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SEARCH ENGINE OPTIMIZATION A GUIDE TO BEING DISCOVERED

GUIDEPOSTS ON THE ENTREPRENEURSHIP JOURNEY Navigating a changing Market

an unconventional path to entrepreneurship with Adedoyin Omotara

ISSUE 9 $8.95 CAN www.dreamer2creatormag.ca


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EDITORIAL K A R E N M. LOWE Executive Editor F R A N C I N E GREY Creative Editor K I M BL EY LOWE-B EN N ETT Editor N I C O L E LOWE Editor

6 THE IMPORTANCE OF A BUSINESS PLAN by Simone Vanessa

10 NAVIGATING A CHANGING MARKET by Michelle Elliot


44

RESOURCES

TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 12 SEARCH ENGINE OPTIMIZATION (SEO) A Guide to Being Discovered

16 FACEBOOK & INSTAGRAM ADS 4 TIPS FOR GROWTH by Julianna Arcese

by Josephine Burdon

Page 34 GUIDEPOSTS ON THE ENTREPRENEURSHIP JOURNEY by Belinda Pompey

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Page 42 FINDING SPARKLE

3 SUCCESS FACTORS TO ENTREPRENEURSHIP

by Andriana Avraam

by McKie Rich

40 SETTING BUSINESS GOALS & SUCCEEDING THROUGH FAILURE by Anthonia Ashade


editor’s note A

s I write this, I still do not know the title of this magazine issue. The magazine is about a month late. In fact, I still do not have a release date. I have had some personal struggles since the beginning of 2021. One of those struggles is common to many entrepreneurs: the Imposter Syndrome. As entrepreneurs, we often encounter imposter syndrome at the start of a business, usually when things are not going our way and sometimes when things are going too well and we get overwhelmed. The dictionary defines imposter syndrome as “a psychological condition characterized by persistent doubt concerning one’s abilities or accomplishments; accompanied by the fear of being exposed as a fraud despite evidence of one’s ongoing success.” In layman’s term, we compare ourselves to the world and believe we are less than. The thing with imposter syndrome is that we are comparing the knowledge and abilities of one person with the combined knowledge of a billion people. Unfortunately, there is no way to win that comparison. I know I should not do it, yet I find myself in that negative mindset. How do I manage? I surround myself with friends and family who mentally slap me over the head and physically and emotionally hug me and remind me of the impact I am making and have yet to make. I am needed for many whom I have not yet met and some I may never meet and those already in my space. My hope for myself is my belief for you. As a micro-entrepreneur, your business is needed to make the country continue to survive. The information in your head is unique,the way you deliver it is special and your current and upcoming customers need to hear it to move to their next level. Above all, your fellow micro-entrepreneurs need your words to learn how to run their business. Consider contributing to our magazine. The readers of Dreamer 2 Creator Business Magazine are waiting.

Stay Motivated!

KAREN M. LOWE Executive Editor


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Copyright 2019 Dreamer 2 Creator Business Magazine.

ISSN 2562-5330 (Print) ISSN 2562-5349 (Online)

All rights reserved. No parts of this publication may be copied, reprinted, displayed, edited or distributed without the written consent of Dreamer 2 Creator Magazine Inc. Dreamer 2 Creator Business Magazine is a Canadian Magazine, published and distributed by Dreamer 2 Creator Magazine Inc, located in Brampton, Ontario, Canada.


The Importance Of A

Business Plan S

imone Vanessa is a self-titled brand

based in Toronto. The brand that takes pride in finding ways to share and preserve stories through creation. Learning to sew at the age of 7 sparked my drive to continue exploring the industry. After establishing my business in 2013, I went on to graduate from George Brown College’s ‘Fashion Designs & Technique’ program in 2017. After graduating, I then took multiple entrepreneurship courses in Toronto, inciting a passion for entrepreneurship and teaching within the community.

When I was first introduced to a business plan, I found it overwhelming, confusing and intimidating. Once I was able to break down sections and understand elements, I uncovered its value. I am writing this article for folks who have felt the same way or feel the need for motivation to incorporate one into their business. As entrepreneurs, it is easy to become sidetracked when cultivating new ventures. Business planning reminds us of our ‘why.’ Our ‘why’ is what keeps us pushing; the sole reason the business was started; the heart and lungs of the business. Business planning allows you to have a complete in-detail overview of your business. It is a document that states all internal and external goals alongside strategies on how to accomplish them. Business plans are not set in stone and can be changed or adapted at any time. With that being said, please do not feel pressured to make it perfect the first time you write it. Before jumping into a business plan, consider starting with a Business Model Canvas (BMC). A Business Model Canvas is a one-page document that goes over the fundamentals of a potential business or product. It is a simple, straightforward, structured document that helps give a clear overview of your concept. Business models cover cost structure, customer relations, revenue streams and key resources (Free templates can be found on google). As entrepreneurs, we know there is always room for improvement. Having a clear, detailed overview allows us to make amendments based on social, economic, or personal changes. Think of it as a working guide to your business.

Simone Vanessa

Setting milestones is essential. A milestone could be reaching a defined sales level, obtaining a marketing team, or owning a storefront. When curating milestones, consider a 3-5-year SMART

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(specific, measurable, attainable, realistic and time) list of goals. SMART planning forces you to think about your goals by breaking them down in a structured manner. Setting smaller goals to reach larger milestones helps make each goal more attainable. Budgeting can become complicated and stressful if not planned. However, it is one of the most important aspects of any business. Budgeting encourages you to analyze monthly and yearly expenses. This includes marketing, equipment, bank fees, insurance, rent, overhead and other outgoing expenses. Budgeting does not solely surround deductions; it also revolves around income. Consider including target profit and revenue goals per month, per year or quarterly. This offers balance in the business and gives insight into what needs improvement to attain specific goals. Other aspects for consideration include cost structure, investments, and revenue streams. A

“A milestone could be reaching a defined sales level, obtaining a marketing team, or owning a storefront. When curating milestones, consider a 3-5-year SMART (specific, measurable, attainable, realistic and time) list of goals.”

clear business plan is the most beneficial influence for an investor. It allows an investor to establish a financial forecast and Return On Investment (ROI) for your business. Breaking down and looking at some of the essential elements will enable you to identify the benefits of business planning. Between providing a clear

structure, managing milestones and tracking expenses, a business plan is the go-to guide when it comes to reflecting and managing your business.

By: SIMONE VANESSA Founder/Owner of Simone Vanessa Website: https://www.simonevanessa.com/ Social: @simone.vanessaa, @officialsimonevanessa

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“YOU CAN’T MAKE ANYTHING VIRAL, BUT YOU CAN MAKE SOMETHING GOOD.” PETER SHANKMAN, FOUNDER OF HARO


Navigating a Changing Market Consistency is Key While there are numerous “tips and tricks” for increasing exposure and engagement, by far, the most important method for increasing exposure is also the simplest and most cost-effective - Show up. Consistency is vital in standing out in an online crowd. Posting regularly both to your main profile and through stories, reels, and IGTV will allow your audience and target clients/customers to connect with you as the face of your business. Some studies have even gone so far as to suggest, not showing your face within your profile can hinder your online presence.

