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E D I T ORI A L K A R E N M. LOWE Executive Editor F R A N C I N E GREY Creative Editor K I M BL EY LOWE-B EN N ETT Editor N I C O L E LOWE Editor

10 TRANSITIONING TO A VIRTUAL BUSINESS by Susan Ruhe

12 DOS AND DON’TS WHEN STARTING PEER-TO-PEER MARKETPLACE by Samantha Vlasceanu


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TABLE OF CONTENTS

RESOURC ES

Page 6 BUILDING YOUR SUBSCRIBER LIST

by Nancy Peterkin

16 JOURNEY OF AN ENTREPRENEUR Step 1: Starting Out

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NARROW IT DOWN

by Michelle Sundborg by Michelle Joseph

Page 40

THREE SUCCESS MYTHS

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by Leah Yard

GROWING A SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS

by Heather Klassen

42 CELEBRATE THE MILESTONES

by Victor Kabuga


editor’s note A

According to the Business Development Bank of Canada (BDC), small businesses consist of less than 100 employees and make up 98.2% of all Canadian companies. Micro-entrepreneurs are a subset of small companies and make up 55% of the 1.1 million small businesses in Canada. These numbers are registered businesses and do not include the many unregistered hustlers. The numbers are available, but the systems are not in our favour. In fact, when I use the term microentrepreneur, many are not aware that they are considered micro-enterprise because they have 0-4 employees. Everyone considers themselves small businesses and is technically correct, but another element creates problems for us. The government lump all small businesses in the same category. What is wrong with this picture? Imagine a small business owner who hires over 50 employees; their revenue must be pretty large to cover payroll and profit. You have 1 or 0 hires, just yourself, your income is substantially smaller. The programs the government creates are often based on revenue and salaries and are therefore geared towards small businesses, not micro-firms; hence microentrepreneurs tend to not qualify for government funding, even though they need it the most. Some micro-entrepreneurs compete with the big names and do it well. They recognize who they are and position themselves accordingly. They do not limit themselves and are more strategic in their thinking. There is much educating to be done around who we are as micro-entrepreneurs for us to compete effectively. This magazine is intended to start educating, and in this issue, we have decided to celebrate micro-entrepreneurs and encourage you to do so with all the small businesses around you. Your hairdresser, your hotdog vendor, your baker, your event planner, and so much more are all microentrepreneurs.

Stay Motivated!

KAREN M. LOWE Executive Editor


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Copyright 2019 Dreamer 2 Creator Business Magazine.

ISSN 2562-5330 (Print) ISSN 2562-5349 (Online)

All rights reserved. No parts of this publication may be copied, reprinted, displayed, edited or distributed without the written consent of Epigram Consulting Services Inc. Dreamer 2 Creator Business Magazine is a Canadian Magazine, published and distributed by Epigram Consulting Services, located in Brampton, Ontario, Canada.


building your Subscriber list You have thought out your business plan, chosen a logo, built a website, have unique products to sell, but how do you find customers and keep them coming back for more?

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t is exciting taking those first steps to entrepreneurship. You are running on adrenaline; ideas are popping up left and right, you are coming up with what you think are unique ideas in your sleep; nothing can stop this dream you have! Time for a reality check! Ummm, how will you get anyone to buy your products? How will you build trust? How will you compete with competitors? How will you get customers to come back for more? Sure, your product is the “best” most fantastic thing ever,….but who will buy it?

You can do all the research required, and you will find many articles on how so and so built their empire “overnight” and whatnot. Guess what? Unless you are royalty or very well known already, this is likely not going to happen. Building trust is key to building a successful Subscriber list, and depending on how hard you are willing to work; it can take some time! I will be honest; this is something I overlooked at the beginning. Doing all this planning solo (I mean, I do have a pretty savvy hubby that would have gladly directed me, but yes, I am stubborn, yes, I want to be in control, and yes, I like my ideas better!) I did a ‘boatload’ of research on starting a business; however, I do not recall coming across too many articles about building your customer base now that I think back. Of course, you will surely come up with some great articles if you google with that actual search criteria. However, that never crossed my mind back then. Things started slow for Hunger Hankerings, which I was okay with as I was still learning as I went along, as well as raising my family and working a full-time office job! For starters, I did some low-cost advertising on social media, Google, and Bing. That brought people to my website and got followers on social media; however, I was not getting the sales volume I was hoping for. A couple of months after launching, I had a local social media influencer contact me inquiring if I was interested in a ‘collab’ – I asked myself what the heck do they mean? (note: I was not a social media person before starting a business; it just seemed like a platform where people could put up a façade of their lives, something that this realist was not into). Therefore, thank goodness

