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Frontier Weapons Lifetime Collection of a Gentleman AUGUST 2008 SALE 141


“The Guns that Won the West” The arms and accouterments in this collection represent the Gun’s that were actually used on America’s Western Frontier. Beginning during the early Fur Trade by the North West Company near the Great Lakes in the 1790’s through America’s westward expansion to California and the Great Plains, culminating with the Custer’s Last Stand at the Battle of Little Big Horn and the Indian War’s in the 1880’s. The focus of this lifetime collection has always been to collect the guns that saw actual use on the frontier, as a geologist with a keen eye for both rarity and history he has built an authentic Frontier Collection. This gentleman’s collecting interest followed those of his father who was born” with a gun in his hand”, they were both ardent gun collectors and hunted in the west. Together they shared a strong feeling of connection with the American Character, both father and son collected these Gun’s and hunting together in the Dakota’s, Wyoming and Montana was annual ritual for them. This collector has published numerous articles in “The Gun Report” as well as “The Winchester Collector” and he is well known within the collecting fraternity. His recent ground breaking article on Custer Little Big Horn carbines has brought him international acclaim and documented the true rarity of these Custer Guns for future generations of collectors. He is most well known for his lifetime interest as well as his historic understanding of these frontier Gun’s “The Gun’s that Won the West” The collection was carefully formed over half a century, along the following guidelines:

Indian Trade Guns 1790-1860 Early Plains Rifles and Pistols 1820-1860 US Army on the Frontier 1840-1880 Buffalo Hunting 1870’s Custer and the Indian Wars 1867- 1880’s Frontier & Hunting Accoutrements Many of these Gun’s are museum showpieces that will never come on the market again. I know you will enjoy owning them as much as the previous generations have and that you will consider adding them to your collection. For this is a truly remarkable collection, holding a frontier gun that “Won the West” is an exciting experience. I look forward to hearing from you. Best Regards Gary

Terms: ANY item may be returned for ANY reason within 7 days of receipt for a full and immediate refund, after that it is non-refundable. I only accept and issue written opinions and no guns may be disassembled. I do business the “Old Fashion Way”, all prices are NET with no trading or discounts, there are NO hidden fees, and there is NO buyers premium. FREE fully insured delivery on all orders over $25,000. All other orders shipped at actual costs only, via fully insured FedEx® delivery. Arkansas residents please remit sales tax. Written condition reports are available upon request. Interest Free Layaway: “ I have never charged a collector or a museum Interest and I NEVER will”. I offer interest FREE layaway plans to suit your budget. Whether a collector or a museum, I will invoice interest free per your requirements. I PRIDE myself on 30 years of Integrity, Ethics and Professional conduct. Buy: I am a constant and avid buyer of all Historical items and Art. Please call on any new discoveries, collections, and estates that you have. I especially like original finds and new discovery items that have never been offered before. I am willing to make immediate payment for them within 24 hours of receipt.

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Frontier Weapons - Lifetime Collection of a Gentleman • August 2008 Sale 141 • www.GaryHendershott.NET


INDIAN TRADE GUNS 1790-1860

Lot 1

Lot 2

W Ketland & Co Chiefs Presentation Fusil. The fusil has a Bow & quiver design engraved into the side plate. The stock wrist is raised carved around the barrel lug tang. A classic Indian Head escutcheon early.

Very good

Flintlock Trade Fusil W. Ketland & Co., pre 1813 early flat serpentine, wrist escutcheon. Early goose neck hammer, in .54C cal. 46” barrel. Early high crown larger cast brass tacks in Indian Council circle right side butt stock. Iron ram rod. Rare.

$5200

Very good

$7400

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Gary Hendershott • 501.258.1861 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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Lot 3

Lot 4

Lot 5

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Hudson Bay Indian Trade Gun ca. 1870

Hudson Bay Indian Trade gun with Serpentine side plate

Indian Chief ’s Grade Trade musket ca. 1830’s

Indian Trade Fusil by Barnett in original percussion configuration ca. 1870. Seated Fox Hudson Bay impression on lock plate. Brass wire wrist repair on stock. Numerous early high crown brass tacks in an Indian Council Ring tacked pattern on right side of stock. Additional tacks run parallel to brass butt plate. Large brass serpentine side plate.

$6350

Barnett Indian Trade Fusil in .54 cal with brass serpentine side plate. The fusil exhibits extensive field use with no visible marks or dates evident. The Running Fox impression on the stock near the butt is visible as well as a faint Hudson Bay Tombstone Fox on the lock plate.

Ketland & Alpert Indian Presentation Fusil ca. 1830’s. Hogs Head & Horn on side plate & butt plate. Indian Head silver wrist escutcheon. Bow, quiver, shield & arrow side plate, trigger guard decoration. Iron ram rod; R.OW. Stamp between London proofs.

Frontier Weapons - Lifetime Collection of a Gentleman • August 2008 Sale 141 • www.GaryHendershott.NET

Very good

$4200

$6450


Lot 6

Indian Flintlock Fusil Parker Field dated 1870 serpentine side plate very popular with Indians in the remote northern regions where cartridge ammunition was often scarce and not available, (i.e.) Blackfoot, Pagan, Flathead, and Blood & Cree. Shows significant use.

Lot 7

Very good

T. Ketland Chief ’s grade presentation Northwest Fusil in .54 cal. Early London proof markings, converted to percussion. Hogs head on lock behind hammer and small headed fox in circle on barrel forward of London markings on barrel which has been a shortened to 32”. Octagonal to round portion of barrel is 15 inches. High crown brass tacks on each side of wrist; fancy brass wrist escutcheon. 5-1/4” long tit terminated, two large screws fastened with small screw toward the tit. Large wide butt plate extends 4” on top of engraved butt stock. This gun speaks volumes of frontier Indian usage.

Lot 8

Flintlock Rifle, in .50 cal. ca. 1770’s. Transitions from octagon to round over a length of 13-1/2”. The 46” barrel is secured to the full stock by 4 sets of pins, two pins at each location about half inch spacing. The trigger guard is 10” in length and extends half way up the butt stock.

Very good

$5950

$4850

$2400

Gary Hendershott • 501.258.1861 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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Lot 9

J. Fordney Percussion Fur Trade Contract Rifle. The rifle was made per contract with the American Fur Co., ca.18301840. These rifles were carried by trappers and traded to Indian’s for furs. This rifle was pictured in Indian Artifacts Magazines, 5th Edition; a simple brass tack Indian decoration is on the butt stock. A Museum quality Indian gun from the Dave Hrachovy Collection. The Northwest Gun, by Charles E Hanson Jr. Also, records from the office of Indian affairs contracts for treaty, annuity rifles, lists Jacob Fordney who on Nov 7, 1837 was contracted to make 250 of these rifles for Indians at $13 each, a expensive gun in 1837!

Lot 10

Lot 11

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U. S. Flintlock Contract Rifle by J. Fordney, ca. 1830’s, bored out to .54 cal with a 32 ½ inch long barrel. Patch box, double set triggers, these are the classic rifles that were used in the Rockies by trappers, Indians, mountain men, scouts and trail blazers. With brass tacks on the stock.

Model 1807 US Flintlock “Indian carbine” in .54 cal and dated 1809 with 33 ½ inch barrel total issued of 1,202. This is the 1st Official US Arsenal made carbine also the 1st Indian Department order. Converted to percussion as 99% are unless re-converted.

Frontier Weapons - Lifetime Collection of a Gentleman • August 2008 Sale 141 • www.GaryHendershott.NET

Very good

$7200

Very good Plus

$8600

$7800


Indian Trade / Frontiersmen Flintlock Pistols

During the period from around 1790 to the 1840’s a brisk demand for powerful belt/sash pistols was created. The pistols largely became available across the northwest, far west and Canada to serve the fur trade industry. Pistols were stocked at trading posts, fur trapping companies, fort stores, rendezvous, etc. A significant number of pistols were ordered by US and Canadian Government agencies for Indian treaty annuities & treaty gifts. A significant number were traded to Indians for furs. Mountain men often carried several pistols to serve as backup to their slow reloading, muzzle loading long arms. Handy at night and easy to carry while trapping and working around camp. To meet the demand several makers in Birmingham and London, England--the most prolific and predominant pistols are those made by the Ketlands of Birmingham, who were ready and capable. Proof marks distinguish whether they were made pre or after 1813. Stocks are maple, furniture is brass, and barrels are iron or brass. Barrels and overall length vary. Although originally (usually) sold as pairs, few such matching pistols exist today. Historically pistols on the frontier have been eclipsed by their big brothers. The sleek serpentine side plate trade fusils. Books, articles, general data relevant to these pistols is meager compared to almost all other arms of the period. The best resources books originate in Canada. Another group of pistols occasionally encountered are identified being marked “Extra Sharpe” in large stamped letters on brass barrels”. According to available data it appears these are the most significant Indian associated pistols. Although there are quite a few markers and distinctive ornamentation it appears that less than a handful of many of this type are known to exist and only in very advanced collections.

Lot 12

Extra Sharpe Trade Pistol, brass barrel professional period conversion to percussion.

$1100

Phone Orders Accepted - Call Gary Direct (501) 258-1861

Gary Hendershott • 501.258.1861 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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Lot 13

Lot 14

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W. Ketland & Co Indian Fur trade pistol. In .54 cal with 8 ½ inch iron barrel. The stock has been decorated with early high crown brass tacks.

Very good

$2400

T. Ketland & Co. Flintlock Indian trade pistol, iron barrel old museum collection tag. With post 1813 Birmingham proofs and tombstone griffin markings between proof stamps. Broad arrow stamped on the tang denoting British government ownership. These types of pistols were given as gifts to their Indian allies in America. Ringed barrel transition, brass wrist escutcheon. Indian presentation grade pistol. Heavy barrel with exceptional overall quality.

