year!

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JAN/FEB 2017

7


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919 | Inside

What’s Inside 28

A New Grocery in Brier Creek First Phase of The Corners Opening With Harris Teeter

29

New Assisted Living Facility Cambridge Village Brier Creek Opening This Year in No Raleigh

36

Bringing a Change to the Market High Touch Meets High Tech With Team Craft Commercial

42

A Real Party With a Purpose 26th Annual Triangle Red Cross Ball April 8 in North Raleigh

43

Thrift Store With a Mission Habitat for Humanity ReStore Now Open in North Raleigh

50

Theatre In The Park Impressive 2017 Season Opens With a Unique World Premier

52

An Honor for Wake County Schools WCPSS Superintendent Dr. James Merrill Finalist for National Honor

52

Triangle Restaurant Week Week-long Culinary Event Features Three-Course Meal Options, More

60

New Logo – and New Tagline Town of Morrisville Unveils New Brand Focused on Connectivity

61

An Annual Morrisville Celebration Wake Tech’s Dr. Stephen Scott Updates Chamber on New Campus

72

PGA Golf Staying in Wakefield UNC Rex Healthcare Continuing As Sponsor for Web.com Tour Event

73

A Community Celebration Annual Martin Luther King Jr. Event Jan. 19 in Wake Forest

Profiles

24 56

Go. See. Do. 11 16 18 20 22 22

68

Community Events School Events Extracurricular Activities Community Sports Walks, Runs and Rides Outdoor Activities

Integrity and Honor

Brier Creek Resident’s Passion Evident to Assist U.S. Veterans

A New High School in Morrisville? Student-Centered Approach Planned By Supporters of Charter Campus

Full Community Involvement

Wake Forest Citizen of the Year Committed to Making a Difference

919 Stuff 10 Publisher’s Note 51 Region 54 All Things Carolina Advertisers Index 78 80 919 Deals 82 Finish Line

High Point NC Unites In Love of Music PAGE 54

79

Railhawks Now North Carolina FC! New Brand, MLS bid, Stadium Effort For Triangle’s Pro Soccer Franchise


919 | NOTES Publisher Suzy Beth Sarver Graphics Tyler McElhaney Deidri Ottesen

Starting fresh in 2017 2017…you had me at hello. I was excited the minute we did the countdown, the moment we reached the crescendo and screamed HAPPY NEW YEAR! I could feel the excitement, the hope and the promise so many others felt that night too. Here we are just a few weeks later and the 919 Team, yours truly included, is still on fire with enthusiasm about all that is good and what’s to come later this year. I want to start the year off right with the number one aspect of what we should all strive to remember, and that is: A good life is really a good life if you have your health. You need it; we all need it. Some things may be out of your control, but some things are not. Your daily self-care, diet and exercise are such an integral part of your life and that trickles down to those you love. My personal focus is that I’m working on more Zumba classes every week, accelerating my outside time with my friends and family with a bigger focus on scheduling my work and commitments around my exercise. I’m not a first thing in the morning kind of girl; give me my coffee and my paper first. I like to ease into my day – I’m also not a nighttime exerciser (that’s my brain storming time, so I have made the adjustments to suit my schedule and give me that hi-energy mid-day work out) . I urge you to take a look at the small changes you can make for yourself. We have gathered up the experts, investigated the restaurants and made sure we did our homework so we can provide you with some great sources to get you started. And if you are a smoker, we have a resource that is available to help you quit (quitting smoking is by far one of the healthiest things you can do for your body). In addition to a healthy, fresh look on the new year, 919 Magazine continues to introduce you to new people in the 919 who are making a difference in our community. For example, look for: • Our article on Brier Creek resident Louis J Jonske Jr. and his efforts to assist U.S. veterans as a part-owner in the General’s Hot Sauce. The intriguing story starts on Page 24. • And the profile of Dawn Nakash, Wake Forest’s Citizen of the Year. Our a article on Page 68 reveals her full community involvement and her efforts to make a difference. This year we celebrate five years and more than 125 published editions of 919 Magazine. I want to personally thank our valued advertisers, faithful readers, our local educators, local mayors, chambers of commerce representatives and all of my friends and family who continue to inspire me and my commitment to bring you a community magazine that you actually want to read. Thank you for being a part of the 919!

919 Magazine

Marketing Maranda Duff Photography Catherine Davis Photography Contributors Buffy Mac G. Cleveland Kilgore Tildon Dunn

919 Magazine

919 Magazine

SUBSCRIPTIONS: Annual subscriptions to 919 Magazine are available for $24.99 (six issues), plus postage and handling. Call 919­-864­-7300 to subscribe, and guarantee home delivery of every issue.

Volume 6, Number 1 2017

Keep on shining,

10

Production Preston Reins Jenny Smith Allison Neal

www.919Magazine.com

JAN/FEB 2017


919| |EVENTS events&&ACTIVITIES activities 919 Community Events BRIER CREEK/ BETHESDA/RDU COMMUNITY EVENTS NORTH JAN RALEIGH, LEESVILLE 1/13

Brier Creek Laughter NOV Club’s Comedy Night 11/5-7 Comedic Hypnotist Doug MacGraw;

41st Annual cocktails,Visions 6 pm; dinner, 6:45 pm; of Sugarplums Holiday show at 8 pm; tickets, $27.50 BCCCShow members and guests Art & Gift

Free Brier admission, Creekparking Country Club Thu-Fri: 9 am-8 9400 Club pm Hill Dr, Raleigh 919-206-4600 Sat: 9 am-3 pm Quailbriercreekcc.com Hollow Swim & Tennis Clubhouse 800 Orleans Pl, Raleigh 919-847-4868 Ninja Party! Come practice your ninja skills, test visionsofsugarplumsraleigh.com your ninja know-how, and make your own “bo staff” to practice at home Horseshoe Farm 3-4 pm; Grade K-5; free Nature Preserve Duraleigh Road Community Library Dedication Ceremony 5800 Duraleigh Rd, Raleigh 10 am 919-881-1344 2900wakegov.com Horse Show Farm Rd Parking: WRAL Soccer Complex parks.raleighnc.gov

1/14

JAN/FEB

Open Enrollment

An international school providing 11/20-22 half-day preschool education for

Tennis for Good children agesCharitable 2-5; contact now Tennis forTournament a no-obligation tour

7 am-5 pm International Preschool of Raleigh Millbrook Tennis Center 2730Exchange Godley Ln, Raleigh 1905 Spring Forest Rd # B, Raleigh 919-957-7249 www.tennisforgood.org ipraleigh.com

DEC 12/3 LEESVILLE/ Reindeer Games

NORTH RALEIGH Songs, stories, games, more

Age 3-5; 10-10:45 am; $10 fee Millbrook Exchange Tennis Center 1905 B Spring Forest Rd 919-872-4128 parks.raleighnc.gov

JAN 1/1-5/6

Freedom Shrine

12/4-20 Visit this collection of historic American documents reproduced for display – Musical: ‘Nuncrackers’

11/10

1/28

Fri, Sat: 8 pm; Sun: 3 pmto gain a deeper encouraging citizens Tickets: $12-$18 of events that build understanding North Raleigh Arts & Creative Theatre America 7713-51 Lead Mine Rd 1-6 pm; free 919-866-0228 Millbrook Exchange Community Center 1905 Spring Forest Rd nract.org 919-996-4156 parks.raleighnc.gov12/11

12/6

Holiday Cookies, 1/17 Milk with Santa 1:30-2:30 pm; $8 Age Job2-8; Search Assistance

Brier Creek Country 11/12 Club’s Chilly Thanksgiving Fun Open

4-player scramble; Age 3-6; 10-11 am; $5 10 am shotgun start; $60, Crafts, games andmembers; stories $80 non-members members and guests LakeBCCC Lynn Community Center 7921Brier Ray Creek Rd Country Club 9400 Club Hill Dr, Raleigh 919-870-2911 919-206-4600 parks.raleighnc.gov briercreekcc.com

11/14

Pre-registration required Topic: Getting Your Resume LakeOut Lynn Centerpresented of Community the Black Hole, 7921 Rd Consultant Sarah Williams byRay Career 919-870-2911 6:30 pm; free parks.raleighnc.gov North Regional Library 7009 Harps Mill Rd, Raleigh 919-870-4000 Santa’s Elves wakegov.com/libraries

12/8

Ornament Special

Sertoma Fall Arts Fair

Enjoy milk, cookies with 1/17 Santa, and make an ornament;

FEB Demonstrations, tours, food, more 10 am-5 pm 2/2-23 Sertoma Arts Center

bring K-5two Adventures: non-perishable food Animals items That Glow

1400 Tumble TimeRd W Millbrook 919-996-2329 Gymnastics

Read, discover and explore 10-11 am;create, age 1-12 through books, activities, more Pre-registration required through wonder ofCenter bioluminescence Greystone Community GradeLead K-5;Mine free Rd, Raleigh 7713-55 Leesville Community Library 919-996-4848 5105 Country Trail, Raleigh parks.raleighnc.gov 919-571-6661 wakegov.com/libraries

parks.raleighnc.gov An introduction of gymnastics

Basics a fun, playful class LRHS DECA’sin Saving Grace Against Thu, 11:30 am-12:15 pm; age 3-4; $30 Walk Animal Abuse Brier Creek Center Benefitting SavingCommunity Grace Animals for 10810 Globe Rd, Raleigh Adoption Lake919-420-2340 Lynn Community Center 7921parks.raleighnc.gov Ray Rd, Raleigh 919-520-2984 zachwalker123@gmail.com lrhsdeca.wix.com/savinggrace

2/7-28

Twinkle Toes Dance I 11/15 An introduction to dance, with

BRIER 1/26CREEK

NOV Second Generation 11/6 Survival Story

A World Holocaust Remembrance Pre-Holiday Day special event: The story of Wine Expo Arnold Kay, Holocaust survivor

2nd Handmade Annual Ribbons, twirling, scarves, music Hanukkah Market Mon, 10:30-11:15 am; age 2-3; $30 fee

6 pm-9 pm 7-9 pm; free, but RSVP required Brier Creek Country Club Raleigh-Cary Jewish Community Center Members Only 12804 Norwood Rd, Raleigh 9400 Club Hill Dr, Raleigh 919-676-6170 919-206-4600 raleighcaryjcc.org www.briercreekcc.com

10 am-3 freeCommunity Center Brierpm; Creek Temple Beth Globe Or 10810 Rd, Raleigh 5315919-420-2340 Creedmoor Rd. Raleigh 919-931-2537 parks.raleighnc.gov hanukkahmarket.com

919 Magazine 919 Magazine

www.919Magazine.com www.919Magazine.com

JAN/FEB 2017 NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2015 13

11


919 | events & activities 1/26

2/6-4/17

MORRISVILLE/ NORTH CARY

JAN 1/1-15

Who Are We and How Can We Help?

Resources for Seniors session on services and assistance provided 11 am-12 pm; free Anne Gordon Center for Active Adults 1901 Spring Forest Rd 919-996-4720 parks.raleighnc.gov

1/26

Yoga for Beginners

Give your body and mind a healthy kickstart for the new year with an Introductory yoga class promoting overall well being 10 am; free; registration requested North Regional Library 7009 Harps Mill Rd, Raleigh 919-870-4000 wakegov.com/libraries

1/29

Catrrine Ponall Wooden Flute Performance

Music in the Library series 3 pm; free North Regional Library 7009 Harps Mill Rd, Raleigh 919-870-4000 wakegov.com/libraries

FEB 2/1-22

Lights, Camera, Action

Instructor Gabriella Whitaker leads this theater/drama class, encouraging Character development, stage crossing, skits, improve and singing Wed, 7-7:45 am; age 13-18; $40 fee Lake Lynn Community Center 7921 Ray Rd, Raleigh 919-870-2911 parks.raleighnc.gov

2/4

Open House

A fun family event; learn about programs, events, and happenings at the center 9:30 am-12:30 pm; all ages; free Abbotts Creek Community Center 9950 Durant Rd, Raleigh 919-996-2770 parks.raleighnc.gov

2/5

Super Sunday Buffet

12

Watch the Super Bowl on a 35 ft. screen, with unlimited hot and cold food buffet 5:30 pm; tickets: $24.95 per person, $29.95 per person for preferred seating; purchase tickets at box office only Raleighwood Movies, Food & Spirits 6609 Falls of Neuse Rd, Raleigh 919-847-0326 raleighwoodmovies.com

919 Magazine

Health Topic: Noggin’ Joggin’

Brain training for seniors that targets memory, attention and focus that may lead to improved recollection and sharper mind Mon, 1:30-2:30 pm; free; Anne Gordon Center for Active Adults 1901 Spring Forest Rd 919-996-4720 parks.raleighnc.gov

2/6-27

Imagination Theatre

Instructor Gabriella Whitaker leads participants through acting as tigers, doctors, astronauts and more Mon, 11-11:45 am; age 3-5; $40 fee Lake Lynn Community Center 7921 Ray Rd, Raleigh 919-870-2911 parks.raleighnc.gov

2/7-28

Not Just Coloring

Four-week art session with Linda Martini leading participants through acitivities to inspire imagination, spark creativity Tue, 4-5:30 pm; age 5-10; $40 fee Abbotts Creek Community Center 9950 Durant Rd, Raleigh 919-996-2770 parks.raleighnc.gov

2/10-11

Krafty Kids Art

Valentines for everyone, an Arts crafts or edible project; registration required 12:30-1:30 pm; age 3-5; $7 fee Optimist Community Center 5902 Whittier Dr, Raleigh 919-870-2880 parks.raleighnc.gov

2/21-3/21

Thimble Thespians: Story Time Theater

Sing, dance, and act, with exercises designed to build confidence, creativity Tue, 10:30-11:30 am; age 2-6; $58 fee Greystone Recreation Center 7713-55 Lead Mine Rd 919-996-4848 parks.raleighnc.gov

2/26

Annual Academy Awards Gala

17th annual live Academy Awards watch-party on the big screen, featuring costumes, contests, more Doors open at 6 pm; free admission Raleighwood Movies, Food & Spirits 6609 Falls of Neuse Rd, Raleigh 919-847-0326 raleighwoodmovies.com

www.919Magazine.com

NC Chinese Lantern Festival

Traditional Chinese dance, jugglers, food trucks, more Tue-Thu: 6:30 and 8 pm Fri-Sun: 6:30, 7:30 and 8:30 pm Tickets: $10-$15 Kika Booth Amphitheatre 8003 Regency Pkwy, Cary 800-514-3849 kikaboothamphitheatre.com

1/5

Job Search Assistance

Topic: Getting Your Resume Out of the Black Hole, presented by Career Consultant Sarah Williams 6:30 pm; free West Regional Library 4000 Luis Stephens Dr, Cary 919-463-8500 wakegov.com/libraries

1/5, 1/19

Senior Bingo

1 pm Cedar Fork Community Center 1050B Town Hall Dr 919-463-7110 townofmorrisville.org

1/6

Yoga for Beginners

Give your body and mind a healthy kickstart for the new year with an Introductory yoga class promoting overall well being 10:30 am; free; registration requested West Regional Library 4000 Luis Stephens Dr, Cary 919-463-8500 wakegov.com/libraries

1/22

Catrrine Ponall Wooden Flute Performance

Music in the Library series 3 pm; free West Regional Library 4000 Luis Stephens Dr, Cary 919-463-8500 wakegov.com/libraries

1/26

Coffee & Connections

Members networking opportunity 7:30-8:30 am; free for members (non-members invited for one session) Morrisville Chamber of Commerce 260 Town Hall Dr, Suite A 919-463-7155 morrisvillechamber.org

JAN/FEB 2017


919 | events & activities 1/30

FEB 2/2, 2/16

Information and Art Night

Entrepreneurial Workshop

Senior Bingo

Information on non-profit Kaleidoscope Charter High School in Morrisville, featur- ing an art presentation by Manisha Goel 6:30-9 pm; no admission, but donations accepted; light refreshments planned The Hindu Society of NC 309 Aviation Parkway, Morrisville 919-434-5769 kaleidoscopehighschool.org

1 pm Cedar Fork Community Center 1050B Town Hall Dr 919-463-7110 townofmorrisville.org

2/15

KNOW Luncheon

1/31

Morrisville Chamber 26th Annual Meeting

2/23

Morrisville Chamber of Commerce celebrate accomplishments and present annual awards 11:30 am-1:30 pm; RSVP by 1/24 Members, $47; Non-members, $63 Prestonwood Country Club 300 Prestonwood Way, Cary 919-463-7155 morrisvillechamber.org

A panel discussion on importance of fostering creativity, innovation from the arts into business; sponsored by Morrisville Chamber of Commerce 11:30 am-1 pm; RSVP by 2/8 Members, $37; non-members, $53 Prestonwood Country Club 300 Prestonwood Way, Cary 919-463-7155 morrisvillechamber.org

2/16

New Member Luncheon

Presented by Morrisville Chamber of Commerce 11:30 am-1 pm; free for members Morrisville Chamber of Commerce 260 Town Hall Dr, Suite A 919-463-7155 morrisvillechamber.org

Presented by Morrisville Chamber of Commerce 7:30-10 am; free for members, including breakfast, networking ($15 for non-members) Lenova 1009 Think Place, Building One 919-463-7155 morrisvillechamber.org

FEB

Daddy Daughter Ball

Date/info to be determined Age 3-13 (with fathers) Cedar Fork Community Center 1050B Town Hall Dr 919-463-7110 townofmorrisville.org

RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK JAN 1/5, 12, 26

Happy Hour at the Frontier

4:30 pm The Frontier 800 Park Office Dr, RTP rtp.org

Sweet specials for your Sweetie Co

rp

ora te S

ar Sug • a le s pi n g • National Ship

her Products Available • Kos s n ctio Sele e e r F

8521 Brier Creek Pkwy #103, Raleigh

919.806.8992

Mon - Thurs 10am- 9pm • Fri -Sat 10am-10pm Sun 12:00pm-9 pm www.rmcf.com/nc/raleigh50680

Buy 3 apples and get the 4th FREE!

$5 off on $20 or more!

Valid only at Rocky Mountain Chocolate Factory 8521 Brier Creek Pkwy #103, Raleigh • (919) 806-8992 With coupon. Lesser cost item discounted. Not to be combined. One coupon per visit. Expires 03/31/2017.

Valid only at Rocky Mountain Chocolate Factory 8521 Brier Creek Pkwy #103, Raleigh • (919) 806-8992 With coupon. Lesser cost item discounted. Not to be combined. One coupon per visit. Expires 03/31/2017.

919 Magazine

www.919Magazine.com

JAN/FEB 2017

13


919 | events & activities 1/10

DYPN Anniversary Party

Durham Young Professionals Network one-year anniversary event; beer, live music, food trucks, games 5:30-8 pm The Frontier 800 Park Office Dr, RTP rtp.org

1/16

Martin Luther King Jr Triangle Interfaith Prayer Breakfast

37th annual event, sponsored by Greater Raleigh Chamber of Commerce Breakfast: 6-8 am Program: 7:15-10:30 am Free Sheraton Imperial Hotel 4700 Emperor Blvd, RTP 919-664-7080 trianglemlk.com

1/19

RTP 180: Microbiomes

6 pm The Frontier at RTP 800 Park Office Dr rtp.org

1/19

Iron Yard Demo Day

6:30-8 pm RTP Headquarters 12 Davis Dr, RTP dana@theironyard.com rtp.org

FEB 2/1

‘Dream, Girl’

Documentary film screening, showcasing stories of inspiring female entreprenuers 6-8 pm The Frontier at RTP 800 Park Office Dr rtp.org

2/2, 9, 24

Happy Hour at the Frontier

4:30 pm The Frontier 800 Park Office Dr, RTP rtp.org

JAN/FEB

RTP Food Truck Rodeo

14

11:30 am-1:30 pm, Fri The Frontier at RTP 800 Park Office Dr rtp.org

919 Magazine

Kauffman Labs’ 1 Million Cups

Entrepreneurs share coffee, ideas and advice 9 am, Wed The Frontier at RTP 800 Park Office Dr 1millioncups.com/rtp

RTPfit Cardio

4:45-5:30 pm, Mon The Frontier at RTP 800 Park Office Dr rtp.org

RTPfit Core Challenge

11:30 am-12:30 pm, Tue The Frontier at RTP 800 Park Office Dr rtp.org

RTPfit Yoga

11:30 am-12:30 pm, Wed The Frontier at RTP 800 Park Office Dr rtp.org

RTPfit Muscle Madness 11:30 am-12:30 pm; Thu, Fri The Frontier at RTP 800 Park Office Dr rtp.org

Fleet Feet Sports Weekly Run Club

5:30 pm, Thu The Frontier at RTP 800 Park Office Dr rtp.org

SOUTHPOINT/ SOUTH DURHAM JAN 1/3-8

‘An American in Paris’

Durham Performing Arts Center 123 Vivian St, Durham 919-680-2787 dpacnc.com

1/7

Madden Big Game Tournament

1-4:30 pm Microsoft Streets at Southpoint Lower Center Court 6910 Fayetteville Rd, Durham 919-572-8808 streetsatsouthpoint.com

1/13-14

Norman Connors & The Starship Orchestra

1/22

The Beach Boys

Durham Performing Arts Center 123 Vivian St, Durham 919-680-2787 dpacnc.com

1/27

Rick Springfield & Richard Marx

Durham Performing Arts Center 123 Vivian St, Durham 919-680-2787 dpacnc.com

1/31-2/05

‘Hedwig & The Angry Inch’

Durham Performing Arts Center 123 Vivian St, Durham 919-680-2787 dpacnc.com

FEB 2/13-15 Chris Rock

Durham Performing Arts Center 123 Vivian St, Durham 919-680-2787 dpacnc.com

2/17

Jay Leno

Durham Performing Arts Center 123 Vivian St, Durham 919-680-2787 dpacnc.com

2/17

Tony Bennett

Durham Performing Arts Center 123 Vivian St, Durham 919-680-2787 dpacnc.com

2/21

Jazz Night 6-9 pm; free The Durham Hotel 315 E Chapel Hill St, Durham 919-768-8831 thedurham.com

2/21-26

‘The Curious Incident of The Dog in the Nighttime’

Durham Performing Arts Center 123 Vivian St, Durham 919-680-2787 dpacnc.com

Beyu Caffee 341 W Main St, Durham 919-683-1058 beyucaffe.com

www.919Magazine.com

JAN/FEB 2017


919 | events & activities WAKEFIELD/ ROLESVILLE/ WAKE FOREST

1/13, 2/10

JAN 1/6

1/14, 2/11

Art After Hours

5-9 pm Downtown Wake Forest wfdrc.org

Give your body and mind a healthy kickstart for the new year with an Introductory yoga class promoting overall well being 10:30 am; free; registration requested Northeast Regional Library 14401 Green Elm Ln, Wakefield 919-570-7166 wakegov.com/libraries

Coffee with a Cop

1/10

Stevan Jackson Guitar Performance

Job Search Assistance

Free movie and popcorn 7-9 pm; age 5-18 Rolesville Community Center 514 Southtown Circle, Rolesville 919-556-3506 rolesvillenc.gov

1/14

Informal discussions between police officers and community members 8-10 am Back Alley Coffee Roasters 314 S Brooks St, WF wakeforestnc.gov

1/19

Music in the Library series 3:30 pm; free Northeast Regional Library 14401 Green Elm Ln, Wakefield 919-570-7166 wakegov.com/libraries

Martin Luther King Jr Community Celebration

Light meal, 6 pm; program, 7 pm Friendship Chapel Baptist Church 237 Friendship Chapel Rd, WF 908-672-8115 wakeforestnc.gov/mlk-communitycelebration.aspx

1/25

Rolesville Movie Night

Yoga for Beginners

Wake Forest churches, organizations Join to honor life and legacy of MLK Jr; area residents invited to participate

Topic: Getting Your Resume Out of the Black Hole, presented by Career Consultant Sarah Williams 6:30 pm; free Northeast Regional Library 14401 Green Elm Ln, Wakefield 919-570-7166 wakegov.com/libraries

FEB 2/4

Arts For All Tired Souls

Recounting Rosa Parks’ decisive Bus ride and other notable events 3 pm, 7 pm; age 3-adult; free WF Renaissance Centre 405 S Brooks St, WF 919-435-9458 wakeforestrencen.org

The Triangle’s Highest Rated Movie Theater and only Truly Unique Restaurant.