Aesthetic Spending the time and energy creating an aesthetic for your business will save you time, in the future, creating content. Sticking with similar brand colours and editing styles will help give your account a visually appealing and cohesive feel. It should be noted, however, that as trends shift and change, the intentional not-perfectly-curated feed has in some cases become the new aesthetic.

A

Know Your Audience

s we navigate this crisis, the need for an online presence has never been greater. The shift from brick-and-mortar shops to online commerce with delivery and or pick-up options continues to be an ongoing trend. As a business, you shift and adapt, adding the ability to purchase online from your website, you link your website with your social media accounts, but then what? How do you get your online presence to stand out in an online world of competition and often similar social media accounts?

As it is said – if you are talking to everyone, you are talking to no one. Knowing your ideal client or customer is incredibly important in tailoring your content in a way that will be noticed by your target audience. Review your insights often, making a note of which content resonates most with the followers you are most interested in connecting with. Stay consistent with content that is “on-brand.” Followers will eventually unfollow if the content no longer interests or relates to them.

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Check the Time

Accessibility

While on the topic of insights, knowing WHEN to post is just as important. Graphs found within your “followers” insights outline the days of the week and even times of the day that your followers are online and engaging. A word of warning; your insight times are listed in Pacific Standard Time (PST).

In a world where 466 million humans are either deaf or hard of hearing, and where most Instagram videos and stories are played without sound, accessibility for all followers is crucial. Adding captions to videos, including Alt-Text to posts, verbalizing visual details during lives/IGTV/stories (for the visually impaired), incorporating image descriptions in your captions and capitalizing each word in your hashtags, all help in making your account more accessible to all followers.

Hastags While there has always been broad debate concerning how many hashtags should be used and where they should be added, one thing is certain – hashtags are an excellent way to connect with new followers. With a limit of 30 hashtags per post, community and brand hashtags will maximize audience reach using a mixture of campaign, community, and brand hashtags. Understanding each category of hashtags and those who follow each will allow an efficient strategy for increasing your online presence and account engagement.

Sharable Content Create content that will not only resonate but will be shared widely. Share tips and tricks, tell a story, show support for your local business culture, or validate your audience’s feelings or opinions on a current matter. Use third-party apps and create graphics or use a photograph to coordinate with or support your caption.

Ghost Followers If your content reaches approximately 10% of your followers and is mostly based on engagement, having ghost/bot followers will work to hinder your account. Periodically removing these accounts from your followers will help drive your content to the 10% engaged and genuinely interested in following your entrepreneurial journey.

Authenticity Counts

Interaction is Important When someone interacts with a post – respond. If someone responds to a story via DM, engage – specifically with more than just a like or emoji. Interact with other accounts in the way that you want your account to be interacted with. Social media interaction is absolutely a two-way street.

Authenticity in an ultra edited and filtered world is essential. Followers will notice, engage and continue to share your space when your content is authentic. Staying true to yourself, your brand, and your business will not only keep your audience waiting for what you will share next but will also make your job creating content so much easier. By: MICHELLE ELLIOT Founder of MEEPhotography Website/Contact: http://www.meephotography.ca/ Social: @ meephotographylondon

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Search Engine Optinmization (SEO) A guide to Being Discovered

A carefully planned SEO strategy enables your business to rank on the first search engine result page (SERP) when customers search for specific keywords and phrases. SEO begins with keyword research to find what words and phrases people use to find your product or service. Once you have identified the keywords, you move on to on-page SEO, off-page SEO and technical SEO. On-page SEO is everything you can control on your website, for example, posting good content with the right keywords and optimizing your titles and meta descriptions. Off-page SEO refers to efforts outside of your website, for example, acquiring links to your site from other websites and increasing engagement on social media. Technical SEO refers to increasing your website speed, fixing broken links and making your site mobile friendly. How can SEO help my business? SEO can be overwhelming to start with, especially when you are a small business. You need to focus on one step at a time and keep in mind that all the time and effort will be worth it. Here are some benefits SEO can offer your business:

I

magine you have invested time and effort to build a beautiful website with products or services you believe customers will love. You are eager to get started, but there is only one problem, there is no traffic to your website. In fact, customers do not even know you exist because they cannot find you on the web. There are ways to generate traffic and get your business noticed by your customers. I am talking about a vital tool called Search Engine Optimization (SEO). SEO is a process used to optimize your website to help customers find you on search engines like Google, Yahoo and Bing.

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Bring more customers to your business SEO helps bring your website to the top search results, making it easy for customers to find you. This will naturally lead to more visitors to your site, which in turn increases your conversion rate. Promotes your business for free SEO is a great marketing tool that gets your business noticed 24/7. Compared to paid advertising, SEO is a free and successful strategy to get your customers’ attention. Get ahead of the competition – even the big ones Small businesses can rank higher than larger competitors in search results based upon an effective SEO plan. Build brand awareness SEO is a valuable tool to promote your brand and ensure your target audience notices you. Constantly popping up at the top of the search engine results page is a great marketing tool that will build brand awareness and make your customers familiar with your name. Create an attractive website Quality SEO means that your website loads fast and provides relevant and quality content giving your customers value. This makes your website attractive to visitors making them more likely to become returning customers. Make your website mobile-friendly SEO helps to make your website mobile-friendly, so it is easy to navigate on smartphones and tablets. Search engines like Google favour websites that are optimized for mobile searches.

Get to know your customers Increased visits to your website allow you to analyze your customers’ behaviour. You can find more information about what gets your customers to your site, what pages and products they prefer and information about age, gender and location. Make it easier for customers to find your location If you are a brick-and-mortar business, you can significantly benefit from using local SEO, making it easier to find your location. For example, if you are a Pizzeria in Toronto, you want people to find you when searching for “Pizza in Toronto.”

Meaning they will rank higher than non-mobile friendly sites in mobile search results. Create higher credibility When people search for keywords and phrases related to your business, they should be able to find you at the top search results. If you are found right at the top of the search results, you gain credibility as you are viewed as an expert in your niche.

By: JOSEPHINE BURDON Founder of Seriously Bamboo Website: https://wwwseriouslybamboo/ Social: @seriouslybamboo

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“IT’S MUCH EASIER TO DOUBLE YOUR BUSINESS BY DOUBLING YOUR CONVERSION RATE THAN BY DOUBLING YOUR TRAFFIC.”