Frontier Weapons - Lifetime Collection of a Gentleman • August 2008 Sale 141 • www.GaryHendershott.NET

Fine

$2800


Lot 15

Pair of rare Extra Sharpe Trade Pistols. Original Flintlock unbridled pan post 1813 Birmingham proofs, dark patina brass barrels.

Very good

$4600

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Gary Hendershott • 501.258.1861 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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Lot 16

Lot 17

W. Ketland & Co. original Flintlock pistol iron barrel crown military proofs and broad arrow. Barrel shortened with brass muzzle band attached, a Belgian proof is stamped behind the “London” stamp on barrel.

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$1550

W. Ketland & Co. original Flintlock trade pistol, iron barrel Tombstone griffin between proof marks, wrist escutcheon, and wood chip left muzzle.

Lot 18

W. Ketland & Co. original Flintlock trade pistol iron barrel with brass band near muzzle. Acorn tipped trigger guard. Unbridled pan pre 1813 Birmingham proof marks. Attractive early pistol with wrist escutcheon.

Frontier Weapons - Lifetime Collection of a Gentleman • August 2008 Sale 141 • www.GaryHendershott.NET

$1550

Fine

$2475


Lot 19

W. Ketland & Co original Flintlock, brass barrel with Tombstone griffin between the post 1813 proof marks; wood chip behind lock plate, hammer rough.

Lot 20

Lot 21

W Ketland & Co. brass barrel trade pistol, post 1813 proof marks with Tombstone Griffin stamped between proofs. Professional conversion to percussion.

W Ketland & Co. original Flintlock trade pistol brass barrel. Tombstone Griffin between proof marks, post 1813.

$1550

$1100

$1750

Gary Hendershott • 501.258.1861 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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Lot 22

Lot 23

Lot 24

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Sharpe Trade Pistol post 1813 proofs with Tombstone Griffin stamped between proofs, iron barrel, broad arrow on hammer.

Geo. Jones Original Flintlock London 1790, brass barrel trade pistol with pre 1813 proofs.

Overall, very good plus

Fine

$2250

J Henry American made Contract Flintlock pistol, ca. 1808, naval boarding pistol variation, missing belt hook attachment barrel, rough but smooth—16-1/2”, and overall length.

Frontier Weapons - Lifetime Collection of a Gentleman • August 2008 Sale 141 • www.GaryHendershott.NET

$1750

$5500


Lot 27

$1750

Lot 25

John Jones & Son Original Flintlock trade pistol. London ca 1810 with pre 1813 Birmingham proofs iron barrel.

Lot 26

T. Bolton & Co. English Naval Flint Lock pistol. The belt clip is an original. The barrel has been shortened for use as a secondary sash pistol, a typical armament on the western frontier.

English Tower Flint Lock Horse pistol. This war of 1812 vintage pistol is engraved on the brass trigger guard with regimental identification “1st H.A.15” the pistol is in very good condition with silvery smooth finish.

Very good

Very good

$650

$1350

I sell the “Old Fashion Way”, all prices are NET with NO hidden fees and NO buyers premium. ANY item may be returned for ANY reason. Gary Hendershott • 501.258.1861 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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Lot 28

Lot 29

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French Flintlock Horse Pistol. During the civil war the Confederacy was desperate for arms of all kinds. Thanks to the English/French rivalry with the United States, France made a significant number of their Charelville Flintlock .69 cal. Horse pistols available to the Confederate agents. The pistol is the original configuration and in very good condition.

German Horse Pistol Fri Arneth A Mergalheim J. Fridrich Arneth Octagon to Round barrel.

Frontier Weapons - Lifetime Collection of a Gentleman • August 2008 Sale 141 • www.GaryHendershott.NET

Very good

$1800

$1200


Early Plains Rifles & Pistols 1820-1860

Lot 30

Lot 31

John Dreppard Flintlock, Indian Chief ’s Grade Flintlock rifle converted to percussion. The records of the American Fur Trade Company are very complete at the NY Historical Society Library. They include orders for Flintlock Lancaster rifles made by John Dreppard, Lancaster, Pennsylvania Dec 30, 1830, for 24-30 rifles. These original records include reference to double set triggers and stained maple stocks with checkered grips. Identical to this gun which is believed to be part of this 1830 contract with the American Fur Trade company.

Leman Full Stock Percussion Trade Rifle in .50 cal. This rifle has the classic ornate Leman patch box. The barrel length is 48” long with a brass muzzle band, and double set triggers. The original rear sight has been removed and a wide buck horn rear sight has been positioned closer to the breech end of the barrel. It has a dovetail Rocky Mountain front sight, and old style straight butt stock cheek piece. A fine large caliber 1840’s side drum percussion frontier rifle.

Fine

Very good

$7950

$3600

Phone Orders Accepted - Call Gary Direct (501) 258-1861

Gary Hendershott • 501.258.1861 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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Lot 32

Lot 33

Lot 34

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Chiefs Grade Lancaster Contract Flintlock Rifle by Martin Smith cc 1833 “The Northwest Gun” Charles E Hanson Jr., Chapter 9 “Indian Rifles” contracts for Lancaster pattern, “the standard American Kentucky”, include Martin Smith 1831/36 period early contract rifles are rarely available on the collector market.

Leman Full Stock Percussion trade rifle in .54 cal. with a brass band 3” from the muzzle, and long 44”barrel. Early straight cheek plate. Henry Leman, Lancaster, Pennsylvania started his gun shop in 1834 and continued to supply guns to the US Indian Bureau and fur trade companies into the 1860’s. Ordinance Report 115 listed arms recovered in 1877 from hostile Indians which included 94 Leman’s plains rifles such as this, as well as 6 plains rifles by J. Henry & Son and 6 by Samuel Hawken. Thus a popular gun used extensively by the Plains Indians

Fine

$7750

Rough, loss of wood on right near lock plate

$3800

Very good

$6250

Percussion Child & Pratt, St. Louis Plains Rifle, iron mounted half stock in .47 cal. 45” heavy barrel, one inch across the flats double set triggers. Buck horn rear sight and rocky mountain dove tail front sight. Clipped tail lock.

Frontier Weapons - Lifetime Collection of a Gentleman • August 2008 Sale 141 • www.GaryHendershott.NET


Lot 35

Lot 36

Chiefs Grade Lancaster contract Flintlock Rifle by Henry Gibbs ca 1833. “The Northwest Gun” Charles E Hanson Jr., Chapter 9 “Indian Rifles” contracts for Lancaster pattern, “the standard American Kentucky”, include Henry Gibbs, Lancaster. 1831/36 period early contract rifles are rarely available on the collector market.

Percussion Fusil by H Gibbs, in .54 cal three double keyed full stock, ca. 1830’s round tail on lock. Lock marker is hard to read (believe possible) great feel and balance. Very pleasing overall look and feel. “Of all the guns of the period this would be my choice,” collector. Rare.

Very good

Very good

$6400

$3900

Gary Hendershott • 501.258.1861 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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Lot 37

Lot 38

Lot 39

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Henry Percussion Plains Trade Rifle ca. 1865, in .43 cal. 36” heavy iron mounted plains rifle with double set trigger and rare patch box. Barrel is marked Henry, whose Muzzle loading rifles were prized on the frontier for reliability and function.

Very good

Leman Percussion Trade/Plains Rifle, ca. 1860’s. A .54 cal. rifle (bored out) with rare early style patch box resembling the 1804 Louis & Clark style patch box. The barrel and lock are stamped with the typical Leman markings, the barrel is further stamped Wilson Bro & Co, St. Louis forward of the rear sight. St. Louis marked guns are rare and referred to by advanced collectors as Eastern Frontier/Trade Rifles through St. Louis saw a lot of use on the frontier. A definite advanced collector or museum rifle.

Fine

Kentucky Flintlock, Golden Age Rifle, Full stock in .50 cal. ca.1790, no name or patch box with typical wide but and plate. Incised groove along stock overall a pleasant flowing color. Fine operating condition

Frontier Weapons - Lifetime Collection of a Gentleman • August 2008 Sale 141 • www.GaryHendershott.NET

Fine

$2400

$7850

$2950


Lot 40

Lot 41

Lot 42

Pennsylvania Rifle Works Percussion rifle .46Cal. These rifles were used primarily on the western frontier. Item no. 140 in table VII of Ordnance notes #115 of Oct 1, 1879 lists “small arms captured from hostile Indians” included in this list is a Pennsylvania Rifle Works rifle that had been captured from the Plains Indians.

J Henry & Sons Plains rifle, heavy .50 cal. Iron mounted furniture with two barrel escutcheon’s. Next to Hawken, Henry family rifles were the most recognized and significant rifles on the frontier from 1808 through the 1860’s. Arms include serpentine side plate Indian trade fusils, pistols, and Indian treaty and plains rifles. By far the greatest use of Henry arms was in the American West.

American Flint Lock Pistol with lock by C. Bird & Co, Philadelphia ca. 1810-20. Octagon to round barrel 58Cal. Possible use in war 1812; Pennsylvania Makers Arms were popular on western frontier where it was common for trappers and mountain men to wear several pistols. Especially handy while sleeping & trapping.

Very good

Very good

Very good

$2800

$2700

$2200

Gary Hendershott • 501.258.1861 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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U.S. Army on the Frontier 1840-1880

Lot 43

The Famous Colt Revolving Rifle – Early 1st Model serial # 210

Colt Revolving Rifle – Military issue – ca1855. The rifle is very early 1st Model with twin spurs on the trigger guard serial #210 in .44 Caliber. This was an important arm on the frontier and during the early years of the Civil War. They were the first style rifle issued to the Berdan Sharpshooters. The finish is dark and the metal is lightly pitted overall, illustrative of extensive field use on the frontier. The wood is similarly very dark with usual dings and use characteristics. A Very early Colt revolving rifle

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Frontier Weapons - Lifetime Collection of a Gentleman • August 2008 Sale 141 • www.GaryHendershott.NET

Good

$8500


Lot 44

Lot 45

Lot 46

Derringer Model 1814 US Army Flintlock Rifle .54 Cal. A contract for 2000 of these rifles was awarded to Derringer during the War of 1812. This rifle is considered to be an improved full stock version of the Model 1803. This US Army Derringer contract gun is rarely seen on the collector market.

