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MINDFUL ENTREPRENEURSHIP

Earn more. Work less. more on Page 10

REAL ESTATE VIRTUAL TOURS:

YOUR SECRET WEAPON TO A FAST SALE! more on Page 32

ARE YOU READY?

CHOOSING THE RIGHT STRUCTURE more on Page 16

the value of significant support more on Page 20


CONTACT US DREAMER 2 C REATO R B USINESS MAGAZ I N E

20 KEV IS & NI C O L E: TH E VA L U E o f SI G NI F IC A NT

P:

(647) 955 3567

SUP P O RT

E: articles@dreamer2creatormag.ca W:

www.dreamer2creatormag.ca

—

EDITORIAL K A R E N M. LOWE Executive Editor F R A N C IN E GREY Creative Editor K I M BLEY LOWE-B EN N ETT Editor

06 ID EA G ENER AT I O N by K AREN M . L OWE

10 M in d fu l E n tr ep r en eu r s h ip EA RN M O RE. WO RK L ESS. by CRYSTAL-MARIE SEALY

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TABLE OF CONTENTS —

RESO URC ES

Page 16 C H O O SING TH E RI G H T ST RU CT U R E By Joanna Sheth .

Page 32 Real Estate Virtual Tours YO U R SEC RET W EA P O N TO A FA ST SAL E! By Natalie Lewin

12 TALES o f m y NAM I NG EXPER IENC E By Frances Murray

30 HOW t o W R I T E a GREAT B LO G By Christine Panourgias

34 TA X TI P S for ENTREP RENEU RS By Anastasia Gazarek

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editor’s note One of the many definitions for support, according to the Oxford dictionary, is to bear all or part of the weight, to hold up. I like this definition because some days being an entrepreneur means carrying a lot of weight on our shoulders. The weight of expectation; the weight of marketing; the weight of accounting; the weight of product differentiation; the weight of learning many new tasks; and even the weight of failure. This magazine is a work of support. Except for the idea for the magazine, the magazine is 90% created from my support system. The layout; the contributors; the graphics; editing; even the interview questions are all because I received support from my friends, family and strangers who will become friends. I am blessed to have a family that always supports me, and so I take for granted that I will always be supported. After working with other entrepreneurs, I was shocked to see how lucky I am; not everyone has the support I have. One of my mottos is “start with what you know”. When a lot of persons who promised to write articles dropped out last minute because of one thing or another (no hard feelings, they will support at a later date), I did just that. I started with who and what I knew. I went to family and friends to fill the missing pieces. That’s what support is about. If you believe you do not have the network to do that in your future endeavours, you can tap into the family at Dreamer 2 Creator Business Magazine. We were created for you, by entrepreneurs for entrepreneurs. When I pitch my magazine idea to persons I meet, they listen quietly then ask, “but how do you make money?”

Me: For me, it is not about money.

This magazine is our way of supporting you. For this reason, the magazine is free to read online, and by contributing a how-to article, you also get free promotion for your business. This magazine wants to support you by offering free research in various areas of business and industries. Pay it forward by writing an article in an upcoming issue to support another entrepreneur. With Support

KAR E N M . L O W E Executive Editor

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1 SUPPORT DREAMER2CREATORMAG.CA ISSUU.COM/DREAMER2CREATORMAG mail@dreamer2creatormag.ca

Copyright 2019 Dreamer 2 Creator Business Magazine. ISSN 2562-5330 (Print) ISSN 2562-5349 (Online) All rights reserved. No parts of this publication may be copied, reprinted, displayed, edited or distributed without the written consent of Epigram Consulting Services Inc. Dreamer 2 Creator Business Magazine is a Canadian Magazine, published and distributed by Epigram Consulting Services, located in Brampton, Ontario, Canada.


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idea generation Try the following exercise. Close your eyes and picture your ideal product or service. It may be your product or service, or it could be someone else’s that already exist. Your choice. (Use a voice recorder and talk through the experience). √ √ The product or service has over 5 million followers. √ √ Visualize the following: * * individuals going after the product/service * * individuals using it * * individuals describing it * * the benefits * * awesome reviews are given by users * * the happiness on the faces of users √ √ what is it about the product/service that makes them happy. √ √ What feature do they use the most? √ √ Do they keep coming back to it? √ √ Describe what the product/service looks like, feels like. √ √ What makes it unique? Be detailed in your description. √ √ What do the users look like? Gender, age, height: size: posture? √ √ Who are they? The exercise you just completed is a variation on the concept of a brainstorming session. Brainstorming is usually a group exercise where individuals build on each other’s ideas. As an entrepreneur or person trying to figure out the next best thing or how to improve on your product or service, a group exercise is not always possible. If this is your product/service, √ √ Does your product/service do what you just visualized? √ √ If no, why not? What are the gaps you can fill by yourself? √ √ What gaps can a partnership fill?