Jeff Eisenberg, businessman

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Facebook & Instagram Ads 4 Tips for Growth budget, I now expect consistent growth on my social media accounts with more consistent online sales and leads than ever before. Paid ads have introduced me to new wholesale partners; contributed to huge growth during the busy holiday season; and shown my brand and products to new accounts and audiences that would not have otherwise known about my offer. I know that starting with paid ads can seem intimidating. Here are a few tips I learned along the way that will help you earn more paying customers from your ads!

Facebook and Instagram ads are a powerful tool to grow your online presence and generate sales and it is time for you to start using them to build your business. Since starting Julianna Candle Co. in November 2019, Facebook and Instagram ads (both run by the same platform, Instagram, and from now on, I will reference them together as Instagram ads) have been a critical piece of my marketing strategy. On a manageable daily

Clearly define your target market and their interests. This is the most important step because your ads will not be effective without a clear definition of your target market. Instagram ads have detailed targeting options, and the more you can use them, the more specific and effective your ads will be. List the typical demographics, interests, and geographic areas of your target audience. Brainstorm similar accounts, brands, or activities that they like and incorporate these into your targeting. You can also stack your targeting options. For example, they must be women aged 2034 AND interested in candles. Tip: your target market “interests” do not have to be specific to your industry. The most effective ad I have ever run (for my luxury, soy wax candles) was targeting women aged 20-44 who are also interested in Starbucks in Ontario. Set realistic and measurable objectives for your campaign. If you expect to get rich quick or see a flood of leads the next day, you need to temper your expectations.

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reducing the budget on less effective ads. Facebook and Instagram have an excellent feature for this built into the platform, called Campaign Budget Optimization - the algorithm will automatically make the most of your daily budget by allocating more money to the best performing ads! I also recommend giving your ads 3-7 days at a time to test any changes. This gives you more data and better insights into your ads’ elements that are working and what needs to be changed.

Ads perform well over the long-term, meaning that short-term results may not be a valid indicator of the long-term effectiveness of your ad. Be specific with your goals and make sure that they are measurable. Getting more leads or driving more traffic is not specific. How much traffic do you want to generate? Do you want leads to make a purchase or submit their contact information as a lead? Start with a small budget and test your ads one week at a time $1 per day is all it takes to see results. You do not need hundreds or thousands of dollars to start paid ads. Start with a small budget that you can afford to test your ads and refine your targeting choices. As you see ads that are working, you can gradually increase the budget for those ads while pausing or

Use free resources and training videos to learn how to work with the software. Facebook and Instagram provide several free resources to help small business owners become familiar with their marketing software. Use these resources to your advantage. There are also countless videos and free training resources available from digital marketers, coaches, and trainers that will give you tactical action steps to get started and optimize your ads. Many small business owners wait for the perfect opportunity to start new marketing or wait until they have enough budget. I recommend starting small and starting today with your paid ads. Test, optimize, and review as you learn. The results will come!

By: JULIANNA ARCESE Founder of Julianna Candle Co. Website/Contact: https://www.juliannacandle.com/ Social: @juliannacandle

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Adedoyin Omotara

an unconventional path to entrepreneurship Adedoyin: My business is Adoniaa Beauty. We are located at Westbrook Mall, 1200 37th Street, South West Calgary. Tell me about your background and your move to Canada from the UK. Adedoyin: While in university in Nigeria, I loved beauty. I did a makeup course, got a bridal job as a makeup artist, and worked on weekends and holidays. After university, I went to Lagos and continued doing makeup part-time because I felt it was a hobby and not sustainable like an accountant, lawyer or engineer. I did my city job Monday to Friday and makeup on weekends. I lived like this until I became unhappy with my full-time profession. Makeup and beauty were my passion. I then got married and moved to the Caribbean. From there, we migrated to the UK before moving to Canada. I worked full-time as an IT Consultant or Project Manager with Oil and Gas companies. What is your origin as an entrepreneur? Describe the first life experience that led you to become an entrepreneur. Adedoyin: During high school - a boarding school - I wore attractive underwear. My friends in the hostel would admire them and other items I wore, ask where I got them and gave me money to purchase stuff for them when I went home for the holidays. It was then I discovered that people are willing to pay for whatever they wanted. That was my very first memory. In university, I sold Mary Kay and other makeup brands. I learned then that anyone with the means would pay for what they valued. That realization planted an idea; If I create value, people who need it will pay for it, which is business.

How did you go from business to a degree in electrical engineering and back to the business of beauty and personal care? Adedoyin: I went from Electrical Engineering to Business and not the other way round. I grew up in Nigeria, and once you are good at certain subjects, parents guide you into what they believe will be beneficial. My dad wanted me to be a doctor, but I knew my strengths were Maths and Physics. I also

I might have studied Marketing or Business if I grew up in Canada, definitely not Electrical Engineering. knew the only alternative to prevent them from feeling bad was to choose another dignifying course, so I decided on Electrical Engineering. I might have studied Marketing or Business if I grew up in Canada, definitely not Electrical Engineering. Then, I did not dream about whom I would become. I just chose the course because not going to university was never an option. Since I had no choice in the matter, this course would be a breeze; I put in minimal effort. I would pass, just not with an A. My university days were not very meaningful. My life was designed for me, and it was part of the plan I needed to fulfil. I followed the career path my traditional professional qualification led me because I was conditioned by

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community. We offer facial, brows, semi-permanent brows, lashes, waxing, wedding and makeup services. We no longer have the capacity for parties in homes. People now come to the store for parties, where we teach them how to do makeup.

society that makeup is not what I should be doing as I was smarter than that. All the time, makeup kept tugging at my heartstrings. Give us an overview of Adoniaa, please. Adedoyin: ‘Unmask your beauty’ is our tagline. I questioned, ‘Of my many skills, why makeup?’ God gave me a clear mandate, ‘Help women with their identity and confidence.’ Adoniaa empowers women through beauty. If you look good, you feel good; when you feel good, you are more confident and more likely to be productive, go after your dream and fulfil your purpose. On the surface of Adoniaa, you will see makeup. Beneath that platform is a raft of services that empower women. I did not want a business where people would buy products and go. I wanted connections. We connect with women and do extraordinary things together. Women connect with me not only because of makeup but something they need that ties into the vision of the company. They want to be inspired.

How was your business idea for Adoniaa conceived? Adedoyin: At 29, I decided to make the next decade more meaningful. I knew the consulting and project management jobs did not fulfil me; the only thing that excited me was makeup. I was concerned about the financial sustainability of makeup, so I researched people who travelled this path and are thriving. I looked at someone who looks like me. Tara Orekelewa started in Nigeria as a makeup artist then expanded with a line of products. Her products are in cities all over Africa. I also read about Mary Kay and Bobbi Brown; they created fantastic products, which have expanded beyond their vision. Why I was made and why God gave me the interest I have, was the next step. I was introduced to a life coach who helped me navigate the crossroad of life’s big questions and entrepreneurship. She encouraged me to connect with my creator, and God gave me the answers. He wanted me to help women with their confidence and regain their identity using the skills I used to help people build their confidence and get jobs. That is why He gave me the makeup platform to connect with women. That was the foundation for building Adoniaa. I was focused on the idea that there was a unique assignment around makeup. It gave me much creative energy and set me on an innovative loop.