US Army Model 1807/08 Musket

Very good plus condition

Bridgewater Flintlock Model 1807 Musket, .69 Cal with a long 41” Barrel ca. War of 1812. It has a 2nd style butt stock, with a overall white metal patina. Several variations of this gun are known to exist

Model 1842 Percussion Harpers Ferry Musket. Used on the frontier and during the Mexican war. Made ca. 1844-55 approximately 100,000 Harper Ferry Muskets were issued many of which saw use during the Civil War and their parts were used by the Confederate government to make the famous Richmond muskets issued to the Confederate Army.

Very good

Very good plus

$6000

$2800

$2350

Gary Hendershott • 501.258.1861 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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Lot 47

Lot 48

Lot 49

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Model 1833 Hall/North US Breech loading percussion carbine in.58cal. Accompanied by a Triangular integral bayonet blade by Simeon North ca. 1834-39 just 7163 of these guns were produced. The model 1833 is historically significant since it was the 1st percussion weapon and breech loader officially adopted for military service globally. Les than 400 are estimated to exist today, this model is rarely seen on the collector market.

Fine

Sharps Model 1853 US slant breech carbine serial# 10107. John Brown Model brass hardware. Serial range from 9000 to approx 19,000.

Springfield Model 1870 Trapdoor Rifle, .50/70 cal. The model 1870 was the last of the Springfield trapdoors utilizing the .50/70 cartridge, it incorporated amongst other features a improved breech. It resembles the model 1868, however, was a much smaller production of only 11,000 vs. 50,000 of the Model 1868’s.

Frontier Weapons - Lifetime Collection of a Gentleman • August 2008 Sale 141 • www.GaryHendershott.NET

Very good

$6500

$4600

$1450


The 1st US gun to use the .58 caliber Minnie Ball

Lot 50

Lot 51

Springfield Model 1861 Rifle Musket, the model 1861 with its distinctive flat barrel bands is eagerly sought by civil war collectors since they were in use early and throughout the civil war. The lock plate is stamped 1861.

Lot 52

Very good

$2800

Very good. Date stamped on barrel

$3300

Model 1855, US Percussion Rifle Musket .58Cal. This model was used extensively in the Civil War from the outbreak to the armistice. It was the 1st US martial arm to use the .58Cal. Minnie Ball issued unserialized

Allin Conversion Model 1865 Rifle, Springfield US breech loading rifle Cal. .58 rim fire, modified from an 1861 Springfield rifled musket 2 band variations. It has the correct 26 inch barrel with the two band stock.

Very good

$1400

Gary Hendershott • 501.258.1861 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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Lot 53

Lot 54

Lot 55

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Springfield Model 1868, .50/70 cal. rifle, ser# 161270, 51,000 were made, between 1868-72. This is the 1st pivoting breech block, design by E. Allin used with modifications until the 1890’s. The rifle stock finish is weathered away and a large crude deep initial “JB” is carved in the stock behind the trigger guard. The collector has always referred to this rifle as his almost “Jim Bridger ” gun! Functional, original & sound frontier rifle.

Very good

Spencer Repeating military rifle Serial# 2543, in .52 cal. 1863-64, with 11,470 delivered. Custer’s 5th Michigan Cavalry was armed with rifles Ser#100-1550 this rifle is 1000, numbers above & was delivered pre-Gettysburg. An early rifle. Modified by US Army part’s in 1865, with stabler cut off, rounded frame slot and beveled hammer face.

Springfield Model 1870 Trapdoor Rifle ca. 1870

$1550

Very good

Springfield Model 1870 Trapdoor Rifle .50/70Cal., ca 1870-1873. The early Springfield trapdoor rifles were known as needle guns by Indians due to the long firing pin and highly valued as Buffalo hunting rifles in the early hide hunting period on the plains.

Frontier Weapons - Lifetime Collection of a Gentleman • August 2008 Sale 141 • www.GaryHendershott.NET

$2950

Very good

$1600


Lot 56

A Very Rare 1st Model Allin Conversion 1865

Lot 57

Lot 58

Allin Conversion Model 1865 Breech-loading rifle modified from an 1861 Springfield US Rifled Musket. This is the very first conversion employing the trapdoor breech block mechanism by the Springfield Arsenal. Using a .58 Cal. Rim fire cartridge, only 5000 of these guns were converted under the Allin patent. There are likely less than 500 of these rifles existing today and they rarely come onto the collecting market. Their Cartridges themselves are extremely rare.

Allin Conversion Model 1866 rifle. Designed by Erskine S. Allin and altered at Springfield armory using Model 1863, 3-band percussion rifled muskets, made famous at Wagon Box fight at Fort Kearney,. Jim Bridger was chief of scouts. Bill Cody named his 1866, rifle Lucretia Borgia, which is currently on display in the Cody Museum, Wyoming. Sitting Bull used a prized 1866; many 1866’s were captured and used by Plains Indians during the Indian wars.

Springfield Allin conversion similar to the ones used at Fort Kearney in 1868

Very good, wood loss around near hinge point of trapdoor mechanism

Very good

Model 1866 Springfield Allin conversion, .50/70Cal. Rifle, ca. 1866. The Allin conversion rifle is well known for it’s use by a group of woodcutters that were sent out from Fort Kearney, along with detail of 20 US soldiers from Company 8 who together held off 3,000 warriors led by Sioux Chief Red Cloud using these Allin conversion rifle’s., during the famous Wagon Box fight near Fort Kearney in 1868. They formed their Conestoga wagons in a circle and cut gun portholes in their sides. This was the first significant western use of the newly introduced powerful .50/70Cal. cartridge. Metal pleasant gray patina.

$3500

$1600

Very good

$1600

Gary Hendershott • 501.258.1861 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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Lot 59

Lot 60

Colt 3rd Model Dragoon Revolver Serial #17451 martially marked dragoon fitted for shoulder stock. The revolver is a 4 screw with a dovetailed folding rear sight and has a relatively uniform brown patina. Formerly in the Dupont collection.

1860 Army Percussion Revolver Serial #78711. Car touche faint, original grip, all matching numbers. The 1860 army was the primary revolver of the US in the Civil War. Serial numbers most closely related are 78700-78710 were issued to the 7th Michigan Cavalry. Many of these revolvers were later issued by the US Gov’t to Indians as relocation annuity. Approx 38 of this model was reported captured from Indians in ordinance notes 115, Oct 1879.

Lot 61

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Fine

$2600

Colt Model 1860 Army revolver . 44 cal. serial #14531, 4 screw cut for a shoulder stock. Made in September 1861 with original grips and car touche. All matching serial numbers with a close serial #14612, that was carried by a member of the 11th Kentucky Volunteer Cavalry.

Frontier Weapons - Lifetime Collection of a Gentleman • August 2008 Sale 141 • www.GaryHendershott.NET

$14500

Very Good

$2800


Lot 62

Model 1836 Flintlock Pistols by R Johnson dated 1842, 54 CAL. 8-1/2’ barrels An improved version of the model 1826 and the last martial pistol produced in Flintlock Regarded as the finest made, handsomest, and most reliable of all military flintlock pistols. The primary arms of dragoon were in the Mexican war. The metal has turned a Gray/Brown smooth patina with traces of case on hammer area. The stocks are pristine with excellent cartouches overall fine condition. No apparent cleaning etc.

Lot 63

Lot 64

Excellent

R. Johnson1836 military pistol in .54 cal. made in 1842 and issued to the 7th US Dragoons stationed in Santa Fe, New Mexico during and after the Mexican War protecting the traders along the Santa Fe Trail. A fine and historic Army pistol with conversion to percussion and clearly stamped on the stock S.F. 7

Colt Baby Dragoon Revolver all matching oval cylinder stops, 5” barrel, Serial #9338.

Overall, very Good

$6500

$1800

$6500

Gary Hendershott • 501.258.1861 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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Lot 65

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Remington 1871 US Army Rolling Block Pistol .50 cal. center fire inspector stamps, excellent stock Car touche. A beautiful pistol.

Fine

Lot 66

Dragoon Pepperbox, Allen & Thurber Grafton, Mass. Cc 1837-42. Fluted 6” barrel, in .36 cal. not engraved. No. 63 between one nipple. No grip escutcheon, wide back strap. One of the best selling handguns of popular early on the frontier with the military mountain men, wagon trains, 49ers etc. Serious competition with colts Patterson revolver used in Seminole, and Mexican wars. This Grafton collected from Paul Henry directly at a Cleveland collectors show in the 90’s (a fine and helpful gentlemen). Only a handful known.

Very good

Lot 67

Dainty Grafton Pepperbox, Allen & Thurber, cc 1837 First Allen model and rarest in .28 cal. 3” fluted barrel, engraved frame. Small characters (1/16”) Allen & Thurber, Grafton, Mass. Small Allen’s patent on side of frame. Acquired from Horst cc 1990.

Very good plus

Frontier Weapons - Lifetime Collection of a Gentleman • August 2008 Sale 141 • www.GaryHendershott.NET

$1750

$8500

$7800


Lot 68

Allen’s patent dragoon Pepperbox 2nd Model, marked AW Spies, fluted 6” barrel.

Very good

Lot 69

Allen & Thurber Dragoon Pepperbox, transitional Grafton-Norwich. Covered percussion nipples, 5” barrel acquired from Paul Henry & pictured in his book. Ethan Allen & Allen & Wheelock.