Serving Beer, Wine Great Casual Foods Homemade Desserts! Your Best Taste’N Movies Academy Awards Gala Super Bowl Party

RaleighwoodMovies.com

6609 Falls of Neuse Rd, Ral. 27615 24 Info & Move Hotline: (919) 847-0326 919 Magazine

Where learning is as easy as 1-2-3!

Call 919.413.7407 or email: JenniferDoerr@wiseowltutoring123.com www.WiseOwlTutoring123.com Certified teacher in Brier Creek • Specializing in K-6th grade • One-on-one private • Home based • local Mom www.919Magazine.com

JAN/FEB 2017

15


919 | events & activities 2/9

Documentary and Book: ‘Origin of the Dream’

NC State’s Dr. Jason Miller explores connection between Langston Hughes’ poetry and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech. 6:30-8:30 pm; free; registration requested; light refreshments Northeast Regional Library 14401 Green Elm Ln, Wakefield 919-570-7166 wakegov.com/libraries

2/10

‘Agnes of God’

Presentation by Forest Moon Theater Feb 10-11, 18: 7:30 pm; Feb 12-19: 3 pm Adv tickets: Adults, $15; $13, students, military WF Renaissance Centre 405 S Brooks St, WF 919-435-9458 wakeforestrencen.org

2/17

Neck of the Woods

Features emerging local artists; sponsored by Wake Forest ARTS 7:30 pm; $5 fee WF Renaissance Centre 405 S Brooks St, WF 919-435-9458 wakeforestrencen.org

2/20

State of the Town Address & Dinner

Featuring Wake Forest Mayor Vivian Jones 6 pm; tickets, $15 (includes dinner) WF Renaissance Centre 405 S Brooks St, WF 919-435-9458 wakeforestrencen.org

919 CALENDAR JAN

Special observances in January 2017

1/1

New Years Day

1/1

Last Day of Chanukah

1/16

Martin Luther King Jr Day

1/19

National Popcorn Day

1/20

Inauguration Day

1/21

Squirrel Appreciation Day

FEB

Special observances in February 2017

Groundhog Day

2/9

National Bagel Day

2/12

Lincoln’s Birthday

2/14

Valentine’s Day

2/17

National Cabbage Day

2/20

2/24

Presidents’ Day

National Cherry Pie Day

National Magarita Day

Rockin’ the Forest

Live music event, featuring Sarah Shook & the Disarmers 8 pm; Tickets: $10, adults; $5, 12-under WF Renaissance Centre 405 S Brooks St, WF 919-435-9458 wakeforestrencen.org

2/25

Wake Forest Mardi Gras

16

Contests, music, walking parade, children’s activities, food trucks, merchant specials and more 11 am-4 pm; free South White Street Downtown Wake Forest wakeforestnc.gov

919 Magazine

2/20 2/22

SCHOOLS Brier Creek/ Bethesda 1/9, 12

School Expo

Winter Open House Dinner, Tour

Opportunity to tour facilities 6:15 pm Bethesda Christian Academy 1914 S Miami Blvd, Durham 919-598-0190 bcacrusaders.org

1/23

No School

Teacher Work Day Bethesda Elementary 2009 S Miami Blvd, Durham 919-560-3904 bethesda.dpsnc.net

1/26

Kindergarten Field Trip

Pleasant Grove Elementary 3605 Pleasant Grove Church Rd 919-694-8770 wcpss.net/pleasantgrovees

North Raleigh

1/5

2/2

1/10

2-3 pm (1/9); 9:30-10:30 am (1/12) Brier Creek Elementary 9801 Brier Creek Pkwy 919-484-4747 wcpss.net/briercreekes

www.919Magazine.com

Kindergarten Registration

9:30 am-3 pm Leesville Road Elementary wcpss.net/leesvilleroades 8402 Pride Way, Raleigh 919-870-4200

1/10, 19

Open House Expo

12:10 pm East Millbrook Middle 3801 Spring Forest Rd, Raleigh 919-850-8755 wcpss.net/eastmillbrookms

1/11

Open House

For prospective students, parents 5:30-7 pm Hilburn Academy 7100 Hilburn Dr, Raleigh 919-571-6800 hilburnacademy.net

1/18

Expo, Open House

10 am; 4:30 pm Jeffreys Grove Elementary 6119 Creedmoor Rd, Raleigh 919-881-4910 wcpss.net/jeffreysgrovees

1/19, 21

Open House

10 am-3 pm (1/19) 10 am-1 pm (1/21) Chesterbrook Academy 10200 Strickland Rd, Raleigh 877-959-4181 chesterbrookacademy.com

JAN/FEB 2017


919 | events & activities 1/20

1/5, 12

1/18

Winterbash

School Expo 2017

9 pm Millbrook High 2201 Spring Forest Rd, Raleigh 919-850-8787 wcpss.net/millbrookhs

1/25, 26

2/9

Open House

Open House

For prospective students, parents 6:30 pm (1/25); 9:45 am (1/26) Abbotts Creek Elementary 9900 Durant Rd, Raleigh 919-694-0555 wcpss.net/abbottscreekes

Winterfest Dance

Open House

For prospective students, parents 6:30 pm; Grades TK-12 Trinity Academy 10224 Baileywick Rd, Raleigh 919-786-0114 trinityacademy.com

JROTC Military Ball

School Dance

3:15-5-15 pm Pine Hollow Middle 5365 Bartram Pl, Raleigh 919-694-8880 wcpss.net/pinehollowms

Open House

Showcase & Open House

9-10 am (Media Center, information) 5:30-7 pm (Tours, etc) Leesville Road Middle 8406 Pride Way, Raleigh 919-870-4141 wcpss.net/leesvilleroadms

Transit Vocal Band

Cultural Arts Performance 9 am Durant Road Middle 10401 Durant Rd, Raleigh 919-870-4098 wcpss.net/durantroadms

1/12

Open House For new and potential parents Morrisville Elementary 1519 Morrisville Pkwy, Morrisville 919-460-3400 morrisvilleyearround.org

2/1,2/22

Open House

1/16

Tours for new families at SCES Sycamore Creek Elementary 10921 Leesville Rd, Raleigh 919-841-4333 wcpss.net/sycamorecreekes

Day of Service

2/3

Talent Show

4 pm West Millbrook Middle 6115 Strickland Rd, Raleigh 919-870-4050 wmms.net

919 Magazine

10 am-3 pm (1/19) 10 am-1 pm (1/21) Chesterbrook Academy 10200 Strickland Rd, Raleigh 877-959-4181 chesterbrookacademy.com

Morrisville/ North Cary

2/1

6 pm Millbrook High 2201 Spring Forest Rd, Raleigh 919-850-8787 wcpss.net/millbrookhs

1/19, 21

2/1

8 pm Sanderson High 5500 Dixon Dr, Raleigh 919-881-4800 wcpss.net/sandersonhs

2/25

1/27

Rising 9th Graders 6-8 pm Leesville Road High 8410 Pride Way, Raleigh wcpss.net/leesvilleroadhs

2/18

1/25

9:30 am (1/5); 4:30 pm (1/12) Brassfield Road Elementary 2001 Brassfield Road, Raleigh 919-870-4080 wcpss.net/brassfieldes

Celebrating Martin Luther King Day at the RTP campus RTP High School 3106 E NC54’ Research Triangle Park 919-998-6757 researchtrianglehighschool.org

Spelling Bee

1/19, 24

Campus Tours

www.919Magazine.com

3 pm (1/19); 8:30 pm (1/24) East Cary Middle 1111 SE Maynard Rd, Cary 919-466-4377 wcpss.net/eastcaryms

2/13

Author Visit

Henry Cole, American author and Illustrator of children’s books Cedar Fork Elementary 1050 Town Hall Dr, Morrisville 919-388-5240 wcpss.net/cedarforkes

2/9

Open House

6:30-8 pm Green Hope High 2500 Carpenter Upchurch Rd, Cary 919-380-3700 wcpss.net/greenhopehs

2/9

Open House/Expo

5-8 pm Panther Creek High 6770 McCrimmon Pkwy, Cary 919-463-8656 wcpss.net/panthercreekhs

2/14

Family Academy

6:30-8 pm Panther Creek High 6770 McCrimmon Pkwy, Cary 919-463-8656 wcpss.net/panthercreekhs

2/28

7th & 8th Grade Band Concert

6 pm Mills Park Middle School 441 Mills Park Dr, Cary 919-466-1500 wcpss.net/millsparkms

North Wake 1/5-6

Winter Dance Concert

6 pm Cedar Fork Elementary 1050 Town Hall Dr, Morrisville 919-388-5240 wcpss.net/cedarforkes

7 pm; $5, students Heritage High 1150 Forestville Rd, Wake Forest 919-570-5600 wcpss.net/heritagehs

JAN/FEB 2017

17


919 | events & activities 1/5, 17

1/23, 24

Open House Expo

9 am (1/5); 5:45 (1/17) Sanford Creek Elementary 701 Granite Falls Blvd, Rolesville 919-570-2100 wcpss.net/sanfordcreekes

1/5, 17

Open House Expo

Wake Forest Elementary 138 W Sycamore Ave, WF 919-554-8655 wcpss.net/wakeforestes

1/6, 20

AIG Nominations and Testing

Academically & Intellectually Gifted Program preparation Rolesville Middle 4700 Burlinton Mills Rd, Rolesville 919-570-2260 wcpss.net/rolesvillems

1/10

Open House Expo

9 am, 5:30 pm Heritage Elementary 3500 Rogers Rd, WF 919-562-6006 heritagees.wcpss.net

1/10, 2/28

Open House Expo 8:30 am North Forest Pines Elementary 11501 Forest Pines Dr, Raleigh 919-570-2220 northforestpines.weebly.com

1/12

PTSA Meeting

Wake Forest Middle 1800 S Main St, WF 919-554-8440 wcpss.net/wakeforestms

1/12-14, 19-21 Theater Department Presents ‘Footloose’

Heritage High 1150 Forestville Rd, Wake Forest 919-570-5600 wcpss.net/heritagehs

1/13

Winter Dance Concert

18

7-9:30 pm Wake Forest High 420 W Stadium Dr, WF 919-554-8611 wcpss.net/wakeforesths

919 Magazine

Open House Expo

10 am (1/23); 5:30 pm (1/24) Forest Pines Drive Elementary 11455 Forest Pines Dr, Raleigh 919-562-6262 wcpss.net/forestpinesdrivees

2/3

Spirit Day

Rolesville Elementary 307 S Main St, Rolesville 919-554-8686 rolesvillees.wcpss.net

2/4

Science Olympiad Competition

HMS team competes in Raleigh Regional Tournament Heritage Middle 3400 Rogers Rd, WF 919-562-6204 wcpss.net/heritagems

2/13

PTSA Meeting

6:30 pm Rolesville High 1099 E Young St, Rolesville 919-554-6303 wcpss.net/rolesvillehs

1/19

Fun Run

Celebrating the 9-day fundraising effort by PTA to fund playgrounds and support the Teachers Give Back program Wakefield Elementary 2400 Wakefield Pines Dr, Raleigh 919-562-3555 wcpss.net/wakefieldes

2/24

Variety Show

7-9:30 pm Wake Forest High 420 W Stadium Dr, WF 919-554-8611 wcpss.net/wakeforesths

2/27

Spring Blood Drive

Wake Forest High 420 W Stadium Dr, WF 919-554-8611 wcpss.net/wakeforesths

JAN-FEB

Science Olympiad

Science tournament practice, Tuesdays in January, February Wakefield Middle 2300 Wakefield Pines Dr, Raleigh 919-562-3500 wcpss.net/wakefieldms

www.919Magazine.com

EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES EVENTS JAN 1/1-15

NC Chinese Lantern Festival

Traditional Chinese dance, jugglers, food trucks, more Tue-Thu: 6:30 and 8 pm Fri-Sun: 6:30, 7:30 and 8:30 pm Tickets: $10-$15 Kika Booth Amphitheatre 8003 Regency Pkwy, Cary 800-514-3849 kikaboothamphitheatre.com

1/14

‘Beyond Bollywood: A Taste of India Food Event

COR Museum partnership With Garland and Vimala’s Curry Blossom Café to celebrate Indian holidays of Pongal and Ohri, featuring Chai Pani, James Beard Award nominated chef 6-9 pm; $30 fee (limited seating) City of Raleigh Museum 220 Fayetteville St, Raleigh 919-996-2220 cityofraleighmuseum.org

1/22

The Beach Boys

7:30 pm Durham Performing Arts Center 123 Vivian St, Durham theatreinthepark.com

FEB 2/5

Super Sunday Buffett

Watch the Super Bowl on a 35 ft. screen, with unlimited hot and cold food buffet 5:30 pm; tickets: $24.95 per person, $29.95 per person for preferred seating; purchase tickets at box office only Raleighwood Movies, Food & Spirits 6609 Falls of Neuse Rd, Raleigh 919-847-0326 raleighwoodmovies.com

2/10-26

‘N: A World Premiere’

Written by local resident Adrienne Earle Pender, who was selected for the Eugene O’Neill Foundation’s Tao House Fellowship Adults, $24; seniors, students, $18 Check website for times

JAN/FEB 2017


919 | events & activities

Theatre in the Park 107 Pullen Rd, Raleigh 919-831-6058 theatreinthepark.com

2/19

Tony Bennett

MAR/APR 4/8

7:30 pm Durham Performing Arts Center 123 Vivian St, Durham theatreinthepark.com

Red Cross Ball

2/26

Annual Academy Awards Gala

17th annual live Academy Awards watch-party on the big screen, featuring costumes, contests, more Doors open at 6 pm; free admission Raleighwood Movies, Food & Spirits 6609 Falls of Neuse Rd, Raleigh 919-847-0326 raleighwoodmovies.com

JAN/FEB

‘Beyond Bollywood: Indian Americans Shape the Nation’

Open Enrollment

Created by the Smithsonian Institution’s Asian Pacific American Center for the Smithsonian’s Traveling Exhibit Service Tue-Sat, 9 am-4 pm; Sun, 1-4 pm

919 Magazine

Fine food, beverages, dancing, live and silent auctions, raffles North Ridge Country Club 6 pm 6612 Falls of Neuse Rd, Raleigh 919-741-3478 redcross.org/enc

SPECIALS/OTHER

JAN/FEB

Free, but donations accepted City of Raleigh Museum 220 Fayetteville St, Raleigh 919-996-2220 cityofraleighmuseum.org

An international school providing half-day preschool education for children ages 2-5; contact now for a no-obligation tour International Preschool of Raleigh 2730 Godley Ln, Raleigh 919-957-7249 ipraleigh.com

www.919Magazine.com

Acting, voice, theater Training & Camps

Sonorous Road Productions 209 Oberlin Rd, Raleigh 919-803-3798 sonorousroad.com

Parents’ Night Out

Jumping, games, dinner, movie 6-10 pm, Fridays; age 4-12 $20 per child ($15 for sibling) Pump It Up Brier Creek 10700 World Trade Blvd #112 919-828-3344 pumpitupparty.com/raleigh-nc

NIGHTLIFE Tra’Li Irish Pub & Restaurant Weekend brunch; live music; special events Brier Creek 10370 Moncreiffe Rd, Raleigh 919-544-4141 Morrisville 3107 Grace Park Dr, Morrisville 919-651-9083 traliirishpub.com

JAN/FEB 2017

19


919 | events & activities Tra’Li Irish Pub & Restaurant

Traditional live Irish music; First Saturday of every month 3-6 pm Morrisville 3107 Grace Park Dr, Morrisville 919-651-9083 traliirishpub.com

COMMUNITY SPORTS REGISTRATIONS, CAMPS, LESSONS 1/2-15, 1/16-2/2 Rolesville Youth Baseball, Softball T-Ball Registration

1/2-15: Residents, $53 1/16-2/2: Non-residents, $80 Rolesville Community Center 514 Southtown Circle, Rolesville 919-556-3506 rolesvillenc.gov

1/2-30

Youth Martial Arts

6:15-7 pm, Mon, Wed; age 7-12; $40 fee Learn self-defense through Chinese Kempo Karate, promoting self-confidence, goals, and self-discipline Millbrook Exchange Community Center 1905 Spring Forest Rd 919-996-4156 parks.raleighnc.gov12/11

1/2-15, 1/16-2/2

Rolesville Youth Spring Soccer

1/2-15: Residents, $53 1/16-2/2: Non-residents, $80 Rolesville Community Center 514 Southtown Circle, Rolesville 919-556-3506 rolesvillenc.gov 1/8-31

Spring Flag Football

Tue, Thu: 5-6 pm; age 5-7; $65 fee Lake Lynn Community Center 7921 Ray Rd, Raleigh 919-870-2911 parks.raleighnc.gov

1/9-20

Youth Lacrosse

Leagues for Grades 2-6; Fee: $75, residents; $90, non-residents Brier Creek Community Center 10810 Globe Rd, Raleigh 919-420-2340 parks.raleighnc.gov Abbotts Creek Community Center 9950 Durant Rd, Raleigh

20

919 Magazine

919-996-2770 parks.raleighnc.gov Greystone Recreation Center 7713-55 Lead Mine Rd 919-996-4848 parks.raleighnc.gov Optimist Community Center 5902 Whittier Dr, Raleigh 919-870-2880 parks.raleighnc.gov Lake Lynn Community Center 7921 Ray Rd, Raleigh 919-870-2911 parks.raleighnc.gov Millbrook Exchange Community Center 1905 Spring Forest Rd 919-996-4156 parks.raleighnc.gov

2/1-29

WF Youth Baseball, Softball Registration

Residents, $40; non-residents, $80 919-435-9569 wakeforestnc.gov/spring-baseballsoftball.aspx

2/5-28

Spring Flag Football

Tue, Thu: 5-6 pm; age 8-10; $65 fee Lake Lynn Community Center 7921 Ray Rd, Raleigh 919-870-2911 parks.raleighnc.gov

2/6

2017 Summer Camp Registration

City of Raleigh Parks, Recreation and Cultural Resource’s 2017 summer camp online registration opens (walk-in registration begins Feb. 20); includes traditional, specialty and specialized recreation camps for a wide age range raleighnc.gov/parks

2/6-17

Spring Baseball Registration

Age 5-6 (T-Ball), 7-8, 9-10, 11-12, 13- 14, 15-18; Fee: $40, residents; $55, non-residents

Girls Spring Softball Registration

Leagues for age 7-9, 10-12, 13-17; Fee: $40, residents; $55, non-residents Brier Creek Community Center 10810 Globe Rd, Raleigh 919-420-2340 parks.raleighnc.gov Abbotts Creek Community Center 9950 Durant Rd, Raleigh 919-996-2770 parks.raleighnc.gov Greystone Recreation Center 7713-55 Lead Mine Rd 919-996-4848

www.919Magazine.com

parks.raleighnc.gov Optimist Community Center 5902 Whittier Dr, Raleigh 919-870-2880 parks.raleighnc.gov Lake Lynn Community Center 7921 Ray Rd, Raleigh 919-870-2911 parks.raleighnc.gov Millbrook Exchange Community Center 1905 Spring Forest Rd 919-996-4156 parks.raleighnc.gov