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SUPPORT COMES IN ALL SHAPES & SIZES from Dreamer to creator: reframing deterrents in our paths


MINDFUL ENTREPRENEURSHIP

Earn more. Work less. M

indful entrepreneurship creates space in your business for you, so clients get your best. A business optimized around your energy and needs, leaves more energy for clients, without sacrificing yourself, wealth or relationships. I invite you to take what works - and leave what doesn’t - from this article, but also from the media, gurus, mentors and anyone else in your head. Let’s say “Good-bye rat race. Hello blue ocean.” MINDSET. Anything is possible. Ask the guy who invented hot cup sleeves. W. Chan Kim and Renée Mauborgne’s book, “The Blue Ocean Strategy”, invites you to stop fighting for space in the blood red ocean of competition, and recognize the uncharted blue waters. I found my blue ocean, but only with a shift in mindset. It meant staying focused on finding my market and avoiding the temptation to take clients that were not a good fit. YOUR E.A.S.Y. AFFLUENCE BUSINESS MODEL™ My four (4) pillars of mindful entrepreneurship: 1. Schedule 2. Process 3. Pricing 4. People Three (3) of these ask you to look within, but all four (4) are important pillars. As they say, a table needs all four legs.

• “Anything is possible. Ask the guy who invented hot cup sleeves.”

(1) Schedule. Put your oxygen mask on before helping others. A sustainable schedule honours your unique boundaries. Do not disturb work hours and accessible hours are made clear. Understanding your rhythms lets you meet with clients or work quietly, accordingly. Morning person or night owl? Introvert, rejuvenated by alone time, or extrovert, rejuvenated by human interaction? Here’s some added inspiration. DRE A M E R 2 CR E A T O R B USI N ESS M A G A Z I N E

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(2) Process. What does your service offering look like, from client requests to delivery? The process here covers a largely templated delivery process and the scope, solidifying: a. What you can truly deliver at a premium service level. b. What add-ons you can deliver, at that same premium quality. c. Contract clarification you’ll need to provide before signing. (3) Pricing. Start as you mean to go on. With a limited number of hours a week for clients, respect your business and each income stream, as if each was your sole source of income. Ensure it covers these costs: a. Professional business operations. b. Healthy financial reserves. c. Your desired lifestyle, no guilt. Don’t join the masses annoyed about multimillion-dollar CEO salaries. Consider that the CEO can focus on the business at hand without the distraction of bills. (4) People. Clarity on who you serve, how and why, creates resilience. You’re focused and comfortable walking away from all else. Ideal clients value what you offer at or above your pricing. Champions genuinely support your goals and decisions. Naysayers and unsolicited advice, however, offer distractions, plant doubts and drain you. Social media gets a bad rap, but it’s great for exploring new networks. Finally, consider Warren Buffett’s “empty schedule” for productivity. Be selective about who gets onto your calendar.

ABOUT CRYSTAL-MARIE Crystal-Marie Sealy, MBA, is a keynote speaker and entrepreneurial strategy consultant focused on sustainable business models for established entrepreneurs and professionals transitioning to entrepreneurship. President and founder of Successiory and her signature “Mindful Entrepreneurship. Your E.A.S.Y. Affluence Business Model™ by Successiory”, Crystal-Marie works with professionals who want to build sustainable (livable) business models around their lifestyles and create sustainable client community on social media. She also speaks and delivers workshops at business and motivational conferences on authenticity, entrepreneurial strategy for pricing, process, feasible schedules and client social media community. Connect with her and subscribe at www.successiory.ca