Fine

Lot 70

Pepperbox, Robbin & Lawrence, ca. 1851-54 ring trigger Cal. 5 shot .31 cal., barrel length is 4-1/2” fluted, with engraved frame.

$4900

$2400

Very good

$1400

I sell the “Old Fashion Way”, all prices are NET with NO hidden fees and NO buyers premium. ANY item may be returned for ANY reason.

Gary Hendershott • 501.258.1861 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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Winchester, Colt Revolvers & Repeating Arms

“60 Shots per minute Henry’s Repeating Riffle is the most effective weapon in the World.” This rare Henry 1st model was bought by Lt. Wallingford, 33rd Indiana Volunteers, after he got out of Libby Prison. Design by Oliver Winchester. It became know as “A gun that could be loaded on Sunday and be fired all week.” Lot 71

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1st Model Henry Rifle in .44 r.f. cal. serial #330. Only the earliest production Henry rifles were made without a lever latch. A rare and much sought after feature that positively denotes this rifle as a 1st model. This early Henry was carried by Capt, Estes Wallingford of the 33rd Indiana Infantry during the civil war and has been in his family since then. The family maintained copies of Estes’ letters etc. going back to his experiences in California. During the Gold Rush On his venture to the gold fields. He joined the Union army in as a sergeant by virtue of his age and experience. He was captured by the Confederates held as a POW in Libby Prison in the Confederate capitol of Richmond, Virginia until an exchange was made. In prison he heard confederates complaining about “the gun loaded on Sunday that fired all week”. Upon release from Libby he quickly acquired this Henry in reprisal of his imprisonment. Estes was quickly promoted up to the rank of 1st Lt. and later Staff Adjutant in the 33rd Indiana infantry Regiment in the Army of the Cumberland under General George Thomas. Copies of his 49er gold rush letters from California and Oregon, and his civil war letters and military record’s are included.

Frontier Weapons - Lifetime Collection of a Gentleman • August 2008 Sale 141 • www.GaryHendershott.NET

Very good

$55,000


Lot 72

Model 1866 Winchester Octagon barrel Rifle with the rare Henry marked barrel in .44 r.f. cal. Serial # 16357 This is an exceptional early and sought after Winchester rifle with period sling. The model 1866 Winchester fired the same .44 cal. Henry flat rim fire cartridge as did the legendary Henry Rifle. After Winchester bought the Henry firearms company, only their earliest productions models retained the Henry barrel address. Thereafter all of the 66’s were Winchester marked.

Fine

$14,500

Phone Orders Accepted - Call Gary Direct (501) 258-1861

Gary Hendershott • 501.258.1861 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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Lot 73

Lot 74

Henry Belt Set

Henry Cartridge Belt made on the western frontier, with 5 rare Henry .44 rim fire cartridge’s still in the loops.

$950

Winchester Model 1892 Rifle, in.38/40 cal. This attractive rifle is in good working order with good bore. The finish is a pleasant silver gray overall with good wood &well taken care of by it’s owner.

Lot 75

Trade Knife Winchester Serial #1025 with 7¾ inch long blade.

Phone Orders Accepted - Call Gary Direct (501) 258-1861 32 |

Very good

Frontier Weapons - Lifetime Collection of a Gentleman • August 2008 Sale 141 • www.GaryHendershott.NET

$700

$60


Lot 76

Lot 77

Winchester Model 1873 1st Model Rifle .44/40 cal. with special order 30” octagon? barrel serial #14175 made in 1876. Less than a dozen of these long barrel Winchester’s are known to exist.

Fine condition

Winchester Model 1873 late 1st Model saddle ring carbine, .44/40 cal. serial #9336 made in 1875. This was the first Winchester production lever action model made in this caliber. This is a scarce pre 76’ gun and is in fine condition.

Fine

$14,500

$9000

Gary Hendershott • 501.258.1861 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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Lot 78

Lot 79

Winchester Model 1873 Rifle, in .44/40 cal. Serial# 37055R. The original finish has turned an even dark patina. The rifle has been contemporarily engraved with an Indian War Bonnet head on one side of the receiver and a Buffalo on the other and One of a Thousand on the top barrel flat forward of the receiver. This legend is also a contemporary marking and is not offered as Winchester factory 1 of 1000 engraving.

Lot 80

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Very good

Colt Army Model 1860 Army .44 Caliber in Original Holster. The major revolver of the Civil War, this serial # 16563 was made in the 1st year of the war in 1861. It is interesting to note that serial # 16557 is recorded as being carried in Company A, of the Loudoun County ( Virginia) Rangers in the Confederate Army.

Frontier Weapons - Lifetime Collection of a Gentleman • August 2008 Sale 141 • www.GaryHendershott.NET

$5100

Very good

Winchester Model 1886 saddle ring carbine .40/82 cal. The .40/82 cartridge was a favorite Elk hunting cartridge in the mountains of the west. The Model 1886 was designed by John M. Browning and adopted by Winchester. Teddy Roosevelt was an enthusiast and used this model 1886 Winchester on many of his western hunting trips.

$1600

$3000


Lot 81

Colt Model 1871-2, Open Top Revolver in .44 r.f. caliber Henry cartridge, serial #1602. The predecessor of the Colt Model 1873 single action, many of these early model’s found their way to Mexico and their survival rate is less than 10%, with less than 700 in existence today. A rare and desirable gun in very good operating condition with a silvery patina.

Lot 82

Smith & Wesson 2nd Model Schofield single action “nickel plated” revolver.45 cal with 7” barrel serial #3729 made ca. 1876. While the Smith and Wesson factory records indicate that no U.S. Contract Schofield revolvers were shipped nickel plated, some officers were known to have their revolvers plated by Adams plating company and are quite rare.

Very good

Excellent

$6500

$9500

Interest Free Layaway Available “ I have never charged a collector or a museum Interest and I NEVER will”. Gary Hendershott • 501.258.1861 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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35


Gatling Gun - Model 1876 on Original Carriage “The Custer Gun”

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Frontier Weapons - Lifetime Collection of a Gentleman • August 2008 Sale 141 • www.GaryHendershott.NET


Gatling Gun - Model 1876 on Original Carriage - “The Custer Gun” Lot 83: This model 1876 Gatling Gun is considered a Classic among collectors. Only 18 of this particular model were ever made and only 7 exist today. It is the most desirable of all Gatling guns both for it’s visual appeal and the fact that it is considered “The Indian War Custer Gun.” The M-1876 was the model that General Custer had for the 7th Cavalry in Dakota Territory but decided not to take on that fateful day at Little Big Horn. This serial number #179 Model 1876 Gatling gun was sold by the U.S. Government to Bannerman after the turn of the century, who kept it as a display and never offered it for sale until his company closed in the 1950’s. We believe that Don Toppel purchased it from Bannerman (he authored the book “The Gatling Gun” in 1971.) A private collector in New Jersey bought it in the 1970’s, owned it for approximately 10 years and sold it to another collector in New York in 1988. I purchased the gun directly from him in October 1999. It is without doubt, the finest Model 1876 Gatling gun in existence and the “only $330,000. one” in private hands .

Gary Hendershott • 501.258.1861 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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Custer and the Indian Wars 1867-1880 Custer’s 7th cavalry stationed at Fort Abraham Lincoln, Bismarck, Dakota was re-armed with the new Springfield Model 1873 trapdoor carbines 45/70 in 1874-5. Initially these carbines used the lighter loaded 45/55 cartridge which is what the 7th Cavalry used at the Little Big Horn fight. The 7th cavalry Ordnance Summary for quarter ending March 31st, 1876 lists 639 Springfield .45Cal. trapdoor carbines with 9 companies reporting. The total regimental issues were approx 1,000. Custer rode into the fight on June 25, 1876 commanding companies C, E, F, I & L and lost his entire command as well as all their weapons, Major Reno commanded companies, A, G & M and Captain Benteen commanded companies D, H & K as well as Custer’s pack train, losing over 50 additional troopers and scouts during the battle. While 1st Model 1873 carbines between serial number 1 and 43,700 are considered possible Custer 7th cavalry carbines, a much more likely grouping is in the 16,000-22,000 serial number range and 31,000-36,000 range. Custer carbines that still exist today should show significant wear and battle use. An US Ordnance Directive in 1879 required that all 1st Model 1873 trapdoors be returned to the Springfield Arsenal where they were disassembled for parts and were destroyed. Today’s existing original 1st Model 1873 Arms avoided the recall and subsequent attrition by way of Deserter’s, Indian capture, scouts and renegades, these overlooked and secreted carbines are much rarer than anyone has previously recognized. Prices have increased significantly since the Gun Report article in June 2006, and will continue to do so as collectors and museums recognize that these Custer range carbines are in fact very rare. Investing, not spending.

This Chart illustrates the officially recorded battles and deployments of the US Cavalry in the west. The number of patrols, escorts, scouts, incidents and countless: months of deprivation dealing with weather, terrain, shelter, forage, food and water must have been staggering. Rough use of these trapdoor carbines and their eventual destruction by the government has resulted in only a few surviving 1st model Custer range trapdoor carbines. It is also interesting to note tht the “ Buffalo Soldier’s” were the most heavily engaged cavalry regiments.