2/6-17

Girls Spring Softball Registration

Leagues for age 7-9, 10-12, 13-17; Fee: $40, residents; $55, non-residents Brier Creek Community Center 10810 Globe Rd, Raleigh 919-420-2340 parks.raleighnc.gov Abbotts Creek Community Center 9950 Durant Rd, Raleigh 919-996-2770 parks.raleighnc.gov Greystone Recreation Center 7713-55 Lead Mine Rd 919-996-4848 parks.raleighnc.gov Optimist Community Center 5902 Whittier Dr, Raleigh 919-870-2880 parks.raleighnc.gov Lake Lynn Community Center 7921 Ray Rd, Raleigh 919-870-2911 parks.raleighnc.gov Millbrook Exchange Community Center 1905 Spring Forest Rd 919-996-4156 parks.raleighnc.gov

2/6-19

Youth Spring Volleyball Registration

Age 8-10; fee, $40 Optimist Community Center 5902 Whittier Dr, Raleigh 919-870-2880 parks.raleighnc.gov

2/22-3/17 Tai Chi

9-10 am, Wed; age 18-up Residents, $30; non-residents, $45 Rolesville Community Center 514 Southtown Circle, Rolesville 919-556-3506 rolesvillenc.gov

JAN/FEB 2017


10251 Little Brier Creek Lane, Suite 101 Raleigh, NC 27617 www.thompsonfamilydentistry.com Monday – Thursday 7:30-3:30


919 | events & activities JAN/FEB

Raleigh Rockets Track Program Registration

An introduction to young athletes to track and field Age 7-14; practices begin in March Brier Creek Community Center 10810 Globe Rd, Raleigh 919-420-2340 parks.raleighnc.gov

WALKS, RUNS, GOLF, BIKE RACES

2-4 pm; all ages Durant Nature Park 8305 Camp Durant Rd, Raleigh 919-870-6435 parks.raleighnc.gov

1/8

Hot Chocolate Run

And SPCA Doggie Dash, a benefit for Wake County Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals 7-9:45 am – Check in ; 10 am, 5K & 10K start; 11 am – 1M start WakeMed Soccer Park 201 Soccer Park Dr, Cary

1/16

The Time is Now MLK 5K

Keeping the Faith, and honoring the life of Faith Danielle Hedgepeth 7:30 am; 5K and 1M Fun Run Start at The Old Well, E Cameron Ave In Chapel Hill rocts.web.unc.edu/timeisnow5k/

FEB 2/12

Carolina Fever: Fight Cancer 5K

8:30 am; 5K; $25 registration The Old Well, E Cameron Ave In Chapel Hill runsignup.com/Race/NC/ChapelHill

2/12

Sole Mates 5K & 10K

22

JAN 1/14

Barking Up the Right Tree

Get Wild! Birds Of a Feather

Play bird-themed games, make bird treats to take home, and test bird-spotting skills 10 am-12 pm; age 4-up; free Johnston Mill Nature Preserve 2713 Mt Sinai Rd, Chapel Hill 704-778-8194 triangleland.org

Wildlife in Winter

New Year’s Day Hike

William.umstead@ncparks.gov

1/20-21

JAN 1/1

OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES

1 pm WakeMed Soccer Park 201 Soccer Park Dr, Cary runsignup.com/Race/NC/Cary

919 Magazine

Take a hike, do a craft and learn how wildlife stay warn, healthy Fri, 12:45-2:15 pm; Sat, 10:30 am-12 pm Age 3-5, $3 fee Annie Louise Wilkerson Nature Preserve 5229 Awls Haven Dr 919-996-6764 parks.raleighnc.gov

FEB 2/4

Meteorology Masters: Weather Instruments

Forget the groundhog; learn how Scientists really predict the weather 2-4 pm; age 9-13; $5 fee Annie Louise Wilkerson Nature Preserve 5229 Awls Haven Dr 919-996-6764 parks.raleighnc.gov

2/4

Birding with Vernon

Easy walk while looking and Listening for feathered friends 8:30-10 am; all ages; free Lake Crabtree County Park 1400 Aviation Pkwy, Morrisville 919-460-3390 bluejaypoint@wakegov.com wakegov.com/parks/lakecrabtree

2/11

Photography Stroll

Bring your camera for a halfmile walk along Big Lake; an experienced nature photographer will share tips to capture just the right images in a natural setting 2-3:30 pm; free Crabtree Creek Shelter #2 (Glenwood Avenue entrance) William B. Umstead State Park 8801 Glenwood Ave, Raleigh 919-571-4170

www.919Magazine.com

2/11

Learn to ID deciduous trees In winter, with only bark, fruit and buds 2-3 pm; age 5-up; $1 fee Blue Jay Point County Park 3200 Pleasant Union Church Rd 919-870-4330 bluejaypoint@wakegov.com wakegov.com/parks/bluejay

2/17-18

Foxes and Coyotes

Meet Red the fox and Carrie the Coyote and here their stories Fri, 12:45-2:15 pm; Sat, 10:30 am-12 pm Age 3-5; $3 fee Annie Louise Wilkerson Nature Preserve 5229 Awls Haven Dr 919-996-6764 parks.raleighnc.gov

2/18

Campfire Story And Marshmallow Roast

Gather around the campfire for a story; registration required Fairytales and build a fairy home 6-7 pm; age 6-up; $2 fee Durant Nature Park 8305 Camp Durant Rd 919-870-2871 parks.raleighnc.gov

2/20

Counting is for the Birds

Hear a bird story, try a fun Bird activity and count birds 10-11 am; age 5-up; $1 fee Blue Jay Point County Park 3200 Pleasant Union Church Rd 919-870-4330 bluejaypoint@wakegov.com wakegov.com/parks/bluejay

2/24

Counting Canids

Take a hike and learn about wolves, coyotes and foxes 3-5 pm; age 9-13; $5 fee Annie Louise Wilkerson Nature Preserve 5229 Awls Haven Dr 919-996-6764 parks.raleighnc.gov

2/26

Tell a Fairytale Day

Fairytales and build a fairy home 2-3 pm; age 2-10; $3 fee Durant Nature Park 8305 Camp Durant Rd 919-870-2871 parks.raleighnc.gov

JAN/FEB 2017


I N G 4 5 YEARS O F S E R V I N G T A R B NC CELE


919 | Personality

Integrity and

Honor Brier Creek Resident’s Passion Evident in Efforts To Assist Veterans, Serve His Country

919 Photos by Catherine Davis Photography by G. CLEVELAND KILGORE 919 Magazine Writer

Brier Creek and North Raleigh are just right for Lou Jonske Jr., his family, and his lifestyle. “We moved to North Carolina and this neighborhood because we wanted to give our kids a better environment to grow up,” said the U.S. Naval Academy graduate and U.S. Marine Crops decorated veteran. “We lived in a wonderful place (Annapolis, MD) prior, but our area was not nearly as conducive to raising a family.” So Jonske, wife Dana, and sons, Joey and Robbie – now students at Brier Creek Elementary – followed their good friends (Rob and Linda Kuzy, who essentially introduced them to each other in 2003) to the elusive “neighborhood feel” they sought. “Brier Creek is a wonderful neighborhood! We enjoy the setting, standards and style – but we mostly enjoy the people,” Jonske said. “The adults and the children are friendly and accepting of us and we feel we belong. We feel like this is the place for us.” Obviously, family and community is extremely important to Jonske – but so is service and honor. “I was unsure about where to go to college, but when I was recruited to play lacrosse at both the West Point Academy and Annapolis, I decided to attend the U.S. Naval Academy,” he said. “I lettered in lacrosse all four years and decided to major in Operations Analysis (math).” Jonske selected to serve in the U.S. Marine Corps, did six years of active duty as a logistician, 24

919 Magazine

Louis J Jonske Jr (Lou) Profile RESIDENCE: Brier Creek, Raleigh(moved from Annapolis, MD, more than 2 years ago) AGE: 53 PROFESSION: US Dept of Defense, IT Sales and Sales Management EDUCATION: BS, US Naval Academy MILITARY BACKGROUND: US Navy, USMC (1981-1996) HOMETOWN: Joppa, MD (near Baltimore) FAMILY: Wife, Dana; two sons, Joey (Louis J III), 10; Robbie (Robert Patrick), 8 – both attend Brier Creek Elementary, North Raleigh PETS: JAX (Golden Retriever) INTERESTS: Cooking, entertaining, boating, golf; spending time with kids and their sports, especially lacrosse (a sport Jonske played as a Division 1 athlete at US Naval Academy) www.919Magazine.com

JAN/FEB 2017


919 | Personality

The General’s Hot Sauce PARENT COMPANY: Louisiana-based, veteran-owned Smoke Hall Foods L3C (including Brier Creek’s Lou Jonske) YEAR STARTED: 2012 PRODUCTS: Hot sauce (3 flavors: Marine Green, Dead Red, Shock & Awe); gift boxes; specialty products CEO: Dan Ballister BENEFICIARIES: Paws4people, The Brendan Looney Foundation, Boostcampain, and more CONTACT: Website: generalshotsauce.com Email: SmokeHallFoods@gmail.com Phone: 225-384-0628

919 Magazine

www.919Magazine.com

JAN/FEB 2017

25


919 | Personality

‘I have always had a desire to give back to the veterans.’ LOU JONSKE Brier Creek Resident

and served as a Logistics Officer (S-4) of an Infantry battalion, Company XO and CO, and as a G-4 Office at a major command as a reserve officer. In the course of service, he received the Navy Commendation Medal, Navy Achievement Medal, Combat Action Ribbon, Kuwait Liberation Medal, and others. These days, Jonske is in sales and sales management with Iron Bow Technologies, still involved with the government and the Department of Defense. “I lead the team that sells complex solutions in the area of energy conservation, building and facility automation and controls, and information technology solutions,” he said. Growing up, Jonske looked up to athletes and leaders, like many kids. “I was a giant football fan, but also looked up to community and national leaders. I was inspired to compete in everything I did,” he said. “I probably learned that from my parents, mostly, and always wanted to do things that they would approve. I wanted 26

919 Magazine

to be known as a person who worked hard and was good to all others, like my parents.” So it’s not surprising that Jonske is involved with General’s Hot Sauce -- a veteran owned (including Jonske) company conceived by a group of Army-Navy football game tailgaters and inspired by a close friend who was a general PURPOSE: in the military, hails from Buffalo and loves to make wings! CONTACT: In addition, the company supports American farmers by growing all its peppers in the U.S., hires veterans, and donates a meaningful percentage of sales to organizations that support U.S. troops, veterans and their families — including paws4people, which trains dogs to assist veterans dealing with stress. “I have always had a desire to give back

paws4people

www.919Magazine.com

Train dogs to assist veterans dealing with stresses of life back from combat Address: 1121C-324 Military Cutoff Rd Wilmington, NC Phone: 910-632-0615 Email: info@paws4people.org to the veterans,” Jonske said. “I get up every morning wanting to ensure I am viewed as a person others can count on. I strive to set a good example and want to be seen as a man of integrity and honor.” JAN/FEB 2017


Discover the Trinity Difference for yourself. TK-12th Open House - January 25, 2017 at 6:30 pm Kindergarten Open House - February 7, 2017 at 9:30 am


919 | COMMUNITY

Famed Comedic Hypnotist Headlines BC Comedy Night Famed comedic hypnotist Doug Macgraw headlines the Laugher Club of Brier Creek’s Comedy Night at 8 p.m. on Friday, January 13. The evening will also feature a live interview with the “inventor of the game of golf, Sir Angus McGee by Ping Calloway, a reporter from the Golf History Channel” (rated PG 17). Cocktails begin at 6 p.m., with dinner at 6:45 p.m. Tickets are $27.50, and country club casual dress code applies.

First Phase of The Corners Opening with Harris Teeter

Hypnotist Doug Macgrow

Members and guests can register online at briercreekcc.com, or call 919-206-4600. Brier Creek Country Club is located at 9400 Club Hill Drive in North Raleigh.

New Hyatt House in Brier Creek Nears Completion

First phase of The Corners at Brier Creek – a new mixed-use development in Brier Creek at the corner of T.W. Alexander Drive and Highway 70 (Glenwood Ave) – is planned to open in the first half of 2017. The multi-phase development will combine a residential community with walk-able restaurants and retail. Future phases include opportunities for office, hospitality, and entertainment uses. Construction commenced onsite at the end of 2015. The first phase is anchored by a 64,000 sq. ft. Harris Teeter grocery, with an additional 13,000 sq. ft. of retail space. Also included in the first phase are four outparcels. For information, visit cornersatbriercreek.com. Leasing information is available at 919-379-9288.

A new six-story Hyatt House hotel in Brier Creek is nearing completion. The Hyatt House will be the third hotel on Sellona Street – just off Globe Road and Brier Creek Parkway, between Fairfield Inn & Suites and the new Aloft RaleighDurham Airport Hotel Brier Creek. The new hotel – developed by CMC Hotels of Cary – is expected to have 130 rooms and a swimming pool.

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919 | COMMUNITY

New Senior Assisted Living Facility Planned in Brier Creek Cambridge Village Brier Creek – a senior assisted living facility – is scheduled for completion in Brier Creek this year. Described as a facility for “gracious, easy living for the on the go senior,” Cambridge Village of Brier Creek is designed as a luxury apartment community in an urban setting – within walking distance of shopping, entertainment and dining. The development will feature up to 316 living units, a movie studio, wellness center/health club with an indoor pool, and a full service spa/salon. Housekeeping, maintenance and scheduled transportation will be a part of the community – plus a full schedule of activities, learning programs and more. The construction is at the southwest corner of Brier Creek Parkway and T.W. Alexander Drive, near the 460-acre Carolina Arbors by Del Webb housing community – an age-restricted active adult community expected to have 1,250 homes at build-out. For information, visit cvsliving.com or contact Raleigh’s Oliver Development LLC AT 919-792-3750.

Jennifer Wrigley Wins National Synchronized Swim Competition

Legacy at Brier Creek Office Building Available by Summer

Artist’s rendering of completed Legacy at Bier Creek Legacy at Brier Creek – a 121,000 sq. ft., four-story office building – is scheduled to become available for tenants at 7751 Brier Creek Parkway beginning in summer 2017. Located at the intersection of Brier Creek Parkway intersection and T.W. Alexander Drive in North Raleigh, the Class A facility is designed to achieve LEED Silver Certification and features a tenant lounge with coffee bar, kitcenette and free Wi-fi – plus a fitness center with locker rooms, a yoga and stretching area, and an outdoor terrace with grills for tenant use. Developed by Maryland-based Heritage Properties, he site can also accommodate additional development of a 45,000 sq. ft. building in the future. Gilbane Building Co. is general contractor for the project, with Colliers International handling marketing and leasing. For more information, visit legacyatbriercreek.com.

North Raleigh resident Jennifer Wrigley went to the desert and won a national swimming competition. At the 2016 U.S. Masters Synchronized Swimming Championship in Oro Valley, AZ, Wrigley caputured first place in the 50-59 age group Solo Finals competition – representing the Triangle Aqualillies, based at Triangle Aquatic Center in Cary. More than 300 competitors participated from the U.S., Canada and Japan participated in the event, in various age categories from 20 to 89 (and over). To secure the victory, Wrigley had to swim two routines: A technical routine, with five specific elements performed in a certain order; then a free routine, with the two scores combined for the final awards. She secured the win by 0.15 points, indicating the competitiveness of the event. A veteran fitness trainer and swim instructor, Wrigley was at Brier Creek Country Club for many years – and now is Wellness Director at Carolina Arbors in Brier Creek. 919 Magazine

Construction completion on new Brier Creek office building by summer 2017

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New Home Sales Under Way At Andrews Chapel Brier Creek

BC Country Club Expanding, Remodeling Deke’s Grill

Sales at Andrews Chapel – a new planned community by M/I Homes – are under way in the Brier Creek area. Four unique new townhome designs are available in the first phase of Andrews Chapel, ranging 1,600 to 2,400 sq. ft. – and all with at least three bedrooms and baths. One and two car garage plans will be available. Homeowners may choose from features such as first floor owner’s suite or guest suites, optional third-floor bonus room and screened porches. Single-family homes will range in size from 2,400 to 3,100 sq. ft. and showcase three to five bedrooms, open kitchen, dining, great rooms which are perfect for entertaining. Owner’s suites with luxury baths, strategically designed lofts and bonus rooms, expandable third floor bonus areas, guest suites and screened porches will also be found in this collection. “We are excited to bring M/I Homes to the Brier Creek area,” said Allison Moriarty, vice president of sales and marketing for M/I. “Andrews Chapel has something for everyone – from singles just starting out to growing families, and even empty nesters.”

Brier Creek Country Club plans to renovate and expand Deke’s Grill, beginning in January. Plans are gain more dining capacity by taking a portion of the men’s locker room. Plans also call for upgrading the bar and restaurant’s décor and refreshed branding that continues to honor Deacon Palmer, the father and mentor of famed golfer Arnold Palmer – who designed the BCCC course. During the construction and remodeling, club dining will move upstairs to the Governor’s Lounge area.

For information, call 919-230-1080 or visit mihomes.com.

Construction Under Way On New BC Handee Hugos Construction is under way at 9910 Sellona Street in Brier Creek for a Handee Hugos gas station and quick-serve restaurant. The new 4,750 sq. ft. facility is planned for a lot near the intersection of Brier Creek Parkway and Globe Road. No completion date or opening date was announced.

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BCCC is located at 9400 Club Hill Drive. Call 919-206-4600 for more information.

Short Takes • For the 11th consecutive year, Wake County Public School System has the highest number of National Board Certified Teachers in the U.S. Among the teachers receiving the certification were Ashley Howey of Brier Creek Elementary and Heather Shipley of Pleasant Union Elementary. • Raleigh-Durham International Airport recently added a nonstop flight to New Orleans by Allegiant, set to begin February 16 and run on Thursdays and Sundays, with one-way fares will cost as low as $53. • Jim Gill – who spent six years at the Raleigh-Durham Airport Authority – is the new President and CEO of the Gerald Ford International Airport in Michigan • Sandy Chambers transitions to principal of the new Hortons Creek Elementary School in Cary on Feb. 1. Chambers has been principal of Brier Creek Elementary since 2009. • Triangle Orthopaedic Associates – which recently expanded its Brier Creek facility – recently combined with Blue Ridge Bone and Joint, Carolina Orthopaedic Specialists and OrthoWilmington to form a new practice called EmergeOrtho, which will have 49 office locations in 21 counties from Asheville to Wilmington and includes 126 physicians and 237 physician assistants, nurse practitioners and therapists. • Construction is now under way on a new Holiday Inn Express hotel on a four-acre site at 10450 Little Brier Creek Lane, near the intersection of T.W. Alexander Drive and Glenwood Avenue. The developer of the Holiday Inn site is Harry Singh of Eastern Properties of NC Inc.

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JAN/FEB 2017


919 | SPOTLIGHT

No Judgment,

Just Results North Raleigh’s Amity Whalen Builds a Welcoming, Respectful Studio Focused on Real Results

919 Photos by Catherine Davis Photography by TILDEN DUNN 919 Magazine Writer

No judgment. Just results.   When Amity Whalen opened her first Carolina Barre and Core boutique fitness studio in Charlotte three years ago, she wanted a place where guests felt comfortable taking classes – a place where everyone is treated with the upmost respect. And now in Raleigh, just as in Charlotte, she has built just that: A studio where individuals of all sizes, shapes, ages and fitness levels are welcome.   “Our mission is to welcome every guest into our studio, to make sure that they are working in the proper position and alignment,” said Walen, a married North Raleigh resident with three children in local schools. “We give our guests the very best experience and they get the maximum results.”   All teachers at Carolina Barre were trained by Fred Devito and Elisabeth Halfpapp of Exhale Spa in New York City to be true teachers – not just instructors.  “We do not use scripts or memorize choreography,” Whalen explained.  “We know what to teach, why we teach it and how to adjust form.”  A graduate of UNC-Chapel Hill (where she studied biology), Whalen taught at a franchise barre studio for more than two years before getting the opportunity to open her own studio in Char32

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919 | SPOTLIGHT

Amity Whalen Profile FOUNDER, OWNER: Carolina Barre and Core YEARS IN POSITION: 3.5 years PROFESSIONAL BACKGROUND: Teaching fitness – including cycle, pilates, yoga, group exercise and barre – since 1995 EDUCATION: BS in Biology, UNC Chapel Hill RESIDENCE: Wetherburn neighborhood off Strickland and Six Forks, North Raleigh FAMILY: Husband, Duncan (22 years); 3 children: Saidey, 19, UNC Chapel Hill; Spencer, 14, Cardinal Gibbons High; Mills, 14, Cardinal Gibbons High PETS: Biggie Smalls, Malu (dogs) INTERESTS: Watching children play sports, traveling with them to tournaments; going to New York City for classes with mentors at Exhale Spa


919 | spotlight sPOTLIGHT

‘We give our guests the very best experience and they get the maximum results.’ AMITY WHALEN Founder, Carolina Barre and Core

Carolina Barre and Core

lotte in 2013. “I was lucky enough to work with Devito and Halfpapp, who taught the original Lotte Berk Method for many years and later founded the iconic Exhale Spa,” she said. “With 30-plus years of experience (each), they were the perfect fit to train all of our teachers in the method of Core Fusion in both North Carolina locations.” According to Whalen, her team is passionate about the method they teach and ensuring that guests be in proper form. “We believe in finding the correct position and getting the guest into the proper alignment before they find movement,” she stressed.  “All teachers will give hands-on corrections and enhancements to give the guest the very best experience possible.  This will also maximize results.”  34

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YEAR OPENED: 2016 (Raleigh); 2013 (Charlotte) FOUNDER, OWNER: Amity Whalen LOCATIONS: Raleigh 8480 Honeycutt Rd, Ste 102 Raleigh (Lafayette Village) Charlotte 2901 Selwyn Ave Charlotte, NC 28209 HOURS: Varies (check class schedule) WEBSITE: carolinabarre.com EMAIL: info@carolinabarre.com PHONE: 919-200-4241 (Raleigh) 980-207-1046 (Charlotte)

Whalen indicated that teachers at Carolina Barre work in a neutral spine and never over tuck, grip or squeeze. Many barre studios and methods live by “the tuck” – but she said her team believes, that over tucking, or moving from the grip of the tuck can lead to tight hip flexors, back pain and, many times, sciatica.  “It is safer and more efficient to move from the ‘brace of the core’, rather than the ‘grip of the tuck’ philosophy,” she said.   It’s all part of the teaching philosophy at Carolina Barre.