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TALES OF MY NAMING EXPERIENCE I

remember it like it was yesterday. I was told growing up that all it takes is one business idea and the trajectory of your life can change for the better. I kept this statement in my heart. I knew I wanted to own my own business one day but had no clue what kind of business. In the summer of 2012, after months of self-searching and creating my vision board, I decided to turn my passion for baking into a business. “Yes!” I thought. “I finally have a business idea. This is the one idea I have been searching for all these months.” I decided to call my business Sweet Elegance Desserts. The name described the taste and aesthetic appeal of my desserts perfectly. The name had me hooked. I was on cloud 9. I wasted no time printing business cards, opening an email account and attending events to spread the word about my amazing dessert company; Sweet Elegance Desserts. A friend of mine and owner of Epigram Consulting Services often checked in on me and my business. She gave me useful and practical advice. One of which was to register my business. So, I did. I sent in my registration and received a notification that my business name already exists. Oh, the horror! The name was already in use? Taken? “What? A U.S. cookie basket product? Seriously? This can’t be; I thought. I felt like a 3-year-old little girl who has just had her stuffy ripped out of her hands; I was mortified. I felt sick to my stomach. How could this be; I thought. Disbelief turned into rebellion real quick.

I thought of a million ways to try and get around having to change my business name, and they ranged from impossible to absolutely ridiculous. My friend had to get me back to reality many times. Through much convincing, I agreed to change my name. “Great! Back to the drawing board?; I thought. Sometime later and after a few self-reflective exercises; I discovered my current business name; Chez Fran Desserts. All of this headache could have been avoided had I known what I am about to tell you, which is, do a thorough name search prior to falling in love with a business name and ordering business collateral. Google is not enough my friends.

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Here are some tips I eventually followed:

1. Your name should be unique (you do not want to advertise for someone else with the same name.) 2. Pick a name that will still be relevant 10 years from now 3. Do a search of at least 6 search engines, not just google. E.g., AOL, Bing, Yahoo, etc. 4. Search Corporations Canada, not just provincial name search (some provinces will register duplicate names, Corporations Canada will not). This is important in case you decide later to incorporate federally. 5. If your personal name is a common name, do not use it; If you are stuck on it, find a way to make it unique, say it backwards or insert something in the middle. 6. Using common words is possible, but may already exist so create variations. 7. Using a name that describes your business is possible, but unless your business type is the only one in the world, the name may already exist, find a variation that will keep the idea but still make it unique. 8. Use words in another language. 9. Use name generator apps. CHEZ FRAN DESSERTS IS OWNED AND OPERATED BY FRANCES FINDLEY-MURRAY. CONTACT FOR DELICIOUS DESSERT ITEMS: TEL: 647.527-1008 - 13 -

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Rehoboth Electrical Services Inc

OUR TEAM IS READY TO SERVE YOU CONTACT US TODAY [289] 401-9742 Rehoboth Electrical Services INC. is an electrical contracting firm that values efficiency, quality and customer satisfaction. Our electricians can install anything from new security lighting for your outdoors to a whole home generator that will keep your appliances working during a power outage.

INFO@RESINC.CA

WWW.RESINC.CA

ESA/ECRA #: 7009658


MONEY IS NOT YOUR STARTING POINT

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The most common structure chosen by new businesses is Sole Proprietorships, in large part because it’s informal, simple, and the least expensive.

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CHOOSING THE RIGHT STRUCTURE Choosing the right structure for your business is an important decision for new business owners and you should seek the professional advice of an Accountant and/or Lawyer. When starting your business, one of the first things to do is choose a structure that is right for your business. Each structure has distinct characteristics, and it’s important that you carefully consider the business structure that best suits your needs and aligns with your goals. In Canada, there are three types of legal structures for a business to operate under: sole proprietorships, partnerships, and incorporation. Sole Proprietorships The most common structure chosen by new businesses is Sole Proprietorships, in large part because it’s informal, simple, and the least expensive. This structure can be set up quickly and costs much less than a Corporation. As a sole proprietor, the business owner and the business itself is one and the same in the eyes of legal and tax authorities. The business owner can easily withdraw money from their business for personal use. The downside for sole proprietorships is that the business owner is personally liable for all debts and functions of the business as there is no legal separation between the two. In addition, the net income earned by a sole proprietor is generally taxed at a higher personal tax rate than Corporations. However, if the business generates a loss, that DRE A M E R 2 C RE A T O R B USI N E SS M A G A Z I N E