I sell the “Old Fashion Way”, all prices are NET with NO hidden fees and NO buyers premium. ANY item may be returned for ANY reason. 38 |

Frontier Weapons - Lifetime Collection of a Gentleman • August 2008 Sale 141 • www.GaryHendershott.NET


INDIAN CAPTURED - CUSTER CARBINE #18852 - 7th CAVALRY CO. C (Lot 84) In a letter written to a collector/client in Colorado dated Aug 2, 1983, the highly respected collector dealer, Edward Benson of Kansas City, Mo; wrote: “I purchased this gun from an individual who found it in the woods in Montana.” The stock has many old brass tacks with a large number missing and shows significant use and wear. The serial number located on the receiver was deliberately filed off by it’s Indian captor. Recently this carbine was conveyed to the State of Utah Department of Public Safety, Division of Law Enforcement & Technical Services; where the serial number was reestablished through a chemical etching process. “Microscopic examination revealed the serial number on the weapon to be 18852. In addition, to the right of this number, in a different, larger script was the number Seven (crossed in the middle in the European style) with the letter “c”. These symbols appear to have been placed on the weapon after the original serial number and after the weapon had been case hardened. The restored number appears as 18852, 7C.” The letter is signed by the Bureau Chief. Company “C” was one of five companies that rode with Custer to their death at Last Stand Hill. Company “C” was commanded by General Custer’s brother Captain Tom Custer. Ordnance notes No. 115, Oct 1, 1879 records 17 carbines and notes two additional carbines with the serial numbers effaced by filing such as this one, as having been recovered from Indians at Slim Buttes, Montana in Oct, 1876 shortly after the battle of Little Big Horn. Three of the recorded serial numbers re-captured are in the 18,000 serial number range, which is one of the prime ranges of Custer carbines known to exist. In addition, Captain Henry Jackson, 7th Cavalry turned in serial number 18383 as having become unserviceable after the Battle of Little Big Horn. In the most complete data base which lists Custer range carbines only 20 carbines in the 18,000 range are known to exist today. This carbine is believed to be one of the only two known to exist as documented by the 1879 Ordnance report, that was captured by the Indian’s during the Battle of Little Big Horn, then recaptured from them by the US Cavalry at Slim Buttes, Montana. A historically important and rare Battle of Little Big Horn Custer’s 7th Cavalry Carbine. Accompanied by: Forensic Analysis and Provenance

$130,000

Gary Hendershott • 501.258.1861 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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Lot 85

Lot 86

40 |

Custer Carbine

Custer Carbine

Springfield Model 1873 Trapdoor carbine (1st model) Ser#18,486 in the prime 7th cavalry range. Ser#18,489, Feb 15,1881 surrendered by “Crow King” (B Green Note); Ser#18,383, 7th cavalry sent to Springfield Arsenal, Aug 1877 by Capt Jackson 7th cavalry.

Model 1873 Springfield Trapdoor Carbine, Serial #18087. An original issue Custer Range Carbine in the prime 7th Cavalry serial range. Carbines under the serial number range of 43,700 are generally accepted as being possible Custer Battle survivors. However, statistical analysis of recorded battle associated carbines places several carbine ranges as the most feasible and likely range. The most likely ranges are from 17,000-22,000 and 33,000-38,000. The number one range are trapdoors in the serial # range 21,000 followed by the 18,000 serial number range. These ranges account for approx 80% of documented Custer 7th Cavalry – battle of Little Big Horn trapdoor carbines.

Frontier Weapons - Lifetime Collection of a Gentleman • August 2008 Sale 141 • www.GaryHendershott.NET

Very good

Very good

$7700

$7700


Lot 87

Lot 88

Custer Carbine

Rare Custer Range Springfield Trapdoor Serial #17410, Model 1873. This is the only 17,000 Custer Range serial number ever seen by the collector. Only forty of these guns in this range are even known to exist today. 17 of these carbines are listed in US Army records, # 17025 is in the Smithsonian’s collection and is identified to Sioux Chief Touches the Clouds, cousin of Crazy Horse and was with him when he died in 1877 (there is a photo of him with a trapdoor carbine). Eight other carbines from this 17,000 range were returned to the US Springfield Arsenal by order of Captain Benteen as being unserviceable after the Battle of Little Big Horn. A General order issued by the US Army in 1878 required all 1st Model 1873’s returned to the Armory and retired from service, dismantled for parts and destroyed makes this ultra rare carbine a museum showpiece.

Custer Range US Springfield Trapdoor carbine serial # 21270 Captain Benteen turned in serial # 21313 after the Little Big Horn battle

A rare Custer range 1st Model 1873 Trapdoor carbine serial # 21270 in the prime Custer 7th Cavalry range from the battle of Little Big Horn. The 21M range carbines represent the largest group of 7th Cavalry Indian & trooper identified carbines documented to date. This carbine #21270 is one of less than 30 carbines in the 21M range known to exist. Historically, it is important to note that serial #21209 was recaptured from the Indians shortly after the Custer battle. Additionally, serial #21313 was turned into the Springfield Arsenal as unserviceable shortly after the battle by Capt Benteen, who commanded Companies E, F & G of the 7th Cavalry during the Battle of Little Big Horn. This gun has a very high probability of being used at the Custer battle, as it falls firmly between two documented 7th Cavalry Little Big Horn used Trapdoor carbines.

$11,500

$9500

Phone Orders Accepted - Call Gary Direct (501) 258-1861

Gary Hendershott • 501.258.1861 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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41


Lot 89

Lot 90

42 |

Custer Carbine

1st Model 1873 Springfield Trapdoor Carbine .45/70 cal. Serial #33993. A possible Custer Little Big Horn carbine. It shows considerable frontier use. US Cavalry Carbine’s #33911 & #33941 were turned into the Springfield Armory after the Custer battle and were tested at armory in July 1876 due to public outcry that Custer and his men were under armed at the Battle of Little Big Horn. This gun is possibly Indian captured as it illustrates rough usage. Excellent Custer range, within known guns tested after the Battle.

Springfield 1873 Regimental Rifle ca. 1874

Springfield 1873 1st Model Rifle .45/70 serial #12478 .US Army Regimental marked on the butt stock with bold number 53 over Co. B over 8th US Regiment. Issued in 1874 prior to the Little Big Horn. Original configuration, no visible car touche or firing proof.

Frontier Weapons - Lifetime Collection of a Gentleman • August 2008 Sale 141 • www.GaryHendershott.NET

Very good

Very good

$6200

$1200


Lot 91

Lot 92

Model 1873 Trapdoor Rifle 1st Model with Metcalf cartridge holder. The Metcalf cartridge holder was used on trials in the field and is rarely encountered. 1st Model 1873 rifles have become scarce on the collector’s market and values have increased significantly. The first model carbines and rifles were ordered to be turned into the Springfield armory because of physical deficiencies and replaced initially with a limited number of 1877 models to be quickly replaced by the Model 1879 which was the largest group to serve the US Military. The turned in 1873 models were disassembled by the armory and parts sold or scrapped. Existing model 1873 trapdoors in original condition had to evade the recall, by way of army deserters, or Indian capture.

Indian altered Springfield 1861 rifled musket; photographs of Indians in the post civil war (Indian wars) era holding stock modified (shortened) Springfield muskets and rifles. Decoration using period cast brass tacks is often seen.

Very good

$1950

Very good

$2700

We offer Fully Insured FedEx® delivery service.

Gary Hendershott • 501.258.1861 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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Lot 93

Model 1873 Trapdoor Rifle, ser#12536, these 1st model rifles are becoming increasingly scarcer and rifles in the lower serial number ranges much more so. There were US regiments of infantry in the period following the civil war and many were engaged in Indian fights separately or together with the cavalry & scouts on the western frontier addition cavalry regiments were issued rifles sufficient to arm up to 10 troopers in every company. In the 7th cavalry ordinance summary of ordnance in stores in the hands of troops during the 1st quarter ending March 31st, 1876. There were 50, Model 1873 trapdoor rifles recorded. (3 Months prior to the Custer fight) Serial numbers of rifles & carbines reached 28,000 in 1875 by March 31st, 1876 the number is estimated at approx. 47,000.

Rough, no rod

$4600

The rifle butt stock was hit by a bullet entering on the left side and blowing away a large wedge 3 by 4” on the opposite. If the rifle was in use at the time the person was likely injured or worse. Use and abuse including four deep notches under the butt stock are strong evidence of Indian use. Great museum piece.

Lot 94

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Model 1877 Springfield Trapdoor Carbine Ser #87672 approx 3000 made 1877-78 Serial numbers range from approx 75,000 to 115,000. The Model 1877 incorporates a number of design changes which includes a trapdoor in the stock butt plate for a steel ram rod. The issue of the Model 77 was a hasty transition to issue troops in the field with improvements given the problems with the 1st Model 1873 experienced at the Custer fight. 1877 carbines are very scarce, being small issues which were included in the 1878-79 recall. Faint car touche.

Frontier Weapons - Lifetime Collection of a Gentleman • August 2008 Sale 141 • www.GaryHendershott.NET

Very good

$4300


Lot 95

Lot 96

Springfield Trapdoor Serial #112560, Model 1877. In .45/70 cal faint cartouche. Less than 3000 of these rare models were issued to the US Cavalry after the 73’ was removed from service after the Custer battle.

Model 1879 Springfield Trapdoor Carbine, Ser#131981. The model 1879 serial numbers start at approx. 100,000 and end at approx 280,000 for all types. 15,000 in this range are carbines. Carbines under approx 135,000 are eagerly sought because they are possible 7th cavalry re-issues.

$3800

Very good

$1650

I sell the “Old Fashion Way”, all prices are NET with NO hidden fees and NO buyers premium. ANY item may be returned for ANY reason.

Gary Hendershott • 501.258.1861 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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45


Lot 97

Lot 98

Springfield Model 1881 US Trapdoor Forager Shotgun 20 gauge serial #548. A total of 1376 of these forager model trapdoors were manufactured in 1881-1885. They were used by US troops in the field on the western frontier when scouting for small game. The metal is gray and the stock exhibits the usual wear of frontier usage.

US Army’s Foragers Belt with Indian War US Buckle. Heavy harness leather with cartridge lops made to carry 20 gauge shotgun shells, by harness makers at the western forts. A fine “fair weather” Christian belt set.