You seem to do a lot; what products and services do you provide? Adedoyin: We started with lipsticks, our flagship product. With time I added foundation, powder and eye shadow. We now have a full makeup line and skincare. Once customers try our makeup and like it, they buy. I started introducing and selling our products at parties in homes to advertise the brand. When I discovered we sold a lot at trade shows, that motivated me to open a store. In the process of opening the store, we added services to build loyalty within the

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I researched how products were developed and produced. I came across ‘Private Labelling,’ which fascinated me.

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How long has the business existed? Adedoyin: We started in September 2016 and opened the first store in November 2017. Though I was scared of the financial commitment associated with a traditional brick-and-mortar store, while there for trade shows, we saw that people responded in that location, so we moved to the mall.

Was the business idea for Adoniaa Beauty tested? Was formal or informal market research done to see if there was a market for the business idea’s success? Adedoyin: I have been testing since I did the makeup training in university. I have been in the industry, passively, since 2005. I understood how the market worked. You apply makeup on people; they like the product, they buy it. So I was not starting fulltime without a line of products to sell. I was selling different brands like Mary Kay, Mac, Lancome and others. I would use them and recommend them to my clients who would buy these products. I also looked at seeds planted in the past and how brands grew. Before I left Nigeria, people owned their Playhouse of Tara

shops and Sleek Makeup stores through franchising. That idea was attractive to me. I was happy to jump on a brand that was working. I am implementing all those principles in my business to franchise. That is the format of my testing, though not intentional or traditional. So in terms of getting customers, did you just assume the customers would come? Adedoyin: I understand women’s love for makeup. They will pay for anything that makes them look good, as long as you establish yourself as an authority in that field. It was a matter of building relationships, and that was experience I had. I have never been scared of not having customers. This might not be good business advice, but it was just never an issue for me. Before selling my products, I was selling for others. I am a born salesperson. If I love an amazing product, I can convince you to love it too and make a purchase. Walk me through the process from product idea to production to getting products in the hands of clients. Adedoyin: I researched how products were developed and produced. I came across ‘Private Labelling,’ which fascinated me. I spent months researching companies in the US, Canada, and the UK and tested many products. I visited labs and manufacturing companies, spoke to and worked with chemists and discussed products I wanted to create. I took products I liked and gave specifications and elements I wanted to develop and improve. I did some contract

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manufacturing, where I worked with lab chemists to come up with products. I worked in the industry for ten years, so I understood it and knew what I wanted. I would not promote a product I would not wear. If I tell customers a product will conceal a spot and colour correct dark areas, it will do just that. Though I am mindful of the ingredients going into my products, I go with something authentic. I know if I like it, I can sell it. That was the easiest way to start because I was focused on getting the product into customers’ hands. How do you decide on the affirmations you will use for each personalized product? Adedoyin: When kicking off the brand with the lipsticks, I researched names. I came up with Scandalous, Dangerous, Ruby Rouge, among others, which were my lipsticks’ names when I first launched, until I had that encounter with the holy spirit. ‘You are not mainstream; you have an assignment in this area,’ was the message. I was instructed to ‘Change the name of products to how God wants women to feel.’ So I changed the names. Our lipsticks now have names such as ‘I am Beautiful,’ ‘I am Worthy,’ I am Gorgeous.’ They have inner truths, and people come to buy them, not because the colours are not available

in the market, but because of God’s assignment and how the affirmations make women feel. The renamed products are available in both physical and online stores. How did you decide on the addition of products and services? Adedoyin: It has been my vision to have a full makeup and skincare line. After starting with lipsticks, I kept adding products based on my financial comfort level. I considered products people would readily buy. Lipstick is something women purchase and did not require much sampling. So I decided it was an excellent place to start. Next was foundation. It requires testing, but I knew if a woman found a good foundation, she would go for it. So I went for products I knew people might have but would be open to testing another. Then came things like blush and others until I had a full line. I started with makeup services; then added facials because I had skincare products, cleanser and moisturizer. When clients began asking for advice, I did classes where they could learn to do their makeup, free of cost. Clients were asking us to fill different needs, e.g. brows, hair. We added services gradually, based on customers’ requests. I take note of things clients are asking for, wishing for or complaining about. They were already sold on our brand and declared that it would make their lives easier if we added services, and they would be here for all their beauty needs. Convenience is a significant value for me too, so I started adding services. This lead to us fulfilling their desire for a one-stop-shop for beauty, so we evolved. We are adding medical aesthetics services as well.

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Where do you see your business in five and ten years? Adedoyin: I see us all over cities. I am looking at opening branches here in Calgary and Toronto. The next step after conquering Alberta is Ontario. I am looking for women ready to be empowered and empower others. I would love to jump on that model for businesses that work making money for ourselves and other women alongside. I see us growing the franchise model.

Did you create a growth plan? What did that look like? Adedoyin: I knew the business was going to be a Canadian brand because we were migrating here. While in the UK, I researched companies in Canada. The reality was, I wanted to do business but did not know how. What I did in the past were just hobbies. Now I wanted a structured company with benefits for employees. I reflected on companies I worked for and considered doing an MBA to get me equipped. I decided a jump-start business course might be quicker. When I got here, I did a six-month government-funded programme designed to support small businesses. I learned about company operations in Canada, registering my business, financial and business planning, which could be used to secure loans from financial institutions. It helped me think critically about my business, what the vision was and how to make money. One of the ambitions in my growth plan was to start franchising in 3-5 years. Having that vision helped me to implement standard operating procedures for everything we do. I ensure anything we do serve as a prototype for other businesses. My vision is to deliver empowerment to women. They might want to be empowered with their own business but lack the skills to structure one. This is me selling a business in a box. I knew I wanted boutiques in different areas meeting the community’s needs, and the business plan helps me focus.

What training is needed to become a beauty consultant or beauty product creator and be successful at it? Adedoyin: They need to go to aesthetics school. It exposes you to the daily operation, handling clients, carrying out procedures, health and safety precautions, and aspects of how to run the business and market the company. That is the first training to acquire. You can then get a business education beyond the skills. You need to streamline those with the bigger purpose. Our magazine is about entrepreneurship and is not industry-specific; how can other business owners learn from your webinars or teachings? Adedoyin: What has helped me most is understanding why I started the business. I recommend the book ‘Start With Why’ by Simon Sinek to every new entrepreneur. I read it and was affirmed and reassured that I was on the right path. I would advise entrepreneurs to start with why. What is your purpose, your mission and the foundation for your vision? Simon Sinek presents it in a way that is relatable to everyone. He presents the concepts from a kingdom perspective. This book confirmed what God has spoken to my heart. People will see you as crazy for bringing spirituality into business. Saying this is what God told me to do was greeted with skepticism. Things like that do not make sense to many. What was most important for me was starting with why. How do you keep ahead of market changes and the competition? Adedoyin: I know in business the practice is to research our competition. My focus is to develop and improve my business continually; it is not on the competition. That way of thinking takes away your creative energy.