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for good ol’ Google; I looked it up and then went back to this person asking a series of questions about what exactly they were looking for. Just a product in exchange for having a post/story written and photographed about our products. That sounded like a fair exchange to me, and it was. This social media Influencer had followers that trusted him, and they believed the products he was promoting had good value. I was getting more sales and wanted to know if they came from this collab; therefore, I started to look on social media for these people, then noticed they had a dog or a cat. This made me think; it would be so cool to send a little treat for the animals as well. Made a point to stop by the pet store and pick up a few treats and include them in the snack boxes along with a handwritten personal note. The feedback was great, customers were so grateful that we thought about their pets, yet it was a simple gesture! I continued to do this for customers who had young children, as well and added special little treats that most children would love, along with a personal note. For those that I was not sure, I would add a little sweet treat! People started to trust the brand Hunger Hankerings and

appreciate the little extra touches I put in. Word was beginning to spread, and volume was picking up; repeat customers were getting numerous; it was great! The odd time I would get special requests from customers, whether it was more of a particular product, or this product instead of that, or customers buying a gift snack box and wanting it delivered by a specific date, etcetera. Being a small business, I managed all these requests, and the appreciation was great for business! A year and a bit later, I continue to do this – Why? Because it is who I am, I am not one size fits most, and I am okay with that! I have tried email marketing, CRM’s and other things you hear about regarding customer retention, and I have not had great results, and the expense involved was leaving me in the red. Not saying that I will never go that route again; however, for now, I am still able to manage this way, and customers keep coming back; therefore, I must be doing something right! Depending on your business, this might not work for everyone; however, I suggest you do you. Do what works for you, and I guarantee results will come. Entrepreneurship is no cookie-cutter model. Sure, there are methods we use that are the same; however, behind every brand, there is the visionnaire, and you represent your brand and are what makes you different than others. Just remember that!

By: NANCY PETERKIN Founder/Owner of Hunger Hankerings Contact: https://hungerhankerings.com/

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“THERE’S NOTHING WRONG WITH STAYING SMALL. YOU CAN DO BIG THINGS WITH A SMALL TEAM JASON FRIED, FOUNDER OF BASECAMP


Photo Credit: SABRINA DOMIZE

Transitioning To A Virtual Business

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ave you ever had a virtual massage? Chances are the answer is no. How would that even work? I remember saying to my first online coach, “If only there was a way for me to get my hands through the computer screen, I would be able to reach more people.” Well, that is precisely what happened with my business this year.

techniques for them to use at home as a part of their self-care routine. Well, this was it! That was how I could pivot my skill, training, and business into the virtual space, where I could reach my hands through the computer screen. How did I move from an in-person massage therapy business to a virtual training business? Here are five important steps that I used to help get me there:

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- Learn as you grow. You can create anything you want and earn an income online regardless of your background or skill. The key is to learn as you grow. You do not need a fancy website or all of the technical stuff figured out to start. There is a tutorial for everything on Youtube; you just have to search for what you need. With so many different ways to create paid offerings online (coaching groups, training videos, e-books, consulting), you have to find a platform or system that resonates with you and start learning from others who are already creating something using the platform you want to use. It is incredible what we are capable of when we are forced to switch gears. For the past 12 years, I have worked in a traditional clinic setting, working with clients using a technique called Myofascial Release Therapy. This is a form of massage therapy where no lotions or oils are used. This very slow yet powerful technique has guided me toward working in the client’s abdomens, which has resulted in decreasing anxiety and calming the nervous system, as well as reducing pain that resides elsewhere in the body. Upon witnessing specific patterns and results, I began showing clients how to connect their own hands to their abdominal fascia by assigning gentle

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- Trust your skill and expertise; or product if you have one. People are looking for and needing what you have, even if you are in a heavily saturated market. During one of her global training sessions, a popular online coach said, “You Are The Secret Sauce.” People will hire You because it is You. It does not matter how many years you have studied, how many books you have written, or what product you are selling. You are your business.

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- Make connections. Reach out to make genuine connections with people to grow your network. Personal emails and private

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messages generate a massive impact on online business. Even if that person does not purchase what you are offering right away, they most likely will later on down the line or provide you with referrals from their network.

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- Drop the self-judgment and show up. I know it is scary to put yourself “out there,” I feel that too. But people cannot buy anything from you if they do not know what you have to offer. Promoting yourself publicly through social media or sending advertisements via email is a free and effective way to sell your product or service. People need your gifts; if you do not talk about them, how will they find you?