Phone Orders Accepted - Call Gary Direct (501) 258-1861

46 |

Frontier Weapons - Lifetime Collection of a Gentleman • August 2008 Sale 141 • www.GaryHendershott.NET

Very good

$1800

$2200


Extremely Rare Model 1869 Springfield “Sporting Rifle” just like Custer’s Lot 99

A rare and Important Model 1869 Springfield Trapdoor “Sporting Rifle” custom made at the Springfield Arsenal

General George Armstrong Custer had one identical to this, he seen holding it in numerous photographs while hunting on the western plains with the Grand Duke Alexis of Russia. This 100% original rifle incorporates the characteristics and custom features as custom made by the Springfield Arsenal; 32 ½ full round barrel in .50/70 cal., with special German silver front cap and a fine Buck horn rear sight. It is built on a cadet style stock with original proof markings, checkered at wrist and modified to carbine length with pewter cap. Custom made trigger guard with extended tang and double set adjustable triggers. The lock plate stamped U.S. Springfield with eagle & shield motif and dated 1863. The breech lock dated 1869 with Eagle, crossed arrows and U.S. stampings with Arsenal applied “A” stamped on top of the barrel at the breach and an “X” on right side of barrel at breech. In 1866 the Chief of Ordnance at the Springfield Arsenal received numerous request’s from army officer’s in the west for a custom made Springfield Rifle. Custer being one of them, for this “Improved “Trapdoor breech loading system on a custom made rifle. Official Military records list the famous leaders and dignitaries that ordered these rare individually made “Sporting Rifles. Frasca’s book on Springfield Trapdoor arms has a very informative section on these rare custom order arms, as does Vance Haynes excellent publication that focus specifically on these, the rarest of all Springfield Arsenal produced weapons This is an opportunity to own the rarest of all Springfield Arsenal custom produced rifles, as there are only a few in existence.

Overall relatively light to dark grey patina. Sound wood with considerable original finish and an excellent bore.

$18,500

Gary Hendershott • 501.258.1861 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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47


Lot 100

Lot 101

Springfield Trapdoor Serial #139560 Model 1879 trapdoor carbine in .45/70 cal. The first Model 1873 and the interim Model 1877 trapdoors were replaced with this new and improved model 1879. It is important to note that over 50 of these carbines in this serial number range were issued to the US 7th Cavalry, Company L in 1885 prior to Wounded Knee.

Springfield Trapdoor Serial # 382309, Model 1884 trapdoor carbine made ca. 1886. This was the last model carbine issued to the US Cavalry, it was issued with a Buffington rear sight which was a significant change as it had much more versatility. While it replaced the Model 1879, it was the standard carbine used during the last days of the Indian wars by the cavalry.

Phone Orders Accepted - Call Gary Direct (501) 258-1861

48 |

Frontier Weapons - Lifetime Collection of a Gentleman • August 2008 Sale 141 • www.GaryHendershott.NET

$1750

$1750


Lot 102

Indian used Spencer Carbine ca. 1860’s

Lot 103

Spencer Repeating Carbine - Indian use ca. 1860’s. This carbine is a civil war .52 cal rim fire (56-56) and exhibits classic Indian use with period tacks and patterns typical to northern plains tack decoration. The Spencer carbine was a favorite of the frontier and ammunition was widely available to the Indian tribes on the Great Plains. This is Museum Quality Indian tacked gun

Very good

$6400

Spencer Model 1865 Carbine serial # 11881 issued to the US Cavalry in 1866. A very Rare Nez Perce Indian usage in .56-50 cal. Issued to US Cavalry regiments in the west from 1865 to1874. They saw extensive service along with Sharps carbines until the famous 1873 Springfield Trapdoor 45/70 carbine became the US Cavalry standard issue in 1874. This carbine was collected directly from a Nez Perce family from the Coalville Reservation, near Brewster, Washington and the Columbia River. The action has several notches filed along the edge, the Nez Perce’ struggle and fight led by Chief Joseph is well documented in western history, and his famous quote “ I will Fight no More” is legendary. A rare Nez Perce warrior’s carbine.

$4850

Gary Hendershott • 501.258.1861 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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Lot 104

Lot 105

50 |

Spencer Carbine Indian use civil war gun serial #28823 in .56/52Cal. With significant evidence of Indian use. The stock has been shaved extensively, the sling bar removed, brass tack plains Indian decoration is classic for the 1870’s period. Most of the tacks are missing with some broken, their square shanks are visible. The Spencer was an Indian favorite and ammunition was widely available on the frontier. This is one of the finest known Indian usage Spencer’s in existence.

Indian Trade Rifle with brass tacks ca. 1860’s

J Henry & Son Indian Treaty Rifle.38Cal. with US stamped on the stock behind the trigger guard. Classic Indian treaty gun with plains Indian style brass tack decoration.

Frontier Weapons - Lifetime Collection of a Gentleman • August 2008 Sale 141 • www.GaryHendershott.NET

Rough

Dark metal some pitting

$9400

$2550


Lot 106

Lot 107

Lot 108

Colt Model 1862 Pocket Navy Conversion with 4-1/2” Octagonal barrel, in .38 R.F. cal revolver ca. 1873-75 Indian decorated stippled barrel & frame. The stippling is of a style and type of the southwest Indians of Arizona & New Mexico. Originally purchased from a family in Texas who claimed it once belonged to an renegade Indian. Typical of Indian usage it is missing the loading gate and gate spring.

Remington New Model Army .44 cal Percussion Revolver Indian used Serial #10067. Carved “X” on grip, the grip bottom is notched & pitted.

Good

Colt Model 1860 Army Percussion presumed Indian used. Revolver serial #76990 This model became a favorite with the Indians. The hammer lever is missing and the bottoms of the grips are crudely carved away on both sides of the bottom the back strap to facilitate the use of a crude lanyard or decorative drop. Cut for a stock the cylinder is marked 77T. Ordinance report 115 Oct 1879 “small arms capture from Indians” record’s 40 such revolvers with 6 of which were missing ramrods. Mfg. late 1861 closest Civil War associated Ser#76822 1st Connecticut Volunteer Cavalry Ser#767551, 759-872-874-888-905-935-936; 7th Michigan Volunteer Cavalry. Ser#76965-16th Pennsylvania Volunteer Cavalry. Ser#77031 Loudoun Co. Rangers. Historically significant and presumed Indian used.

$1450

$2700

$3600

Gary Hendershott • 501.258.1861 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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51


Lot 109

Lot 110

Lot 111

52 |

Spencer carbine Model 1865 Serial #676 “Indian Wars” made in 1865 approximately 30,000 of these cavalry carbines were purchased by US Army, serial numbered in early range this is one of the first Spencer’s made in 1865.

Henry Percussion Plains Trade Rifle ca. 1865, in .50 cal. 36” heavy iron mounted plains rifle with double set trigger. Barrel is marked Henry, whose Muzzle loading rifles were prized on the frontier for reliability and function.

Fort Laramie Treaty Indian Trade gun ca. 1868

J Henry & Son Indian treaty trade rifle .32 Cal. Stamped “U.S.” on the stock behind trigger guard. The lock is an old replacement. These trade rifle’s are believed to have been issued as annuity payments for Indian relocation as per the Fort Laramie treaty in1868.

Frontier Weapons - Lifetime Collection of a Gentleman • August 2008 Sale 141 • www.GaryHendershott.NET

Very good

$2500

$2600

Good

$1900


Lot 112

Lot 113

Blacksmith made Flintlock Indian Blanket gun. Stamped impression to resemble trade gun marking. From Oklahoma crude, one of a kind (museum piece) Americana.

Remington New Model Army Indian pistol. Missing loading lever dark pitted overall patina grip butt notched with several small brass tacks. A favorite with the Indians, many of the pistols were given by US Government as relocation annuity to the plains Indian tribes.

$2200

Rough and not in working condition

$2850

We offer Fully Insured FedEx® delivery service.

Gary Hendershott • 501.258.1861 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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53


Buffalo Hunting 1870’s There were over 100 Million Buffalo across what is now the lower 48 states at the time of America’s discovery in 1492. Prairie and woodland buffalo occupied the entire area. Indian hunting allowed a sustaining population. The introduction of firearms in the east and coastal regions reduced the herd to approx 60 million remaining largely in the western plains by 1800. Firearms were Flintlock Fusils imported from Holland, France, & England. Hunting was for meat and Indian tanned hides. From 1800-30 American eastern makers of Flintlock rifles furnished the primary arms. From 1830-60 the American Eastern, Pennsylvania and Kentucky percussion rifles; and during the 1840’s St. Louis and eastern plains rifles became preeminent buffalo rifles for meat and soft hides. The herd size was still basically sustainable. However, by the mid 1860’s after the civil war and railroads reached the west, buffalo hunting changed dramatically and became a commercial enterprise. The eastern cities taste for meat and particularly buffalo tongue coincided with the introduction of surplus powerful civil war military cartridge rifles and even more powerful commercial rifles. The classic western “Buffalo Rifle” emerged i.e., Sharps, Remington, & Ballard. Tongue hunting became overshadowed by the hunting of buffalo for flint hides. Raw hides were stretched and sun dried to be shipped east and tanned into tough leather facilitated by a new tanning process developed in France. Starting in the central plains in Kansas & Nebraska, during 1871-72 and moving into the southern plains; Texas, Oklahoma & New Mexico during1873-75 and moving to the northern herd in Wyoming & Montana in 1877-82 the entire 60 million buffalo population was essentially annihilated. These events starting in the mid 1860’s precipitated the Plains Indian wars and culminated with an end to a way of life for the American Indians as well. They no longer hunted the Great Buffalo on the open plains, they resigned to life on the Reservation.

54 |

Frontier Weapons - Lifetime Collection of a Gentleman • August 2008 Sale 141 • www.GaryHendershott.NET


Lot 114

Lot 115

Spencer Model 1860 Rifle serial #5690, in .56/52 cal. issued ca. late 1863. Many of these rifles were used during the early years of Buffalo hunting from 1866-71 for meat to feed the Union Pacific railroad builders and for the US cavalry who were stationed in the west to protect the building of the 1st Trans-continental rail road. It has the wear, patina and use characteristics of a Buffalo rifle.

