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N E W C O M E R + R E L O C AT I O N G U I D E

SAYYESTODALLAS.COM

THE REGION’S GUIDE TO JOBS, COMMUNITIES, CULTURE, SCHOOLS, OUTDOORS, AND MORE

SPRING 2019


PUT DOWN ROOTS

W H E R E C O M M U N I T Y G R O W S N AT U R A L L Y .

Welcome to The Grove Frisco, a modern village nestled within the trees. With thoughtfully crafted amenities, enchanting homes and access to top rated schools, The Grove Frisco offers ever ything you need to put down roots. LOCATED WEST OF CUSTER RD., BETWEEN MAIN ST. AND ROLATER RD.

HO MES F R OM THE $4 75Ks TO $1MM • TH E GR OVE FR I SCO. COM/ PUTDOW NROOTS Newland Communities is the largest private developer of planned mixed-use communities in the United States. With our partner, North America Sekisui House, LLC, we believe it is our responsibility to create communities for people to live life in ways that matter most to them. www.newlandcommunities.com | www.nashcommunities.com NASH The Grove Frisco (“Owner”) is the owner and developer of The Grove Frisco (the “Community”) and has retained Newland Real Estate Group, LLC (“Newland”) as property manager. North America Sekisui House, LLC (“NASH”) has an interest in Owner. Owner, NASH and Newland are not responsible for obligations or representations made by Builders building homes in the Community. Prices subject to change. Not an offering of real estate to residents of any jurisdictions where prior-qualification is required unless the Community has been qualified or an exemption is available. ©2019 The Grove Frisco is a trademark of Owner and may not be copied or used without permission. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY.


HOMECOMING starts with a home.

RELOCATE BETTER

For generations, people have turned to Better Homes & Gardens® for guidance on how to live the lives of their dreams. Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate is here to help you find the perfect home in which to bring those dreams to life. Each member of our relocation team is certified, trained and has a deep knowledge of their local market. Let us connect you with one of the best agents in your area.

BetterDFW.com/Relocate 800.836.4374

© 2018 Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate LLC. All rights reserved. Better Homes and Gardens®, the Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate Logo and Expect BetterSM are service marks owned by Meredith Corporation and licensed to Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate LLC. Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate LLC fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Each franchise is independently owned and operated. Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate Winans is an Independently Owned and Operated Franchise

BetterDFW.com


You found the perfect apartment. All it needs is new paint, new rugs, new curtains, new couch, new TVs, new dinner table, new desk, new chairs, new linens, new cutlery, new art, and a new bed.

Whether you’re moving to DFW to start a new life or for a life change, Nickson handles everything you need; from big stuff, like furniture, to small stuff, like linens and cutlery. Learn how Nickson can give you the apartment of your dreams in just a few hours, all for as little as $199/month.

nicksonliving.com


WHY BE THE SAME? BE UNIQUELY YOU.

WHERE BUSINESS + CHARM GROW NATURALLY You’ve arrived someplace special when you come to Cedar Hill. Whether it’s our pristine natural beauty, the unique experiences in our historic downtown, or perhaps a friendly wave from passing neighbors. Whatever the reason, Cedar Hill’s bustling and diverse community of just over 45,000 people combines the best of big-city living with natural beauty, and outdoor recreation found nowhere else in the Metroplex. When it comes to opportunity, Cedar Hill is the place for entrepreneurs of all types to bring their dreams and make them a reality. Come take a look for yourself, we’ve been planning for your visit!

CITY OF CEDAR HILL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT • 972.291.5132 • CEDARHILLEDC.COM


ON THE COVER:

BMX rider Spencer Bass flies above a halfpipe at Klyde Warren Park’s annual Spring Fling. PHOTO: MICHAEL SAMPLES

SPRING 2019 CON T EN T S 8 10

WELCOME

28

Edgewood Place

28

The Bottoms

29

North Dallas

29

Far North Dallas

17

COMMUNITIES

COMMUNITIES

30

Park Cities

17

31

Northwest Dallas

18

DALLAS NEIGHBORHOODS

31

Northeast Dallas

19

Urban Living

31

Far Northeast Dallas

20

Dallas Arts District

32

Oak Cliff

21

Main Street District

32

East Kessler

21

West End

32

Lake Cliff

22

Reunion

33

Love Field

22

Dallas Farmers Market

33

Stemmons Corridor

22

Civic Center

33

Medical District

23

Uptown

34

Oak Lawn

23

Harwood

35

Old East Dallas

23

Victory Park

35

Cityplace

24

Turtle Creek

35

Bryan Place

24

State Thomas

36

White Rock

24

West Village

36

Lake Highlands

40

BEYOND DALLAS

25

Deep Ellum

36

Lakewood

43

West Collin County

25

Baylor

37

Far East Dallas

46

East Collin County

25

Exposition Park

37

Southeast Dallas

49

Northwest Dallas County

26

Design District

37

Fair Park

51

Denton County

26

Riverfront District

38

South Dallas

52

Northeast Dallas County

27

West Dallas

38

Grand Park South

54

Eastern Dallas County

27

Trinity Groves

38

Park Row South Blvd

56

Southwest Dallas County Area

La Bajada

39

Pleasant Grove

58

Arlington & Grand Prairie Area

28

The Cedars

39

Mountain Creek

60

Northeast Tarrant County

28

South Side

39

Red Bird

62

Fort Worth Area

27

4

Welcome Letter

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D A L L A S REG I O N N E W C O M E R + R E L O C AT I O N G U I D E

SPRING 2019


DFW METROPLEX

YOU FOUND THE SWEET SPOT. Welcome to Addison, where you’re 15 minutes from anywhere in Dallas. There are more than 1,600 businesses here, surrounded by 180 restaurants, 22 hotels and the number one ranked general aviation airport in Texas. With over 10 million square feet of office space, highly qualified workers in every field close by and a city government dedicated to helping you succeed, it’s no wonder NerdWallet voted Addison the #1 city in Texas to start a business. AddisonED.com • 972.450.7076


CON T EN T S

(CONTINUED)

66

Hospitals

67 69 70 71 72 74 76 77 78

GE T T ING A ROUND

80 82 84 87 89 90 93 94 96 98 100

E DUC AT ION

102 104 106 108 109 110 113 118 119 120

HOUSING

6

Highway Map Tollways Construction Map Drive Time Maps Public Transit Airports Nonstop Destinations Flight Times