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“We know what to teach, how to teach it and how to correct form. We don’t have set choreography and don’t teach off of a script,” Whalen said. “Every class can be personalized based on the guests attending.  We treat every guest with respect and there is never a feeling of competition. We live by another mantra: We don’t compare.  We don’t compete.” JAN/FEB 2017


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919 | SPOTLIGHT

Craft Commercial Brings A Change to the Market

Team Craft Enhances the Client Experience With Commitment, Aggressive Marketing For decades, sales and leasing of commercial real estate in the Triangle has operated status quo. But as it is in every industry, sometimes change comes along. So is it with the big splash, made by the launch of the dynamic real estate firm, Craft Commercial. It is where high touch meets high tech, coupled with exciting innovation in a world where consumers demand fast, accurate information. Brokers at Craft Commercial have introduced new technologies to enhance the client experience the way movie magic miraculously transformed grey images into a vibrant rainbow of active narratives. Team Craft Commercial buzzes alive at their newly renovated headquarters on Six Forks Road in Raleigh. As you enter Craft Commercial’s elegantly contemporary think-

CRAFT COMMERCIAL ADDRESS: 7300 Six Forks Road, Raleigh PHONE: 919-889-7557 WEBSITE: craftcommercial.com tank, you are soothed by refreshingly breathable space and guided by capable hands to navigate the often-elusive mysteries of commercial real estate. The brokers here all radiate positivity, experience, wisdom, and seem to have been sharpened from the Ivy League – minus any hint of pretentiousness. Just as Tesla Motors revolutionized the auto world, Craft Commercial is well on its way to doing the same in the high stakes game of buying, selling, and leasing of skyscrapers, raw land, sexy start-up space, a modern A-list restaurant destination, and everything in between. Commercial real estate experts here not only love what they do, they are what they do. On a typical day, team Craft Commercial brokers meet with real estate moguls looking to break ground for a new boutique or outdoor shop-

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ping experience. Then they may be off to a listing appointment to represent a multi-million dollar farm zoned for commercial development. After a power lunch with one of the top architectural firms in the region regarding a live/work loft project, they’re off meeting with professional filmmakers to talk out the creative details of a cinematic video production to showcase a seven-figure law firm building that they represent. And after a celebratory dinner honoring their founder at an American Red Cross gala, the team is off to enjoy their coveted Carolina Hurricanes at a game – being that they are all big fans and the top real estate sponsor for many years running. The countless, thrilled clients of Craft Commercial sound like cheerleaders for a winning team. The team offers a fierce commitment to clients, state-of-the-art marketing and taking the time to listen to objectives seem to be the running theme in their rave reviews. With smiling eyes, flawless presentation, and a sense of purpose behind everything they do, team Craft Commercial is the special operations team of commercial real estate. Highly skilled, highly specialized – and they get it right first time, every time. This is not some firm from New York, Los Angeles, or London. This is a firm born and bred in our very own backyard here in Raleigh, NC. CEO Linda Craft and President Sonya Wagner have a message for other firms in the area: “We’d love to partner with other firms to add value any way we can to better serve our clients.” And, with a playful smile – not unlike an Olympian on the verge of winning the gold – Craft offered: “For all you superstar brokers ready to take your game to the next level of extraordinary, let’s talk.”

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

JAN/FEB 2016


919 | spAPSHOTS

VOLLEYBALL CHAMPIONS The Franciscan School’s volleyball team won he Triangle Catholic School Athletic Conference league title last fall. The campus is located in North Raleigh. Call 919-847-8205 for more information. Submitted Photo

JINGLEBELL GOLF Because the greens at Brier Creek Country Club were closed, the annual Jinglebell Golf Extravaganza played through with a special “one swing for the closest to the pin” at a temporary flag in the middle of the 18th fairway. Though reduced to a single hole, participants’ spirits were high in support of the group’s annual holiday season contribution to the Raleigh Rescue Mission. Submitted Photo

What did your child do in preschool today? Our children had fun with their friends in Beijing. Experience an international preschool. Half Day Preschool for ages 2 to 5! Children love our Technology: One-on-one iPad Program, OSMO, Coding and 3D Language Arts Program! Spanish & Chinese - Reading, Math & Writing - Art, Music, Science Smart Boards and iPads - Yoga - International Assessments After School Classes: Dance, Soccer, Chess, STEM Club

Call Us Now To Schedule A Tour! International Preschool of Raleigh

2730 Godley Lane, Raleigh, NC 27617 (Brier Creek next to Frankie’s)

919-957-7249 ipraleigh.com 38

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919 | COMMUNITY SNAPSHOTS

Habitat for Humanity ReStore Opens on Glenwood Avenue

LRHS Cheer Takes Top Prize at NC Competition

Habitat for Humanity of Wake County ReStore is now open in North Raleigh at 8009 Glenwood Avenue. The ReStore is a thrift store with a mission, offering a wide variety of items that change daily. Store hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday. The facility is closed on Sunday. Glenwood ReStore staff includes Manager Alex Cooley, Assistant Manager Lee Alexander and Donations Manager Eric Moe. Other store locations include 2420 North Raleigh Boulevard in Raleigh, Wake Forest, Cary, Apex, and Fuquay Varina. Taxdeductible donations of new and gently used furniture, appliances and building materials are accepted (call 919-744-2420 to schedule a pick up for larger items).

Leesville Road High took home the top prize, the Carolina Cup, at the recent 14th annual Cheerleading Invitational Championships at the Raleigh Convention Center. Presented to the highest scoring team across each of the 18 varsity divisions in the competition, the Cup annually recognizes the top high school varsity cheerleading team in the state. Cheer Ltd., Inc., the NCHSAA’s corporate partner that assists with the invitational championship, has established the Carolina Cup to recognize

For more information, call 919-307-8949, or visit wakerestore.org.

More than 100 teams competed in the event.

Leesville Road High Cheer Team

Chesterbrook Academy

®

Elementary School Serving 3 Years – 5th Grade A private school education for the whole child Our challenging, well-rounded curriculum helps students master the core academics while developing skills such as creativity, problem solving and collaboration. Our individualized approach to instruction helps each child grow, flourish and excel. • Personalized learning environment • Art, music, drama, PE, STEM and foreign language • Project based learning and field trips • Ongoing parent involvement

OPEN HOUSE Thursday, March 9, 10:00 am – 3:00 pm & Saturday, March 11, 10:00 am – 1:00 pm 10200 Strickland Road, Raleigh • 877-959-4181

cbaelementarynorthraleigh.com 919 Magazine

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919 | Community

5401 North Features Family Farm, Restaurants, and More

Trinity Academy Open House Scheduled Jan. 25

Construction is under way at a new north Raleigh community: 5401 North, featuring homes ranging in size from 1,800 to 3,100 sq. ft. and priced in the mid-$200s. The epicenter of the new neighborhood is the Purple Martin Community Farm, featuring resident farm supervisor Ty Boyd. With BS in Horticulture from NC State and a Master of Forest Ecology from Purdue University, Boyd brings a wealth of experience and expertise to the community. “I am very proud to be your community farmer at the Purple Martin Farm,” said Boyd, who will work with residents to develop sustainable agriculture for the community. “I’m thrilled to be a part of such a unique farming environment that will give us an opportunity to educate children and young adults on healthy living and growing fresh produce right in their own neighborhood,”

Trinity Academy plans an open house for prospective students and parents at 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Jan. 25 at the North Raleigh campus. The private school accepts applications for students in Grades TK-12. Trinity Academy is located at 10224 Baileywick Road.

5401 north also touts: • Authentic regional architecture, not mass-produced/ streamlined tract-homes. • Diverse housing styles in a range of prices for all age ranges.

5401 North is located at the intersection of I-540 and Highway 401, near Wake Tech Community College’s North Campus and River Bend Elementary School.

For more information, call 919-786-0114 or visit trinityacademy.com.

• Easy to manage small yards with large front porches. • Restaurants, shops and office space that is easy to access. • Hiking and bike trails that traverse the community and open spaces. • Ample parks and public spaces serve as gathering points for the community.

For more information, visit 5401north.com

KEEP FIT AND HAVE FUN

Start off 2017 with our Introductory Special: 50 for 2 weeks

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Pump It Up of Raleigh • 919.828.3344 • pumpitupparty.com/raleigh-nc 10700 World Trade Blvd., Suite 112, Raleigh, NC 27617

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Unlimited Classes

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Mention this ad and get a free pair of CBC Sticky Socks with Intro Purchase

8480 Honeycutt Road #102, Raleigh NC 27615 Lafayette Village – Falls of Neuse Road www.carolinabarre.com

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919-200-4241 JAN/FEB 2017


919 | COMMUNITY

Annual Raleighwood Academy Awards Gala Scheduled Feb. 26

Millbrook Exchange Tennis Center Offers Free Sessions

Doors open for Raleighwood’s 17th Annual Academy Awards Gala at 6:45 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 26, in North Raleigh. Admission is free to watch the 89th Annual Academy Awards presentation on the big screen. Special activities and contests include movie trivia, “pick the Oscar winner”, and “best dressed competition”. Move star and character look-alike contests also are planned, with prizes awarded. Attendees are encouraged to get glammed up, dressed up or come casual. A regular food menu is available, and a portion of the evening’s proceeds will go to the Will Rogers Motion Pictures Pioneer Foundation.

Millbrook Exchange Tennis Center offers free winter tennis opportunities for juniors in January and February. For age 7-10, one hour play days sessions supervised by Head Tennis Professional Bennett Bailey are available 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. on Jan. 17, 19, 24, 26 and 31 – and on Feb. 2, 9, 10, 16 and 17. For age 11-17 (Bronze Level and Silver Level), Junior Team Tennis-style practice sessions are set for 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. on Jan. 20 and 27. For age 7-17 Junior Team Tennis Assessments for individuals seeking to play Junior Team Tennis in spring 2017 are 4:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. on Feb. 7 and Feb. 8.

Visit raleighwoodmovies.com, email specialevents@raleighwoodmovies.com, or call 919-847-0326 for more information. Raleighwood is located at 6609 Falls of Neuse Road.

919 Magazine

Visit raleighnc.gov/parks or call 919-996-4156 for more information. Millbrook Exchange Tennis Center is located at 1905 Spring Forest Road in North Raleigh.

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Raleighwood Hosts Super Buffet Party

Chesterbrook Academy Open House Sessions January 19, 21

Want to see the Super Bowl on a 35 ft. screen in HD digital projection? Want to listen to Dolby Digital Stadium Surround Sound? Then purchase tickets now at the Raleighwood Movies, Food & Spirits box office – and also enjoy an unlimited hot and cold food buffet throughout the game, featuring pizza, deli platters, chili, hot wings, salads and more. Tickets are $24.95, or $29.95 for preferred seating. Buffet tickets do not include taxes, beverages or desserts. All seating is reserved and numbered. Purchase tickets at 11:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the theater box office, located at 6609 Falls of Neuse Road in North Raleigh.

Chesterbrook Academy Preschool & Elementary School in North Raleigh plans Open House sessions in January. Combining a rigorous, standards-based curriculum with experiences that develop 21st century skills – such as creativity, collaboration and communication – Chesterbrook provides a technology-rich environment in a convenient location on Strickland Road between Creedmoor and Lead Mine roads. The sessions are 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 19 and 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 21.

For more information, call 919-847-0326 or visit raleighwoodmovies.com

Short Takes

Red Cross Ball Set At NR Country Club Celebrating 100 years of community service to the Triangle, the 26th Annual Triangle Red Cross Ball is planned for Saturday, April 8, at the North Ridge Country Club in North Raleigh. Linda Craft of Linda Craft & Team Realtors and Suzy Beth Sarver of 919 Magazine return for the third consecutive year as Co-Chairs and hosts of one of the biggest annual charity events in the region. Popularly know as a “Party for a Purpose”, attendees can dance the night away while enjoying fine food and cocktails, and bidding on incredible live and silent auction items. American Red Cross of Eastern North Carolina Region supports a number of initiatives each year. Among the recent highlights: • Home Fires: On average the Triangle Red Cross responds every six hours to a home fire affecting families from the Triangle to the Coast, assisting families to take control of their recovery. • Military: Triangle Red Cross gave financial, emotional and training support to military families more than 68.000 times in the Eastern North Carolina Region. • Blood Collection: Local blood donors gave more than 126,070 units of lifesaving blood to help their neighbors survive a crisis, such as cancer and heart-related illnesses. • Volunteers: Triangle Red Cross provided 4,319 volunteers to fulfill its mission in the past year. For additional information on becoming a sponsor or securing tickets, email mira.batchelor@redcross.org, call 919-741-3478, or visit redcross.org/enc. 42

919 Magazine

For information, call 877-959-4181 or visit chesterbrookacademy.com. The campus is at 10200 Strickland Road in North Raleigh.

• The Tilted Kilt sports bar and restaurant has closed its location at 4516 Falls of Neuse Road in North Raleigh. • Former Millbrook High football running back Marcus Marshall plans to transfer from Georgia Tech to James Madison following the 2016 season. • Leesville Road High senior Nevada Mareno finished second at the recent national Foot Locker Cross Country Championships in San Diego. A two-time North Carolina state cross country champion, she has signed to attend Stanford University next year. • Sprouts Farmers Market – a 30,000 sq. ft. food store – anchors the new Olive Park retail center at 9414 Falls of Neuse Road opening in 2017. • Best Buy converted its former retail outlet at 5220 Capital Boulevard in North Raleigh (Towne Square Shopping Center) into an outlet warehouse, featuring products on clearance. The retailer moved its North Raleigh store several months ago to 6280 Capital Boulevard, near Triangle Town Center. • For the 11th consecutive year, Wake County Public School System has the highest number of National Board Certified Teachers in the U.S. Among the teachers receiving the certification: Gretchen Houston, Abbotts Creek Elementary; Annette Pakes, Brassfield Elementary; Christopher Watkins, Carroll Middle; Jessica Uehlin, Lead Mine Elementary; Yvonne Anderson, Cathleen Batten, Angela Browning and Deborah McNally of Leesville Road High; Wendy Edwards, Dail Nixon Midgette, and Mary Lynn Wallace of Millbrook High; Margaret Lumsden of Sanderson High; and Gloria Dragonette, Andrea Lyons, and Andrea Mehlenbacher of Sycamore Creek Elementary.

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JAN/FEB 2017


Carin Savel New Jewish Federation Chief Officer

Free Open House at Abbotts Creek Community on Feb. 4

Carin Savel is the new chief executive officer of the Jewish Federation of Raleigh-Cary. Carin returns to North Carolina from Western Massachusetts, where she served as Senior Vice President of Resource Development & Strategic Communications for the United Way of Pioneer Valley, leading a $7 million community campaign. Prior to that, she served for 10 years as senior staff in the NC General Assembly. “I am delighted that we will usher in a new era with a leader of Carin Savel’s stature. She is an ideal match for how we plan to grow in the coming years,” said Federation President Mark Wiener. “Carin is passionate about Jewish life and the unique role Federation plays as convener and community builder in the local, national and global Jewish world.”

A free open house is planned for 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 4, at Abbotts Creek Community Center in North Raleigh. A fun family event, attendees will learn about programs, events and happenings at the center throughout the year. For more information, call 919-996-2770 or visit parks. raleighnc.gov.

919 Magazine

Abbotts Creek Community Center is located at 9950 Durant Road in North Raleigh.

No stranger to the Jewish community, Carin served on the Executive Committee and Board of Trustees of the Jewish Federation of Western Massachusetts, and chaired their Jewish Community Relations Committee. She currently serves on the national board of the Jewish Council for Policy Affairs, and is a member of the JCPA Task Force for Resource Development, Education and Advocacy Strategy. Savel can be reached at 919-672-2200, ext. 102 or carin.savel@shalomraleigh.org.

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919 | HEALTH & WELLNESS

A NEW YEAR,

A NEW LIFE! How To Stay Healthy and Active in the 919

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919 | HEALTH & WELLNESS

11 Easy Tips to Good Health in 2017 Here’s how to ensure the new year is one of improved health for 919’ers.

Feel Good At Any Age ‘No matter how old you are, no matter how much you weigh, you can still control the health of your body.’ - Mehmet Oz, M.D.

919 Magazine

1. Walk, run or bike on more than 100 miles of the Capital Area Greenway System trails. Get a map and more details at raleighnc.gov/parks. (Or sample the other trails at various Wake County parks, near Falls Lake, at Umstead State Park and, of course, the American Tobacco Trail in Durham and Wake counties.) 2. Exercise and have fun with ZUMBA! With more than 50 classes available in the area, find a class near you for any day of the week at www.zumba.com, or check your nearest community center schedules. 3. Try a new heart healthy recipe. Choose one of hundreds at recipes.heart.org. 4. Join your local YMCA: See a list of all locations here ymcatriangle.org. 5. Get swimming today at Triangle Aquatic Center in Cary (triangleaquatics.org) or a City of Raleigh indoor pool facility visit raleighnc.gov/parks and select “Aquatics”, or the Morrisville Aquatics and Fitness Center (townofmorrisville. org). 6. Take a free yoga class from “Free Yoga in the Triangle” at several locations, both indoors and outside. Many classes to choose at yttonline.org/freeyoga.php. 7. Get social: Join one of the many adult sports leagues/social clubs in the 919. One that looks really fun is at tripsportsnc.com. 8. Quit smoking. Quitline NC provides free cessation services to any North Carolina resident who wants to stop the habit. Both telephone and web coaching is available 24 hours a day, and free of charge. Reach them at 1-800-QUIT NOW or quitlinenc.com. 9. Make exercise and being active a family affair: Jump at several indoor facilities, such as Pump it Up Raleigh in the Brier Creek area (pumpitupparty.com or search for “trampoline parks”). 10. Take your dog to the park! Off-leash dog parks in the 919 offer the unique opportunity to run, play and get moving with your best friend. Find a list of parks available at www. bringfido.com. 11. Eat more fresh fruits and vegetables from the farm. Many grocers often have special produce areas filled by local farmers – but also visit numerous local farmers markets in Raleigh, Morrisville, Cary, Durham, and Wake Forest (and more). North Carolina State Farmers Market in Raleigh is the largest in he 919 (ncagr.gov/markets).

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919 | HEALTH & WELLNESS

Just How Healthy is the 919?

Don’t Just Survive… Thrive in 2017!

Health-related local statistics that 919’ers need to know.

Healthy Tips and Advice from Local Experts

1. Four of the 10 leading causes of death in North Carolina are related to obesity. 2. Wake County is ranked #1 healthiest county in North Carolina. 3. For every 1,000 hospital stays in Wake County, 50 are considered preventable. 4. The average life expectancy of a Wake County resident is 81.3 years. 5. Teen pregnancy rate among females age 15-19 has declined 36 percent since 2007. 6. 6 percent of residents in Wake County reported that they use the emergency room as a place they most often go to when sick. 7. 70 percent of Wake County residents reported that they got a routine health check-up in the past year. 8. 17 percent of Wake County adults reported being diagnosed with depression at some point. 9. 15 percent of Wake County residents binge drink. 10. Wake County high school drop-out rate has been in general decline since 2006-07. 11. Wake County heart disease rate has decreased 30 percent in recent years. 12. According to the 2013 Community Health Opinion Survey, 18.6 percent of residents reported their health to be fair or poor, compared to 7.9 percent in the 2010 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey. 13. Wake County residents with household incomes less than $50,000 were 3.3 times more likely to report fair or poor health. 14. Wake County residents with a high school education or less were 2.2 times more likely to report fair or poor health compared to those with some college. 15. In Wake County, 11.3 percent of non-whites reported fair or poor health compared to 6.1 percent for whites. 16. Diabetes is the 5th leading cause of death in Durham County. 17. Colon cancer is he second leading cause of cancer death in North Carolina. 18. Though heart disease is more prevalent than cancer in the U.S., the opposite is true in Durham County. 19. 65 percent of adults in Durham County are overweight or obese. Four of the 10 leading causes of death in North Carolina are related to obesity: Heart disease, type 2 diabetes, stroke, and some kinds of cancer.

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AGING/SKIN CARE Anna Churchill Founder Synergy Spa & Aesthetics 8300 Health Park, North Raleigh & 2603 Glenwood Ave, Raleigh 919-510-5130 feelsynergy.com

5 Suggestions for a Renewed You • Detox your Body: Cupping massage provides real results to help increase blood flow and decrease back pain and stiff muscles. This treatment can be helpful for those suffering from anxiety, headaches, joint paint or fatigue. • Fresh Year, Fresh Face: Try “the peel you don’t feel” with Neostrata’s Retinol Peel. This treatment offers amazing results with zero discomfort, and is appropriate for all skin types. • Lip, Lip, Hooray! Want a subtle boost to your lips with increased volume or smoothing of fine lines? Try Volbella, the newest filler from Allergan, the makers of Botox and Juvéderm. • Your Secret Weapon! diVa is a quick, comfortable, no downtime solution to a woman’s most intimate challenges using hybrid fractional laser technology by Sciton. This treatment helps improve issues with laxity, dryness, incontinence, and other vaginal concerns. • You Had Me at Halo! This customizable laser treatment targets various skin issues, such as tone, texture, pore size, and unwanted pigment. With little to no downtime, your skin has a vast improvement after just one treatment.