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business loss can be applied against other sources of income to reduce income gained from other sources. This is typically why most business owners who are operating a parttime business chose to operate as a sole proprietor. Partnerships A Partnership is a form of proprietorship, but more than one proprietor is coming together to operate a business. This structure is fairly easy and inexpensive to form. As a Partnership, the partners and their business are one and the same, in the eyes of the legal and tax authorities. The partners in the Partnership typically have a contractual agreement that governs, in percentage terms, how revenues and expenses are shared. When it comes time to prepare taxes, each partner applies the agreed upon percentage to the business’ income and expenses. This structure allows partners to pool their resources and share the business risk of operating a business. From a tax perspective, partners can deduct their portion of net business losses from the Partnership against other sources of personal income. Similar to a Sole Proprietorships, I SSUE 1


partners are personally responsible for the liabilities of the Partnership as there is no legal separation between the partners and the business. In addition, there is a risk of disagreements among the partners and how to operate the business. Each partner is also held financially responsible for business decisions made by the other partner(s). A contractual agreement that governs your partnership is important as it can also establish the terms of the partnership and helps to avoid and handle disputes that may arise. Corporations Corporations are more complicated legal structures compared to Sole Proprietorships and Partnerships. Incorporation is a process where a separate legal entity is formed and is owned by shareholders. A Corporation is a legal business structure that can have many different shareholders as owners of the business. In the eyes of legal and tax authorities, a Corporation is a separate legal entity from the shareholders. The combined corporate tax rate for a Canadian Controlled Private Corporation is typically lower than personal tax rates, so there can be possible tax advantages as taxes may be lower for an incorporated business. It can also be easier for Corporations to raise capital than other business structures. It is important that Corporations keep extensive records for the company (i.e. Corporate Minute Book, financial statements, and tax records). This business structure is much more time consuming and costly to set-up and maintain. Corporations offer the strongest protection to its owners from personal liability and have a completely independent life separate from its shareholders. This also allows the Corporation to have a continuous existence in the event that a shareholder leaves the company. Choosing the right structure for your business is an important decision for new business owners, and you should seek the professional advice of an Accountant and/or Lawyer. It’s important to assess the facts of your situations and your personal and business goals in order to make the right decision. Taking the time to properly select the right business structure can save time, money, and any surprises later on in your business.

by JOANNA SHETH Contact: info@accountwellco.com www.accountwellco.com

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1. The One-Page Business Plan 2. Financial Projection Plan 3. Product/Service Differentiation 4. "New" Product/Service Development 5. Portfolio Development 6. Marketing and selling of the final/new verver sion of your product or service

1. Realize Your Dream 2. Make Money 3. Create a Profitable Product or Service 4. Define and Attain a Successful Business 5. Customer and Client Awareness – Having clients who understand the quality and value of your product or service 6. New Differentiated Product and Service

CONTACT Tel: 647-955-3567

E: mail@epigramconsulting.com

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Web:www.epigramconsulting.com

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KEVIS & NICOLE:

the value of significant support —

Thank you for taking the time to meet with us today. We are excited to delve into your story and cover the theme of support. To begin, please introduce yourself to our readers. Kevis: My name is Kevis Lowe. I have an Electronic Telecommunications Engineering Diploma and a Master’s Electrician License. I have been working in this trade for 13 years; received my Master’s License in 2013, and started my own company a month after. My company is Rehoboth Electrical Services specializing in residential, commercial and industrial services. Nicole: My name is Nicole Lowe. I am Kevis’ wife. I help with the administration side of the business. I also work in childcare and volunteer with various children’s groups. Why did you choose to embark on the challenging life of an entrepreneur? Kevis: I am a Christian; I am a believer in God. One of my passions is to serve God, and I wanted to be able to devote my whole life to Him. To aid that goal, I wanted to be able to semi-retire early and have flexibility in my schedule; having my own business gives me the control to make that happen. How did you choose the name of the company? Kevis: I named the company Rehoboth Electrical Services Inc. I went into prayer and fasting, and I asked God for direction. While doing that, the themes of peace and rest came to mind. During the fast, I came across a

story about Isaac in Genesis 26. He had his servants dig a well because they were in need. The locals argued about the first two wells, but not with the third well. The well was given the name Rehoboth, which means, ‘God is making room for you’ and ‘He will give you peace and rest’. I felt this name made sense because I felt that I will have my space in the industry and that the business will fulfil my goals.