School Districts Map School District Profiles Choosing a District Charter Schools Navigating the System The Best High Schools Pick Your Path Private Schools Alternative Schooling Higher Education

How Much House Can I Buy? Housing Costs Map Custom Building Home Lots Utility Rates Special Advertising Section - Homebuilders Senior Living Apartment Life Live-Work-Play

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PARKS & OUTDOORS

122 124 126 128 130 132 133 134 135 136 138 140

142 144 146 147 148 150 151

152 153 154 156 158 160

163 164 165 166 168 170 172

152

JOBS

PHOTO: TEXAS INSTRUMENTS

LIVING

142

PHOTO: ANDREW SMITH

64

PHOTO: MICHAEL SAMPLES

122 CULTURE

CULTURE

Dallas & Fort Worth Arts Districts Entertainment Districts Mall and Boutique Districts Map Family-Centric Activities Sports Religion International Studies and Diversity GLBT Demographics Population Market Tapestry

PARKS & OUTDOORS Parks Map Dog Parks Map Hike and Bike Trails Map Lakes Map Golf Courses Map Hidden Gems

JOBS

Major Employers What People Earn Industry Clusters Map Fortune 1000 Companies Map The Innovation Ecosystem

ESSENTIALS

Moving Checklist Your First 30 Days Taxes Essential Phone Numbers and Websites Regional Map Laws

SPRING 2019


02.07.19_D Mag_8.375x10.875_02.07.19_D Mag Ad 8.375 x 10.875 2/7/19 2:00 PM Page 1

Kubota Headquarters USA Mercedes Benz-USA GameStop Headquarters Gaylord Texan Hotel Resort & Convention Center Paycom The Trade Group Great Wolf Lodge Grapevine Mills Mall Wineries Bass Pro Shops Sea Life Aquarium Award Winning Golf Courses Legoland Historic Downtown Fine Dining Award-Winning Festivals 60 Mile Shoreline Lake

Grapevine has over 100 years of innovation and imagination that drives growth and creates opportunities for our businesses and families. Blending historic charm with commercial growth provides both a great place to live and work. The City of Grapevine is home to many successful businesses as well as numerous wineries, fine dining, nationally ranked festivals, and select attractions and resorts. Grapevine has earned a well-deserved reputation as one of the nation’s premier destinations by drawing 20 million visitors annually. Our unique geographic location and variety of amenities makes Grapevine an amazing City location and destination for success.

Grapevine Economic Development

200 South Main Street, Grapevine, Texas 76051 Bob Farley, Director bfarley@grapevinetexas.gov | 817.410.3108 GrapevineTXEcoDev.com


WELCOME

A LETTER FROM THE DALLAS REGIONAL CHAMBER

I’m not a native Texan, but as the old saying goes, I got here as fast as I could. I’m one of those kids that came as a package deal when my father’s company relocated from upstate New York to the Dallas Region in the late ’90s. I attended college at Midwestern State in Wichita Falls, Texas, and after graduating, I decided to make my way back to the Dallas Region to start my career. I met my husband, Michael, a Dallas native, at a social event in 2004. JESSICA HEER Talent Attraction, We got married in 2007 and settled down just northwest of Dallas. The Senior Vice President Dallas Regional Chamber amenity-rich area — with a surprising small-town feel — has been a great place for us to raise our two small children. We have exceptional parks, places to shop, countless restaurants, and the newest entertainment venue, Toyota Music Factory. With an easy commute to just about anywhere in the region, we have the ideal family setting for two working parents. Working downtown for more than 10 years, I’ve seen Dallas become more and more dynamic and family oriented. The Rory Meyers Children’s Adventure Garden at the Dallas Arboretum, the Dallas World Aquarium, and the Perot Museum of Nature and Science are just a few of our favorite places to explore with our children. I’ve lived here for nearly two decades, but I’m surprised every day by new restaurants and cultural amenities across the region. The flourishing Dallas Region business community is unparalleled by any across the country and has increasingly become a magnet for corporate headquarters and major companies. Dallas has a wealth of options for anyone looking to start or continue a career, and is replete with welcoming people who want to see others succeed. Moving to Dallas has been rewarding for me, both personally and professionally. There truly is no other place my family would call home. Jessica Heer Talent Attraction, Senior Vice President Dallas Regional Chamber

The Dallas Regional Chamber is one of the most established business organizations in the nation and serves as the voice of business and the champion of economic development

2019 CHAIR OF THE BOARD Chris Nielsen Executive Vice President, Product Support & Chief Quality Officer, Toyota Motor NA PRESIDENT & CEO Dale Petroskey CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER & CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER Angela Farley ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT Mike Rosa INTERNATIONAL ENGAGEMENT, SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT Sarah Carabias-Rush RESEARCH AND INNOVATION, SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT Duane Dankesreiter TALENT ATTRACTION, SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT Jessica Heer MEMBERSHIP AND REVENUE GROWTH, VICE PRESIDENT Meghan Kelley Wehner MEMBER SERVICES, SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT Jennifer A. Schmiel COMMUNICATIONS, MARKETING, & EVENTS, SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT Darren Grubb

and growth in the Dallas Region. We work with our member companies and regional partners to strengthen our business community by advocating for pro-growth public policies, improving our educational system, attracting talented workers from around the world, and enhancing the quality of life

PUBLIC POLICY, SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT Priscilla Camacho

for all. Our goal is to make Dallas the best place in America to live, work, and do business. For more information, please contact the Dallas Regional Chamber at 214.746.6600 or visit www. dallaschamber.org.

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D A L L A S REG I O N N E W C O M E R + R E L O C AT I O N G U I D E

PROJECT EDITOR Dave Moore

SPRING 2019


A D A L L A S REGION A L CH A MBER P UBL IC AT ION

EXCLUSIVELY PUBLISHED FOR THE DALLAS REGIONAL CHAMBER BY

D MAGAZINE PARTNERS SAYYESTODALLAS.COM

MANAGING EDITOR Lance Murray CREATIVE DIRECTOR Michael Samples ASSOCIATE EDITOR Alex Edwards PROJECT EDITOR Payton Potter PHOTOGRAPHY Bill Chance Elizabeth Lavin Chase Mardis Kevin Marple Daniel T. Pope Hannah Ridings Justin Terveen ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Samantha Ragsdale 214.523.0384 samantha.ragsdale@dmagazine.com BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT MANAGER Steve Reeves 214.523.5259 steve.reeves@dmagazine.com BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT MANAGER Stephanie Mojonnet 214.523.0311 stephanie@dmagazine.com

INTERNS Christopher Augustine Rebeca Posadas-Nava Lauren Hawkins Blair Welch

Dallas-Fort Worth Relocation + Newcomer Guide® is published for The Dallas Regional Chamber by D Magazine Partners, 750 N. St. Paul St., Ste. 2100, Dallas, TX 75201; www.dallaschamberpublications. com, 214-939-3636. ©2019 All rights reserved. No part of ths publication may be reproduced or reprinted without written permission. Neither the Dallas Regional Chamber nor D Magazine Partners is a sponsor of, or committed to, the views expressed in these articles. The publisher is not responsible for unsolicited contributions. For bulk distribution, contact Payton Potter at payton.potter@dmagazine.com.