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- Hire your friends! Give back and create even more impact. If you need something edited, ask a close friend and compensate him/ her for their efforts. If you have a friend who does web design or creates marketing materials, hire them for the back-end stuff you do not have time or energy for. A win-win for both businesses and the referral marketing that comes along with it is enormous! I still cannot believe that exposing my bare belly through the internet is my job now, but it has become the best approach to reach more people across the globe. Being vulnerable is a crucial component to any business, and therefore I must lead by example. We are all capable of taking care of our bodies; we just need to be shown how. We have always held this power in our own hands and just need the ‘knowhow’ to unlock its potential. I am honestly still blown away with my clients’ results and the ripple effect that this has created. Witnessing their success is indeed the biggest reward of all.

By: SUSAN RUHE Founder of Love Your Cells Website: http://www.loveyourcells.ca/

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DOS AND DON’TS WHEN STARTING PEER-TO-PEER MARKETPLACE

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he sharing economy, or the peer-to-peer marketplace, is booming and will continue to boom for the next ten years! Platforms like Airbnb, Etsy, Uber, & Fiverr have proven that the marketplace model is scalable and can work in any business industry. Even though the timing is right and the technology is available, there is still a lot that goes into building a thriving marketplace. I started Traveling Munchkin two years ago, and here I share what you should do and what common mistakes to avoid when starting.

Do – Solve the Chicken & Egg Problem A peer-to-peer marketplace requires you to either convince others to bring their inventory onto an empty platform with no customers yet, or to attract buyers when you do not have inventory for them. You will also have to creatively think of how you will find them. For the most part, it is usually easier to find the sellers and then the customers. You will also want to find quality sellers initially, as your validation will depend on their service and commitment to your platform.

Don’t – Do Any Random Marketplace. It is essential to know that starting a marketplace requires a lot of time, effort & dedication. The more passionate you are about the subject area, the more likely you are to succeed. It is also important to keep in mind the value of the service. The product/service value must be high enough for the seller to provide the service or product, and the product/service must

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be expensive enough for the customers not to just buy it for short term use. For example, if you had a marketplace exclusively for renting out tools to consumers, it might not be worth it for a consumer to pay $20 for rental when purchasing it for $50 and vice versa as a seller. A car or space are examples that are too expensive to buy for short term use, so it is usually better to rent out on a marketplace.

Don’t – Focus on Building the “Perfect” Platform. That was one of the biggest mistakes I learned from. I was one of the entrepreneurs that wanted to develop a platform like Airbnb in the initial phase - one that “has all the features, it works worldwide, and all kinds of people can use it.” Having a global vision is important, but no successful business is where

Do – Start by creating your Minimum Viable Product as soon as possible. You might have a great idea, and all your friends might agree with you, but if you do not test out the idea to your demographics, you might end up with a platform with nobody using it. When starting, launch a minimum viable product as soon as possible. It does not have to be perfect, but it will help you validate your business idea without investing a lot of capital upfront. Why? Because the learning curve only starts when you have something to offer for your users, so it is crucial to get there as soon as possible. Keep in mind; your platform only needs enough features to solve your supplier & consumers’ core problems. Some great off the shelf platforms to start with include Idyaflow, Arcadier & Sharetribe.

A peer-to-peer marketplace requires you to either convince others to bring their inventory onto an empty platform with no customers yet, or to attract buyers when you do not have inventory for them.

they first started (remember Airbnb and couch surfing?). Everyone started at a minimum viable product, and it is essential to focus on the main features for your users and not get lost in all the sparkles and jazz.

Do – Engage with your users early on, even if you haven’t launched yet. What I have learned early on when starting Traveling Munchkin, you must engage with your users and hear their concerns throughout the whole process while using your platform. Do your sellers need reassurance with an insurance policy in place? How do you ensure your customers feel confident with the product/service they are getting?

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What validations or safety checks are you doing for both customers & sellers to make it not ‘Craigslist’ like? How can you make your platform trustworthy? Is the check-out process easy enough to find what they need?

Don’t – Don’t be the “Walmart” of the marketplace. When launching a marketplace, focus on one thing in that one city. You might be thinking, if I offer the “one-stop-shop” model marketplace, I will be able to attract a broader user base and will be able to grow faster in my marketplace. However, a quick expansion will slow down your learning. The bigger

About the Author Samantha Vlasceanu is the owner of Traveling Munchkin, a peer-to-peer marketplace for baby gear rental in Toronto, Ontario. She spent 10 years working in operations improvement for companies, that one day she decided to pursue her own business. By day, she’s a mom of two and at night she’s building her empire. You can find her on Instagram at @TravelingMunchkin & on Tik Tok @ TravelingMunchkin.

you are, the slower it is for you to learn new things and pivot when needed. Additionally, the bigger you are, the faster you are burning through your money, which means less time to learn from your mistakes. Again, you want to validate your idea first, so start in your home town and focus on that “one” thing.