Sharps Model 1874 Rifle, military rifle in .45/70 cal. Serial# 51973. This rifle was found under a basement stairwell in an old northern Illinois farm house during an estate sale appraisal. It was acquired by a realtor and found its way as a walk in at a Chicago CADA show. The gun is pitted and shows considerable use. The model 1874 military rifle was almost exclusively a buffalo rifle in the early hide hunting years of 1872-1875. Many early hunters were Civil War veterans from nearby Illinois/Wisconsin & Indiana. When buffalo hunting became highly commercial in the mid and late 1870’s many hunters returned home through Chicago. This area has been traditionally rich in frontier items as the discovery of this rifle illustrates.

Very good

Rough condition

$3900

$3200

Gary Hendershott • 501.258.1861 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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55


Lot 116

Spencer Sporting Rifle, .56/46 cal. Half stock with a heavy octagon barrel. Tang sight, single set trigger. Fancy grain walnut stock, this gun is pictured in Spencer Repeating Arms, by Marcot 1990, and illustrated on page ex Greg Martin collection.

Lot 117

Sharps Model 1874, .50/70 cal. military style Buffalo Rifle, serial #C52756, heavy pommel wear & shaving between barrel bands. Retains swivels and has a mellow dark patina.

56 |

Frontier Weapons - Lifetime Collection of a Gentleman • August 2008 Sale 141 • www.GaryHendershott.NET

Fine

Very good

$9000

$4800


Lot 118

Sharps Model 1874 Conversion military rifle .50/70Cal. Gunsmith conversion of a Sharps civil war carbine into a military style Sharps rifle to meet the demand of the early years of buffalo hunting. The .50/70 military cartridge introduced in 1866 was the first center fire cartridge in general use by the US Army on the frontier; it was accurate and had great killing power at medium range. Ammunition was widely available on the plains making it a favorite of Frontiersman and Indian alike.

Lot 119

Sharps Model 1874 military rifle .50/70 cal. A favorite with the independent early Buffalo hide hunters many of whom were civil war veterans that traveled west and were not skilled in frontier survival and lost their lives as well as their rifles to marauding Plains Indians.

Very good

Considerable wear and hard frontier use

$2800

$4300

We offer Fully Insured FedEx® delivery service.

Gary Hendershott • 501.258.1861 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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57


Lot 120

Punch or Awl with 7 inch long point & tooled scabbard.

Lot 121

Lot 122

$40

Trade Knife by Russell, Green River Works, with 8 inch long blade and light handle.

Meat Cleaver by H Ehrlich of St.. Joseph, Mo. With huge 8 ½ blade.

Lot 123

$80

$150

Trade Knife by Carson & Goodman, ca. 1860, Skinning knife with large 10 inch long blade.

$85

I sell the “Old Fashion Way”, all prices are NET with NO hidden fees and NO buyers premium. ANY item may be returned for ANY reason.

58 |

Frontier Weapons - Lifetime Collection of a Gentleman • August 2008 Sale 141 • www.GaryHendershott.NET


Lot 124

Remington #1, Rolling Block Heavy Barrel Sporting Rifle Serial #6482, in .44/77 cal. Scarce Indian usage rifle well worn with an overall dark patina. The .44/77 along with the .50/70 was the pre-eminent cartridges used in the early 1870’s for buffalo hunting. The extractor on this rifle was broken early in its use and a sharp implement used for cartridge extraction has worn a deep grove in barrel breech. Two rude X’s have been carved into the stock along with several notches are carved on left wrist. Many independent buffalo hunters fell prey to marauding Indians seeking their gun and ammunition. A great historic gun of the western frontier of museum quality.

Lot 125

I. Hollis & Sons English Plains Rifle with .75 cal. Damascus barrel. Chapter 4 of “The Plains Rifle”, by Charles E. Hanson Jr. is devoted to the English rifle. This type rifle was very accurate using a conical bullet. It had a great knock down power at medium range. A Very rare plains rifle

Good

$4950

Fine

$3350

Gary Hendershott • 501.258.1861 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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Lot 126

Lot 127

60 |

Buffalo Hunters Woven Canvas cartridge belt by Milne . Loaded with 20 original Ballard , original cartridges. Superb showpiece 4 inch extra wide to hold the powerful Ballard cartridges

A Rare and Early Rolling Block Buffalo Gun ca. 1875

Whitney-Laidley Style I Rolling block Rifle (split breech Whitney) ca 1875, .44/77Cal. Considerable use in the field an exclusive western use rifle. A desirable buffalo gun in the earlier period of hide hunting. Pitted and dark patina

Frontier Weapons - Lifetime Collection of a Gentleman • August 2008 Sale 141 • www.GaryHendershott.NET

Good

$3200

$1850


Lot 128

Custom made and Highly Engraved Buffalo rifle ca. 1872

Remington Rolling Block Custom made Buffalo Rifle, in .45/77 cal, this rare buffalo gun weighs 14 lbs. And has a beautifully engraved barrel with wavy lines over the entire length of the barrel, that strongly resembles a Damascus pattern. The fore stock is large has a hand cast silver end cap. The rear sight is missing and the rear butt stock has a patch box like those seen on early Leman Plains rifles.

Lot 129

Lot 130

Early Belt Set

Cartridge Belt for Buffalo Hunter. Roller buckle made of Brown Leather.

Remington #1, Rolling Block Sporting Rifle, ca. 1868-88 (heavy barrel) .50/70 cal. The Sharps model 1874, the Marlin Ballard and the Remington #1 sporter were the preferred rifles used by the professional buffalo hunters during the 1870’s. This was also one of Custer’s favorite hunting rifle’s in the mid 1870’s. He carried and was photographed with his Remington #1 during the Yellowstone Expedition. Some historians also believe that Custer may have carried his Remington #1 into the fight at Little Big Horn. No records of its existence are known.

Excellent

$5400

$3500

$7500

Gary Hendershott • 501.258.1861 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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61


The earliest known U.S. Dragoon Officers- Indians Wars Uniform in Existence 1st United States Dragoons – from Kansas to Oregon The rarest U.S. Military uniform, they guarded the Wagon Trains on the Santa Fe Trail and the Oregon Trail (Lot 131) 1st US Dragoons (Cavalry) Company “A” Uniform Set – being the only one known to exist (Even the US Army nor the Smithsonian have this in their collections). The Dragoons were the forerunners of the US Cavalry and were stationed at Fort Scott in Kansas on America’s western frontier and played an important roll in protecting America’s Westward Expansion. From Fort Scott Kansas they provided armed escort led by Capt Phillip St... George Cooke for wagon trains and traders on the Santa Fe Trail, latter they went overland to protect the early settlers on the Oregon Trail. They surveyed the unmapped northern plains and maintained peace amongst the Plains Indian tribes, armed with Halls breech loading carbines, heavy pistols ad two cannon’s. They first met the Sioux in 1845 near Fort Laramie and brought about a Peace between their Pawnee enemy, who were awed by the Dragoons firepower , that they believed the Dragoons were “ a new and superior white people” and agreed to leave the overland settlers wagon trains alone. They accompanied General Kearny on his military expedition to claim – Oregon for America as President Polk wanted American’s to control all of Oregon “or go to War ,54 -40 or Fight” was their motto, indicating the latitude that the boundary with England was contested over. They were the first US Military force to cross the Continental Divide. The 1st Dragoons opened the way for all of the other US Cavalry units that followed it on the western frontier. This is the only known Dragoon Officer’s uniform in existence.

$130,000

Phone Orders Accepted - Call Gary Direct (501) 258-1861

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Frontier Weapons - Lifetime Collection of a Gentleman • August 2008 Sale 141 • www.GaryHendershott.NET


1st United States Dragoons, Company “A”. The rarest U.S. military uniform still in private hands. A superb Sergeant Major single breasted Frock Coat with Eagle “D” button, collar and shoulder scales insignia. Accompanied by it’s original buff sword belt, and equally rare Dragoon Shako hat ca. 1840’s.

Gary Hendershott • 501.258.1861 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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63


Frontier & Hunting Accoutrements

Lot 132

Lot 133

Dragoon Saddle Holster

Lot 134

64 |

$2100

US Cavalry Model 1872 Cartridge Belt with 1874 pattern belt brass Eagle buckle and sword hangers, a Civil War Holster for a Colt Army and Cap box, Belt, Buckle, & 1876 Hazen cartridge loops.

A very rare US Dragoon Saddle Holster. Frontier made from saddle leather, it held a pair of Colt dragoon revovler’s accross the pommel of saddle.1850’s to Civil War.

Buffalo Hunting “ Skinning Set” ca. 1870

$2900

A rare and large Buffalo Hunter’s Skinning set, loaded with eight skinning knives in original frontier made saddle/boot leather case with leather belt. A wonderful showpiece, this belt saw a lot of use during the early days of Buffalo Hunting on the western plains.

Frontier Weapons - Lifetime Collection of a Gentleman • August 2008 Sale 141 • www.GaryHendershott.NET

$1800


Lot 135

Lot 137

Powder Horn Fur Trade or Indian with native tanned hide Fringed Shoulder Strap.

Cartridge Belt “Wide” Variation Model 1876, for .50/70 cal ammunition, stenciled inside belt in black ink “Company B , 2nd Georgia Volunteers”

Very rare

$175

$1400

Lot 136

Lot 138

Lot 139

Powder Horn Fur Trade or Indian on native tanned hide with brass tacks.

$145

Blue Cartridge Belt Infantry 1st Model 1876 Prairie Belt; narrow width.