Anna Churchill has over 24 years of skincare and medical aesthetics experience.

Breathe ‘Practicing regular, mindful breathing can be calming and energizing and can even help with stress-related health problems ranging from panic attacks to digestive disorders.’ - Andrew Weil, M.D.

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JAN/FEB 2017


919 | HEALTH & WELLNESS 5 Ways to Improve Your Mind

MIND Jeanine Finelli Author, Speaker, Health Coach jeaninefinelli.com loveyourselftohealth.com

• Clean up your social life – set boundaries with toxic people • Eat nothing white • Move your body regularly with dance, walking, yoga, hiking, the gym • Break up with the sweet-talker in your life: Sugar (for weight loss and reduced inflammation) • Create a healthy atmosphere to thrive in at work (website?)

SPIRIT

5 Benefits of Meditation * • Reduce stress • Boost immunity • Enhance creativity • Increase productivity • Improve attention and memory * Free meditation classes in Cary: 6:30-7 pm, 2/1-22 (call 919-920-0569 or visit clients.mindbodyonline.com/classic)

5 Ways to Shape Your Body

BODY Whitney Walter Lead CycleStar Cyclebar Brier Creek 8741 Brier Creek Pkwy #100 919-906-1172 briercreek.cyclebar.com

Define Your Authentic Self ‘The authentic self is the you that can be found at your absolute core. It is the part of you not defined by your job function or role. It is the composite of your skills, talents and wisdom. It is all of the things that you are uniquely yours and need expression, rather than what you believe you are supposed to be and do.’ - Phil McGraw, Ph.D

919 Magazine

Ann McKenzie Holistic Minister, Reiki Master Practitioner Omnigirl.net/events/ annmckenzie@omnigirl.net 919-920-0569

• Set small goals/expectations: Don’t expect to be the best; just celebrate that you came and worked out. CycleBar riders burn on average 500 calories in a 50 min. class, so make the commitment to ride and we will help you with the rest. • Make new friends: Talk to people after class about their favorite CycleStar (instructor) or class type. Most people are more than willing to give advice, and these will be your new workout friends who will keep you accountable for continuing to come to classes. • Once you find a CycleStar and class time that works for you, make it a routine. Mark it on your calendar on repeat and treat it the same as you would a meeting or a date. Have a date with yourself for yourself! • Give yourself mini rewards along the way, such a glass of wine after three CycleBar classes in a week, or a new workout outfit after you notice your clothes fitting better. Celebrate the little things along the way to your goal. • Don’t be afraid to be slightly uncomfortable; if exercise were easy everyone would do it. It takes a while to get used to it, and your muscles will be sore…as will your rear from the seat. It takes about three classes to get used to the pain in your muscles and your seat, then it won’t bother you any more. The benefits will extend far beyond just the physical benefits.

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919 | HEALTH & WELLNESS

Healthy Dining Options in the 919 Fresh and healthy food is in abundance restaurants, eateries and other establishments in the 919. Here are a few favorites that made our list:

Tamarind Eatery

Asian Fusion restaurant in Brier Creek Commons 8531 Brier Creek Pkwy #109, Raleigh 919-406-3473 tamarindeatery.com Opened in 2016 in the Brier Creek Commons, Tamarind Eatery offers fresh and healthy Asian classics with a modern twist. Many of the entrees are vegetarian, gluten-free and low carb. The restaurant focuses on popular wellknown dishes, but everything is cooked to order – utilizing locally sourced produce and no MSG added.

Poppyseed Market

Gourmet deli and café in North Raleigh’s Harvest Oaks Plaza 8801 Lead Mine Rd, Raleigh 919-870-4997 poppyseedmkt.com A long-time established deli and café in North Raleigh, Poppyseed Market remains a 919 Magazine favorite. Chef Julia McGovern stays true to her passion by offering healthy, fresh ingredients with a gourmet flair. When you need diversification on dining options for lunch or dinner, this is the place to go. We can never get enough of her incredible homemade salads and seasonal menu items.

Whole Foods Market Smoothie King

Blended drinks, nutritional products and snacks in Park West Village 1117 Market Center Dr, Morrisville 919-800-0118 smoothieking.com There is no excuse to making healthy choices when you have an option like Smoothie King. This place offers custom smoothie blends for wellness, kids, fitness and diet conscious consumers. Everything from Almond Mocha High Protein to the delicious Gladiator Strawberry, made fresh right on the spot. They also offer many smoothie enhancements and healthy food supplements. Locally owned and operated, you can expect great service and a friendly staff.

Terra’s Kitchen

Fresh-prepped ingredients for 30-minute or less meals Worldwide In-home delivery terraskitchen.com Now here’s a company that found us! Terra’s Kitchen is navigating the homedelivery market making it easy to eat healthy with “freshly prepped” wholesome meals that you make in your own home. With entrees such as the mouth-watering “Skillet Lemon Garlic Chicken” or the “Paprika-rubbed Salmon Tostadas with Avocado-orange Salsa,” we were soon on board to something different. According to the company’s website, their philosophy is to source clean, sustainable ingredients that are antibiotic-and hormone-free, as well as offering nonGMO and organic whenever possible. There seems to be no excuse to eating right when you have an Internet connection and a credit card.

Eco-minded chain offering natural and organic foods at the Market at Colonnade 8710 Six Forks Rd, Raleigh 919-354-0350 locu.com When you think of a grocery store, you may think of only a place to buy groceries. Whole Foods Market is so much more. They offer an incredible fresh take out service with in-store dining and also a spacious outdoor patio, free wi-fi AND they are proud to boast that this location was recognized by the EPA as a “Zero waste facility”. What could make you feel better than eating fresh, organic food with a company that is sensitive to our environment and sources natural and organic products and has a strong commitment to local growers.

Among the other healthy establishments to consider: Tazza Kitchen – Cameron Village 432 Wodburn Rd, Raleigh 919-835-9463 tazzakitchen.com

Fiction Kitchen 428 S Dawson St, Raleigh 919-831-4177 thefictionkitchen.com

Vegan Flava Café 4125 Durham Chapel Hill Blvd, Durham 919-960-1832 veganflavacafe.com

Saladelia 4201 University Dr, Durham 919-489-5776 saladelia.com

The Remedy Diner 137 E Hargett St, Raleigh 919-835-3553 theremedydiner.com

Irregardless Café 901 W Morgan St, Raleigh 919-833-8898 irregardless.com

Sassool 9650 Strickland Rd, Raleigh 919-847-2700 sassool.com

Guasaca Arepa & Salsa Grill 4025 Lake Boone Trail #107, Raleigh 919-322-4928 guasaca.com

Healthy Buffaloes 1807 W Markham Ave, Durham 919-237-2358 heavenlybuffaloes.com


919 | HEALTH & WELLNESS

Where to Stay Fit in 2017 CycleBar Brier Creek 8741 Brier Creek Pkwy #100, Raleigh 919-906-1172 briercreek.cyclebar.com Planet Fitness 8201 Rowlock Way, Ste 116 919-792-9132 planetfitness.com D1 Sports Training 201 Kitty Hawk Dr, Raleigh 919-825-1298 d1sportstraining.com

If You Smoke, Quit

Carolina Barre & Core 8480 Honeycutt Rd #102, Raleigh 919-200-4241 carolinabarre.com

‘Cigarette smoking is clearly identified as the chief, preventable cause of death in our society’ - C. Everett Koop, former Surgeon General

Morrisville Community Crossfit 2933 S Miami Blvd, Durham 919-234-0983 morrisvillecrossfit.com

Want a Holistic Approach?

Awakenings Health 8352 Six Forks Rd, Raleigh 919-909-7819 awakeningshealth.com

Drink Water With Lemon Adding the lemon to your water helps to detoxify the liver and metabolizes fat, so this can speed up metabolism by about 33 percent.’ - Jackie Warner, celebrity trainer/fitness expert 919 Magazine

• To help stop a chronic cough at night, take two teaspoons of honey with 500 mg of Ester C 30 minutes before bed. • Reducing the intake of salt can reduce blood pressure, and eliminate tinnitus and hypertension. • For minor skin burns, apply aloe vera gel – which creates a second skin to protect the burn from air. • Stinky feet? Stop odor by soaking nightly in one part vinegar and two parts water to eliminate odoriferous bacteria. • Prevent chapped lips by rubbing olive oil (antiinflammatory, antioxidant, and moisturizing) on them two or three times a day. • To avoid insomnia, before bedtime, eat a handful of cherries – which are packed with melatonin. Once in bed, rest your head on lavender-filled pillow. • If you want whiter teeth, crush strawberries into a pulp and mix with baking soda into a paste. Apply to a toothbrush and polish teeth for a few minutes once every couple of months. • Nausea? Put it to rest by putting isopropyl alcohol on a cotton ball and take a few deep breaths.

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919 | HEALTH & WELLNESS

Don’t Forget Supplements For many people, their daily diet provides inadequate amounts of every single vitamin, mineral and antioxidant necessary for good health. With that fact in mind, here are important diet supplements for 919’ers to consider to stay healthy and vibrant in 2017: • Fish Oil: While studies vary on the effectiveness, it seems clear that individuals can benefit from the omega-3s found in fish oil. Omega-3s are linked to higher levels of HDL (the “good” cholesterol), better absorption of nutritional foods, and a better metabolic rate. • Multi-vitamin: Simple, easy and smart for everyone. • Magnesium: Instrumental in the relaxation of muscles (such as the heart), the formation of bones and teeth, proper bowel functioning, and regulating blood sugar levels. • Acetyl L-Carnitine: This amino acid converts fats to energy and boosts antioxidant activity in the body. • Folic Acid: Most known for use by women during their childbearing years, this also both men and women of all ages – potentially lowering the risk of Alzheimer’s, heart disease and hypertension. • Asian ginseng: A part of Chinese medicine for centuries, ginseng purportedly can enhance mental and physical vitality, reduce fatigue and improve metabolism. • Vitamin C: Many people can forget everything else – including the latest trends – and rely on this superior antioxidant. • Vitamin E: Protects against heart disease, by preventing oxidation of LDL cholesterol. Some studies suggest it may prevent Parkinson’s disease, boost immune strength against colds and flu in older people, and may even alleviate allergies. • Pomegranate: Rich in punicalagin, which may destroy colon cancer cells and slow the progression of Alzheimer’s disease. • Green tea: Prized for promoting heart health and preventing cancer. • Saw palmetto: For men over age 50, can improve symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia – which causes increased frequency of urination at night due to enlargement of the prostate. • Boron: For men, it improves testosterone levels and prostate health. • Calcium: Beyond the benefits of building strong bones, etc., among the young, calcium is essential for women for their lifespan to avoid brittle bones, fractures and osteoporosis. It’s important to research individual needs for supplements, and balance use with personal diet and exercise. SOURCES: Various health organizations and websites, including preventtionmagazine.com, drphi.com, drweil.com, inspirationquotes.com, oprah.com

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919 | REGION

Theatre in the Park Season Begins With World Premier Theatre In The Park, located at the 250-seat indoor facility at the northern end of Raleigh’s scenic Pullen Park, offers an impressive schedule of award-winning shows for its upcoming 2017 season. Led by founder Ira David Wood III as Artistic and Executive Director, the Theatre In The Park’s 2017 schedule begins with the highly anticipated world premiere of “N” by local playwright Adrienne Earle Pender on Feb. 10-26. Eugene O’Neill’s groundbreaking 1921 play, “The Emperor Jones”, was the first American play that featured an African-American actor in the lead role on Broadway. Charles S. Gilpin’s portrayal of Emperor Brutus Jones was hailed as “revelatory,” and he was named the finest actor of the age. The opening of “The Emperor Jones” made stars of both men; it was O’Neill’s first commercial success, and Charles Gilpin became the toast of the theater world. But by 1926, O’Neill was a legend and Gilpin was lost to history. “N” explores the challenging relationship between Gilpin and O’Neill and how it ultimately hinged on one word; a word that lifted one of them to the heights of American theater, and a word that destroyed the other. Playwright Adrienne Earle Pender was selected for the Eugene O’Neill Foundation’s Tao House Fellowship last year. The Foundation holds an O’Neill Festival every year, one of the largest in the country, and her latest play, “N”, was selected to receive a workshop and a staged reading earlier this year. It has also been selected as a finalist in the 2016 Dayton Playhouse FutureFest, a festival of new works. Season memberships are available for Theatre in the Park, which offers discounts and other incentives. Other shows scheduled for the 2017 season include: • April 7-23: “On Golden Pond,” by Ernest Thompson, about a couple in their twilight years. • July 21-Aug. 6: “Glorious,” a comedy about the worst singer in the world.

Ira David Wood III at Raleigh’s Theatre in the Park

THEATRE IN THE PARK YEAR STARTED: 1947, as The Children’s Theatre of Raleigh; name changed in 1970s EXECUTIVE DIRCTOR: Ira David Wood III LOCATION: Ira David Wood III Pullen Park Theatre, 107 Pullen Rd, Raleigh WEBSITE: theatreinthepark.com EMAIL: info@ theatreinthepark.com INFORMATION: 919-831-6936 BOX OFFICE: Hours: 9 am-5 pm, M-F Phone: 919-831-6058 • Sept. 22-Oct. 8: “Playing With Fire,” about Victor Frankenstein finally tracking down his creature at the North Pole. Individuals interested becoming involved with Theatre in the Park as a volunteer – assisting as an usher, backstage, costumes or other areas – may call 919-831-6936 or email info@theatreinthepark. Tickets are available to all shows at 919-831-6058 or theatreinthepark.com. For information, email info@theatreinthepark.com.

Wake Tech Receives $50,000 Suntrust Foundation Award Wake Tech Community College received an inaugural “Lighting the Way” $50,000 award from the SunTrust Foundation. Eight awards of $50,000 were given to non-profits across the Southeast for financial education programs. At Wake Tech, the funds will continue to support the SunTrust Center for Financial Education, which was established in 2013 to help students build money management skills and avoid debt. The center assists more than 500 students each year. “The SunTrust Center for Financial Education has helped thousands of students,” said Wake Tech President Dr. Stephen Scott. “Money management skills are absolutely critical, and with the sup919 Magazine

port of SunTrust we’ve been able to offer students some very valuable tools and resources.” The SunTrust Center for Financial Education offers financial empowerment workshops, games, contests and challenges, and a complimentary online learning center. Lessons cover a variety of topics, including credit, budgeting, entrepreneurship, financial psychology, banking, and investment basics.

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919 | REGION

WCPSS Supt. Merrill Finalist For National Recognition

Holt Brothers Playoff Party Features Super Bowl Raffle

Dr. James Merrill, SuperintenDr. James Merrill, Superintendent of the Wake County Public School System dent of the Wake County Public School System, is one of four finalists for National Superintendent of the Year. In November, the North Carolina Association of School Administrators and the North Carolina School Boards Association named Dr. Merrill North Carolina’s Superintendent of the Year – the highest honor bestowed on a superintendent in our state. “Dr. Merrill has restored our district’s local and national reputation as a leader in education,” said Monika Johnson-Hostler, Chair of the Wake County School Board. “He makes sure our district remains focused on preparing students to be productive citizens when they graduate. When making any decision impacting the district, from finances to policy, he asks how this will better prepare students for higher education or a career.” Merrill is one of only two people named twice as North Carolina Superintendent of the Year. He was named North Carolina Superintendent of the Year in 2005 when he oversaw the Alamance-Burlington School System. He also won the same award in Virginia in 2013 as the top administrator of the Virginia Beach City Public Schools. “I am humbled by this honor and the opportunity to showcase the focused work and professionalism happening every day in our school district,” Dr. Merrill said. “As we become a more global and technology-driven society, we have to adapt the way we teach our students and I’m thrilled to see that happening our schools.”

The 4th Annual Holt Brothers PNC Playoff Party, presented by PNC, is planned for 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. on Sunday, Jan. 22, at the Close-King Indoor Practice Facility in Raleigh. The event includes music, food, adult beverages, celebrity athletes, NFL cheerleaders, games, competitions and plenty of big screen TVs for viewing NFL games. Attendees can participate in a special raffle to win two Super Bowl tickets or an North Carolina State University Football Game Day Experience with Terrence and Torry Holt. The event is a fundraiser for the Holt Brothers Foundation, which assists children with a parent with cancer.

Merrill was named the ninth WCPSS superintendent in the summer of 2013. He oversees the nation’s 16th largest district, which enrolls about 160,000 students in 177 schools.

Triangle Restaurant Week Culinary Event is Jan. 23-29 Triangle Restaurant Week is Jan. 23-29. A week-long event designed to incorporate the premier Raleigh, Durham and Chapel Hill and other restaurants in the 919, it features participating restaurants offering special three-course menu options and fixed pricing. This provides a great opportunity for local residents to indulge in fine cuisine, without reservation, tickets or passes required. For more information on the event, visit trirestaurant.com 52

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For more information or to purchase tickets, visit holtbrothersfoundation.com.

Military, Veterans Resource Center Opens at Wake Tech The Military and Veterans Resource Center opened recently on the Northern Wake Campus. The new resource center will serve as a home base for students, with space for relaxing and socializing -- as well as computer work stations. Vets and members of the military can complete academic assignments, work on resumes, or search for employment. They can also research health care benefits, financial resources, and other services available to them. “Wake Tech is a military-friendly college,” said Sam Strickland, SVP for Military and Veteran Programs. “We want our veteran and military students to know we appreciate their service. This center was designed as a welcoming place for them to find community as well as resources.” The grand opening for the Military and Veterans Resource Center took place in the Building E Lecture Hall on the Northern Wake Campus. The event included music from the 440th Army Band and a keynote address by Maj. General Cornell Wilson, USMC Retired, Military Advisor to the Governor of North Carolina. It was followed by a ribbon-cutting and tour. Wake Tech provides a variety of programs and services for military veterans and their family members pursuing education, training, and professional development: Accelerated training programs, assistance with VA benefits and financial aid, and options for translating military experience into workplace credentials.

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919 | REGION

COR Museum Hosts Indian American Historic Exhibition City of Raleigh Museum hosts the Smithsonian Institution’s traveling exhibit – “Beyond Bollywood: Indian Americans Shape the Nation” – through April 9. The exhibit was created in collaboration with the Smithsonian’s Asian Pacific American Center with the goal of going beyond the stereotypes of Southeast Asian Indians by exploring their daily lives, to struggles in a new country and contributions to food, culture, and politics. The first national exhibit to celebrate the history and remarkable achievements of Indian Americans in the United States, it was launched by the Smithsonian Institution’s Traveling Exhibition Service in May 2015 – with the COR Museum being only the sixth

institution to host the inaugural tour. It opened at the Raleigh facility in October 2016. “We were excited to open this exhibit in Raleigh” said Ernest Dollar, Director of the COR Museum. “It is a great opportunity to tell the story our rapidly growing Indian community through exploring Indian American’s impact on American history.” In addition, the museum is partnering with local groups to present a series of public programs and events to highlight Wake County’s connection to the exhibit. Admission is free, although donations are accepted. Museum hours are 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday, and 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. on Sunday. Group tours are available with advance notice.

Nominations for Fletcher Volunteerism Awards Due

For information, call 919-996-2220 of visit cityofraleighmuseum. org. The museum is located at 220 Fayetteville Street in downtown Raleigh.

Nomination are due by Feb. 10 for the Fred Fletcher Awards for Outstanding Volunteerism in the City of Raleigh parks system to citizens, businesses, community organizations, and non-profit organizations. Sponsored since 1996 by the City of Raleigh Parks, Recreation and Cultural Resources Department and the Parks, Recreation, and Greenway Advisory Board, the annual volunteer recognition honors those outstanding volunteers who have contributed time, talent, and resources and have enriched the lives of the citizens in Raleigh. The awards are given to volunteers in 13 categories. Award recipients will be chosen based on their intensity of service, active volunteer involvement, and commitment to Raleigh Parks, Recreation and Cultural Resources. A special ceremony for the honorees is planned on May 11. For information or to submit a nomination, call 919-996-3285 or email ashley.deans@raleighnc.gov, or visit raleighnc.gov/parks.

Short Takes • A Colorado company plans a $100 million plant in Duplin County that will convert pig feces to methane for Duke Energy. • Toll rates on the Triangle Expressway in West Wake County increased 6.5 percent on Jan. 1. Two new interchanges on the toll road also are planned, including one at Morrisville Parkway – scheduled to open in 2019. • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention – in a report released in December 2016 – reported that heroin overdose death rates in North Carolina increased more than 46 percent from 2014 to 2015. 919 Magazine

‘Music in the Library’ Series Free, Features Local Artists Wake County Public Libraries “Music in the Library” series continues in January 2017 with a variety of soothing entertainment from local musicians. Among the performances scheduled: • Stevan Jackson (guitar), at 3:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 10; Northeast Regional Library in Wakefield (14401 Green Elm Lane, Raleigh); 919-570-7166. • Catrrine Ponall (wooden flute), at 3 p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 22; West Regional Library (400 Luis Stephens Drive, Cary); 919463-8500 – and on Sunday, Jan. 29; North Regional Library in Raleigh (7009 Harp Mills Road, Raleigh); 919-870-4000. No registration is required. For more information on public library programs, visit wakegov.com/ libraries.