I HAVE CONNECTED WITH OTHER SMALL CONTRACTORS, AND WE HELP EACH ON AND OFF THE SITE Why this business path, as opposed to IT engineer for example? Kevis: Like most people, I wanted the benefit of enjoying my job, being challenged mentally, and the money to live comfortably. The electrical industry allowed me to accomplish those goals. Plus, I like working with my hands. Nicole: Kevis’ mom will tell me stories about how every toy and gadget would be destroyed so that his inquisitive mind can work on how to put it back together. In other words, he has been working with his hands since he was young. Kevis: As I stated before, I have a diploma in Engineering, which I received from the University of Technology, Jamaica. Upon arrival in Canada, I attended Carleton

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Photo Credit: SABRINA DOMIZE OF ASAGIE PORTRAITS DRE A M E R 2 C RE A T OR B U S I N E S S M A GA ZI N E

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University to further my education in Electrical Engineering. The more I studied, the more I realized that this learning path was preparing me for a desk job, which I did not want. I loved the problem-solving aspect of Engineering, but I wanted more of the hands-on approach. While at Carleton, I began working for an electrical company during school breaks and loved it. The more I learned, the more I was invested in the trade. I continued to push myself and successfully completed my apprenticeship, received my journeyman license, and received my contractor’s license. Taking the next step from employee to business owner can be nerveracking. How did you know you would be successful? Did you do any market research? Kevis: The business idea was not formally tested, but as an employee, I was given valuable opportunities to be a team leader and supervisor. I worked closely with my

employers and was able to learn business operations, while still developing in the trade. For example, I was hired for a commercial project as an electrician, and after a few weeks, I was also given the responsibility of site foreman. This happened more than once. My employers were amazed and offered to spend hours with me, mentoring and teaching me muchneeded skills, such as how to minimize costs and maximize profits. I also learned about the needs of other trades, how to effectively schedule a project, and communicate clearly with clients and employees. My informal experiences revealed that there was room for me in the marketplace. What training do you find is needed to be successful at the business side of the business, such as marketing, accounting, etc.? Kevis: I don’t think that specific training

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I CONNECTED WITH OTHER SMALL CONTRACTORS, AND WE HELP EACH OTHER ON AND OFF THE SITE.

is needed across the board. It will differ depending on your business, and your skills. I do believe in mentorship, and I think that everyone should have a mentor. There are pitfalls that entrepreneurs will encounter, running a business. Regardless of how much training you have had, no one person is skilled in everything. Nicole: I often go to business development workshops, and I remember one particular one that discussed the topic of being an entrepreneur and being all things for the company. The speaker was challenging all entrepreneurs NOT to do everything. If you use skilled

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Photo Credit: MIKE’S CREATIVE PHOTOGRAPHY

professionals, they will make your business operations more efficient, and give you, the entrepreneur, more time to do what you are good at. For example, a skilled accountant will cost you money, but may also save you $1000’s of dollars, because of their advanced skill. What are two business challenges or obstacles (in starting up or operation) how did you overcome them? Kevis: Firstly, the capital. It takes money to make money. I started by using our household income to get started. Through relationships developed and my credibility working in the industry, I was able to acquire a credit with my supplier and be able to fund materials. I also learned the importance of taking a deposit. In doing so, I minimized my risk, as I received funds to cover some of my expenses. Secondly, choose your clients wisely. Don’t take a job to be busy, but recognize that the business relationship is a two-sided interaction. Good clients bring referrals, repeat business and timely payments. Difficult clients may bring down your reputation and bring added stress. Be selective and, as much as possible, work with clients that allow you to do your best work.

Photo Credit: MIKE’S CREATIVE PHOTOGRAPHY

At the end of the day, you and your clients will win. How does a small business owner not get caught up into doing everything when they have a limited start-up budget? Kevis: Honestly, I am still learning this lesson. One thing I have come to realize is that doing it all by yourself is near impossible. I connected with other small contractors, and we help each other on and off the site. We refer to each other and encourage each other often. If you try to do it on your own, you will eventually burn out, and the excellence of your skill will dim under all the pressure. My biggest support is my wife, Nicole. She takes care of a majority of the paperwork, which works for me, because I truly dislike

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doing it, and my time is limited being on site, as often as I am. How did you become such an integral part of the business? Nicole: It was kind of automatic. As Kevis and I were discussing his business plans, I was excited to be able to share the load of getting it off the ground. In my mind, there was no need for the question. I was excited, willing and intentional to manage my time so that I could be the help that Kevis needed. As much as this business was

CHOOSE YOUR CLIENTS WISELY Difficult clients may bring down your reputation and bring added stress. his, it was ours. Why is it important to be a part of the business? Nicole: Kevis and I strive to partner in every aspect of life, so I was often asked my opinion on a new deal, or pricing strategy, or whatever was happening in the business. I appreciated it because it was another way that I was valued in helping to develop the business into a successful operation. Why are you still a part of the business? Nicole: I don’t plan on ever stopping. Throughout different seasons, my roles may change, depending on varying factors, but I value the business. It makes my husband happy, it holds a majority of the weight in covering household expenses, and as we work it, we are strategizing and believing that it will grow into a strong operation that will continue to provide for our family and benefit the community.