PHOTO: MICHAEL SAMPLES

PUBLISHER Quincy Curé Preston 214.523.5215 quincy.preston@dmagazine.com

THE CONVERSATION CONTINUES ONLINE ■ Want to see how much money you’ll save moving here?

■ Trying to narrow down a neighborhood or city?

Test our cost-of-living calculator.

View bonus photos to get a better feel for each city’s distinct character.

■ Like maps but want details about each point? Find them online.

■ Still need more?

■ Want to share?

Find articles, facts, links, essential contacts, and photos online.

Find shareable articles, everything in this magazine, and online extras.

REMEMBER: YOU DON’T HAVE TO BE IN DALLAS PROPER TO HAVE FUN.

Check out our digital edition on SayYesToDallas.com for an expanded look at what we call the Suburban North — Plano, Frisco, Richardson, and other pockets of Collin County.

MY DALLAS STORY Dive into a treasure chest of personal recommendations from locals—both new and native—from all over the region. You’ll hear over and over again that our welcoming, accepting people make all the difference. Come discover why. Have your own story to tell? Share it online at www.sayyestodallas.com. CONNECT WITH US SOCIALLY Through regular posts on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube, we round out the story of the Dallas Region. We point you to our favorite local resources for timely entertainment options, housing pulse, job opportunities, neighborhood happenings, and moving tips.

SayYestoDallas.com @SAYYESTODALLAS

For reprints, call 214-523-5215. D A L L A S REG I O N N E W C O M E R + R E L O C AT I O N G U I D E

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3 COMMUNITIES

3 CULTURE

From Uptown to Frisco, and Denton to Red Bird, we break down Dallas neighborhoods as well as communities in Dallas, Collin, Denton, and Tarrant counties, giving you the lay of the land and helping you determine the right community for your lifestyle, family, and more.

The Dallas Region is diverse and changing every day. The rapid influx of people has made us the fastestgrowing U.S. metro over the past decade. Whether you’re looking for fine arts, entertainment, professional sports or giving back, you’ll never run out of activities in Dallas — fun here knows no bounds.

3 LIVING IN THE DALLAS REGION This chapter is divided into three main sections: ■ The HOUSING section provides information to those looking for a home. Here, you’ll learn which neighborhoods are the most and least expensive, and how much can you expect to pay for utilities. ■ GETTING AROUND covers airports, freeways and tollways, public transit and more — providing everything you need to get around like a local. ■ The EDUCATION section helps families determine where to learn in the DallasFort Worth area through a comprehensive look at public school districts in the region, including maps, statistics, and school district profiles direct from the ISDs. We also cover private school options in the area, as well as options for alternative education.

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3 PARKS & OUTDOORS Dallas has over 230 sunny days a year — and lots of sunshine means lots of time to be outside. Dallasites have access to countless outdoor activities with sprawling parks, green spaces and several lakes featuring boating, water sports, and trails for mountain biking, road biking and hiking — you won’t have to go far to find your favorite spot.

3 JOBS Our Jobs section provides a snapshot of our diverse economy, showcasing major employers, top employers, and industry clusters, as well as what you might expect to earn in various sectors of the job market in the Dallas Region.

3 ESSENTIALS Ready to move? Use the moving checklist—an overview of important Texas laws, a discussion of property and sales taxes, and must-have phone numbers and websites.

D A L L A S REG I O N N E W C O M E R + R E L O C AT I O N G U I D E

PHOTO: MICHAEL SAMPLES

WELCOME

NO MATTER WHO YOU ARE OR WHERE YOU’RE FROM, WHEN YOU SAY YES TO DALLAS, YOU’RE SAYING YES TO MORE THAN YOU MIGHT THINK. The Dallas Region is a modern metro area with more than 200 cities, each unique in personality. Explore stories from locals sharing why Dallas is a great place to start or continue a career, to raise a family, and to experience a high standard of living in one of the most vibrant and affordable places in the nation. Say Yes to Dallas, it’s more than you might think.

SPRING 2019


WELCOME PHOTO: VISIT DALLAS

SPRING 2019

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WHAT LOCALS KNOW AND LOVE ABOUT WELCOME

DALLAS

Live in the Dallas Region? That could be one of more than 200 cities. The region, including Fort Worth, spreads out farther each day. Only 1.3 million of a total population of 7.4 million lives in Dallas proper. Each surrounding city is unique in personality, but we’re all Texas proud. Explore and discover.

THINGS ARE BIGGER HERE.

This is the Traveling Man, a public sculpture commissioned by DART, and created by Brad Oldham, Inc. and Reel FX Creative Studios.

INCLUDING OUR BIG TEXAS WELCOME. ( WE CAN’T WAIT TO MEET YOU.)

DALLAS/FORT WORTH ACCOLADES

No.

12

1

No.

2

Dallas-Fort Worth Led the Nation in Job Growth in 2018

The Best Cities for Jobs

Bureau of Labor Statistics

(2018) Forbes

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D A L L A S REG I O N N E W C O M E R + R E L O C AT I O N G U I D E

No.

4

Most Entrepreneurial Cities Global Entrepreneurship and Development Institute (2018)

No.

2

Green-Powered Cities (Dallas) U.S. EPA

SPRING 2019


WELCOME

We are among the fastestgrowing regions in the country.

UNT SYMPHONY DALLAS OPERA ORCHESTRA

PHOTO: DALLAS OPERA

But don’t worry, we have plenty of room. Our area is the size of New Jersey and Delaware combined, and we add nearly 400 people to our population every day. You know what that means? Big opportunities for all.