Do – Think about your competitive advantages. What does your platform do that other businesses cannot provide? Are you providing convenience, community, affordability or service that is unlike the current status quo? Are you providing an opportunity for your sellers to become entrepreneurs like never before?

So there you have it! Now that we have covered the do’s and don’ts when creating a marketplace, it is now time to put it into practice. What business idea will you have for us? The next “Airbnb for X”.

By: Samantha Vlasceanu Website/Contact: https://www.travelingmunchkin.com/

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advertise with us 647-955-3567 ads@dreamer2creatormag.ca


JOURNEY OF AN ENTREPRENEUR STEP 1: STARTING OUT

I lost my full-time job as an Employment Specialist on January 15, 2020. Oddly enough, I was not heartbroken, upset or even angry. I was relieved, ecstatic, and happy! Leading up to this, I was experiencing severe burnout, depression and did not enjoy working for someone who did not value my worth.

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efore being fired, I practised my exit speech for two weeks to be ready to deliver it when needed. Unfortunately, my boss beat me to it, and she relieved me from my shackles. It was on that day that I was reborn and vowed never to work for anyone again! - Especially working for someone that did not even like me. I felt in every fibre in my being that it would be that last 9-5 that I would have. Before you high five me, I would be completely lying to you and myself if I said that it was on that fateful day that I embraced being an entrepreneur. That was the plan; that is what I was telling everyone, but it was not the case. I am a writer, content creator, and podcaster, and although I wear all of those hats, I did not take them seriously. I knew I was a good communicator, and I have repeatedly proved myself, but I did not take becoming an entrepreneur seriously. I put in 50% effort into starting and investing in my business.

Then COVID-19 happened. The little effort that I was putting into my business came to a standstill. I felt the distressing emotional effects of the pandemic, and I pretty much shut down. My mother was experiencing some health issues to add insult to injury, and I was 100% focused on her getting better. Although I spent hours at my computer, I never wrote or created anything.

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Feeling embarrassed, I stumble, getting the words out. Then she said something that shocked me. She said that I lacked ‘passion.’

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During this time, I, along with the world, learned of the senseless killings of George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery and Breona Taylor. That did it. I could no longer create. Writing was put on the back burner until further notice. Starting my business was not even a thought.

If there is one thing that I pride myself on is my passion. I pour passion into everything I do. In writing, editing, conducting interviews for my podcast, and even cooking! I was ashamed and realized that I needed to re-evaluate what it meant to be an entrepreneur.

A few months went by, and I started to feel like myself again in July. I felt better emotionally, and I thought it was the best time to sit down and write down my goals. I wrote a list of about ten things that I wanted to accomplish. One of my goals was to be published in a magazine.

During our heart-to-heart talk, she suggested that I create a schedule for my ‘workday’. The schedule would keep me on top of things and make me more focused and aware of how I worked towards my goals. I needed to designate when I did on my podcast when I needed to search out potential guests for my show and schedule a time to pitch myself to small companies that needed a writer or content creator. She seriously lit a fire under me. Once we finished our call, I created a schedule to devote time to work on my podcast, work on social media, and prospect guests. It helped me to feel more organized and productive. Although I have considered myself an entrepreneur for years, I can say that only now I am taking the necessary steps to become one.

Within a week, I was contacted by a magazine publisher looking for someone to write an article for her magazine. I was shocked. That happened so quickly! It reinforced that when your mind is right and focused, an opportunity will present itself.

By: MICHELLE JOSEPH Website/Contact: https://wordswithmichelle.com/

We communicated for a bit, and then I ended up writing a couple of articles for her. Even after that, I still was not taking my business seriously. It was not until I had a long, frank conversation with a Business Consultant in September, where she served up some tough love and asked me what my goals were and what I was doing to attain my goals. Feeling embarrassed, I stumble, getting the words out. Then she said something that shocked me. She said that I lacked ‘passion.’

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celebrating micro-entreprneurs Testimonials from customers

It has been an unprecedented year for everyone. We thought it would be a great time to celebrate those who make our world turn! Your photo may not be here, but we salute all who are micro-entrepreneurs (small business owners with 0-4 employees). More than 95% of Canadian businesses are run by micro-entrepreneurs. Here is a toast to you and all you have achieved and will achieve. The government needs you to succeed for the economy to become and stay successful. Continue to stick out and thrive in the tough times!