What is your role? Nicole: I am the administrative director. I help in creating contracts, bookkeeping, answering the phone and managing clients’ accounts to name a few. How do you manage or make time for your business interests and Rehoboth? Nicole: It is not always easy. As Kevis is fulfilling his dream with Rehoboth, I have my own dreams and aspirations. I am currently in school working towards my Degree and Masters in Elementary Education. I also currently work in Childcare. On my most successful weeks, I plan my week from Sunday and follow the time blocks that I put in place. It is important to make a plan and follow the plan. How do you not compromise your entrepreneurial dreams while supporting his? Nicole: As much as I support him, he supports me. He believes in my dreams and encourages me when they seem unattainable, or the task at hand just feels really hard. He wouldn’t allow me to compromise my dreams for his dreams. And in the same way that he seeks my


advice, I seek his. We support each other to reach our individual goals. What are the benefits and pitfalls of support from Nicole versus others? Kevis: The benefit of Nicole’s support is her vested interest in the company. I don’t need to question her motives. The benefit in Nicole being my support is that we are learning as we go. A pitfall is that she does not have the experience and training that a hired employee may have. So if we both miss something, it goes unchecked until it presents itself with, at times, mammoth implications. Even then, her support goes past just the tasks that she completes. She is so encouraging, helping me to think on a larger scale, so that Rehoboth does not resemble a mom and pop shop, but that we push to get the business to the next level. How do you not get tired of each other being in each other’s space so much? Kevis: I love her! And I know she loves me too. I don’t think we can get too much of each other. We have a good balance of spending time with each other, as well as chilling with our individual friends. In addition, our friends and family respect our schedules and are accommodating, when we are busy, and it’s time to work. Equally, they also make time for us when it’s time for fun. I think the business has also helped to build our relationship because it has brought us together when we have come across some tough situations or had major decisions to make. Nicole: I don’t feel that we are in each other’s space often. Even though we work together for the business, and are intentional in developing our relationship, we are both introverts. Every so often, we find ourselves in our separate corners to reset.

If I just need a sounding board or advice, they are always accessible. They are true friends because they will correct me if they feel I’m wrong. One of my closest friends, Craig, would call me on a regular basis, to give me an idea of something that he came across, that could benefit my business. They care for me and know that my business is important to me, so they care for my business as well. Thank you for taking the time to share with us your wonderful and encouraging story of support. We hope our readers can enjoy such a level of support in all of their endeavours.

www.resinc.ca info@resinc.ca Tel: 289-401-9742 Photo Credit: MIKE’S CREATIVE PHOTOGRAPHY

How would you describe your other support systems? Kevis: My friends and family are phenomenal. Whenever I need them, they are always there. DRE A M E R 2 C RE A T O R B USI N E SS M A G A Z I N E

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START WITH WHAT YOU KNOW from Dreamer to creator: reframing deterrents in our paths


HOW TO WRITE A GREAT BLOG There are articles out there that tell you, in order to write a great blog post you need to write engaging content, with a strong headline that speaks to your audience but, what does that even mean? No one tells you! I am happy to share how to write a great blog post for your business.

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Step1 Think of a topic that speaks to a specific pain point (or problem) your prospective customers might be having. For example, my clients don’t know how to write a great blog post and are searching Google for that very specific term. Knowing that this is the case, I’m going to write a blog post that addresses the issue. Step 2 Prepare an outline, introduce the topic, and then break down the ways your client can work towards resolving their issue. The Introduction Present your topic to your readers Summarize your topic and why you are writing about it Try to make the introduction exciting and interesting The Body In this section break down your subject into more details Use strong headings, and lists or bullet points to break up the content, especially if it’s going to be very text heavy Conclusion This is more than just the end of your blog post Take the time to wrap up your blog in a nice little bow, making sure to review the issue and the solutions In your conclusion, it’s important to add things like a call-to-action, or informing your readers that there might be something exciting happening soon, and they need to check back to learn more Step 3 The editing phase. Ensure the most important items for strong SEO and readability are in place. Confirm that the pain point or problem you are writing about is visible in your content. This issue/ topic has become your keyword or key phrase for SEO. My key phrase for this blog is “write a great blog post”. I may have gone slightly overboard in how many times I’ve mentioned the key phrase, but I’m doing so to demonstrate the various places your keywords / key-phrases should be placed.