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There will always be another product on the market that will compete with yours; people doing what you are doing, even better. To focus on the competition is engaging in a war that will never end. Save your energy, focus on injecting your effort into developing and improving your brand. Your unique selling point is who you are. Your strengths, gifts, personality, delivery and values will be different and make you stand out. I am not saying you do not look at market trends and allow your creativity to come onboard. Do not create a new product because another brand has created a new product. Innovations should tie into your company’s purpose and vision and not others. You will then find yourself in the creative lane and not the competition lane. With this approach, businesses you deem ‘the competition’ will want to learn from you. This is how you will succeed and ensure the longevity of your brand. As the owner of Adoniaa Beauty, it is left to me to focus on strategy, the priorities I know will grow the brand. I know we are growing, and at some point, will have a research and development (R&D) team.

Your strengths, gifts, personality, delivery and values will be different and make you stand out.

In the interim, clients make requests for products and services we do not have on offer. Based on their queries and demands, I conduct market research to determine the viability of products and services to ensure they are suitable for business and fit our purpose and vision. Any product or service we offer that makes life convenient for clients is usually successful. That is one way we keep up with the market trend. As we grow, we will have a department that focuses on that so that we will give our clients the best.

Are you interested in being ahead of the market trends, the first to bring something out? Adedoyin: It is possible, but that is not my strength. That will be the role of my R&D team. Once growth is established, I can mobilize them to focus on being trendsetters in the market. They will collect information from our client base and the broader market, generate solutions and develop products and services accordingly. Having just started the business, I am focusing on building relationships and building a brand with the notion that Adoniaa Beauty empowers women. I am focused on the strength I have and believe that you cannot be the only one to bring a vision to life. There is also the stage of growing - step by step; there is no overnight success. What are three other business challenges or obstacles (in starting up or operation) and how did you overcome them? Adedoyin: Starting a brick-and-mortar store was scary. I would have to pay rent, hire staff, and the business would need to make money. It was difficult. However, when challenges arise, do not be afraid to talk to the right people. Thinking of resources as not just money is essential. There are people with gifts wanting to invest their time. One thing that helped me was communicating my vision to others. I believe in visionary financiers who have the opportunity and are willing to invest. That helped me get through the first year. People partnered with us, and we have a subscription model. Clients pay monthly to access our products and services. That was vital to our operation at the start. There were many challenges in the first

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year. Finance and balancing the hours the business required with my family’s needs were major ones. At one point, I questioned why I had the store. Then I was reminded of the dream of building a community - not just online - real people to connect with. I was also comforted that beauty has been around for a long time and will remain for a long time to come.

that thing. Start with your own itch. One issue I had for years was understanding who I was. Others would point out my strengths, which did not answer who I was. Now I do workshops helping women unmask their beauty and identifying who they are. That is the problem I see myself solving beyond other platforms I have.

What are the top three mistakes businesses make? How can they avoid these mistakes? Adedoyin: Hiring too soon. Consider the things you can do and how you can make them happen. Only outsource jobs that are not your strength and take you away from powering your business. You also need to be realistic that it will take time. Start with what you have, and do not think you are not a technical person, so you cannot do the website. Things are easier than they used to be. Learn to do the things you cannot, and with time you can hire staff. There are things we can automate now that will reduce hiring. Secondly, trying to solve a problem based on what others need can be stressful if you do not know their problem. Start with your problem and develop a solution or product around it. You will find you are not the only person who needs

The people I attracted, as a result, became my target audience. With time, I narrowed my audience once I better understood my niche, who will tell me what the gaps are. Thirdly, if possible, do not take a loan. Initially, I started without a loan. With time, I got one, and now I wish I did not. When starting, the interest rates are high. Taking time to think makes you more creative in how you approach financing your business. Having access to capital is a big part of startups and their ability to expand or grow; what advice would you give entrepreneurs who do not have access to the required capital? Adedoyin: Start with what you have. Shift the focus from what you do not have. Before you focus on the product or service you want to sell, start with mastering

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the business of you. People have different gifts. How can you serve in your place of strength to fund your business? I had a mentee who was unhappy with her job and unsure about what to do as she did not have the money to do what she wanted. She established she wanted to create candles. I recommended she could be of service doing the thing she loved, working with candles, for someone else until she had enough funds to start her business. She was then introduced to someone who could help bring her vision to life. She is now in the process of starting her own business. What you have might mean being paid to serve someone else’s vision, doing what you love until you have enough to feed your dream.

How did you manage to survive the current world crisis? Adedoyin: At the beginning of the lockdown, some expressed concern about our future. Adoniaa Beauty is not the store; it is the vision. Beyond the store and services, there is so much that can be done online. We launched products online. I had time to write my book, which is now a coaching framework for women. I had time to do things around the vision that I could not do before. We made more money during lockdown than we made in the time before lockdown. It is perspective and where you base your reality. I try to see how I can add value during the pandemic. Attending the ‘black lives matter’ movement, I recognized the issues were deep on different levels for different black people. I travelled when I was twenty-three. I see racism, but I will achieve what I want to achieve. I will not allow it to affect me. I am fully aware it is very different for those born in and living the reality of racism every day. I considered what the solution to solving the problem was. I concluded that we are solutions to our problems. Anyone who complains about not finding a black doll in the store can create their own black doll. Create your own solutions. Women were complaining of systemic racism that prevented them from getting their products into stores. So I thought, I have a store; why can I not support black businesses to get their products into my store? That idea is now a stream of income for Adoniaa. We have the ‘Partner with Adoniaa Beauty Programme’ where people rent a shelf at the store. We have others with products they did not know how to market. They rent a shelf and can include an event per month. Their products are selling, and we have become a community. You cannot solve all the world’s problems, but you can solve a problem and add value. Many people are thankful:

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Those renting shelves, those who have access to the products, and those who have access to the store. In turn, they invite people to the store. It was one of our best sellers last year. Before COVID, our attention was mostly on the store. We were selling online, but sales were slower than in-store. Since COVID, it has really picked up compared to what we were doing before. The store is now closed, so there is no comparison of in-store and online sales. Pre-COVID, in-store services drove sales; customers would come in for a service and buy products simultaneously.

What has helped is, when they are around, they know what I do. I communicate it to them. During the lockdown, I told them I wanted to write a book and needed uninterrupted times in the day. During that period, they also got busy writing their books. You cannot use your children as an excuse not to fulfil your dream. They know you have a dream. They have dreams too. Parenting is not just about what you say; it is also what you do. They are looking at you and how you handle life. That will form a big part of whom they become.