We certainly do big business—in everything from finance to high-tech. As of 2018, 41 Fortune 1000 companies were headquartered in the Dallas Region with more announcing moves every day. Our Arts District is the largest in the nation, accompanied by Fort Worth’s own worldrenowned artistic meccas, including the Kimbell Art Museum and the Amon Carter Museum. As for fashion, iconic Neiman Marcus’ home base is downtown. Folks here know how to shop and fine dine—and we’ve got plenty of places to do both.

PHOTO: UNIVERSITY OF NORTH TEXAS

We’re quite cosmopolitan.

Interesting people live here, too. Every world culture is represented. Dallas is diverse in every aspect of its population—culture, race, religion, sexual orientation, level of education, age, background, hometown, or home country. We welcome all y’all. (Yes, we do say y’all. You’ll love it, too.)

Get here, and you can get anywhere. PHOTO: SOUTHWEST AIRLINES

In town or out-of-country, our transportation rules. The Dallas Region’s modern highway system is constantly undergoing improvements to keep pace with our growth. Our light-rail system? At 85 miles in length — and expanding — it’s the longest in the United States. Plus, we’re home to the world’s largest global airline, American Airlines, and the country’s largest domestic carrier, Southwest Airlines — each with their own airport. Hop a plane to the world via 56 nonstop international flight routes and 167 nonstop domestic routes.

No.

4

Tech Hiring in the U.S. Robert Half Technology

SPRING 2019

No.

1

Airport of the Year Dallas Fort Worth International (2019) Air Transport World

No.

1

No.

7

Dallas Leads Texas Cities with the Most New Jobs from Out of State

The Cities Creating The Most White-Collar Jobs

Dallas Federal Reserve Bank (2000-2013)

(2018) Forbes

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WELCOME

OUTDOOR CONCERT AT THE NASHER SCULPTURE CENTER

There’s some stunning scenery to behold in the Dallas Region. For starters, we have a sky so big it can take your breath away. Look around the next time you’re road-tripping. South of Dallas, you’ll find rolling hills and the Great Trinity Forest, the largest urban hardwood forest in the United States (yes, we have a lot of “largests” here). East Dallas has White Rock Lake, Cedar Hill has Joe Pool Lake, and north of the city are Grapevine and Lewisville lakes, to name a few of our watering holes. In fact, within 100 miles of the region, there are more than 400 public parks and more than 60 lakes.

PHOTO: HANNAH RIDINGS

PHOTO: VISIT DALLAS

We’re pretty. Oh, so pretty.

We’ve got tons of stuff to do. There is a thriving cultural scene in the Dallas Region, and there is always something to do. We take our food seriously. We also take our sports seriously. And our arts. And our fun. Dallas is the only metro area in the country that was built around nothing—no major river, no port—so we built exactly what we wanted from the ground up. And we’ve got it all.

A Dallas-Fort Worth education will get your kids to college— or wherever their hearts desire. PHOTO: UNIVERSITY OF NORTH TEXAS

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH TEXAS

We are focused on great education. Variety and options are what we do best. We’ve got excellent public and private schools. We’ve got schools that focus on the arts and schools that focus on science. We’ve got schools rooted in religious tradition and myriad resources for kids with special needs. Plus, you and your kids will feel safe and nurtured here. And if college is in your child’s future, Texas has 12 major universities where you can pay in-state tuition.

DALLAS/FORT WORTH ACCOLADES

No.

14

/

9

No.

1

No.

8

U.S. Cities With High-Paying Jobs, Low Cost of Living

Highest Job Growth Rate Among Top 12 U.S. Metros

Best Cities for Software Engineering Jobs

(2018) GOBankingRates

(2018) NBC DFW.com

(2018) Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Spectrum magazine

D A L L A S REG I O N N E W C O M E R + R E L O C AT I O N G U I D E

No.

7

U.S. Metro Economies (2018) Business Insider

SPRING 2019


You might feel like you get a raise when you move to Dallas. WELCOME

With no state income tax and no payroll tax in Texas, you may feel like your wallet is a little fatter when you relocate here. Plus, you’ll definitely get more house for your money here than in any other major metro in the country. And that’s a great thing.

PHOTO: ANDREW SMITH PHOTO: BRIGGS FREEMAN

We really have not four, but five seasons. Local blogger Dallas Whisperer says it goes like this: “Rainy Spring” starts in February and continues until the beginning of May. “Pleasant Summer” picks up with clear skies and temps in the 80s or 90s until mid-July. That’s when “Sol” season kicks in through August, with enough sun glare and heat to make that pool heaven. “Glorious Fall,” a.k.a. porch weather, hits in September until December when the “Northers” appear. It’s our version of winter. Out of nowhere, temps instantly drop with howls of wind and ice, and sometimes snow (in which case, the city shuts down). The Northers disappear as quickly as they come, but pop in sporadically well into February. So keep your parkas. You’ll need them now and again.

We have new condos. We have historic homes. Take your pick. The Dallas Region offers vast housing choices. Mid-century moderns, 1920s bungalows, contemporary high-rises, walkable community apartments, cutting-edge architectural splendors, yards with acres, even those fabled ranches — we’ve got that. And if we don’t, there’s plenty of land to build on.

No.

2

Top

7

No.

1

No.

1

Most Economically Diverse, Medium-Size Cities (Plano)

Metros With Most Tech Workers

Happiest City in U.S. (Plano)

Top Emerging Real Estate Market

(2018) WalletHub

[2018] Cushman & Wakefield

(2019) WalletHub

(2016) PwC/Urban Land Institute

SPRING 2019

PHOTO: MICHAEL SAMPLES

PHOTO: BRIGGS FREEMAN

DALLAS ARBORETUM

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DALLAS

Building The Future Now

Dallas is the urban center of the country’s most dynamic and diverse metropolitan economy, perfect for an increasingly connected world. WWW.DALLASECODEV.ORG

(214) 670-1685


COMMUNITIES

COMMUNITIES

PHOTO: MICHAEL SAMPLES

INSIGHT INTO DALLAS NEIGHBORHOODS AND SURROUNDING CITIES

KLYDE WARREN PARK

17


COMMUNITIES

CITY OF DALLAS NEIGHBORHOODS About 1.3 million people with all kinds of characteristics and perspectives live in Dallas proper. And new people are moving here every day. Our residents live in houses big and small, multifamily developments, high-rise luxury buildings, new construction, and lovingly restored properties from generations past. They cherish nature and culture, shop at small boutiques and massive malls. They send their kids to private school or public school, or they school them at home. They go to church, they volunteer, they find like-minded groups, and they make friends. And the basis of it all is their community. Dallas communities are as diverse as our population. Downtown and Uptown attract those focused on urban living, while neighborhoods like Preston Hollow and Lakewood are right for people who want to be in town with a little more space. Areas in southern Dallas are replete with nature; areas to the north are boomtowns with every modern convenience there is. And the city of Dallas is a more exciting place to live than ever before.