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919 | ALL THINGS CAROLINA

The Sultry Sounds

of Jazz

High Point Celebrates the Long Legacy of John Coltrane, Uniting in a Common Love of Music Editor’s Note: Kenny G headlined the annual john Coltrane International Jazz & Blues Festival in High Point, NC, during Labor Day weekend in September 2016. One of the largest and most unique musical events in the region, the special event also featured live performances by Gregory Porter, Eric Gales, Esperanza Spalding and more. For information on next year’s event, visit coltranejazzfest.com or call 336-819-5299. by JAY IZSO

Special to 919 Magazine

Imagine Labor Day weekend sitting by a beautiful lake, the sun shining, golfers playing across the water as a kayak or two gently route their way. While you sit in your lawn chair, a waft of North Carolina barbeque and the sultry sounds of live jazz fill the air. Where are you? If you guessed High Point, NC, at the John Coltrane International Jazz and Blues Festival at Oak Hollow Park – you not only are correct, but, I am guessing, you have been there before. 54

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Thousands of people make the trek from the 919, and from all over the U.S. and other parts of the globe, just to see some of the greatest musicians and budding prodigies anywhere. Can you imagine listening and watching Kenny G, Boney James, Dave Koz, Al Jareau, David Sanborn, or George Benson…up close, live, and in person? Those are just a few of the names you missed in the past six years. It’s not in the 919, but in less than the time it sometimes

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919 | ALL THINGS CAROLINA

takes for many of us to get home in rush hour traffic from the RTP, you could be listening to the sultry sounds of smooth and traditional jazz. Not a jazz fan? Make the trip anyway. You will find that the festival is filled with some of the most amazing people who come together for one thing: Enjoy the music, and each other. Jazz is like wine. You probably do not know every label, or where the wine is from… but you know what you like when you taste it. Not everyone here is a jazz aficionado, but one base riff, one free styling moment from a saxophone, and, like that wine you cannot name – you just know you love what you are hearing. The music, itself, at times, transforms you to another world in your soul. There is no doubt that the festival is about the music. After all, John Coltrane – one of High Point’s favorite sons – is the festival’s namesake; but also pay close attention, because this festival is doing something very special: Ushering in new young musicians, giving junior high and high school students the stage for the purpose of keeping this genre of music alive. You literally see the faces of these young people light up when 919 Magazine

someone such as Kenny G walks up on stage to encourage them to pursue their dreams. Will they be the next George Benson, Gerald Albright, Dave Koz, or Kenny G? Who knows, but one thing is certain – they are getting off on the right note. Having been to many concerts and festivals, there’s no doubt this one is different. The John Coltrane International Jazz and Blues Festival actually changes people. In times when it seems that the coming together of people seems so impossible – and politics seems to separate many of us – during these two days, we drop our political bents, our differing theologies and come together under one common theme of jazz and blues. Having been to many concerts and

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festivals, this one is different. We can put aside differences and be united over a common love…jazz music. Does it sound a bit utopian? Yes. Is it a reality? Yes, again. You may never find another two-day venue where people of every type, race and background shed all of their baggage, just to enjoy the music, each other, and the sun setting over the lake. Does it sound a bit utopian? Yes. Is it a reality? Yes. Jay Izso, a North Raleigh resident, is a national multi-award winning author, speaker, internet entrepreneur, radio/TV personality – and music enthusiast. He can be reached at 919-369-2121, or jay@ internetdr.com. JAN/FEB 2017

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919 | SPOTLIGHT

Giving Youth More Ownership of Their Education

Supporters of New Morrisville Charter High School Planning A Student-Centered Approach

Submitted Photos

by G. CLEVELAND KILGORE 919 Magazine Writer

Janet Salvio-Littlejohn has a lot of confidence – and that confidence, combined with her personal persistence – just might give Morrisville it’s own high school. Five years ago, Salvio-Littlejohn and Lara Visser co-founded the proposed Kaleidoscope Charter High School to create an empowering high school offering youths a core-curriculum enhanced by (digital) arts and technology, preparing them for careers and beyond. After two previous applications to the state Charter School Advisory Board, Salivo-Littlejohn is determined that she and her supporters and board members will succeed now in securing approval from the State Board of Education. “We are currently preparing for our capital campaign to raise funds for a down payment on land with the help of investors, as well as generate working capital to hire staff and implement Phase One of our 21st Century high school,” she said. “We have learned with each charter application submission, to fine-tune our focused vision, mission and purpose to create a studentcentered school that provides a rigorous core-curriculum and empowers youth.” Salvio-Littlejohn said the proposed school will provide in-depth learning op56

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Founders Janet Salvio-Littlejohn (left) and Lara Visser (right)

Janet Salvio-Littlejohn, MA Ed Admin POSITION: Board of Directors Chair, Co-Founder Kaleidoscope Charter High School (in-development) PROFESSIONAL BACKGROUND: Educator and Administrator, Project Manager, Producer EDUCATION: BA Psychology/Clinical Counseling; Masters in Educational Admin RESIDENCE: Cary FAMILY: Husband, Bradley (Tech Lead, Cisco Systems); daughter, Sara Anne (UNC-Greensboro student) PETS: Lark, Lucy and Cami (domestic shorthair cats); Juliet (golden/greyhound mix dog) INTERESTS: Horseback riding, ceramics, arts and crafts, self-actualization and human evolution

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919 | SPOTLIGHT

Kaleidoscope Charter High School

Kaleidoscope Charter High School CoFounder and Board Chair Janet SalvioLittlejohn, MA Ed Admin

portunities during the school year, as well as after finals during the week-long i​ntersession created by students who desire learning “outside-the-box” – with intensive classes such as nano-technology, robotics, theater production, community service and travel. In Phase One, the supporters of the new campus plan to lease a school location appropriate for 9th and 10th Graders beginning in August 2018. This property would be leased for one-to-three years while raising funds purchase property in Morrisville. Phase Two includes building a sustainable 21st Century campus, suitable for 550-plus students and staff. “Our mission is to provide a studentcentered learning environment and a creative and dynamic 21st-century curriculum, Kaleidoscope will uniquely prepare students for higher education and beyond,” said SalvioLittlejohn, a married mother who holds a BA in Psychology/Clinical Counseling and a Masters in Educational Administration. “We seek to attract highly qualified teachers and instructors (and career professionals as adjunct instructors) who are trained and engaging, while using “student-centered” teaching techniques.” Salvio-Littlejohn stressed that the new school will assess students not only by testing, but also by compiling their work 919 Magazine

LOCATION: Morrisville (planned) OPENING: August 2018 (planned) GRADES: 9-12 (starting with 220 in Grades 9-10 in 2018; 550 students in Grades 9-12 by year 3) Charter application under review by Charter School Advisory Board reviewers MISSION: By providing a student-centered learning environment and a creative and dynamic 21st-century curriculum, Kaleidoscope will uniquely prepare students for higher education and beyond PHILOSOPHY: Attract highly qualified teachers and instructors (and career professionals as adjunct instructors) who are trained and engaging, while using “student-centered” teaching techniques (currently seeking curriculum vitaes for educators and head of school candidates with experience in “student-centered” education and leadership BOARD: Janet Littlejohn, MA Ed Admin, Chair/Co-Founder, educator and administrator, project manager, producer James Stout, MA​, Director; writer, state-licensed educatorMontessori Certification, currently working with upper elementary students at Sterling Montessori Rupali Tayal, MA,​ Secretary; entrepreneur (owner, The Ladders Teaching Store Nakenge Robertson, MA, D​ irector​​(project manager, UNCChapel Hill) Gautam Aggarwal, MA​, Director (entrepreneur and founding partner, Triangle Insights Group) ADVISORY BOARD: Lara Visser​, Co-Founder (architect, artist, parent) Mark Stohlman, Development Committee (CPA​, Mayor of Morrisville); Margaret Broadwell (first female Mayor of Morrisville, entrepreneur; Edwin Norse (retired CFO Connecticut Utilities, nonprofit consultant); Marian Hale, MH (DesignSpaces); Angela Randall, MA​, (high school counselor); Missy McClure, MA​ (educator, Montessori certified-Heartwood Montessori Irfan Azam (educator, student-centered math and video/audio production; Arvind Mahajan​(entrepreneur, owner of Live Spectrum, AKM Realty, The Goddard School and Investor); Naresh Kumar Giri​(entrepreneur, software engineer at Cisco Systems, founder of Triangle Events on Facebook, networking producer WEBSITE: kaleidoscopehighschool.org EMAIL: info@kaleidoscopehighschool.org PHONE: 919-694-7030, 919-434-5769 www.919Magazine.com

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Special gathering of Kaleidoscope Board of Directors and Advisory Board

in their personal digital or physical portfolio – which can be used for higher education admissions and career application. “Our philosophy, of giving youth more ownership of their education, by virtue of the student-centered approach, challenges the student by giving them an opportunity to learn more of what really interests them, at their learning pace, and by nudging them to take on more rigorous projects and goals,” Salvio-Littlejohn said. “We were inspired by international student-centered schools, such as high schools in Finland and Sweden, as well as by the Montessori philosophy and pedagogy,” she said. “We are looking forward to creating partnerships with schools in other countries (such as China) to develop international relations experience and better understanding of what our world neighbors’ lives and education are like.” Morrisville high school students now largely attend Green Hope High 58

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‘We recognize the positive impact our school will have for Morrisville and its citizens and we are going to make it a reality.’ JANET SALVIOLITTLEJOHN Kaleidoscope Charter High School

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or Panther Creek High in Cary – which Salvio-Littlejohn indicated were excellent, yet over-crowded. “Morrisville needs an innovative high school where future entrepreneurs, artists, technologists and inventors are stimulated, challenged, encouraged and nurtured,” she said, noting that the Board of Directors and Advisory Board include a dynamic and experienced group of experienced politicians and business savvy leaders. “We recognize the positive impact our school will have for Morrisville and its citizens and we are going to make it a reality. We believe a good education is the foundation of strong families and strong communities,” she said. “The Morrisville community wants our school. That’s all that matters!” Kaleidoscope Charter High School seeks individual and corporate sponsors. For more information, call 919-4345769 or visit kaleidoscopehighschool.org.

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by Adrienne Earle Pender FEB 10-26 World Premiere Directed by Hope Alexander

"Your legacy is that you're the greatest playwright in America. What's my legacy?" African-American actor Charles S. Gilpin's portrayal of Emperor Brutus Jones was hailed as "revelatory" on Broadway in 1921 and he was named the finest actor of the age. The opening of The Emperor Jones made stars of both he and playwright Eugene O’Neill; it was O'Neill's first commercial success, and Charles Gilpin became the toast of the theater world. But by 1926, O'Neill was a legend and Gilpin was lost to history. N explores the challenging relationship between Gilpin and O'Neill and how it ultimately hinged on one word; a word that lifted one of them to the heights of American theater, and a word that destroyed the other. Playwright (and Theatre In The Park Board Member), Adrienne Earle Pender, was selected for the Eugene O'Neill Foundation's Tao House Fellowshipin 2015. The Foundation holds an O'Neill Festival every year, one of the largest in the country, and her latest play, N, has been selected to receive a workshop and a staged reading at this year's festival in September. It has also been selected as a finalist in the 2016 Dayton Playhouse FutureFest, a festival of new works. 919 Magazine

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Town of Morrisville Unveils New Logo and New Tagline

Council Member Cawley Joins National Committee

New Brand Focuses on Connectivity

Morrisville Town Council Member TJ Cawley recently was appointed to the National League of Cities 2017 Energy, Environment and Natural Resources federal advocacy committee. This committee has the lead responsibility for developing NLC’s federal policy positions on issues involving air quality, water quality, energy policy, national wetlands policy, noise control and solid and hazardous waste management. The appointment was announced by NLC President Matt Zone, a councilmember in Cleveland, OH. “I am looking forward to this opportunity with the National League of Cities to continue the advocacy efforts begun at the town and state level to safeguard our natural resources and promote a sustainable energy future for our country,” said Cawley. As a member of the committee, Cawley will play a key role in shaping NLC’s policy positions and advocate on behalf of America’s cities and towns before Congress, with the new administration and at home. “The N.C. League of Municipalities was more than happy to support Councilman Cawley’s appointment to a National League of Cities’ policy committee,” said Paul Meyer, Executive Director of the N.C. League of Municipalities. “The appointment is welldeserved, and the NLC will benefit greatly from his commitment to helping cities and towns fulfill their roles as service providers that protect and enhance the lives of residents.”

Town of Morrisville unveiled its new identity at its annual Tree Lighting event in December – the result of a multi-year rebranding initiative. The new logo is a lower case “m” to represent Morrisville, with blue above it, and green below. The overall effect is a park scene, with trees and sky that allude to a friendly, welcoming Town atmosphere. The tagline is “Live Connected. Live Well.” “As Morrisville has grown and evolved in recent years, we found we had outgrown our brand. This new mark and tagline better reflects who we are – a thriving, progressive place where people, businesses and opportunities are truly connected, a small-town atmosphere in the heart of the Triangle,” said Mayor Mark Stohlman. The branding initiative, led by the Raleigh firm Mottis, solicited input from residents, town and business leaders to craft the new logo and tagline. “As we talked with our residents, what stood out most was the feeling of belonging and access they felt to the world around them,” said Town Manager Martha Paige. “They loved that in Morrisville they truly felt like they were part of a diverse, inclusive community without being secluded and we wanted to celebrate that idea.” Morrisville’s population is roughly 25,000 people, only a small fraction of its neighbors Raleigh, Cary and Durham, with a geographical footprint of just eight square miles. The Towns serves as the U.S. headquarters for many global companies such as Lenovo and will be welcoming a new Wake Tech Community College campus in 2017. As part of this effort, the town also plans to replace its signs and redesign its website, although those will be rolled out at a later date. Brand updates can be found at townofmorrisville.org/brand.

Additional Stores Announced At New Alston Town Center Additional tenants are scheduled to open soon at Alston Town Center in North Cary, adjacent to Morrisville. Alston Town Center is anchored by Whole Foods Market, and other businesses confirmed include Pet People, Posh Nail Spa, Moe’s Southwest Grill, AT&T, The Body Mechanic, Artisan Hair, CycleBar and Built Custom Burgers. The new shopping center is located at the Intersection of NC 55 and Petty Farm Road, just off the I-540 – and is being developed by American Asset Corporation. For more information, visit shopalstontowncenter.com.

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Morrisville Chamber Installs New Board at Annual Meeting Robert Mouro of Merrill Lynch-The Fried Mouro Group will be installed as the new Chair of the Morrisville Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors at the upcoming 26th Annual Meeting of the organization in January. The event is planned for 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 pm. on Tuesday, Jan. 31 at Prestonwood Country Club in North Cary, featuring Dr. Stephen Scott, President of Wake Technical Community College as keynote speaker. Others to be installed as members of the Board of Directors include David Brunner of Park West/CASTO, Immediate Past Chair; Mike Little of Poythress Commercial Contractors, ChairElect; Sachin Gupta of UNC Rex Healthcare, Treasurer; Mark Lawson of Wells Fargo Bank, Innovation Board Representative; Carla Mantilla of Credit Suisse, Executive Committee At-Large Member; Joel Graybeal, Triangle Rock Club, Executive Committee At-Large Member; Allen William, Trinity Partners; Anthony Blackman, Atlantic Tire & Service; Kimberly Copney, COSTCO; Ralph DiLeone, DiLeone Law Group; Dan Dzamba, Morrisville Square-Dzamba LLC; Marth Paige, Town of Morrisville; Julie Roper, PSNC Energy; Roy Watson, Blue Cross Blue Shield of North Carolina; Sarah Gaskill, Morrisville Chamber of Commerce President; June Boersma, Lenovo; Kristie VanAuken, RDU Airport Authority; Samantha Godfrey, United Drug Supply; Rita Jerman, Wake Technical Community College; Rose Cornelious, Dorcas Ministries; Rod Frankel, Frankel Staffing Partners; Mark Lawson, Wells Fargo; and Carmen Prevette, Duke Energy. Members of the Morrisville Chamber’s Innovation Foundation also will be installed, including Sandy Gareton of Campbell University-RTP Campus, Chair; Creighton Blackwell, Immediate Past Chair; Nam Douglass, Challa Immigration Law; Sarah Gaskill, Morrisville Chamber of Commerce President; Mark Lawson, Wells Fargo, Morrisville Chamber of Commerce Representative; Roger McGee, Community Workforce Solutions, Treasurer; Karen Ondrick, Lenovo; Amish Patel, Revolution Law, Entrepreneurship Liasion; Annette Stevenson, North Carolina Veteran’s Business Association; Robert Sunukjian, PEG Contracting, Economic Development Liasion; Mike Trainor, S&A Com919 Magazine

munications, Community Development Liasion; Walt Parker, Fidelity Bank of Morrisville. During the session, attendees will also: • Celebrate the accomplishments of the Chamber in the past year. • Connect with top business leaders and elected officials. • See the presentation of several Chamber awards, including the Jeremiah Morris Community Steward of the Year, the James M. Pugh Small Business of the Year, and the Ambassador of the Year. Cost is $47 per employee of member firms and $63 for nonmembers. Corporate tables for 10 are also available for $423. RSVP is requested by Jan. 24 at 919-463-7155. For information, visit morrisvillechamber.org. Prestonwood Country Club is located at 300 Prestonwood Parkway, Cary.

Morrisville Ranked 7th Safest North Carolina Mid-Size Town Morrisville is the 7th safest mid-size town in North Carolina and 17th safest overall after ValuePenguin ranked 115 communities in the state. “This is another example of the wonderful things that happen when our community and law enforcement remain connected to create a safer environment,” said Police Chief Patrice Andrews. “Since I came to Morrisville six months ago, it’s been a privilege to see how we all live well.” To rank these places, ValuePenguin analysts collected data from the FBI. The raw data included property crimes (burglary, larceny-theft, motor vehicle theft, and arson), and violent crimes (murder/manslaughter, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault) from all law enforcement agencies that chose to partake in the FBI Uniform Crime Reporting program. The 115 communities included in this ranking have a population of at least 5,000. For a full list of cities and where they ranked, visit valuepenguin.com.

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Kaleidoscope Charter High Event Planned for Jan. 30 in Morrisville

RTP SPOTLIGHT

Kaleidoscope Charter High School – a non-profit educational organization creating a “student centered” educational facility Morrisville, with a planned 2018 opening – hosts an Information and Art Night at 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. on Monday, Jan. 30 at The Hindu Society of North Carolina. The event for students, families, educators and local residents will feature a question-and-answer session on the school, followed by a local artist Manisha Goel guiding the group through a stepby-step process of creating a beautiful, personalized piece of art. Light refreshments are planned. The event is free, though donations are accepted in support of the school. For more information, call 919-434-5769 or visit kaleidoscopehighschool.org.

Bob Geolas Joins HR&A Advisors in New Position

The Hindu Society of North Carolina is located at 309 Aviation Parkway in Morrisville.

Short Takes • Double R Restaurant Group opened Another Broken Egg Cafe recently at 1103 Parkside Main Street, Cary, NC 27519. It’s ABEC’s fourth restaurant location in the Triangle. • Susan Stewart Taylor is the new principal at C.E. Jordan High School in Durham Public Schools. Taylor moves from Panther Creek High in Cary, where she was an assistant principal since 2010. • Kwame Dixon resigned recently as the head football coach at Green Hope High in Cary. • Over the upcoming several years, INC Research plans to add 550 jobs to its North Carolina operations, which will move from Raleigh to Morrisville’s Perimeter Park soon. The company conducts clinical trials for pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies. State of North Carolina will provide incentives to the company for the jobs growth. • For the 11th consecutive year, Wake County Public School System has the highest number of National Board Certified Teachers in the U.S.  Among the teachers receiving the certification:  Tina Robinette, Rebecca Spriggs and Kecia Staib of Green Hope High; Katherine Bainlardi of Morrisville Elementary; Rosa Baltodano de Rengifo, Steven Haine, Cara Karra and Gwendolyn Shaw of Panther Creek High. • New Jersey-based Hmart opened a new 14,000 sq. ft. Asian grocery store at High House Road and and Davis Drive in North Cary. • David Green is the new head football coach at Green Hope High in Cary. Green coached at Enloe High in Raleigh the past two seasons. Previously, he coached at Williams High in Burlington and Leesville Road High in Raleigh. 62

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Bob Geolas, former president and CEO of the Research Triangle Foundation, recently joined HR&A Advisors – a real estate and economic development consulting firm with offices in New York, Dallas Los Angeles and Washington DC. Geolas will lead a new Raleigh office. The company, in a news release, described Geolas as “a nationally-recognized leader in the development of innovation districts, university campuses, and research parks” by HR&A Advisors Chairman John Alschuler. In October the foundation named Liz Rooks, who had retired in 2015 after more than a 25 years at the organization, as interim chief executive for an indefinite period.

Durham Young Professionals Network Party Set for Jan. 10 Durham Young Professionals Network’s one-year anniversary party is 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 10 at The Frontier at RTP. This event – which is open to members and non-members of all ages – will feature beer from Bombshell Brewery, food trucks, live music and games. About 600 attended last year’s party – and more are expected in 2017. Durham YPN’s mission is to engage and empower young professionals through educational workshops, professional connections and involvement in the unique community of creativity and innovation within Durham and the Research Triangle Park. The group offers a bi-monthly speaker series with speakers and panelists motivating and discussing relevant topics about building careers and creating a fuller life in the Triangle – plus bimonthly social events to help members get connected and build professional relationships, and community events to help people connect with local nonprofits and serve the community. Individual memberships are $100 per year. For information, visit DurhamYPN.org. The Frontier at RTP is located at 800 Park Office Drive.

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Inspiring Capital Plans Kickoff Event on Jan. 18

‘Dream, Girl’ Documentary Film Screening at The Frontier

Inspiring Capital’s 2017 Kickoff Celebration is 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Jan. 18, at The Frontier at RTP. The event will engage new and old friends alike in an exploration of current social sector challenges – all while having a bit of fun, with an interactive exchange of ideas between social sector organizations, purpose-driven professionals, and others interested in the space. Participants will brainstorm innovative solutions to challenges presented by 6-8 local organizations in small, dynamic breakouts and have the opportunity to mingle with their peers. Inspiring Capital is a New York-based B Corp that has built a unique model blending leadership development and consulting work – that chose North Carolina as its first expansion market. It plans on running its flagship MBA Fellowship program in the Triangle this summer; and its MBAs are specifically recruited and trained to address operational, strategic, and financial modeling challenges in social sector organizations.