Entrepreneurship is heavy on time and mental capacity, were you ever tempted to give up? Adedoyin: No, I was never tempted to give up. I have mastered the art of telling myself, ‘I do not want to think about this now.’ ‘This is not what I want to do right now.’ I replace ongoing thoughts of the business with things like, ‘I am going to focus on praying.’ ‘I am going to focus on reading my Bible.’ ‘I want to focus on my children.’ ‘I do not want to think about the business.’ You have to be intentional; otherwise, you can take it as a drug, which takes over your life. Develop a life structure that gives you time to do other things. Talk to me about parenting and entrepreneurship. Adedoyin: I know women who decided to focus solely on their children in the season while raising them. I tried, and it was the worst time of parenting in my life. I certainly was not present. I was always online researching how to get into one market or another. When I started working and put my child in a nursery, I spent quality time with him before and after work and weekends. I had fulfilled my desires, and this was my son’s time. It is what works for you. Being a parent and businesswoman can be challenging, but it is about knowing what you want to prioritize at this stage of your life. My kids are not going to be young forever, so there are some sacrifices I am making now and will have time in the future. I am focusing on the things I can do around the time between 9:00 am and 3:00 pm while they are at school. I want to be a present mom and impact their lives.

Website/Contact: https://adoniaa.com/ Social: @adoniaabeauty


Photo Credit: SABRINA DOMIZE

3 success factors to entrepreneurship

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hances are a new year has begun, and now is the time we entrepreneurs and business owners start to sketch out our goals for the next twelve months, five and ten years. It is important to have a reliable, realistic plan in place, firstly to hold yourself accountable and secondly to ensure maximum growth. As the saying goes, “If you fail to plan, you plan to fail.”

does not get frustratingly overwhelming, leaving you to feel like giving up early in the race. If a vision board does not work for you, list your goals in your phone or even in a daily task note on your computer. The trick is to see your goals daily and have your consciousness and surroundings understand just how important your goals are. I know it sounds like a bunch of ‘fairy dust,’ but trust me, it worked wonders for all of my endeavours. The most crucial factor to any achievement is your mindset, accompanied by a little bit of patience. Think about it, if you do not believe in your vision, how can you expect anyone else?

HOLD THAT ENERGY

VISION-MANIFESTATION When I first started my production company, I used a vision board to visualize the goals I wanted to achieve. I printed large photos, made a collage and placed my board where I would see it every day as a constant reminder. Instead of trying to get all my goals achieved at once, I prioritized selecting realistic goals that made sense to my overall plan. Choose one task to do at a time, so goal-achievement

SAME

We have all had to work for someone else at some point in our lives. With every company comes rules, mandates, code of conduct, policies and procedures. To add a layer of structure to your company, you should be following similar guidelines. Show up on time; yes, that means rolling out of bed early and staying the full course. Make those hours count and hold that same energy as if you were at your 9 to 5 job. Maximize your workday, and with consistent behaviour, you will see the rewards. Entrepreneurs must be aware that product and service quality is paramount. Remember, you are the face of your brand, and you always want to put your best foot forward when it comes to

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representation. Knowing your demographic well and making business choices based on your audience’s needs is essential to success. However, there are two mistakes I see start-up businesses make, which lead to the most complaints from consumers.

Professionalism. Have you ever been speaking to someone and felt as if you wanted to take your business elsewhere? The number one reason why business owners do not retain clients is due to a lack of professionalism. That includes not responding to emails or messages in a timely fashion; the language used when communicating with customers, how you present yourself in person when and if you finally get to meet your potential clients.

I printed large photos, made a collage and placed my board where I would see it every day as a constant reminder.

Follow up. After that initial contact with your customer lead, two things can happen; You close the sale, or the lead falls through. At that point, you still have some work to do. Remember, many other businesses are offering similar services. You want your customer to see what makes you stand apart from the rest and that you are serious about acquiring new clients. Following up at the right time is a great way to make your presence known, and it gives you a second chance to close that pending sale.

CLEAN BOOKS As start-up entrepreneurs and business owners, we are often financing our projects ‘out of pocket’. It is critical to make sure you create a budget; you cannot spend more than you make and your ‘books are clean’. This refers to bookkeeping and having every cent that goes in or out of your business accounted for. As you keep track of your profits and see the growth, over time, this will give you a new sense of accomplishment and hopefully push you to set more challenging goals. Run your own race. There is much noise in any industry, and sometimes it’s hard to stay on track when comparing your achievements or lack thereof to other professionals. Strive at a pace that is right for you, and just like an athlete, kick it up a notch when you need a good challenge. Do not be afraid to reach out to mentors, network and ask questions. Everyone started in the exact position you are in now; constructive criticism and a few pointers can help catapult your business to the next level. Step out of your comfort zone, take the smart risk and in no time, you will be on the path to financial freedom.

By: MCKIE RICH CEO of Mckie Rich Productions Website/Contact: https://www.mckierich.com/ Social:@mckierichproductions

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GUIDEPOSTS ON THE ENTREPRENEURSHIP JOURNEY

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xecuting a business is not just about selling products. There are many steps required to start and grow your business successfully. I am presently on a journey with my online Tea shop.

Educate Yourself I do think I have been strategic because I taught myself “How To Run A Business” instead of thinking about what Teas I required. I am not a specialist in managing a business; however, I have taught myself how to be efficient and in charge of my business, so I can be prosperous.

Social Media We live in a society where social media is everywhere. So I have used this platform to bring my business to life. I had to slowly educate myself on how to actually use social media as a channel. There are so many free online courses on how to utilize it properly. No excuses! I did this for almost two years before I started dealing with products.

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Networking Another stepping stone to success is to network, network like crazy. I spoke to anyone involved in the business industry to get awareness of how the back end of a business functions. You may or may not get support from the people closest to you. I learned very quickly that whoever is in your corner may not all be rooting for you or have your best interest at heart. It will be hard to accept but keep moving to grow your business.

repeat them; repeating mistakes will only put you in a vicious cycle you cannot reverse. Do not allow your mistakes to control how your business functions. If it means you have to start a project again to get it right, then do it! Your future self will thank you for it.

Experiencing a mentor by my side has been immensely gratifying. I was encouraged to follow through with a clear vision of what I wanted to do. Remember, you are always learning.

Being Relevant Being a woman entrepreneur, I wanted to stay fresh and current. I do this by continually educating myself with the knowledge I obtain from other business owners in my circle, the experience gained through running my own business, and staying aware of the changing trends in the market. This has kept me committed and motivated even though I have encountered struggles. Being transparent with your product can catapult your business but can also leave you vulnerable. I have learned that educating my customers with the knowledge of the products has drawn consistent sales. People are open to learning about what you sell. Not to only enjoy it but to understand the background of what the product is all about and the wellness it can bring to their lives. However, be equally prepared for constructive criticism to cultivate your company.