FAR NORTH DALLAS

FAR NORTHEAST DALLAS NORTH DALLAS

NORTHWEST DALLAS

LAKE HIGHLANDS

NORTHEAST DALLAS

LOVE FIELD

PARK CITIES LAKEWOOD

MEDICAL STEMMONS DISTRICT COPRRIDOR

OLD EAST DALLAS

OAK LAWN

WEST DALLAS

WHITE ROCK

DOWNTOWN

FAR EAST DALLAS

FAIR PARK SOUTH DALLAS

NORTH OAK CLIFF

PLEASANT GROVE

WEST OAK CLIFF CENTRAL OAK CLIFF

DATA SOURCE FOR THIS CHAPTER:

EAST OAK CLIFF

MOUNTAIN CREEK

FOR BY THE NUMBERS / RACE AND ETHNICITY ESRI forecasts based on 2010 US Census Demographic and Income Profile Report, ESRI Business Analyst FOR EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT ESRI forecasts based on 2010 US Census Community Profile Report, ESRI Business Analyst

SOUTHEAST DALLAS SOUTHEAST OAK CLIFF

RED BIRD

FOR HOUSEHOLD EXPENDITURES ESRI forecasts based on 2015 and 2016 Consumer Expenditure Surveys, BLS Household Budget Expenditures Report, ESRI Business Analyst

DALLAS BY THE NUMBERS 2018

Population Households

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT (Population 25+)

2023

1,356,896

1,459,761

TOTAL

2018

876,030

HOUSEHOLD EXPENDITURES (Average annual amount spent)

TOTAL EXPENDITURES

Less Than 9th Grade

12.7%

Food

9th-12th Grade, No Diploma

10.8%

Housing

High School Graduate

18.5%

Apparel and Services

515,686

554,288

Average Household Size

2.59

2.60

GED/Alternative Credential

Median Age

33.1

33.6

Some College, No Degree

3.0% 17.6%

2018

$69,190 $8,561 $21,775 $2,206

Transportation

$7,918

Travel

$1,985

Median Household Income

$48,628

$54,358

Associate Degree

4.8%

Healthcare

$5,141

Average Household Income

$80,081

$89,646

Bachelor’s Degree

20.4%

Entertainment and Recreation

$3,032

Per Capita Income

$31,007

$34,573

Graduate/Professional Degree

12.3%

Education

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$810

SPRING 2019


NEIGHBORHOOD/DISTRICT | PAGE

URBAN LIVING

W E ST V I L L AG E

OAK LAWN

C I T Y P L AC E

TURTLE CREEK

OLD EAST DALLAS

UPTOWN S TAT E T H O M AS H A RWO O D

DESIGN DISTRICT

B RYA N P L AC E B AY LO R DA L L AS A R T S DISTRICT

V I C TO RY PA R K

DEEP ELLUM

L A B A JA D A

WEST END

TRINITY G R OV E S

RIVERFRONT D I ST R I C T

EXPOSITION PA R K

MAIN STREET DISTRICT DA L L AS FA R M E R S MARKET

DOWNTOWN

SOUTH DALLAS FAIR PARK

CIVIC CENTER REUNION

WEST DALLAS

G R A N D PA R K SOUTH

THE CEDARS PA R K R O W S O U T H B LV D

E AST KESSLER SOUTH SIDE

OAK CLIFF

E D G E WO O D P L AC E LAKE CLIFF

THE B O T TO M S

RACE AND ETHNICITY

2018

PERCENT

2023

PERCENT

White Alone

662,246

48.8%

694,049

47.5%

Black Alone

338,501

24.9%

364,926

25.0%

American Indian Alone Asian Alone Pacific Islander Alone Some Other Race Alone Two or More Races Hispanic Origin (Any Race)

SPRING 2019

8,397

0.6%

8,904

0.6%

51,633

3.8%

65,511

4.5%

620

0.0%

704

0.0%

255,504

18.8%

280,306

19.2%

39,995

2.9%

45,361

3.1%

597,448

44.0%

664,832

45.5%

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WEST END

21

MAIN STREET DISTRICT

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DALLAS FARMERS MARKET

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CIVIC CENTER

22

REUNION

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UPTOWN

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HARWOOD

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VICTORY PARK

23

WEST VILLAGE

24

TURTLE CREEK

24

STATE THOMAS

24

OAK LAWN

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DESIGN DISTRICT

26

RIVERFRONT DISTRICT

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LA BAJADA

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TRINITY GROVES

27

WEST DALLAS

27

OAK CLIFF

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EAST KESSLER

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LAKE CLIFF

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THE CEDARS

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SOUTH SIDE

28

EDGEWOOD PLACE

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THE BOTTOMS

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FAIR PARK

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SOUTH DALLAS

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GRAND PARK SOUTH

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PARK ROW SOUTH BLVD

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DEEP ELLUM

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BAYLOR

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EXPOSITION PARK

25

OLD EAST DALLAS

35

CITYPLACE

35

BRYAN PLACE

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Dallas’ urban core is an exciting and diverse collection of environments, experiences, and neighborhoods — each with its own character, personality, and purpose. From historic buildings and museums to first-rate art facilities and an endless selection of amazing restaurants, Dallas’ urban core provides a place for almost any taste.

DALLAS ARTS DISTRICT

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COMMUNITIES

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DALLAS ARTS DISTRICT

The largest contiguous urban arts district in the nation, the Dallas Arts District, includes the AT&T Performing Arts Center, Dallas Museum of Art, Crow Collection of Asian Art, Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center, Dallas City Performance Hall, Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas Black Dance Theatre, and Belo Mansion. Here, you’ll also find Booker T. Washington High School for the Performing and Visual Arts and One Arts Plaza, as well as a myriad of historic churches, delicious restaurants, and eclectic food trucks. And, of course, you can’t forget Klyde Warren Park, a 5.2-acre deck park built over a stretch of Woodall Rodgers Freeway.