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Mutiat bello

Love Mutiat! Her whole business is based around helping others excel financially via property investment. She genuinely cares!! ~ @ umber.nadia


Kevis

lowe

@resinc.ca is the best electrical contractors in the GTA. They are reliable and have the most friendly and relatable staff. They also extends themselves across borders to ensure people feel safe with their electrical services in their homes and businesses. You CANNOT get better than that with electrical services for commercial and domestic purposes. ~ @keishamellow

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Amanda Hamer

Amanda Hamer is the culinary genius behind the catering company edible bliss11. I seriously can’t say enough about her work. all you need to do is try anything she has created- and you are hooked. my fave dessert: jamaican rum cake cheesecake ~ @wordswitmichelle

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Israelle hill

@izzyosity has done voice over for us and I love how she owns the content and put her own spin on it. She is authentic and we love listening to her voice. It helps that she is young and innovative. ~ @kimbleylowebennett

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Kimber-Lee Samuels

Don’t waste your time hunting for a photo of what you think you want in a cake. If you Just share your vision with @kimsnectar she will create something beyond your wildest dreams and exceed your expectations. ~ @keishamellow

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Tennile

Cooper

Not sure if Tennile Cooper knows this, but I am a superfan of hers. She is the brains behind the company She is Epic. Tennile specializes in copywriting and providing witty and wise info to fellow business owners. I have been following her for years and I can honestly say, she is EPIC!!! ~ @wordswithmichelle

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Nikita dore

Nikita is the consummate professional! She follows through, ensuring the work is done accurately and on time. ~ Karen

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Kara Isert

we wanted to give a SHOUT OUT to Sparkplug Coffee because it’s #nationalcoffeeday!!! And we LOVE their coffeeeeee! Like PhotoED magazine - Sparkplug Coffee delivers to your mailbox - across Canada, you can drink really nice coffee, crafted by really nice people!. ~ @PhotoEDmagazine

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Garrett Prince

@Paynive consistently shows up on social media being authentic and sharing tips to help educate their audience. They are working hard to build their reputation on Instagram and I admire the effort. ~ @yegmarketer


Christina McKenzie

Christina’s cookies always brings me so much joy to look at (and to eat...tee hee) One talented #baker! ~ @digitalgirlca

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Nita

Tandon

@dalcinistainless is an incredible sustainable canadian small business led by a #heartledpreneur who is savy and sweet. ~ @digitalgirlca

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Jhonelle Brown

Jhonelle Brown and her team at @redhills Co. are technology entrepreneurs, helping businesses build back with the future in mind. their mission is to solve business problems of today, with the technology of tomorrow. ~ @arcommagency

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Growing A Sustainable Business

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here is a shift happening in the coffee industry. More people are looking for local, freshly roasted options and provide a living income to farmers. That is where we come in. As a specialty coffee micro-roaster, we are in a niche market. It is about quality, not quantity. Our vision is to help more people become mindfully aware of the type of coffee they consume and where it comes from. It is relatively easy to start a coffee business nowadays. They are popping up everywhere. We jumped into this business without knowing much about the coffee industry or the food and beverage industry. We tried some amazing coffee in our travels and had this crazy idea that we wanted to share these coffees with others.

It is easy enough to grab a cup of coffee from a drive-thru on the way to work. It is quick and convenient. In an industry with big names like Tim Hortons, McDonald’s and Starbucks, our little business barely seems to register. But we do not aim to compete; our purpose is to provide an alternative.

Setting up our business online was easy. Launching our business was easy. The challenge has been the learning curve that comes with all the nuances of specialty coffee. And learning the art of coffee roasting to produce specialty level roast profiles would have to be the hardest part. Luckily, we have been able to partner with a master roaster who has over 25 years of experience. Here are a few things we have learned about starting a specialty coffee business.

Sustainability From the beginning, we have been relying on our roaster to guide us when sourcing green coffee. We are now at a point where we feel comfortable sourcing our coffee directly from farmers or

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importers. Thanks to social media and the internet, there is an endless supply of specialty coffee farmers at our fingertips. We are able to build relationships and acquire information about the origins so we can tell the story of where our coffees are grown. Organic and Fair Trade certifications are not always the best indicators of sustainable practices. We want to know that farmers are getting paid a living income higher than the global market price. One way to do that is through direct trade, when possible. We recently sourced one of our coffees through iFinca, an organization dedicated to providing more transparency and traceability in the supply chain. This allows our customers to meet the farmers and see precisely how much they are paid per pound.