Another stepping stone to success is to network, network like crazy. I spoke to anyone involved in the business industry to get awareness of how the back end of a business functions.

Making Mistakes Believe it or not, your greatest friend is a mistake! I have made so many, and that has probably been my best teacher. Mistakes have the capacity to turn you into a superior entrepreneur. See each one as a lesson, not a loss, a temporary detour, not a full stop to your dreams. Learn from them and do not

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Motivational Mindset Be optimistic and find out what motivates you to get up daily to run your business. If you stay awake thinking about your business like me, you are on the right pathway. My accomplishments were achieved by having a positive mindset and writing down goals on my journey. When you write things down, you make yourself accountable for your targets. Do not let any of your projects go in vain. Always carry a daybook with you and write down your ideas to accomplish them later. The only person you can blame for not following through is yourself. At times it helps to be a little hard on yourself; it gives you that extra push to dive into the deep end of your business, which in return will sustain and fulfil your aspirations. Self-talk brings out confidence. Talk to yourself, laugh at yourself and relish the process of bringing your passion to life. Having a constructive mindset is imperative to how you conduct yourself regarding experiencing the business you desire. The thoughts that you manifest will come to light to lead the way to success, which in turn will guide power to your reality. Only you can elevate your mind to equip yourself with greatness. Do not get me wrong, sometimes I fall off the tracks, and I feel it is impossible to get it done. Surround yourself with individuals who force you to level-up. Those are the people that will pick you up when you are low. My Tea journey began as a child, and I am now taking it to higher levels to fulfill my soul’s fire. The expression I repeat daily because of that is “Slow Steady And With Passion.”

By: Belinda Pompey Founder, Bee’s Soulteez Website/Contact: https://beestea.ca/ Social:@pompeyguyanese

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“DON’T WORRY ABOUT PEOPLE STEALING YOUR DESIGN WORK. WORRY ABOUT THE DAY THEY STOP.”

Jeffrey Zeldman, entrepreneur and web designer

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Setting Business Goals & Succeeding Through Failure love with how the trainer explained the different types of gemstone, how she was stringing up the beads, and how a piece of jewelry could accentuate a woman’s beauty. There and then, I knew I had found my happy place. I started buying all types of gemstones, metals, pearls, beads, and jewelry findings to create something beautiful. I signed up for a jewelry training class with a local jewelry school and trained for two months. After the training, I felt I was ready to go. I did not set any branding or advertising goals, learn how to make sales, differentiate my niche, organize my finances, or fix my price. I was buying, creating, selling, and enjoying the flow, and in the space of a year, Hadash Jewelries collapsed. Since then, it has been an incredible journey of successes and failures, trials and errors, and I would say that Hadash Jewelries is now thriving because I am intentional about setting goals and achieving them.

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here I was in 2011, fresh out of school, and felt the need to get busy. I loved creating and designing, and I was looking for my happy place. Little did I know I would find myself owning a jewelry business ten years down the line. My name is Anthonia Ashade, and I am the Creator of Hadash Jewelries. I became a small business owner in 2012. To be honest; I was clueless when I started my business; I was going with the flow. I attended an entrepreneurship workshop back in 2011 after being invited by a friend. That was the first time I came across jewelry-making. I immediately fell in

Here are a couple of tips on setting business goals and achieving them. These tips have been most influential to my success:

DEFINE A CLEAR PRIORITY. When the business collapsed, I did not know what to do. I remember taking a step back and consulting a friend who was a brand strategist. The questions she asked me were, “What are your SMART goals? What do you hope to achieve? What are your priorities?” Then it dawned on me that I never actually set any goals for my business. I was going with the flow. Getting your business priorities clear and written down from the beginning is particularly important. Recorded SMART goals give you, the business owner,

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struggle for me because it was a different culture, and economy and I had to start creating my niche all over again. A month after the move, my box of supplies and inventory arrived from my home country (Nigeria). While I was unpacking the boxes, I found the first piece of jewelry I ever made, and it took me back to the reason I started Hadash Jewelries in the first place. I took time throughout the proceeding months and learned how to restrategize my business in a new economy. Less than a year later my business took off, and I was getting sales; before I could fully settle into the new economy, the pandemic occurred. But guess what, I did not allow that to stop me. I used self-motivation to help me achieve my goals for my business.

a clear picture of where you want to see your business in a given timescale. It also provides clarity about what your priorities are. REVIEW YOUR BUDGET AGAINST YOUR SET GOALS. As a small business owner, having goals and priorities are essential, and developing a budget for the goals is equally important. Working with a financial plan is a step I started since the recent pandemic. Before, I could buy inventory and supplies for my business just because I loved them, not because I needed them. I did not have a budget/financial plan, and then the pandemic happened; I just had to go back to the drawing board and strategize all over again. I had my goals, but I did not tailor my plans to a budget, and I was spending way beyond what I had in the bank and on the less critical projects. I took a break from my business, arranged my SMART goals, and reviewed my budget against each plan in order of priority. This step saved much cash in the bank and reduced my anxiety over my financial position. LEARN TO MOTIVATE YOURSELF Motivating myself was something I had to learn when I immigrated to Canada. As a new immigrant, my major headache was moving and continuing my small business in Canada. It was a whole lot of

As a small business owner, there are days when progress is slow. There are days when you have a huge sales volume; there are also some months where you spend a lot of money stocking up on inventory, only to end up having no sale. There are times that the goals and priorities you set are seemingly impossible to achieve. It can be frustrating, but my advice; Find what motivates you and lean on those things. During the slow periods, your motivators are the things that will keep you going. Goal setting for a small business can sometimes be tricky and tedious, especially when trying to find your niche or starting. The best approach is to wake up every morning and put one foot in front of the other, one step at a time. What has always worked for me is sometimes to take my eyes off the bigger picture because it can be overwhelming. I break my SMART goals into smaller tasks that can be more readily achieved one at a time. Always have fun setting those incredible goals, and cheers to you achieving each one!

By: ANTHONIA ASHADE Founder of Hadash Jewelries Website/Contact https://hadashjewelries.com/ Social: @hadash_jewelries

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FINDING SPARKLE buzz of happy banter, the awe on faces and more importantly, the gasps on their lips when the pretty red-head unfurled and dropped over the dance floor in shocking delight and surprise. WOW-factor achieved. I was happy. Rewind to September. The client, a world-class publisher, whom I had the pleasure of working with on various events in the past, was celebrating 60 years in the industry and wanted to mark this occasion in gratitude for its employees. This was no author dinner or book launch. This event was more important. It was to celebrate its people, their hard work and commitment to excellence over their 60 years. “Just a fancy dinner, some music to dance to, awards ceremony…” they said. “We do not expect more than 350 guests to attend….” The one thing they did say, which was true, “The budget is limited….” I accepted enthusiastically, even with the challenging 3-month timeline. Hey, it was a diamond anniversary! There was sure to be bling and sparkle, and those who know me know I live for both.