A special, free screening of “Dream, Girl” – a feature length documentary film showcasing the stories of inspiring and ambitious female entrepreneurs – is planned for 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 1 at The Frontier at RTP.

For information, visit nspiringcapital.ly. The Frontier at RTP is located at 800 Park Office Drive.

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Popcorn will be provided. “Dream, Girl “is a 60-minute documentary that follows several extraordinary female entrepreneurs in a variety of industries from startups to billion dollar companies in 3-D printing, publishing, and fashion. The film was originally funded on Kickstarter and raised over $100,000 in 30 days. Since its release, “Dream, Girl” has been shown as part of a private screening at the White House during the United States of Women Summit. The film’s Producers Erin Bagwell and Komal Minhas were also recently named to Oprah’s SuperSoul100. For more information, visit dreamgirlfilm.com. Get tickets at eventbrite.com. The Frontier at RTP is located at 800 Park Office Drive.

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RTP Short Takes • Rajat Modwell was named chief executive officer of Research Triangle Institute Global India. Modwell – an executive at consulting firm McKinsey & Company – will lead the RTI group that works on air, water, sanitation, energy health and other issues. • CED President and CEO Joan Siefert Rose is joining CREO Inc. as Senior Partner. CREO operates in the health, life sciences, and technology markets. • 37th Annual Martin Luther King Jr. Triangle Interfaith Prayer Breakfast is 7:15 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. (breakfast served beginning at 6 a.m.) a the Sheraton Imperial Hotel, located at 4700 Emperor Boulevard in Research Triangle Park. The event is sponsored by the Greater Raleigh Chamber of Commerce. For information, call 919-664-7080 or visit trianglemlk. com. • LifeNet Health plans to open a facility in the RTP, expanding the cell-based research and processing capacity of its Institute of Regenerative Medicine in Virginia Beach, VA. • Sweden’s Recipharm named Aaron Small to oversee its RTP-based pharmaceutical contract development

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and manufacturing businesses, acquired from Kemwell Biopharma. • RTP’s Datu Research LLC, worked closely with the Soil Health Institute to create and release the Soil Health Research Landscape tool – an online library and search engine designed to be a resource for agricultural and environmental scientists, industry leaders, agriculture producers, conservation policy makers, agricultural journalists and others. • CEO Mark Valleca, MD, PhD of G1 Therapeutics Inc., a Research Triangle Park clinical-stage oncology company, plans to present a company overview at the 35th Annual J.P. Morgan Healthcare Conference in January. • First Flight Venture Center, a Research Triangle Park science and technology incubator for entrepreneurs, recently received a $450,000 challenge grant from the U.S. Department of Commerce. The grant boosts FFVC’s new Hangar6, a shared, rapid prototyping facility to be open to all North Carolina science-based businesses.

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SouthPoint/South Durham Spotlight

Madden Big Game Event At Southpoint in January

Nevermore Horror, Gothic Film Festival in February Founded in 1999, the Nevermore Film Festival in Durham is a juried three-day event dedicated to the dark, the gory and the macabre at the Carolina Theatre on Feb. 24-26. The festival includes new films – feature-length and short – from around the world in the genres of horror, science fiction, dark fantasy, animation, suspense, violent crime, and everything in between. Last year, 1,275 submissions were received – resulting in 11 features and 41 shorts being presented. Tickets and additional information are available at carolinatheatre.org/films/festivals/nevermore.

The Madden Big Game Tournament is scheduled on Saturday, Jan. 7 for 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. at the Microsoft store at The Streets at Southpoint. The event provides participants with an opportunity to win a trip to the Super Bowl and meet former NFL quarterback Warren Moon. Registration begins at 12:30 p.m. One winner per division will compete Feb. 3 in Houston for the chance to go to the NFL Championship game. A special bracket-style tournament is also planned for 1 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.. on Sunday, Feb. 5 (Super Bowl Sunday). Plus, Madden free play is planned for every Tuesday and Saturday leading up to the Super Bowl. The Big Game Tournament is limited to age 13 and older. The Streets at Southpoint is located at 6910 Fayetteville Road in Durham. Call 919-572-8808 or visit streetsatsouthpoint.com for more information.

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Noted Chef Mark Mishalanie Joins Alivia’s Durham Bistro

The Winter Season at DPAC

Noted California Chef Mark Mishalanie recently joined Alivia’s Durham Bistro. Chef Mishalanie competed and won the Food Network’s “Grocery Games” in season eight and more recently competed in the television network’s tournament of champions – with results to be broadcast in spring 2017 (with a viewing party at Alivia’s). Chef Mishalanie brings his passion for Latin and Basque cuisine and uses his talent to fuse these two regions using local ingredients. His food is rustic and approachable with robust flavors with a farmhouse style. “As the Executive Chef at Alivia’s, I have been afforded the opportunity to introduce my culinary philosophy to a new culture. I have put forward a menu that focuses on execution and sound techniques, while still remaining playful and approachable,” he said. The new menu consists of food people are familiar with but taking it one step further out of the box and turning the ordinary in to the extraordinary, according to Fergus Bradley, owner of Alivia’s. “Mark’s passion for food preparation and execution has taken our dining options available at Alivia’s Durham Bistro to a whole new level,” he said. Alivia’s is located at 900 West Main Street in Durham. For information, visit aliviasdurhambistro.com or call 919-682-8978.

Kid’s Clothes at Children’s Orchard We buy all seasons, all the time. Call for details about selling to us! Clothing • Shoes • Toys • Hats • Equipment • And more! •

ChildrensOrchard.com Swift Creek Shopping Center 2865 Jones Franklin Rd., Raleigh/Cary 919.852.0550

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Planned Shows Include Beach Boys, Tony Bennett, and More

Durham Performing Arts Center features a wide variety of performances in this winter season. Among the shows: Jan. 3-8: An American in Paris Jan. 20: Family-friendly comedian Tim Hawkins Jan. 21: Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood Live! Jan. 22: The Beach Boys Jan. 27: Rick Springfield and Richard Marx Jan. 31: Hedwig and the Angry Inch Feb. 13-15: Chris Rock Total Blackout Feb. 17: Jay Leno Feb. 19: Tony Bennett Feb. 21-26: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time For a complete list of performances – and ticket information, visit dpacnc.com.

Home Show Planned March 4 at Southpoint The Home Show Greater Triangle is planned for 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, March 4 at The Streets of Southpoint Lower Level Center Court. Mini-sessions are planned throughout the day, with various real estate vendors participating. The Streets at Southpoint is located at 6910 Fayetteville Road in Durham. Call 919-572-8808 or visit streetsatsouthpoint.com for more information.

Short Takes • Durham Pub Crawl & Haunted Adventure happens at 7:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. every Friday and Saturday, beginning at Tyler’s Restaurant and Taproom and The Speakeasy, located at 324 Blackwell St. Cost is $19 for the visit to three ghost and paranormal locations (that also serve spirits!). For information, call 800-979-3370 or visit tobaccoroadtours.com. • Durham Performing Arts Center offers a special behind-thescenes tour on the first Monday of every month. Hosted by the DPAC staff, the tour includes a view of the stage from all levels, a memorable walk across the Mildred and Dillard Teer Stage, city views from the Blue Cross Blue Shield Atrium lobby, and an opportunity to see backstage. The tours are free, but reservations are required. Call 919-281-0587 for more information. • A special concert by Christian Tetzlaff on the violin and Lars Vogt on piano is planned for 8 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 11 at Baldwin Auditorium at 1336 Campus Drive in Durham (on the Duke University campus). For information, call 919-6603356.

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919 | SNAPSHOTS

CHAMBER HOLIDAY PARTY Friends, supporters, members and business leaders celebrated the holidays in December at Aloft Raleigh-Durham Airport Brier Creek at the Morrisville Chamber of Commerce Annual Holiday Party. Top Photo: June Boresma of Lenovo; Morrisville Chamber President Sarah Gaskill; and SB Sarver, Publisher of 919 Magazine Bottom Photo: Jerry Allen, Director of Morrisville Parks, Recreation and Cultural Resources; Morrisville Town Council member Liz Johnson and Hill Carrow, CEO of Sports & Properties Inc (SPI)

Submitted Photos

KNOW LUNCHEON Women from throughout the 919 gathered in November at Brier Creek Country Club for the Morrisville Chamber of Commerce’s KNOW Luncheon. The topic of the popular event: “Working Together: Becoming a Workplace Ally.” Panelists were Patrice Andrews. Morrisville Chief of Police; Judy Fourie, President, Fourie Group; Megan McGrath, Public Relations, TrialCard; and moderator June Boersma, Director North American Customer Experience and Transformation PMO, Lenovo. Top Photo: Morrisville Chief of Police Patrice Andrews, 919 Magazine Publisher SB Sarver, and Morrisville Police Capt. Felicia Sykes Bottom Photo: 919 Magazine’s sponsor table with SB Sarver and invited guests

Submitted Photo

TREE LIGHTING Residents and visitors enjoyed refreshments, entertainment, a visit from Santa, and more at the annual Town of Morrisville Tree Lighting event in December. Submitted Photos

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Full Community

Involvement Wake Forest Citizen of the Year Committed to Make a Difference by G. CLEVELAND KILGORE 919 Magazine Writer

919 Photos by Catherine Davis Photography

Dawn Nakash is a woman of faith, wife, mother, daughter, friend, volunteer and a female business owner. It’s not necessarily in this order, all of the time – but this is what she strives to be. She’s also the Town of Wake Forest’s Citizen of the Year. Mayor Vivian Jones made the announcement at the 69th Annual Wake Forest Christmas Dinner in December 2016 – which forced Nakash to hold onto her emotions in accepting the annual honor. “I knew I was nominated, as I had to accept the nomination from the Community Council, but I did not know I had won until the mayor began reading the nomination,” Nakash said. “I was almost in tears as she talked about what comes naturally to me – but figured makeup running down my face was not a good look for me, so I held it together.” What comes naturally to Nakash – a New Jersey native who moved to the Wake Forest area five years ago – is full community involvement. Not only is she completely engaged in her church (the Wake Forest United Methodist Church) in a variety of capacities, she is also involved in leadership and other capacities with the Wake Forest Optimist Club, the Wake Forest Woman’s Club, Wake Forest Downtown and more. It was the opportunity for community involvement that attracted Nakash to 68

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Dawn Marie Nakash Profile RESIDENCE: YEARS AT RESIDENCE: AGE: PROFESSION: BACKGROUND: EDUCATION: HOMETOWN: FAMILY: PETS: INTERESTS: AFFILIATIONS:

HONORS:

Silo Glen, Wake Forest 5+ years 54 Promotion Marketing Specialist Owner, Daybreak Marketing Services (18+ years) Bachelor’s Degree (Advertising Specialty Information); Grant Writing Certificate Jersey Shore Husband, Ken Nagy; 3 children: Anthony Nakash, 33 (US Coast Guard, San Francisco); Chris Nakash, 30, (US Navy, New Jersey); Rebecca Nagy, 24, New Jersey Sea Grant Consortium) Daisy (rescued dog) Crafting, shopping with the girls, Dine-Around Club WF United Methodist Church (Secretary, Board of Trustees; Chair, Communion Preparation Team; Greeter; Visitor Welcome; Bazaar Volunteer, Assists with Social Media promotion) Wake Forest Optimist Club (Lifetime Member; Secretary/Treasurer; Newsletter Editor; Social Media Editor; Community Council Representative; Grant Writer) Wake Forest Woman’s Club (Parliamentarian Chair, Resolutions & Revisions Committee; Chair, Publicity; Social Media Editor; Co-Chair, Federation Day Committee; Co-Chair, Annual Club Arts Festival; Member, Arts program area; Member, Christmas Party and May Banquet Committees; Grant Writer) Wake Forest Downtown, Inc. (Board Member; Chair Events (includes Dirt Day, Mardi Gras, Charity Car Show, Lighting of Wake Forest and Christmas Parade); Chair, Events Committee; Member, Marketing Committee; Social Media Editor; Liaison to the Downtown Business Alliance; Developed first-ever sponsorship brochure Wake Forest Boys & Girls Club (Homework Tutor) Wake Forest Renaissance Plan Steering Committee (Member) Georgian Court University Annual Golf Tournament Committee (Member) Howell, NJ Optimist Club (Long-Distance Honorary Member) National Rifle Association (Woman’s Instructional Shooting Clinic, Women on Target, that teaches firearm safety and marksmanship) Wake Forest Citizen of the Year (2016); Wake Forest Woman’s Club – Club Woman of the Year (2016); Emerging Woman, NC (2016); Alline Johnson Wiggins Award, Wake Forest Woman’s Club (2015); Helen Saintsing Johnston Award, Wake Forest Woman’s Club (2013); Ambassador of the Month, Wake Forest Chamber of Commerce (8/13, 9/12); Optimist of the Year, Wake Forest Optimist Club (2011-2012); Service Award, New Jersey Association of Women Business Owners, Monmouth-Ocean Chapter (2010); Business Woman of the Year, National Association of Women Business Owners, Central Jersey Chapter (2008); NJBIZ New Jersey’s Best 50 Women in Business (2008); Business Woman of the Year, New Jersey Association of Women Business Owners, Monmouth-Ocean Chapter (2006); Teal Heart Service award, New Jersey Association of Women Business Owners, Monmouth-Ocean Chapter (2005); Business of the Year, Howell, NJ Chamber of Commerce (2004); Double Distinguished President, Howell, NJ Optimist Club (2002)

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Wake Forest, when she and her husband of 21 years, Ken Nagy, decided to relocate. “We looked at many places to live when we decided to leave New Jersey and we knew we wanted a walk-able downtown,” she explained. “Downtown Wake Forest was just beginning to be re-energized at the time (early in 2011). Five years later, we know many of the downtown shop owners and frequent the eateries often. We live on an old dairy farm in a small neighborhood (on the fringe in Franklin County) and love our

‘If anyone asks for suggestions on where to eat or shop, my answer is always the same: Wake Forest!’ DAWN NAKASH Wake Forest Citizen of the Year neighborhood and Wake Forest. If anyone asks for suggestions on where to eat or shop, my answer is always the same: Wake Forest! I like my little Wake Forest bubble.” Nakash and her spouse have a blended family of three children, including daughter, Rebecca, a graduate of North Carolina State University. She attributes her success to personal drive and commitment, believing that failure is not an option, and having the support of her husband. What gives her the most pleasure in life? “Sitting around a table, usually with good food involved, and laughing with family and/or good friends,” she said. “The best memories in my life came from times like this.” And, of course, volunteering and making a difference in her community.

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Rex Extends TPC Wakefield Plantation PGA Sponsorship

WF Renaissance Centre Closing for Renovations

UNC Rex Healthcare will continue as the title sponsor of the PGA Tour’s Rex Hospital Open for another five years. The Web.com Tour event returns to TPC Wakefield Plantation on May 29 to June 4 in 2017 – and marks the 30th year of Rex hosting a professional golf tournament for charity. Co-chairmen for this year’s Rex Hospital Open are G. Smedes York, former mayor of Raleigh and chairman of York Properties; and George York, the firm’s president and CEO.

Wake Forest Renaissance Centre for the Arts offers a variety of events and activities in February at its downtown facility. From live music to dramatic theater and more, the Renaissance Centre has a line-up with something for all ages and interests. • Arts for All, Feb. 4: Mike Wiley performs “Tired Souls,” a recount of Rosa Parks’ decisive bus ride and the notable black citizens who laid the groundwork for this pivotal moment in history. 3 p.m. and 7 p.m. Free. • Forest Moon Theater, Feb. 10-12, 18-19: As part of its fourth season, the group presents “Agnes of God.” 7:30 p.m. (Feb. 10, 11, 18); 3 p.m., (Feb. 12, 19). Advance tickets: Adults, $15; students and seniors, $13. • Neck of the Woods Performance Series, Feb. 17: Sponsored by Wake Forest ARTS, this variety performance series features emerging local artists. Bar is open for wine, beer and other refreshments. 7:30 p.m. $5. • Rockin’ the Forest Concert Series, Feb. 24: Sarah Shook and the Disarmers performs. 8 p.m. Adults, $10; 12-under, $5.

The first phase of a nearly $1 million renovation project at the Wake Forest Renaissance Centre of the Arts will be closed through January. The comprehensive renovation project is designed to increase the Renaissance Centre’s accessibility, technology, and functionality, while also creating more dynamic spaces for interdisciplinary learning. Phase one improvements -- projected to total approximately $147,300, will entail connecting the Arts Annex to the Grand Hall, installing movable walls in Arts Annex classrooms, purchasing a snap-lock dance floor, re-leveling the sidewalk in front of the Arts Annex, and adding assistive listening devices in the Grand Hall. Phase two enhancements are expected to include a raised ceiling, extended stage, and upgraded sound system in the Grand Hall, along with the installation of theater lighting, choir risers, upstairs dressing rooms, and a lighted marquee. The total cost is expected to be $848,500. The Renaissance Centre renovation project was made possible due in large measure to a $348,530 matching grant the Town of Wake Forest received in November 2016 from the Wake County Board of Commissioners. Wake Forest was one of seven Wake County towns and organizations selected by county commissioners to receive $3.35 million for projects that promote recreation or the arts. The funding came from Wake’s food and hotel-occupancy tax revenues which county leaders award periodically to projects designed to boost local tourism. “By awarding us this grant, the Wake County Commissioners have not only acknowledged the Renaissance Centre as a viable cultural and performing arts venue, but also as an important economic driver for our community,” said Mayor Vivian Jones. “The scheduled renovations are another important step towards the center fulfilling its stated commitment of providing quality visual and performing arts programming for people of all ages.” According to the terms of the two to one grant, the total amount of the town’s portion of the cost is $647,270, which was included in its five-year Capital Improvement Plan.

The Renaissance Centre is located at 405 South Brooks Street in Wake Forest. For tickets, call 919-435-9458. For more information, visit wakeforestrencen.org or call 919-435-9428.

Renaissance Centre is located at 405 S. Brooks St. For more information, contact Renaissance Centre Manager Cathy Gouge at 919-435-9567 or cgouge@wakeforestnc.gov.

For more information, visit rexhospitalopen.com.

Renaissance Centre Offers Drama, Music in February

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919 | COMMUNITY

MLK Jr. Community Celebration Set at Friendship Chapel Baptist

Wake Forest Ranked Among Safest North Carolina Cities

Several Rolesville and Wake Forest churches and community organizations plan to honor the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. during a free, public celebration on Thursday, Jan. 19, at Friendship Chapel Baptist Church at 237 Friendship Chapel Road. Area residents are invited to attend the observance, beginning with a light meal at 6 p.m. followed by the program at 7 p.m. Dr. Earl C. Johnson, founder of The Success Dream Center, LLC will be the featured speaker. The event’s theme will center around one of King’s messages: “The time is always right to do what is right.” Local groups involved include the Wake Forest Human Relations Council, Friendship Chapel Baptist Church, Heritage Baptist Church, Wake Forest Baptist Church and Kingdom Family International Church. Other supporters include Faith Tabernacle United Holy Church, Corinth UCC, New Bethel Rolesville, Olive Branch Baptist Church, Wake Forest Methodist Church and the Kiwanis Club of Wake Forest.

Wake Forest is one of the safest cities in North Carolina, according to a study by ValuePenguin, a financial education website. After analyzing the most recent FBI Crime Report data to determine the safest places in North Carolina, ValuePenguin ranked Wake Forest 6th among cities with populations greater than 25,000 and 25th overall. “We are extremely pleased to learn of the findings,” said Wake Forest Police Chief Jeff Leonard. “One of the primary objectives of our strategic plan is to enhance the sense of safety in Wake Forest. Our high ranking suggests our residents have good reason to feel safe. That’s a testament to not only our policing efforts but also to the cooperation of our residents and their commitment to a safe community.” Other Wake County cities and towns making the top 50 list were Holly Springs, 3; Apex, 6; Cary, 8; Morrisville, 17; Wendell, 20; and Knightdale, 35.

For more information, contact Margo Grant at 908-672-8115, or visit wakeforestnc.gov/mlk-community-celebration.aspx.

Heritage High Winter Dance Concert Series January 5-6 Heritage High School’s Dance Department presents its Winter Dance Concert at 7 p.m. on Thursday and Friday, Jan. 5-6 in the school auditorium. The performances will feature all levels of dance in small and large group choreography, as well as solos by Honors dancers. Each night will be different. Student tickets are $5 and general admission is $7. For more information, visit wcpss.net/heritagehs or call 919-5705600.

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Monica Lileton Wake Forest 2016 Employee of the Year Recreation Program Superintendent Monica Lileton is the Town of Wake Forest’s 2016 Jon Ray Employee of the Year. A native of Tuscaloosa, AL, Lileton has worked for Wake Forest since 2014. A 2005 graduate of GarderWebb University, she was nominated for the award by several co-workers who praised her “innovation,” “outgoing personality,” and “passion for her job.” Lileton is credited with enhancing the Parks, Recreation & Cultural Resources Department’s special needs programming, which has experienced a 78 percent increase in participation over the past two years. For her part, Lileton said she was humbled to hear her name announced as this year’s winner. “I was genuinely surprised to win Employee of the Year,” she said. “It makes me feel good that others chose to recognize me for the accomplishments I’ve made while working here. I’m surrounded by such a great team of co-workers and it makes my job enjoyable. I look forward to coming to work each day.” Town Manager Kip Padgett made the announcement during the town’s annual Employee Christmas Luncheon in December.