Quality Specialty coffee is roasted fresh in small batches (unlike commercial coffee such as Nabob, Folger’s or Maxwell House). Our coffee is roasted once a week, and we keep a small inventory that will sell within 1 – 2 weeks. We would rather sell all our current stock and have our customers pre-order from our next batch to ensure our coffee will be fresh. We struggled with the decision to sell whole beans only because we knew we would be excluding a

considerable segment of the market that prefers to buy pre-ground coffee. Whole beans stay fresh longer, and since we are focused on quality, this knowledge has helped us stick with our decision. It has also allowed us to educate our customers. We continue to roll out our wholesale program very slowly because we want to find the right fit with retail partners who share our commitment to quality. Our minimum orders are relatively small, so our coffee is not sitting on the shelves for months.

Brewing/Production Although there is a precision to brewing a great cup of coffee, it can be done easily at home using the equipment you have available. We want to make specialty coffee accessible to everyone, so we like to choose coffees with an exceptional taste no matter how you brew them.

Evolving with purpose We started this business with the sole purpose of selling whole bean coffee roasted to order. Our vision has evolved a few times since then! The more we learn about the coffee industry, the clearer our vision becomes. With 2.25 billion cups of coffee consumed daily worldwide, and roughly 25 million coffee farmers trying to make a decent living, there is plenty of room for more entrepreneurs to enter this market. By: HEATHER KLASSEN Co-Founder of Mugging Whales Coffee Website/Contact: https://muggingwhalescoffee.com/

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narrow it down more questions from the client and often resulted in people being unsure about my capabilities. Now I respond with, “I am a cookie enthusiast that hand bakes and delivers cookie box subscriptions.” Being able to fit my pitch and my job description into a single sentence has changed my interactions with my potential clients because they immediately know what I do, and I sound confident in my delivery. When you offer multiple products or services, getting your pitch into a short and straightforward, clear description is difficult.

F

ind Your Niche

When I first started my baking business, I was a typical people pleaser. I did not want to lose a potential sale, so I would say yes to any job, regardless of whether it was something I wanted to do or felt comfortable doing. This resulted in longer hours, doing multiple things, and never feeling like I was mastering what I was doing. When I decided to get specific about what I was offering, I found four major things that changed how I felt about my business and how I was able to run my business.

B

M

aster Your Offer/Product

When you get specific about what you are offering or what your products are, you can also focus and grow your skills on that particular thing. Instead of being average at many different things, you can excel and become a master in your element. No more Jack of all trades, but a master at none! Getting specific allows you to hone in on your skills, become the best and reach for the stars.

e Confident in Your Pitch

When you get specific about what you are offering or what your products are, it becomes easier to describe your business to your potential clients. When you sound sure about what you are an expert on, people are more likely to hire you over someone else.

When you get specific about what you are offering or what your products are, it becomes easier to describe your business to your potential clients.

In the past, when asked what I did, I often responded with, “I am a baker.” This always led to DRE A ME R 2 C RE A T O R B USI N ESS M A G A Z I N E

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D

elete Your Scheduling Stress

When I first started, I would bake anything for anyone, and I wound up with a scheduling nightmare each week. If I tried to focus on one task at a time, I ran the risk of falling behind, and if I tried to multitask, I ran the risk of making mistakes. In getting specific on my offer, I was able to simplify my scheduling and do things in bulk, rather than trying to balance multiple things at once. I have also become faster at completing my tasks because I can practice my specific skills consistently. Whether you run a product or a service-based business, scheduling is a part of what you do. And when you can focus on one task, you can simplify your schedule.

D

o What Truly Makes You Happy

Picking your one (or two) offers or products can be a challenge because you would not have chosen your general field unless you loved it! But I challenge you to ask yourself, what is your favourite thing to do in your specific field? Yes, I love baking, but I recognized that certain aspects caused me more stress than others, and certain parts I could not get enough of. Since I have shrunk my offerings significantly, I have genuinely enjoyed every aspect of my business.

M

aking the Transition

When I decided to cut out many of my products, I was concerned that I would lose past clients and have uncomfortable conversations about how I am no longer providing certain services. What I found was the opposite. When approached by previous clients about products I was no longer making, I was typically met with understanding and excitement, as they were happy that my business was growing and changing

in the direction I wanted it to be in. Though some questioned my decision, those were not my ideal clients, and in losing them, I was able to open the doors to new clients. Though there is no right or wrong way to make this transition, the key is to stick to your decision about your offerings. You will find that, in being specific, you will have a new set of potential clients who are looking for an expert in your exact field. You may lose some of your previous clients, but in narrowing down your offers, you are also narrowing in on your ideal clients, and those clients you may lose will no longer fit the profile. Narrowing down my products was one of the smartest decisions I have made for my business, and I have seen a remarkable profit increase because of this. It is a scary step, but a step in the right direction.