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he forecast called for freezing rain. It was a cold January that year. One of the coldest I can remember. I stood in the massive entrance of the Governor’s Room at Liberty Grand, shivering, not sure at the time if it was the cold draft blowing inside from guests arriving one after the other or just nerves that overwhelmed me. As I look back now, I recognize it was the moment itself. I did it! The smiles, the

By November, it became apparent the executive team was struggling with opposing visions. The venue location was a hot topic, DJ or live band was another, sit-down service or buffet-style food stations caused many heated discussions to escalate. My internal monologue was always the same at these meetings: ‘time is running out, make the decisions for them, it is what you know, so trust your instincts. They hired you to get this done. They have their jobs to do.’ And so I did. Do not get me wrong, there was push back and a whole lot of fear in possibly failing to deliver an extraordinary guest experience. Every planner

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battles this simple truth. But invitations had to go out, period. I had to tune out the noise.

equipped to support the poor girl suspended from the ceiling.

December was a blur. Venue secured, menu finalized with a compromise of sit-down dinner service and dessert stations for optimal caloric opportunities. Why choose when you can have both a DJ to start the evening and help emcee the welcome speeches, presentations and provide synched visuals onscreen; then open the dance floor with the live band taking center stage and pushing the party late into the night? Done. Décor? Well, you know there was sparkle. Starting with shimmering tablecloths that swept the floor, silver-satin napkins cinched with

And just like that, the budget screamed uncle. I needed a quick “funds re-allocation plan” and some big favours. Luckily, vendor partnerships are a superpower in this business. I was grateful for those relationships then, and I am certainly grateful for them today.

polished rings and displayed over silver-rimmed chargers, sparkly crystals on tall candelabras topped with jewel-dressed roses. Simple, elegant and within budget. Wait. January rolls in with a surprise or two or three. The guest list is now pushing 500 RSVPs; isn’t that great? Many of them from our head office up north, we will need to bus these guests downtown. Ok, no problem. Oh, and we should capture the night in some special way, perhaps a keepsake photo for each guest to mark the company’s milestone. You bet. I am on it. And! Can we still add the WOW factor you suggested previously? They stared at me with excited anticipation. Of course, I said yes! Everyone knows successful events need the WOW factor. Live aerialist coming right up. Please let the venue be

Fast-forward a year later, a year of challenges for us all, especially the live events industry. Sitting here at my desk reminiscing by clicking image after image of magic. It was pretty, that is for sure. But it is not why I am sharing my story with you. It was a pivotal night for me personally and professionally. This celebration marked me differently. Maybe it was the profound learning curve that came with a high-profile event, or perhaps it was simply finding my voice amongst the noise. I do not know. What I do know is, it gave me the confidence to reach a little higher, expand our brand and align our core values with a deeper, more human outlook to social connections. I was now securely in the business of making people happy. I found my sparkle. Lessons Learned? EXPECT THE UNEXPECTED, THEN PLAN FOR IT. BE GOOD TO YOUR VENDORS. ALWAYS. FIND YOUR SPARKLE!

By: ANDRIANA AVRAAM Founder/Owner of Pink Media Website/Contact: https://www.pinkmedia.ca/ Social: @pinkmedia.events

DRE A M E R 2 C R EA T O R B USI N ESS M A GAZ I N E

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I SSUE 9


BUSINESS: THE ULTIMATE ADVENTURE


resources Search engine optimization (SEO) is used

may be improved.

to improve the quantity and quality of traffic to your website from search engines like Google and Yahoo. SEO targets organic or natural traffic, also known as unpaid traffic, which is different from direct or paid traffic through ads. Unpaid traffic may originate from various searches, including image, video, news, and industry-specific searches. Imagine someone searching google for a topic in your industry and finds you. Or searching Dreamer 2 Creator Magazine and finds you, that is organic or unpaid traffic. SEO is essential to the growth of your business as it means referrals from unknown and potential clients.

https://developers.google.com/speed/pagespeed/insights//

You can always pay someone to work on your SEO, but you will still need to know if the job is done acceptably since results will not show until months later. Below are some resources and links on SEO to get you started.

Answer The Public: Instead of pulling up endless lists of keywords that may be relevant to your audience, Answer The Public instead provides you with a list of questions that users are tapping into Google and Bing. Answer The Public listens to autocomplete data from Google then provides phrases and questions people are asking around your keyword. Once you receive a report on what queries users have based on your target keyword, you can begin to create ultrarelevant content that answers a few of those questions. https://answerthepublic.com/

Google Analytics: A very powerful free analytics tool, Google Analytics tracks all traffic to your website— where it comes from, which page is receiving it and so on. While it is not purely for SEO, it is still a helpful tool to track if you are getting traffic from organic search. Google Analytics does not show which keywords are sending you traffic. You will need to pair it with a keyword tool generator to uncover the keywords or hashtags that drive traffic. https://analytics.google.com/analytics/web/ PageSpeed Insights: PageSpeed Insights (PSI) reports a page’s performance on both mobile and desktop devices and provides suggestions on how that page

Ahrefs Webmaster Tools: verify your website, then you can assess your website for over 100+ technical SEO issues and receive suggestions on how to fix them. After running an audit, it also suggests areas where you can improve your internal linking, boosting your rankings in search engines. This tool also allows you to see your site’s organic keyword rankings as well as who it is linking to you. https://ahrefs.com/webmaster-tools

Google Search Console: This allows you to check indexing positions and optimize the visibility of their websites. Submit and check a sitemap. List internal and external pages that link to the website. See what keyword searches on Google led to the site being listed in the SERPs, total clicks, total impressions, and the average click-through rates of such listings. https://search.google.com/search-console/welcome

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I SSUE 9


“EMBRACE WHAT YOU DON’T KNOW, ESPECIALLY IN THE BEGINNING, BECAUSE WHAT YOU DON’T KNOW CAN BECOME YOUR GREATEST ASSET. IT ENSURES THAT YOU WILL ABSOLUTELY BE DOING THINGS DIFFERENT FROM EVERYBODY ELSE.”

Sara Blakely, founder of SPANX


BOOK AVAILABLE FOR SALE AT AMAZON.CA & CHAPTERS.CA

Profile for Dreamer 2 Creator Business Magazine

Dreamer 2 Creator Business Magazine Issue 9  

In this issue, we have an insight into the back end of getting noticed. Search Engine Optimization, using Facebook and Instagram ads, market...

Dreamer 2 Creator Business Magazine Issue 9  

In this issue, we have an insight into the back end of getting noticed. Search Engine Optimization, using Facebook and Instagram ads, market...

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