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Candance Davis to Assist Town Manager on WF Town Priorities Transportation Planning Manager Candace Davis is the town’s first Assistant to the Town Manager. According to Wake Forest Town Manager Kip Padgett, Davis will be responsible for assisting Padgett with a variety of town priorities, organizational initiatives, and special projects. She will also serve as program manager of the Capital Improvement Program (CIP) and the bond referendum projects approved by voters in 2014. “Over the past eight years Candace has been an incredible asset to Wake Forest – particularly in regard to securing grants and advocating on behalf of the town’s greenways and transportation system,” said Padgett. “I’ve always been impressed with Candace, particularly during the interview process, so I am confident her experience and leadership in this new position will continue to serve our residents well.” A native of Augusta, GA, Davis and her family have lived in Wake Forest for the past 10 years. Prior to coming to work for the town as a Senior Transportation Planner in May 2008, she served as a Transportation Planner for the Town of Apex. The 2011 Town of Wake Forest Employee of the Year, Davis is expected to begin her new position on Jan. 3.

WF State of the Town Event Features Mayor Jones Jan. 20 The 2017 Wake Forest State of the Town Address & Dinner is at 6 p.m. on Monday, Feb. 20 at the Wake Forest Renaissance Centre, 405 S. Brooks St. Since 2009 the Town of Wake Forest has partnered with the Wake Forest Rotary Club to sponsor the annual event, which features remarks by Mayor Vivian Jones. The occasion offers all Wake Forest citizens to attend and reflect on the town’s list of accomplishments during the previous year and learn about its goals in the coming months. Tickets are $15 per person and can be purchased online or at the Renaissance Centre Box Office. Anyone not interested in eating dinner is welcome to attend without purchasing a ticket; however, non-ticket buyers should arrive between 6:30 and 6:45 p.m. at the conclusion of the dinner portion of the program. The mayor’s address is expected to begin between 6:45 and 7 p.m. Mayor Jones’ remarks will be recorded and replayed on Wake Forest TV 10 throughout March. It is also made available in streaming video on the town’s website. For more information, visit wakeforestnc.gov.

Downtown WF Mardi Gras Festival Planned for Feb. 25 Downtown Wake Forest’s annual Mardi Gras Street Festival is 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 25. This free family-friendly celebration offers a variety of fun things to do, including a walking parade, children’s activities, contests for people of all ages, music, entertainment, face painting and a walking parade for children and adults. A variety of food trucks will locate in the Fidelity Bank parking lot at 231 S. White St.. In addition, over 20 downtown merchants will offer discounts and activities throughout the day. One of the day’s highlights promises to be the Mardi Gras Walking Parade. The lineup will begin at 12:45 p.m. in Wake Forest Town Hall’s Centennial Plaza, at 301 S. Brooks St., and the 74

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parade gets under way at 1 p.m. The parade is open to both children and adults, and no pre-registration is required. Parade participants are encouraged to flex their creative muscles by decorating their bicycles and wagons, dressing up in their best Mardi Gras garb and wearing a mask. Awards will be presented for “Best Decorated Vehicle (wagon, cart, bicycle or stroller),” “Best Baby,” and “Most Festive Family.” Judges will also select a “King & Queen” and “Prince & Princess” for the best costumes. For more information, visit wakeforestnc.gov.

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919 | COMMUNITY

Heritage High’s Miles Macleod NC Regional Teacher of the Year The celebration continues for Heritage High School teacher Miles Macleod. In May, he was named the 2016-17 Wake County Public School System Teacher of the Year. Now, he’s moved up to become the North Central Region Teacher of the Year. Macleod, who received the news during a surprise announcement at a schoolwide assembly in December, will now compete against eight other finalists for the statewide title. “Miles is an outstanding educator. His enthusiasm and dedication set high standards for others in the profession,” said Wake County Public School System Supt. Jim Merrill. “He is admired and respected among colleagues, parents, students and members of our community. He represents our school district and our region well.” This is Macleod’s seventh year teaching English and Global Studies at Heritage High School. He also taught English as a Foreign Language to middle school students in South Korea earlier in his career. Project Wisdom is one of Macleod’s many projects at Heritage and in the surrounding community. The unique service and learning program includes an after-school club, travel program and elective course. Macleod and 13 students traveled to Ghana

last year as a part of the program. In just two years, Project Wisdom has grown from five students to 120 students and is now a registered non-profit. Macleod holds a bachelor’s degree in English and secondary education from Salisbury University in Maryland – and is completing a master’s in 21st Century Teaching and Learning from Wilkes University. The North Central Region is made up of 16 school districts. The selection of North Carolina’s nine regional teachers of the year is managed by teams of Regional Education Facilitators. It includes a class visit, candidate interviews and interviews with parents, colleagues and members of the school community. The statewide Teacher of the Year winner will be named during a ceremony in April in Cary.

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NE Library Event Features NC State’s Dr. Jason Miller Wakefield’s Northeast Regional Library hosts Dr. Jason Miller of North Carolina State University presenting his book and original documentary film, “Origin of The Dream”. Both explore the connection between Langston Hughes’ poetry and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech. The free event is 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 9. Light refreshments are provided and registration is requested. Northeast Regional Library is located at 14401 Green Elm Lane in Raleigh. For information or to register, call 919-570-7166 or visit wakegov.com/libraries.

Wake Forest Seeks Sponsors For April 8 Easter Egg Hunt Wake Forest Parks, Recreation & Cultural Resources Department seeks sponsors for its annual Easter Egg Hunt, scheduled Saturday, April 8, this year. Presented by Primrose School of Heritage Wake Forest, the egg hunt is at E. Carroll Joyner Park, 701 Harris Road. In addition to hiding over 10,000 Easter eggs, PRCR will introduce several exciting changes to this year’s Easter Egg Hunt – including several food vendors and Easter-themed arts and crafts activities in the Joyner Park Amphitheater. Also new this year will be dozens of special prizes hidden inside unmarked eggs and opportunities for participants to win a variety of grand prizes donated by local businesses. This year, egg hunt times are planned for: Ages 3 and younger: 10 a.m. Ages 4-6: 10:20 a.m. Ages 7-9: 10:40 a.m. Ages 10-12: 11 a.m. Special needs: 11:30 a.m. For sponsorship details, contact Anna Bolton at 919-435-9422. For general information, call 919-435-9560. 76

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Forest Moon Theater Offers ‘Agnes of God’ in February When a newborn child is found dead in a convent, a court psychiatrist must determine whether the nun accused of the crime is mentally fit to stand trial – with the question of the father’s identity hanging in the balance. Forest Moon Theater brings the Tony Award-winning play “Agnes of God” to the Wake Forest Renaissance Centre for the Arts in February. Featuring an all-female cast of three, the play is a gripping drama wrapped in a mystery and conflict that is as entertaining a story as it is an intense glimpse of the gray areas between faith and fact, between religion and science. Cast for the play includes Benji Jones, Gilly Conklin and Jill Cromwell. Bob Baird directs the performances. The production team includes David Petrone (Lighting Designer), Todd Housenecht (Sound Designer), and David Bissette (Set Designer). Performances at the Renaissance Centre are at 7:30 p.m. on February 10, 11 and 18; and 3 p.m. on February 12 and 19. Advance tickets are $15 for adults and $13 for students and seniors (prices are $3 more the day of the performance). Parental guidance is recommended for these performances, due to mature subject matter and strong language. The Renaissance Centre is located at 405 South Brooks St. in Wake Forest. For tickets, call 919-435-9458 or visit wakeforestrencen.org. Additional performances of “Agnes of God” are planned on Feb. 23-26 at Sonorous Road Productions, 209 Oberlin Road in Raleigh. Future shows scheduled by the Forest Moon Theatre include “Anne of Green Gables” on March 10-19 (directed by Tony Pender) and “The Curious Savage” on June 16-25 (directed by Mike McGee). For additional information on the Forest Moon, visit forestmoontheater.org.

Arbor Day Celebration, Tree Giveaway, Planned April 22 Wake Forest hosts its annual Arbor Day celebration and Tree Seedling Giveaway on the same day on Saturday, April 22, at E. Carroll Joyner Park, 701 Harris Road. The Arbor Day Expo and seedling distribution begins at 11 a.m., while the Arbor Day ceremony begins at 12 p.m. During the expo, local organizations will offer special activities, treats, and information related to trees, gardening, and related topics. A variety of children’s activities also are planned. For information on participation and sponsorships, contact Urban Forestry Coordinator Jennifer Rall at jrall@wakeforestnc.gov.

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919 | COMMUNITY

Short Takes • Wake Forest High won the 4-AA North Carolina state football title in December, defeating Page High 29-0 at Raleigh’s Carter-Finley Stadium – the first time since 1987 that a Wake County school won the championship • A U.S. Postal Service truck caught fire in mid-December, sending the driver scrambling to exit the vehicle and save what she could of the onboard packages. Wake Forest Fire Department responded to the incident at Heritage Lake Road and Heritage Heights Lane, but the truck was destroyed. The carrier and a passerby managed to rescue most, but not all, of the onboard packages. • For the 11th consecutive year, Wake County Public School System has the highest number of National Board Certified Teachers in the U.S. Among the teachers receiving the certification: Alicia Michel, Tonya Murphy, and Edith Poulsen of Heritage Elmentary; Melinda Mouzzon of Heritage High; Summer Pittman of Knightdale Elementary; Paul Cancellieri and Aurelia Evans of Rolesville Middle; Edward Tharrington of Wakefiled High; Gina Ligon-McClees of Wakefield Middle; and Bradley Baker of Wake Forest High. • Wake Forest High School football coach Reggie Lucas will serve as an assistant coach for the east team in the annual U.S. Army AllAmerican Bowl, scheduled for Jan. 7 in San Antonio, TX. • TPC Wakefield Plantation in Raleigh will continue to host the Rex Hospital Open for another five years. The 2017 tour event runs from May 29 through June 4. • Wakefield High School football coach Rod Sink resigned in December to spend more time with his family and accept a teaching position at Heritage High School in Wake Forest.

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• Wake Forest Parks, Recreation & Cultural Resources Department received a 2016 ExoFit Matching Grant of $10,000, which will be used to purchase a rowing machine, leg press, double pull-up bars, push-up/dip station and sit up bench for installation in spring 2017 along greenways in several town parks. • At the recent 69th Wake Forest Community Christmas Dinner, Mayor Vivian Jones received the Peggy Allen Award, Dawn Nakash was named Citizen of the Year (see article on Page 68), and the Wake Forest High Junior ROTC was named Organization of the Year. • The Olde English Tea Room and Gift Shoppe at 219 South White Street in downtown Wake Forest closed in December. It’s expected that the Sugar Magnolia Café & Emporium will open in February at the location. • Wake Forest High clubs, students and staff members raised $9,227 for Make-A-Wish during the recent Christmas holidays. • Sanford Creek Elementary community helped 41 students and 23 families through the annual Giving Tree Project during the holidays. The students and families received gifts such as needed winter clothing, books, bicycles and other requested items. In addition, students and families donated clothing, books, toys and food to families affected by Hurricane Matthew. Wake Forest United Methodist Church assisted in delivering the items. • Free walking tours of the Wake Forest Historic District in spring 2017, led by architectural historian and Town Historic Preservation Planner Michelle Michael. Check wakeforestnc.gov for dates and times.

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919 | INDEX

Index of Advertisers Bovenizer Orthodontics............................................................63 Brier Creek Orthodontics............................................................7 Catherine Davis Photography...................................................77 Carolina Barre and Core...........................................................40 Chesterbrook Academy.............................................................39 Children’s Orchard...................................................................66 Closets by Design....................................................5, 83W, 84NR Cyclebar Brier Creek.................................................................19 Holding Oil...............................................................................75 International Preschool of Raleigh...........................................38 Law Office of Katie A. Lawson..................................................65 Linda Craft and Team Realtors ...................................... 2, 83MV Little Smiles Dental......................................................... 4, 84MV Midas Fabrics & Blinds............................................................23 Mid Carolina OBGYN................................................................75 Park West Village.......................................................................3 Pump it up Raleigh..........................................................2MV, 40 Raleighwood Movies, Food & Spirits.........................................15 Reflections Dental......................................................... 31, 83BC Rocky Mountain Chocolate Factory...........................................13 Sir Walter Chevrolet....................................................................8 Sonorous Road Productions......................................................19 Synergy Spa & Aesthetics................................................ 37, 84W Tamarind in Brier Creek.............................................................6 The Organic Bedroom...............................................................35 Theatre in the Park......................................2MV, 59, 83NR, 84BC Thompson and Thompson Dentistry...................................21, 41 Trali Irish Pub...........................................................................64 Trinity Academy........................................................................27 Wise Owl Tutoring.....................................................................15 Wood Play.................................................................................43

On the Cover

919 Magazine Cover Photographs by Catherine Davis Photography MORRISVILLE l RTP

BRIER CREEK

NORTH RALEIGH ®

®

Leesville I Bedford I Six Forks l Creedmoor Rd l Capital

®

Glenwood Rd l Bethesda l East Morrisville l RDU

®

Southpoint l North Cary l RDU l NW Raleigh l South Durham

NORTH WAKE Wakeeeld Plantation l Heritage l Wake Forest l Rolesville

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No Judgment,

Just Results! A North Raleigh Studio Gets It Right

Will Morrisville Get A New High School?

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Supporters Want to Give Youth More Ownership Of Their Own Education

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STAYING

STAYING

IN THE 919!

IN THE 919!

• 11 Tips to Make 2017 Great

• Is the 919 Really Healthy?

• Is the 919 Really Healthy?

HEALTHY

HEALTHY • 11 Tips to Make 2017 Great

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• Don’t Just Survive…Thrive!

PAGE 46

• Healthy Local Dining Options • Supplements, Holistic & More

PAGE 48 PAGE 49

Party With A Purpose

Annual Red Cross Ball One Of North Raleigh’s Biggest Annual Events

PAGE 45

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Volume 6 | Number 1

What’s Your Home Worth? Page 84 I Habitat for Humanity ReStore Opens in North Raleigh, Page 43

NORTH RALEIGH/ LEESVILLE EDITION North Raleigh’s Amity Whalen provides North Raleigh residents a good health studio that is welcoming and respectful – and focused on real results.

STAYING

Harris Teeter, Hyatt House, And More!

IN THE 919!

FRENZY

PAGE 28

PAGE 46

• Don’t Just Survive…Thrive!

PAGE 46

• Healthy Local Dining Options • Supplements, Holistic & More

PAGE 48 PAGE 49

PAGE 42

JAN/FEB 2017

Brier Creek Construction

No Judgment, Just Results A North Raleigh Studio Gets It Right

PAGE 56

NORTH CAROLINA FC!

HEALTHY • 11 Tips to Make 2017 Great • Is the 919 Really Healthy?

Effort to Bring MLS to the 919 Includes New Brand, Stadium

STAYING HEALTHY

IN THE 919!

• 11 Tips to Make 2017 Great

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PGA To Stay In Wakefield

PAGE 79

UNC Rex Healthcare Will Continue as Title Sponsor

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• Don’t Just Survive…Thrive!

PAGE 46

• Healthy Local Dining Options • Supplements, Holistic & More

Teacher of the Year

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Heritage High Instructor Finalist For State Honor

• Don’t Just Survive…Thrive! Our Experts Offer Advice PAGE 46

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JAN/FEB 2017

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Volume 6 | Number 1

What’s Your Home Worth? Page 84 I Deke’s Remodeling at Brier Creek Country Club, Page 28

BRIER CREEK/ RDU EDITION Local resident Lou Jonske’s passion is evident in his efforts to assist veterans and serve his country – which Is reflected in his involvement with General’s Hot Sauce.

JAN/FEB 2017

919Magazine.com

Volume 6 | Number 1

What’s Your Home Worth? Page 84 I Morrisville Ranked 7th Safest Mid-Size Town in North Carolina, Page 61

MORRISVILLE/ RTP EDITION Local resident Lou Jonske’s passion is evident in his efforts to assist veterans and serve his country – which Is reflected in his involvement with General’s Hot Sauce.

JAN/FEB 2017

919Magazine.com

Volume 6 | Number 1

Wake Forest Musical Line-up Confirmed For Friday Night on White The Town of Wake Forest and Downtown Wake Forest Inc. released the band line-up for the 2017 Friday Night on White event, presented by White Street Brewing Co. Each free concert begins at 6 p.m., and continues until 9 p.m. The scheduled local performers are: April 28: Magic Pipers May 12: Smile June 9: Bull City Syndicate July 14: Big Love Aug. 11: Love Tribe Sept. 8: Crush Bands will play rock and roll covers from classic to modern rock, with a little funk and original music thrown in. Friday Night on White takes place along South White Street on the second Friday of each month from April through September (due to Good Friday falling on the second Friday in April, the 2017 series begins April 28). In addition, several downtown merchants offer a variety of special discounts, programs, and activities. Food is available at each event from downtown restaurants and a variety of food trucks. Beer and wine are available for purchase. And soft drinks and bottled water are available at the Wake Forest Police Department Explorer Post 401 tent. Chairs and blankets are permitted; however, no coolers or outside outside alcoholic beverages are allowed.

What’s Your Home Worth? Page 84 I Wake Forest Ranked 6th Safest Mid-Size Town in North Carolina, Page 73

WAKE FOREST/ ROLESVILLE/WAKEFIELD PLANTATION EDITION North Raleigh’s Amity Whalen provides North Wake residents a good health studio that is welcoming and respectful – and focused on real results.

For additional information, visit wakeforestnc.gov.


919 | SPOTLIGHT

RailHawks Become North Carolina FC! New Brand, MLS, Stadium Initiatives Announced By The Triangle’s Soccer Team North Carolina FC is the new identify for the Carolina RailHawks, as part of an effort by owner Steve Malik and president and general manager Curt Johnson to use a new brand and a new vision to bring the largest level of men’s and women’s professional soccer in North America to the 919. “This is a brand restatement. We aspire to be at the top level of both of both men’s and women’s professional soccer, so we are pursuing MLS and NWSL bids, as well as a new stadium,” said Malik. “We made a conscious decision to brand ourselves as North Carolina’s professional club. A united soccer community will be one of STEVE MALIK the keys to reaching these Owner, Carolina goals.” Railhawks/North Carolina FC The effort involves a new crest and new colors that tie to North Carolina’s culture and history. “We wanted a crest that embodied the symbols that are synonymous with the state of North Carolina,” said Johnson. “The star, the triangle, the wings and the colors are all nods to the state’s rich culture and tradition.” Malik announced plans for a new 20,000-plus seat stadium, with a location and renderings available this year. The club was founded in 2006, and currently plays in the North American Soccer League – with home games at WakeMed Soccer Park in Cary. Major League Soccer previously announced plans to expand to 28 teams, with Charlotte, Cincinnati, Detroit, Nashville, Sacramento, St. Louis,

‘We aspire to be at the top level of both of both men’s and women’s professional soccer, so we are pursuing MLS and NWSL bids, as well as a new stadium.’

919 Magazine

North Carolina Football Club STADIUM: CHAIRMAN/OWNER: LEAGUE: WEBSITE: PHONE:

WakeMed Soccer Park, Cary Steve Malik North American Soccer League northcarolinafc.com 919-459-8144

San Antonio, San Diego and Tampa/St. Petersburg vying with Raleigh/Durham for slots.

Steve Malik

www.919Magazine.com

For information on North Carolina FC tickets – and all aspects of the club – visit northcarolinafc.com or call 919459-8144. JAN/FEB 2017

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919 | Deals

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ELDER ABUSE? What’s Your North Carolina Ranks 16th in Elder Abuse Prevention

According to WalletHub.com, North Carolina ranks 16th among all states in preventing abuse to elderly citizens. SOURCE: WalletHub.com

Top States For Doing Business? In 2016, North Carolina Ranked

9

TH

Based on the overall cost of doing business, North Carolina ranked 9th in the U.S., based on an analysis by Area Development magazine. Georgia topped the list for the third consecutive year, followed by South Carolina and Texas.

BOOMTOWNS IN US? Cary Raleigh

#1 #10

Raleigh Ranks 8th in Nation

According to a Realtor.com housing forecast, both the Raleigh-Cary and Durham-Chapel Hill metros will have higher than average increases in home prices and home sales in 2017 – and they will rank among the top U.S. markets for housing growth. The Realtor.com report ranks the Raleigh-Cary market at eighth in the country with a forecasted 4.16 percent increase in average home price and a 7.55 percent increase in home sales for 2017. Year-to-date in 2016, the average home price in Wake County is up 5.1 percent with home sales up 6.8 percent, according to Triangle Multiple Listing Service. SOURCE: Realtor.com

NORTH CAROLINA

SOURCE: AreaDevelopment.com

TOP 10

Home Worth?

Based on several factors – including net migration rate, housing growth, unemployment, 2015-16 change in unemployment and GDP growth. – SmartAsset ranked Cary as the top “Boomtown” in the U.S. Raleigh was at number 10.

6TH

Fastest-Growing State in America

The report evaluated 572 of the country’s largest metros using data from the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, Bureau of Labor Statistics and the U.S. Census Bureau.

Statistics show North Carolina added 111,602 residents in 2015-2016, making it the sixth fastest-growing state in the U.S.

Other metros on the top 10 list included Fort Collins, CO; Fort Myers, FL; Longmont, CO; Bend, OR; Orem, UT; Kissimmee, FL; Midland, TX; Bismarck, ND; Midland, TX; and Bismarck, ND.

Utah topped the list, followed by Nevada, Idaho, Florida and Washington. SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau

SOURCE: SmartAsset

82

919 Magazine

www.919Magazine.com

JAN/FEB 2017


Little Smiles Dental The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommends establishing a dental “home” for your child by age 1.

Dr. Tu is a board certified pediatric dentist that believes in providing compassionate comprehensive dental care for your child with a focus on prevention and maintenance of good oral heath.

919.439.9998

Welcoming new patients, will happily file your insurance. Jenny Tu, DDS • 3735 Davis Dr Suite 125, Morrisville, NC 27560 • www.littlesmilesdentalnc.com • 919-439-9998

919 Magazine Jan/Feb 2017 Morrisville, N Cary, RTP  
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