way that non-specialists can read, or scan, and easily digest the main ideas or themes in your post. While writing you should also consider writing in a conversational style. Maintaining a conversational tone will make the blog seem less instructional, and more like a conversation between yourself, and your audience. Top ways to write conversational content: Keep your sentences short, around 20 words Keep your vocabulary simple, using words like antidisestablishmentarian-ism, isn’t going to help your cause Maintain your authentic self in your content People who know you should be able to read what you wrote and recognize that you are the author

Keywords breakdown: … and that’s how you write a great blog post! Your keyword should reside in the blog’s title by CHRISTINE PANOURGIAS Your keyword should make an appearance in the Contact: www.christinepanourgias.com first sentence and paragraph of your content me@christinepanourgias.com Your keyword should be present in your headings (especially your H1 level heading) Your keyword should show up in the body of your content a couple of times. Step 4 Keep the content easy to read; this is a blog post, not a PhD thesis. The content should be written in a DRE A M E R 2 C RE A T O R B USI N E SS M A G A Z I N E

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REAL ESTATE VIRTUAL TOURS:

Your Secret Weapon to a Fast Sale ! A

lthough over 90% of buyers start their home search online, very few realtors are leveraging the power of technology as a marketing tool to sell your home. In 2019, home buyers are expecting to see both images of homes online and a virtual walk-through of the property.

THIS TECHNIQUE OR MINDSET WORKS FOR ALL INDUSTRIES, NOT JUST THE REAL ESTATE INDUSTRY.

P

artnering with a realtor who can create an interactive virtual tour of your home is the #1 way to boost your home’s selling potential. Here are three reasons why your listing needs a real estate virtual tour: Captures More Interested Buyers Realtors with their pulse on technology know your home’s online presence is everything. Modern-day buyers don’t have time to scroll through countless listings, book appointments, or drive hours to an open house. An online virtual tour captures buyers who do not live in the vicinity of the property and allows them to ‘walk through’ the property as many times as they want at their own convenience. Offers Buyers More Detail The photographs or description of the property often fail to do it justice. A virtual tour offers an in-depth walkthrough of your home and is more effective than a photograph in helping buyers visualize the space and overall flow of your home. By capturing not only the interior of the property but the view from the porch or windows,

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buyers can get a real feel for the home and explore its full potential. Increases Selling Potential With YouTube being the world’s #2 search engine, having your home ‘wow’ online from the get-go instantly drives more traffic to your listing. A study by Realtor.com found that real estate listings with virtual tours received 87% more views than those without tours! Apart from the overall usefulness of online tours, the biggest advantage of video is that it propels the listing to the top of the search engine. Without online visual support, sellers will automatically lose more than half of potential buyers (the National Association of Realtors found that 54% of buyers will not even look at a property unless it has virtual images.) Although many realtors create virtual tours, sellers should be wary of the fact that not all tours are created equal. Many visual walkthroughs are composed of a slideshow of still pictures set to music and subtitles. While these images may give buyers a vague idea of the home’s appearance, they do nothing to represent a 3D space and are not a true, interactive virtual tour. Are you thinking of selling your home or condo and want a video to get more money in your hands? Partner with a realtor who can market your home to the modern buyer! by NATALIE LEWIN, REALTOR Contact: email info@natalielewin.com Tel 416-903-7653


Tax Tips for Entrepreneurs incorporated), then you are not a separate legal entity from the owner. Therefore, you can report all of your business information on your personal tax return, otherwise known in Canada as a T1 Income Tax and Benefit Return. You would report your income and expenses related to your business on form T2125, Statement of Business or Professional Activities. Your tax return is due June 15th; however, if you have a balance owing, that amount is due April 30th.