Navajo Indian McClellan Saddle

Early Navajo heavily tacked “McClellan” Civil War saddle with original brass shield on pommel. Heavily tacked from the pommel to the rear of the seat. Fully Indian rigged with original stirrups. Numerous Confederate and Union cavalry were in New Mexico during the Civil War and fought a major battle at Glorieta Pass just north of Santa Fe, New Mexico. Most of the Navajo were moved to a reservation known as Bosque Redondo after the Civil War, which is where this Cavalry saddle was most likely used by the Navajo.

$700

$3600

We offer Fully Insured FedEx® delivery service.

Gary Hendershott • 501.258.1861 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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65


Lot 140

Lot 141

US Cavalry Cartridge Belt Model 1876 Belt Variation “WN Altered.” Rock Island Arsenal- Experimental

66 |

$375

US Cavalry Prairie style canvas cartridge belt 1886.

$425

$400

Lot 142

Lot 143

US Cavalry Cartridge Belt Model 1881 signed inside by Indian War trooper Corporal Mahoney.

US Army’s Foragers Belt with Civil War Enlisted Eagle Buckle. Modified to accept 20 gauge shot gun shells, made at the western forts by the harness makers to carry heavy ammunition. A fine fair weather Christian style belt set.

Frontier Weapons - Lifetime Collection of a Gentleman • August 2008 Sale 141 • www.GaryHendershott.NET

$1200


Lot 144

US Cavalry Carbine Model 1885 Saddle Boot in mint condition.

Lot 146

Lot 147

$185

Lot 145

US Cavalry Cartridge Box ca. 1870 for .50/70 caliber cartridge. Clearly embossed “US” on flap and a forerunner to the US Cavalry Dyer ammunition pouch

US Dyer Pouch, ca. 1874 this is the ammunition pouch used by the US Cavalry including Custer’s 7th, to hold their .45/70 cartridges in battle.

US Cavalry Sword Knot in mint Unissued condition

$150

Lot 148

$250

$395

Hazen Loop marked in black ink,” US Arsenal, Benicia” a scarce California made cartridge belt loop.

$275

I sell the “Old Fashion Way”, all prices are NET with NO hidden fees and NO buyers premium. ANY item may be returned for ANY reason.

Gary Hendershott • 501.258.1861 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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67


Lot 149

US Cavalry Brass Bugle, from the Indian Wars marked “R.H. Chicago” a scarce company size cavalry bugle.

Lot 151

68 |

$175

Lot 150

Brass Bugle from the Mexican War ca. 1840’s, etched in Spanish (Army away from Home)

US Cavalry 1st Model 1876 Prairie Belt; narrow width canvas with brass frame buckle.

Frontier Weapons - Lifetime Collection of a Gentleman • August 2008 Sale 141 • www.GaryHendershott.NET

Billet trimmed

$700

$300


Lot 152

Haversack & Cord

Lot 154

US Cavalry Bear Skin Winter Gloves in excellent condition.

Lot 156

US Indian Scouts, Arizona Territory canvas Haversck & Scout hat cord.

$475

$175

Lot 153

Lot 155

$250

Canteen US Cavalry stenciled in black ink “4th Infantry Company I”. A hard fighting infantry unit, they were in Colorado during the infamous Meeker Massacre by the Ute’s, they latter served under General Crook in the Battle of the Rosebud, and guarded the Northern pacific railway through Idaho and Washington.

US Cavalry Scouts Pair of Fur Gloves and Fur Hat, lined in bright red wool cloth. Excellent condition

Carbine Sling US Cavalry Indian War, Model 1887 in excellent condition.

$1150

$375

Interest Free Layaway Available “ I have never charged a collector or a museum Interest and I NEVER will”. Gary Hendershott • 501.258.1861 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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69


Lot 157

Bowie Knife by BG IC, Scabbard, Bridgeport, Ct. with large 7 ½ inch long blade on handle with markings.

Lot 159 Lot 158

Lot 160

Trade Knife, with 6 ¼ inch long blade Fur Trade and in Leather Scabbard.

Bowie Knife with 5 ¾ inch long blade,” Washingtonian”, with beautiful Red Embossed Scabbard.

$175

$300

Lot 161

Pair of Brass Cavalry spurs “Dog head” with original Leather Straps. Bright color and a excellent pair of western spurs.

$275

Fur Trade Knife, with 6inch long blade on Horn Handle by LF & E with original Brass Rivet Leather Sheath.

$275

Phone Orders Accepted - Call Gary Direct (501) 258-1861

70 |

$200

Frontier Weapons - Lifetime Collection of a Gentleman • August 2008 Sale 141 • www.GaryHendershott.NET


Lot 162

Army Knife with large 9 ½ Bowie blade by Collins of Hartford, Ct.

$400

Lot 163

Lot 164

Army Model 1880 Hunting Knife. Conversion to Bowie Serial #982 with large 8 inch US Springfield clip point blade.

Lot 165

Army Trenching Knife & Scabbard, Model 1883.

$275

$275

Army Knife US Springfield, Model 1881 hunting knife. Serial #2384 with large 8 inch long blade & Scabbard.

$475

Gary Hendershott • 501.258.1861 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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71


Lot 166

Lot 167

Lot 168

Meat Cleaver by EL Simmons of St. Louis with large 7 inch blade.

Trade Knife by Russell, Green River Works, with large 11 ¼ inch long blade and dark handle.

Trade Knife by I Wilson Sycamore St.., Skinning Knife with large 11 inch long blade

Lot 169

Lot 170

72 |

$185

$65

$115

Trade Knife by Russell, Green River Works, with 9inch Long Blade.

Trade Knife by I Wilson, Sycamore St. Sheffield England, large 13inch Long Blade.

Frontier Weapons - Lifetime Collection of a Gentleman • August 2008 Sale 141 • www.GaryHendershott.NET

$90

$175


Hunting & Miscellaneous Western Arms

Lot 171

Lot 172

Sporting Rifle made by J.P. Gemmer of St. Louis, Missouri. A 30 inch octagon barrel in .45/70cal. The barrel is mounted on a 1st Model US Springfield rifle modified to sporter configuration. Gemmer, a skilled gunsmith employed by Samuel Hawken, he acquired an equity ownership in the Hawken Shop producing their famous Plains rifles during the early 1860’s and later took over sole ownership in 1865.

Marlin Lever Action Model 1881 Rifle

Marlin Model 1881, Lever Action Rifle .40/60Cal. Serial # 5052. Large frame with a 27” octagon barrel and a wide hollow buck horn rear sight. Dovetail front sight silver gray patina.

Very good

$5800

Very good

$2400

Gary Hendershott • 501.258.1861 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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Lot 173

Lot 174

74 |

Colt single action .44 cal. Serial #104018. Made in 1884 in .45 cal long Colt 4-3/4” barrel grips with small wood inlays. Heart & Diamond & Spade of clubs along with the initial “H” carved right side grip of this great Cowboy Colt Pistol action.

Marlin Model 1889 lever action rifle .38/40 cal. Serial # 63835. Half magazine, this was Marlins first solid top, side loading lever action rifle. Acquired by a Chicago area sportsman on a goose hunting trip to Hudson Bay area from a Cree Indian family. The stock has been extensively decorated with small steel tacks, in a pictographic pattern of a raven, a shore line, and raven foot print. The finish is an fine silvery patina with a pleasant overall appearance. Accompanied by it’s original Moose hide gun case. A remarkable Plains Cree Indian gun

Frontier Weapons - Lifetime Collection of a Gentleman • August 2008 Sale 141 • www.GaryHendershott.NET

Overall, very good

$3200

$1450


Lot 175

Lot 176

A Historic Springfield Trapdoor Model 1884 Rifle. The rifle exhibits an elaborate brass tack decoration consistent with southwest design. The rifle was acquired from Jonathan Peck and is accompanied by a hand written note stating that this rifle was recovered from a street in Columbus, New Mexico after a raid led by the infamous Pancho Villa onto American soil on March 9,1916. When Pancho Villa led an armed force of 1,500 of his Mexican Revolutionaries across the US Border into New Mexico in retaliation for being defrauded by some American arms dealers, who he demanded his money or his guns from. Pancho Villa also attacked a small detachment of the 13th US cavalry while en route to New Mexico. However Pancho Villa retreated gaining few of his guns and getting little money from the arms dealers! The US Army pursued Poncho Villa into old Mexico led by US Army General Pershing himself, a rare and historic gun from his last raid onto American soil, as well as the last armed invasion into the United States by a foreign army. A showpiece

Spencer Sporting Rifle in .56/46 cal. Half stock Spencer with Octagon barrel and single set trigger. These rifles often referred to as Spencer Buffalo Rifles used a special .56/46 bottle neck cartridge to achieve the maximum range possible with the Spencer’s feed and ejection system They were manufactured during the waning day of the Spencer Arms company following the civil war. Spencer was bought out by Winchester and became part of western history.

Very good

Very good, wood loss along wrist stock

$2750

$3700

Gary Hendershott • 501.258.1861 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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75


Rare Buffalo Sharps Rifle

Custom “Heavy” 14lb. Buffalo Gun made in Iowa ca. 1872.

(Lot 177) Custom Made Sharps 14 LB Buffalo Rifle. This rifle was made by rare western gunsmith I. Ohrt of Burlington, Iowa and dated 1872, in 45/70 Cal. The action is from a previous Civil War Sharps carbine, the barrel is stamped cast steel and bears the name of “John S. Hay” stamped underside. further research could document his history on the western frontier. There is a small hole in the stock wrist to adjust the sear for trigger pull. Single trigger has #210 stamped in front of trigger guard with a Winchester style open sight. It is interesting to note that one of Custer’s sargent’s was carrying a similar heavy barrel Sharp’s Rifle at Custer’s last Stand. Very good condition.

$6,000

Guns That Won the West Catalog - Sale 141  

Guns That Won the West catalog from Gary Hendershott. The arms and accouterments in this collection represent the Gun’s that were actually u...

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