By: MICHELLE SUNDBORG The Little Red Bake Shop Website: https://www.thelittleredbakeshop.com/

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“MOST GREAT PEOPLE HAVE ATTAINED THEIR GREATEST SUCCESS JUST ONE STEP BEYOND THEIR GREATEST FAILURE.”

Napoleon Hill, author of “Think and Grow Rich”

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three success myths Success does not look or feel like you think it will. When I first started my business in 2013, I had dreams of having a jewellery studio walking distance from home, with big bright windows, a place to showcase the line to buyers and enough room to host events. Now I had it. But here is what no one tells you about reaching the next level:

SUCCESS MYTH #1: You are going to feel ready. Three months before the meeting (the one where I walked away feeling ill), the thought of having a separate space for my business seemed crazy. I had been working from home for the last seven years, and only three of those were without a side job. Six months before that meeting, the world had gone on lockdown due to COVID-19. For someone who does not like change, this was a lot. When I decided to start looking for a commercial space, I went from searching for offices around 100sqft to finally signing for a full 450sqft studio. At no point did I feel ready. But that is the big myth— you never feel prepared for the next step.

Here is why: I left the meeting feeling excited, terrified, and slightly nauseous. “What did I just do?” “Have I made a mistake?” “Who do I think I am?” I walked home with weak knees as these three questions circled in my mind. I had just signed my first commercial lease during a pandemic.

You are not the person you need to be to get to the next step yet. But once you take the leap, you begin to adapt to this new level. You start becoming the person required for the job. You have to trust your intuition. Trust that you would never put yourself in a situation that you could not manage. Plus, there is no failure in trying—the worst-case scenario is that you will learn a lot.

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growth are directly related to your feeling of success.

So here is what I have learned so far: Do not forget the wins along the way, no matter the size. Keep striving and keep adapting to your new level of success. Don’t underestimate your intuition, and trust yourself—weak knees and all.

By: LEAH YARD

SUCCESS MYTH #2: Once you reach it, you will be satisfied. So you have fulfilled a dream. Now what? Have you ever gotten that new job, ample opportunity, flashy award, and within a month, you already feel as though you have surpassed it? We are hardwired to progress, making “success” a finish line that continuously moves further away. This is a good thing. Often, the times we start to feel satisfied is when we begin to slip. We get sloppy. We stop putting in the effort for our bosses, spouses, kids. We lose the drive to grow.

Author Bio: Leah Yard is a Vancouver Jewellery Stylist / Designer and the Owner behind Leah Yard Designs (est. 2013). With an unusual upbringing, including growing up on a series of lighthouse islands, she has turned her experience of isolated living into a passion for creating a community with her brand platform. Sign up here to connect and learn more about this Canadian Designer. https://leahyarddesigns.com/

You are likely never to be completely satisfied with your level of success, but that is ok. It is what keeps you striving and succeeding. Appreciate what you have, and keep moving forward.

SUCCESS MYTH #3: It has to do with money. Success, to many, means a bank account with lots of digits in it. And yes, money can make life wonderful. It solves problems, creates opportunities, and allows for freedom. But it is important to remember that even if your vision of success is one of monetary abundance, money itself cannot make you successful. Your health, state of your relationships, and personal

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celebrate the milestones I

n business and projects, it is essential to define milestones at the onset of the venture. The milestones charter the path to an ultimate objective. The Project Management Institute defines a milestone as a specific point in time within a project’s lifecycle used to measure a project’s progress toward its ultimate goal. Oxford dictionary defines a milestone as an action or event, marking a significant change or stage in development. As a project manager, I felt it important to celebrate the milestone and recognize the team members’ contributions. In this reflection and celebration of milestones, progress is measured, lessons are learned, growth is realized, relationships are fostered, team engagement is harnessed, and loyalty is strengthened. It wasn’t just a fun thing to do; it was strategic in sustaining engagement and driving momentum towards the ultimate goal.

Drink glasses rose, and melodious clinking went around the table as the team celebrated the achievement of a significant milestone. Fittingly, it was a bright sunny day, and we were filled with a unified sense of accomplishment. It was not easy getting there! After expending tireless days, nights, sweat, and stress for the $20 Million, we finally reached the highly anticipated milestone, first-of-akind evolution. We completed one giant step closer to renewed energy capacity for the province.