WINSPEAR OPERA HOUSE PHOTO: TIMOTHY HURSLEY COURTESY OF VISIT DALLAS

NASHER SCULPTURE CENTER

PHOTO: TIMOTHY HURSLEY COURTESY OF NASHER SCULPTURE CENTER

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MAIN STREET DISTRICT PHOTO: RADCLIFFE DESIGN / DOWNTOWN DALLAS INC.

The Neiman Marcus flagship store, Comerica Bank Tower, Bank of America Plaza, The Joule, Magnolia Hotel, The Adolphus, and numerous restaurants all combine to form the central space known as the Main Street District. With landmarks such as Main Street Garden, Belo Garden, Stone Street Gardens, and Pegasus Plaza, as well as historic buildings that have been converted to residential buildings, the Main Street District is a great place to live, work, and play.

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WEST END

PHOTO: HANNAH RIDINGS

SPRING 2019

The West End Historic Disrict is one of downtown Dallas’ famous sites, as well as one of its most-visited destinations. Complete with The Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza, Dallas World Aquarium, and Dallas Holocaust Museum, and surrounded by a cluster of fun restaurants and entertainment venues, this district provides a valuable experience for visitors and locals alike. For decades, the West End served as manufacturing hub for hats, crackers, candy, apparel, farm equipment, and saddles. Today, a cavalry of well-established developers and downtown stakeholders are driving the creation of an innovation district and smart city pilot project — a rebirth of the West End.

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COMMUNITIES

URBAN LIVING CIVIC CENTER Civic Center is the regional hub of many landmark destinations, and home to the Omni Dallas Hotel and the Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center, one of the largest convention centers in the country. Here, you’ll find Dallas City Hall, Earle Cabell Federal Building and Courthouse, J. Erik Jonsson Central Library, George L. Allen Sr. Courts Building, Pioneer Plaza, and Pioneer Park Cemetery. 75

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PHOTO: JUSTIN TERVEEN COURTESY OF VISIT DALLAS

REUNION DISTRICT

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The Reunion District is widely known for two primary landmarks: Reunion Tower and Union Station. Reunion Tower, one of Dallas’ most iconic symbols, includes Five Sixty, a fine-dining restaurant by Wolfgang Puck. Union Station is a hub for the Trinity Railway Express, DART Light Rail and Amtrak Intercity Rail. Stay in the Hyatt Regency Dallas and enjoy both of these amazing landmarks. 30

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PHOTO: VISIT DALLAS

THE GEO-DECK AT REUNION TOWER

FARMERS MARKET DISTRICT

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Anchored by the Dallas Farmers Market, which has been providing the people of Dallas with fresh fruits, vegetables, and meats for more than six decades, the Dallas Farmers Market District encompasses a large area bounded by Jackson Street, North Central Expressway, R.L. Thornton Freeway, and St. Paul Street. Not only does the Dallas Farmers Market District offer unique food and specialty vendors, including the newly enclosed Shed 2, but it is also home to a collection of historic buildings, contemporary townhomes, and apartments. 30

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PHOTO: CHASE MARDIS

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UPTOWN The last 15 years have seen massive construction projects transform this area into a dense mixed-use, pedestrian-friendly place to live and work. Just north of downtown Dallas, Uptown is popular with young professionals. Although it is one of Dallas’ earliest settlements, redevelopment has fostered a lively mix of new and old. The Historic State Thomas neighborhood includes wood-frame houses restored to their early-20th-century grandeur. New high-rise residences offer ownership and rental opportunities and typically include fitness centers and shopping. The area is also home to hundreds of fine dining and nightlife venues, as well as galleries, boutiques, and an art house movie theater. Uptown attracts young professionals who want a walkable neighborhood with plenty of action. 75

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PHOTO: MICHAEL SAMPLES

HARWOOD The Harwood District, under the direction of developer Harwood International, launched in 1984 with the Rolex Building at downtown Dallas’ east side. Today, the 18-block, 30-acre district has 3.5 million square feet of Class A office, residential, and retail space, along with 8 acres of green space, with more to come. 75

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PHOTO: HARWOOD

JONES DAY

VICTORY PARK Victory Park is home to one of downtown’s most recognizable sporting venues, the American Airlines Center, where you can see the World Champion Dallas Mavericks and Dallas Stars. This 75-acre district offers luxurious urban living, dining, sophisticated nightlife, and office space. Also located here is the beginning of the Katy Trail and the Perot Museum of Nature and Science. Other landmarks include the W Dallas Victory Hotel and the House of Blues. 75

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PHOTO: DANA MCCURDY

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TURTLE CREEK The elegant Turtle Creek corridor, north of downtown Dallas in the Oak Lawn area, makes up 80 city blocks containing approximately 90 acres of green space, as well as luxury townhomes and modern high-rises. The area has spectacular natural beauty with Katy Trail running throughout the neighborhood. Turtle Creek is also home to the Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Kalita Humphreys Theater. 75

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PHOTO: ELIZABETH LAVIN

PHOTO: ROSEWOOD

COMMUNITIES

URBAN LIVING

THE MANSION AT TURTLE CREEK

STATE THOMAS

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The State Thomas area of Uptown Dallas offers easy access to freeways, the M Line Trolley, and close proximity to the central business district. State Thomas is one of Dallas’ oldest neighborhoods, with the largest collection of intact Victorian residential structures. It also has a modern touch, including mixeduse commercial and residential projects with restaurants, boutiques, art shops, and hotels. 30

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PHOTO: MICHAEL SAMPLES

WEST VILLAGE West Village is known as Dallas “Uptown’s Downtown,” containing 275,000 square feet of retail and restaurants, and more than 5,000 residential units. This walkable shopping and dining district offers a variety of one-of-a-kind retail shops and boutiques, along with plenty of restaurants and entertainment options. Developed by Phoenix Property Co. and Urban Partners, West Village has direct access to the Katy Trail, McKinney Avenue Trolley, and DART rail and bus stations. 75

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PHOTO: WEST VILLAGE

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URBAN LIVING COMMUNITIES

BAYLOR Baylor University Medical Center anchors this district, which is comprised of pedestrian-friendly streets, historic homes, condos, and apartments. The Baylor District is home to several nonprofit organizations located along Swiss Avenue, as well as the Latino Cultural Center, Bryan Place neighborhood, and Exall Park. 75

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PHOTO: BAYLOR UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER

PHOTO: MICHAEL SAMPLES

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BAYLOR UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER

DEEP ELLUM Nestled east of downtown Dallas, Deep Ellum was established as Freedman’s Town by former slaves after the Civil War. In the 1880s, the area was considered too far from downtown Dallas to be a reputable address. Today, Deep Ellum is an eclectic entertainment district with a funky style consisting of avant garde shops, nightclubs, art galleries, restaurants, and loft and apartment developments. People who live here tend to eschew traditional styles and embrace the unique. 75

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PECAN LODGE PHOTO: CHRISTINA CHILDRESS PHOTOGRAPHY

PHOTOS: VISIT DALLAS

EXPOSITION PARK

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Exposition Park’s focus is Fair Park, home to the State Fair of Texas in September and October. During that time, Exposition Park experiences hundreds of thousands of visitors, especially during the annual Oklahoma-Texas football game at the Cotton Bowl, known as the “Red River Showdown.” This East Dallas area includes boutique shops, and eclectic bars and restaurants. 30

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As one of Dallas’ most successfully branded destinations, the Design District consists of more than 300 specialty merchants offering a unique selection of art, furnishings, antiques, and designer goods. More than an attraction for interior designers, the Design District consists of numerous restaurants, residential, and other commercial projects that add to the district’s vitality, making it a blossoming community as well as a creative epicenter.

PHOTOS: CHASE MARDIS

DESIGN DISTRICT

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As the front door to the Trinity River (downtown Dallas’ greatest natural asset), the Riverfront District has created the most significant change to the city’s skyline with the construction of the Margaret Hunt Hill Bridge, designed by internationally renowned architect and engineer Santiago Calatrava. From an array of unique antique shops to the famous tacos and longhorns of Fuel City, the Riverfront District is home to some of Dallas’ mostloved stops.

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PHOTO: CATHERINE DURKIN

RIVERFRONT DISTRICT

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URBAN LIVING This area has long been home to La Bajada, a largely Hispanic working-class neighborhood. When the Margaret Hunt Hill Bridge opened in 2012, it transformed the Dallas skyline, while bringing new interest and energy into the area. Trinity Groves, a 15-acre restaurant incubator at the foot of the bridge, was the first true sign of innovation and the harbinger to the future of West Dallas (in other words: build a microbrewery, and they will come). Developers have made significant investments in the area and have a number of new communities in the works. There is a surge in apartment construction, and plans are underway for offices, shops, an urban farm, and more. It’s not a stretch to say that West Dallas is poised to be the next big thing.

PHOTO: REBECA POSADAS-NAVA

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PHOTO: BELMONT HOTEL

BELMONT HOTEL

TRINITY GROVES

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This West Dallas neighborhood is a 100-acre, multiphased redevelopment of an area once containing light industrial buildings and warehouses. Trinity Groves’ first phase consists of a 10.3-acre restaurant/specialty food incubator. The 40-acre, mixed-use second phase includes the 352-unit Cypress at Trinity Groves. Finally, a 50-acre third phase is planned for mixed use. 30

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PHOTO: CHASE MARDIS

LA BAJADA The West Dallas neighborhood of La Bajada is north of the mixed-use Trinity Groves with views of downtown Dallas. The area is home to Hispanic families, many whom owned their homes for generations. With the opening of the Margaret Hunt Hill Bridge in 2012, this area is revitalizing with small apartment buildings and retail under construction. The area is also home to Urban Youth Farm Park, a community garden in West Dallas that provides youth hands-on outdoor education. 75

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PHOTO: MEREDITH MILLS

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WEST DALLAS 75


URBAN LIVING COMMUNITIES

THE CEDARS Home to a range of industries, creative office and living space, and affordablehousing options, The Cedars neighborhood is where you’ll find Dallas Heritage Village (a living history museum), American Beauty Mill lofts, and the popular annual Cedars Open Studios art tour. You’ll also find a growing base of urban dwellers throughout the area, making The Cedars a diverse, eclectic neighborhood. 75

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LORENZO HOTEL

PHOTO: MICHAEL SAMPLES

PHOTO: DANA MCCURDY

DALLAS HERITAGE VILLAGE

SOUTH SIDE

CANVAS HOTEL (FOREGROUND)

“South Side” is named after South Side on Lamar, an adaptive reuse of the former Sears Catalog Merchandise Center. South Side consists of many prime landmarks, including Gilley’s performance hall, Poor David’s Pub, and the Canvas Hotel, which features a hard-tobeat view of downtown. Other landmarks in South Side include Jack Evans Police Headquarters and the administrative offices of the Dallas County Community College system. 75

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PHOTO: MICHAEL SAMPLES

EDGEWOOD PLACE South Dallas Edgewood Place was once home to the Jewish community, and later on, African-American residents; many of today’s Edgewood inhabitants are from families who owned their houses for decades. Edgewood today is attracting the attention of young professionals and urban pioneers, who are quietly buying houses in need of renovation. Developers are interested as well, because of Edgewood’s proximity to Downtown, Deep Ellum, Farmers Market, and Baylor Medical Center. 75

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PHOTO: MICHAEL SAMPLES

THE BOTTOMS The 126-acre Bottoms is bounded on the north by the Trinity River, and on the west by Interstate 35, with Corinth and Eighth Streets to the east and south, respectively. Best known for the Yvonne A. Ewell Townview Center School for the Talented and Gifted, one of the nation’s best high schools, as well as the Golden Gate Missionary Baptist Church, the city of Dallas is working with community stakeholders to revive the area.

YVONNE A. EWELL TOWNVIEW CENTER

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PRESTON HOLLOW NORTHPARK CENTER

PHOTO: NORTHPARK CENTER

North Dallas is the site of some of Dallas’ wealthiest neighborhoods, including Preston Hollow, which consists of Old Preston Hollow and 12 small neighborhoods. Strait Lane in particular is a multimillion-dollar address of influencers. These estate-filled neighborhoods with shade-covered hills, private lakes, streams, and expansive grounds house dignitaries such as George W. Bush and Ross Perot, notable CEOs like Mark Cuban and T. Boone Pickens, and sports icons like Dirk Nowitzki and Roger Staubach. Famous architects like Frank Lloyd Wright designed a majority of the older mansions. But new, custom estates are the current trend. Predominately a family-centric community, many of the children get their education at the prestigious private school corridor within the area. As you travel north, the Preston Forest neighborhoods scale into ranch homes and prices drop slightly. Quick entry onto both the Dallas North Tollway and U.S. Highway 75 gives easy access to the rest of the city. Highend shopping and dining is found at Preston Center and the popular NorthPark Center.