Do you have a regular side hustle? Maybe you’ve picked up some freelance work. Perhaps you’ve fully ditched your day job for a self-employed existence? If any of these scenarios

describes you, here are some things you should consider with regards to income taxes. I should note that this article will specifically focus on unincorporated businesses and that you should consult with your accountant. General Tax Filing If you are the sole proprietor of your business (not

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GST/HST Registration If your business makes more than $30k over four consecutive calendar quarters, you are required to collect GST/HST on your taxable sales and must, therefore, register for a GST/HST registration number. Failure to do so can cost you 13% of taxable sales (in Ontario), as you would have been required to collect and remit the GST/HST on taxable sales. If you are a GST/HST registrant, you would be required to file a GST/HST return, Form GST34. Your frequency of filing depends on your taxable sales; if your taxable

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sales are less than $1.5 million per year, you are only required to file annually, but you can choose to increase your filing frequency to quarterly.

the year. Unpaid taxes can incur penalties and interest from the CRA, so make sure you have money available for when you need it. A good habit is to set aside a portion of the revenue you earn from each client/customer, noting that this percentage will depend on your taxable income.

Home Office Expenses A lot of entrepreneurs start out by working from home. You can deduct expenses for the business use of a workspace in your home, as long as you meet one of the following conditions: • It is your principal place of business • You use the space only to earn your business income, and you use it on a regular and ongoing basis to meet your clients, customers, or patients Allowable expenses include property taxes, mortgage interest, capital cost allowance or rent, heat, home insurance, electricity, and cleaning materials. To calculate the part you can deduct, use a reasonable basis such as the area of the work space divided by the total area of your home. While this is a nice deduction to help reduce your taxable income, the deduction cannot create or increase a business loss; however, you can carryforward the expenses in subsequent taxation years.

Separate Personal and Business Expenses Make sure to separate your business from personal expenses. It is advisable that you have a separate account for each (and or separate credit card) so that you can easily track your business expenses. This will allow for easier bookkeeping, and to help ensure you don’t miss reporting any income earned or expenses incurred.

Business Use of Vehicle If you own or lease a vehicle that you use to earn business income (i.e. meet clients, pick up supplies for your business), then you are entitled to a tax deduction for the business use of your vehicle expenses. These expenses include gas, maintenance and repairs, insurance, license and registration, leasing costs (up to a reasonable amount) or capital cost allowance. It is important to keep a daily vehicle log of the kilometres driven for business use. This log (which may be requested by Revenue Canada) provides the basis for a ratio of personal to business use that is applied when computing allowable vehicle expenses. Having the information readily available will make the calculation easy and also provide supporting documentation in the case of an audit. Set Aside Money for Taxes If your business is profitable, congratulations - but you are likely going to have to pay income tax. Avoid the shock by setting money aside for taxes throughout DRE A M E R 2 C RE A T O R B USI N E SS M A G A Z I N E

by

ANASTASIA GAZAREK

Contact: : www.eversavvy.ca admin@eversavvy.ca

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BUSINESS: THE ULTIMATE ADVENTURE


resources Federal Incorporation: h t t p s : / / w w w. i c . g c . c a / a p p / s c r / c c / CorporationsCanada/bs/crp-wz.html?lang=eng For business corporations it costs: $ 200 (online filing) $ 250 (paper filing) You will need your credit card, your Nuans report and be able to follow instructions. Nuans Report: https://www.nuans.com/intro-en-fr.html A Nuans report is a list of existing corporate and business names, as well as trademarks, that are similar to the one you proposed. A Nuans report helps avoid choosing a name that is already in use. It costs $13.80 CDN per report You can order reports yourself only in the following jurisdictions: Canada (at the federal level) Northwest Territories Provincial Corporation Will be featured in our next issue.

Name Generator/Creator Namelix.com TheNameApp.com (helps with social media as well.) Naminum.com Namewhale.co Namefruits.com (paid) These are a few ideas. There are other name and domain generators, let us know if you have better ones. Social Media Pages This might seem redundant, but some entrepreneurs are still not entrenched into social media. Social media pages are essential to connect with your clients and advertise to potential ones. Below are a few: Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest, Youtube, Messenger and WeChat. There are more not mentioned here. Fiverr.com Fiverr is an economical online marketplace for freelance services such as logo design, video creation, business plan creation, websites, and more.

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WE NEED SUPPORT FROM THE WIDER COMMUNITY from Dreamer to creator: reframing deterrents in our paths

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BOOK AVAILABLE FOR SALE AT AMAZON.CA & CHAPTERS.CA

Profile for Dreamer 2 Creator Magazine

Dreamer 2 Creator Business Magazine Issue 1  

Dreamer 2 Creator Business Magazine is a how-to educational magazine, created by entrepreneurs for entrepreneurs.

Dreamer 2 Creator Business Magazine Issue 1  

Dreamer 2 Creator Business Magazine is a how-to educational magazine, created by entrepreneurs for entrepreneurs.

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