DRE A ME R 2 C RE A T O R B USI N ESS M A G A Z I N E

I apply milestone celebrations to my real estate ventures as well. On move-in day, I welcomed my latest tenant with a bottle of champagne and a congratulations card waiting on the kitchen counter. That day, she reached out to thank me, and I believe this contributed to a troublefree lease term and recent lease renewal. Furthermore, I do not hesitate to partake in the celebrations of colleagues and potential clients’ successes. When others achieve milestones, I relay my congratulations. I always do it genuinely, and in some cases, it is also strategic. I once congratulated a management colleague who was on the verge of retirement. Unexpectedly, he then recommended me for

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the position he was vacating to his line management. That is one example where you never know what opportunities may be availed by demonstrating your capabilities and then simply expressing interest and excitement for milestone achievements. I have also experienced not celebrating milestones, even when it is mandated in a team contract. I recall the end of a capstone group project during my MBA student days. The restaurant industry research and corporate expansion strategy paper took longer than planned. It was challenging, and in the end, we produced a solid plan for the client. When we finally finished, the team immediately disbanded. I mostly took away from the experience the challenges we faced in completing the project, which overshadowed all positives, including the learning and relationships developed. It was unfortunate, and I am convinced that a final team milestone celebration would have enriched the lasting impression.

For the recent project milestone, I believe we ended it off right. We defined the milestone, progressed towards completion and celebrated the win together! We are, therefore, well-positioned to take on the next challenge and succeed. Until then, Cheers!

In business and projects, it is essential to define milestones at the onset of the venture. The milestones charter the path to an ultimate objective.

By: VICTOR KABUGA Company: Axis Energy Advantage

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BUSINESS: THE ULTIMATE ADVENTURE


resources MICRO-ENTREPRENEUR DIRECTORY EverSavvy Financial

Accountants

https://eversavvy.ca/

Little Chomperz Teethers

Baby Supplies

https://littlechomperzteethers.ca/

Crytal-Marie Sealy

Business Consultant

https://crystalmariesealy.com/

Allen Wick Candles

Candles

https://allenwickcandles.com/

Minus Cake Boutique

Dessert

https://www.minuscake.com/

Digital Girl Consulting

Digital Consultant

https://digitalgirlconsulting.com

The Virtual Effect

Event Planning

https://www.thevirtualeffect.com/

Nwamaka Agbakoba

Fashion Designer

https://mkcurvy.com/

SA Capital

Financial Services

http://sacapital.ca/

House Of Sweat

Fitness

https://www.instagram.com/houseofsweat/

Thoughtfully Handmade

Greeting Cards

https://www.thoughtfullyhandmade.com/

Braids Made Perfect

Hair Stylist & Trainer

https://msha.ke/braidsmadeperfect/

Christa by Design

Home DĂŠcor

https://christabydesign.com/

Cloud Wealth Management

Wealth Management

https://cloudwm.ca/

Beneva Designs

Jewelry

https://www.benevadesigns.com/

Without Co.

Low Waste Living

https://withoutco.com/

Aster and Vine

Macrame ~ Crochet ~ Weaving

https://asterandvine.com/

Makeda Waterman

Writer/Marketing

https://www.freelancewriteredmonton.com/yegmarketer

Laura Connor

Marketing/Public Speaking

https://connorspeaks.com/

Prairie Wilds

Organic Clothing

https://prairiewilds.com/

Healthybud

Pet Supplies

https://www.healthybud.co/

Amanda Lee Coffey Photography

Photography

http://www.amandaleecoffey.com/

Ayobami O. Balogun

Photography

www.instagram.com/aobyyc

Jagged Little Pillows

Pillows

https://jaggedlittlepillows.com/

Natalie Lewin Realtor

Real Estate Agent

http://www.natalielewin.com/

Tandem Media

Space Rental & Marketing

http://tandemmedia.ca/

Ten & Co

Sponge Cloths

https://www.tenandco.ca/

Video Power Up

Video Content Consultant

https://videopowerup.com/

Hygge Life Vancouver

Lifestyle

https://livehyggelife.ca/

Alchemy Jane

Skin Care

https://alchemyjane.com/

DRE A ME R 2 C R EA T O R B USI N ESS M A G A Z I N E

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“RISK MORE THAN OTHERS THINK IS SAFE. DREAM MORE THAN OTHERS THINK IS PRACTICAL.”


Howard Schultz, CEO of Starbucks


BOOK AVAILABLE FOR SALE AT AMAZON.CA & CHAPTERS.CA

Profile for Dreamer 2 Creator Business Magazine

Dreamer 2 Creator Business Magazine Issue 8  

It has been an interesting year for everyone.  We thought it would be a great time to celebrate those who make the world turn!  Your photo m...

Dreamer 2 Creator Business Magazine Issue 8  

It has been an interesting year for everyone.  We thought it would be a great time to celebrate those who make the world turn!  Your photo m...