PHOTO: ANDREW SMITH

NORTH DALLAS

FAR NORTH DALLAS

SPRING 2019

PHOTO: MICHAEL SAMPLES

THE GALLERIA

Far North Dallas is sandwiched between suburban Addison and Richardson, and bounded by Interstate 635 and Belt Line Road. Even residents have trouble distinguishing the lines between Dallas proper and their suburban neighbors—especially as the schools belong mostly to the Richardson ISD. The schools, plus proximity to shopping centers and equidistance between downtown and Frisco, attract many young families with children. The area was first developed in the ’70s and ’80s. Many homes date back to that era, but the home values vary. While made up of many neighborhoods, the North Dallas Neighborhood Alliance creates some cohesion. Of note are the 6.3-mile Preston Ridge Trail and the Galleria, a multistory mall featuring lots of shopping and an ice-skating rink.

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CITY OF DALLAS NEIGHBORHOODS


Even though it’s situated in the heart of Dallas, this enclave is actually composed of two independent entities: the Town of Highland Park and the City of University Park. Each maintains its own tax structures, police departments, school districts, and municipal operations. The well-to-do and influential live here, including Jerry Jones (Dallas Cowboys’ owner). In fact, some of the highest per-capita incomes in all of Texas reside within these ZIP codes. Home prices easily reach the millions. Boutique shopping is luxe, providing high levels of personal service at places like Highland Park Village, the oldest shopping center in the United States. While the houses are grand, the streets are lined with majestic oak trees. Lush green spaces are meticulously manicured. The presence of the private Southern Methodist University campus lends a quaint Ivy-League air to these small-but-wealthy towns. At Christmas, horse-drawn carriages carry crowds to view the awe-inspiring light shows of the decorated mansions. The Park Cities are also home to the Dallas Country Club, George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum, and Snider Plaza.

PHOTO: MEREDITH MILLS

PARK CITIES

HIGHLAND PARK VILLAGE

GEORGE W. BUSH PRESIDENTIAL CENTER

PHOTO: VISIT DALLAS

COMMUNITIES

CITY OF DALLAS NEIGHBORHOODS

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CITY OF DALLAS NEIGHBORHOODS

PHOTOS: MICHAEL SAMPLES

This pocket of Dallas has two distinct sections—residential and commercial. Neighborhoods developed in the late 1950s contain mid-century and ranch-style houses on mid-size lots. Public schools are highly rated and private schools are abundant. Park Forest is known for its community pool. Midway Hills is popular for the Disney Streets whose character-named streets attract high demand. Korea Town to the west, while mostly commercial, serves the largest Korean community in Texas. If you are looking for wholesale-only fabric and gift stores, cruise down Harry Hines Boulevard.

NORTHEAST DALLAS

THE VILLAGE THE SHOPS AT PARK LANE PHOTOS: MICHAEL SAMPLES

Apartment complexes and retail dominate Northeast Dallas. The Village, made up of 17 complexes served by central services and a community country club, draws young professionals. Nearby are newly built and renovated ’50s complexes off University Drive which are popular with SMU students. North of Park Lane is a cluster of apartments called Vickery Meadows. It’s home to ethnically diverse families, including immigrants from all over the world. A pocket of midpriced ’50s-era housing communities are found east of Skillman Street. Housing is close to Presbyterian Hospital, shopping centers, and DART stations that line upper Greenville Avenue.

FAR NORTHEAST DALLAS

RICHLAND COLLEGE

PHOTO: YVENA CHOWDHURY

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Here’s a slice of Dallas north of Interstate 635 and east of U.S. Highway 75, just south of Richardson. Right at the corner of those intersecting freeways lies the sprawling headquarters of Texas Instruments, a global semiconductor design and manufacturing company. Close by, you’ll also find the campus of Richland Community College, with both accredited and youth or enrichment classes. For housing, expect a mix of lower-rent apartments alongside modestly priced homes built in the ’70s. The closer you get to the suburbs, the higher the prices go.

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COMMUNITIES

NORTHWEST DALLAS


COMMUNITIES

CITY OF DALLAS NEIGHBORHOODS

OAK CLIFF 1. North Oak Cliff People here are proud to represent a convergence of artists, musicians, and culture-rich Hispanic communities. While it’s one of the older neighborhoods, it has seen quite the resurgence in recent years. Renovations to the Bishop Arts District and several historic districts like Kessler Park, with its hills and Tudor-style homes, and Winnetka Heights, with Prairie and Craftsman-style houses, spurred the launch of independent restaurants and shops around family-owned Mexican restaurants and mercados. It strives to retain its open-minded, diverse character in the midst of its new popularity.

BISHOP ARTS DISTRICT

PHOTO: DANA MCCURDY

When mentioning Oak Cliff, most are referring to North Oak Cliff, but the district actually encompasses four unique sections—and a huge amount of real estate.

3. Southeast Oak Cliff This is a haven of education with the campuses of both recently expanded University of North Texas at Dallas and Paul Quinn College. Big plans are in the works for the areas surrounding these schools.

Stevens Park Golf Course just saw a complete redesign by architect John Colligan and is open for public golfing. Kidd Springs Park offers walking trails and lots of outdoor opportunities. 2. East Oak Cliff East Oak Cliff is home to the Dallas Zoo, plus the No. 1 and No. 4 high schools in the nation—The School for the Talented and Gifted and the School of Science and Engineering Magnet at Yvonne A. Ewell Townview Center.

4. Central Oak Cliff Wynnewood North, named the Dallas Observer’s “Dallas’ Best Neighborhood” in 2012, is prized for its mid-century houses on gently sloping hills. The 263-acre Kiest Park is full of sports options. Oak Cliff Nature Preserve offers eight miles of trails.

EAST KESSLER Established in the late 1930s by developer Roy Eastus and the Stemmons Family, East Kessler’s chalk hills, combined with many doctors living there once earned it the designation of “Pill Hill.” These days, East Kessler Park is home to Methodist Dallas Medical Center, and is the furthest east of the Kessler Park neighborhoods in Oak Cliff. Crisscrossed by many creeks, this quiet residential area takes its street names from the many real estate figures who developed it, as well as the chalk hills embellishing it. 75

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PHOTO: MICHAEL SAMPLES

LAKE CLIFF Lake Cliff takes its name from Cliff Park, which was constructed in the late 19th century. Many of the houses in this northern Oak Cliff neighborhood were built between 1890-1930; during this time, John Zang and Charles Mangoled built the Crystal Hill entertainment complex. