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Grey Snow Eagle House

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Also, today there are rule s for safety no tackling reasons, below the wai st of the bal in order to avo l carrier, id leg and ank le injury. No they prefer to cleats, play bare-fo oted in the summer and wear ligh time t running sho es at other times.

OKLAHOMA

We play 15 minute qua rters with a half after 2 break at quarters. In My oldest gra the old day ndson, Brenne score was pre s, the final r Billy, is 18 determined years old and or set prior a freshman game. For inst to the at the Univer ance, if the Central Ok sity of y lahoma in Edm dec ided the gam would be won ond, Oklah e at 100 points, He continu oma. es to perpet they would for several uate the stic play days or unt game by inco kball il the team rpo rating it as scored 100 points. Eac an on-campus h striking of activity. He the goalpost has played ball equates with the in many stic to 1 point. Ge games in Ok kball nerally, most lahoma and were set at games Mississippi. 20 points. you The nge r Also, in Ch grandsons, octaw Miko, C A S I Stic kball, the N OS + goa EN R Te A lpoTstsEwer I N M E N T age 10 and Logan Bill age 9, Trayvian, at eac the playing h end of y, age 5, cur field and one in ren age tly play app team had to ropriate stic advance the kball games. ball to the opp onent’s goa defense on l. The the opposin Curtis Billy g tea grew up in m could tac the player with Broken Bow kle , Oklahoma the ball; the with six sibl ings and his refore, it too more skill and parents, Ed k maneuvering Cynthia Bill and y. Under his to score a poi The same stra leadership, nt. tegy applies youth have Choctaw today. been playing Choctaw stic Broken Bow kball at Hig h School, Inte Is your fam r-tribal gam ily still involv and in the Lab es, ed with Ch or Day Festiva Stickball? octaw l, Tushkahom Oklahoma a, with an I have been exhibition gam in charge of e on the Capitol Law presenting n since 197 stickball exh a 7. Tha t same year, ibition gam the Choctaws e at the won the title Choctaw Na in a Five Civ tion Labor Da Tribes Tourna ilized y Festival sinc ment. Curtis 1976. I hav e is currently e not missed employed with a year. Now, the Ch sons, Bryon octaw Nation my two Mahli Billy Department. Language age 37, and He teaches Chilita Billy Jimmy Choctaw Lan age 31, hav and Culture, guage e grown up and Choctaw playing History at Southeaste rn Oklahom a State Univer sity.

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the game as well as making the kapuch or stickball a sticks. They have involved children in their playing the Choctaw stic game as wel kball l as instructing others to pla making stic y and kball sticks and ball.

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> GREY SNOW EAGLE HOUSE > > he Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma is ensuring that future generations will be able to see and revere eagles—considered messengers between Man and the Creator.

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Bald and Golden eagles face many challenges to their survival. While the Bald eagle’s numbers have increased since the population declined in the 1970s due to the use of the pesticide DDT. Today, these threats include a continued loss of habitat, the development of wind energy and lead poisoning from improper hunting methods. The number of Golden eagles has not increased for decades. And both species face unknown consequences of future climate change.

> The Bah Kho-je Xla Chi (Grey Snow Eagle House) was completed in January 2006 to protect injured eagles and increase community awareness of wildlife and Native American culture. The Eagle House is permitted to rehabilitate injured eagles for eventual release, house eagles that are non-releasable, study eagles for conservation efforts, gather naturally molted feathers and distribute them to tribal members for cultural ceremonies and to send eagles out for educational purposes.

John Jernigan


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John Jernigan


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> THE EAGLE GENOME PROJECT > > he Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma and Oklahoma State University signed an agreement to study the genetic health of wild Bald and Golden eagles. The genetic health of animals is important because it provides the variation that allows individuals in a population of animals to respond to new diseases, and other stressors. Without adequate variation, populations can become extinct.

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> This goals of this research are to 1) determine how genetic variation has changed since the Bald eagle’s population decline caused by DDT in the 1970s, 2) determine the historical and current layout of genetic variation over the range of Bald and Golden eagles and 3) sequence and annotate the Golden eagle genome.

> By evaluating the genetics of the species, we will be able to provide information that will aid wildlife managers to make decisions that will ensure the species are being managed to survive current and future threats in the best possible way.

> Native American students are given first choice for the work being done in the Van Den Bussche lab at OSU. Megan Trope (Choctaw) and Jenny Dyer (Cherokee) are currently working on the project.

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> A SUSTAINED EFFORT > > s of March 2013, the Grey Snow Eagle House has 46 non-releasable eagles (12 Golden Eagles and 34 Bald Eagles) which are cared for by an Aviary Manager, 7 staff members and volunteers. The Tribe has successfully rehabilitated eight Bald Eagles and released them back into the wild —iowanation .org

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> The Iowa Tribe continues to pay operating costs and for expansions such as the ICU, quarantine and flight cages, a fresh food supply and video surveillance. American Indian Nations from across the country have also generously supported their mission to preserve a creature that is sacred to all tribes; some have even been inspired to create their own eagle facilities and programs.

> Eagles are still not safe; Victor Roubidoux, Wildlife Manager, (top right) explains: “The greatest threat to the eagle population was the change from Endangered status to Threatened status... previously protected lands can now be encroached upon... eagles will lose their habitat.”

> Tours are by appointment only; call 405-334-7471. Online, see their facebook page and the Iowa web site, http://www.iowanation.org.

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> BALD AND GOLDEN EAGLE PROTECTION ACT > > hen America adopted the Bald Eagle as the national symbol, the country may have had as many as 100,000 nesting eagle pairs. In 1940 the species was threatened with extinction and Congress passed the Bald Eagle Protection Act. A 1962 amendment added the Golden Eagle, and the law became the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act.

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> The Act prohibits “the take, possession, sale, purchase, barter, offer to sell, purchase or barter, transport, export or import, of any bald or golden eagle, alive or dead, including any part, nest, or egg, unless allowed by permit. Penalties for violating the Act include a maximum fine of of $250,000 or two years of imprisonment. Rewards are provided for information leading to the arrest and conviction for violations of the Act.

> For more information check http://www.fws.gov/midwest/ eagle/protect/laws.html

> > setback for the protection of eagles occurred in December 2013 when the Obama Administration changed existing rules to allow eagles to be killed by commercial windfarms.

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John Jernigan


info@dreamcatchermag.net http://www.dreamcatchermag.net http://www.facebook.com/dreamcatchermag

Grey Snow Eagle House, Dreamcatcher 052  

From the pages of Dreamcatcher Magazine: Iowa Nation's Grey Snow Eagle House

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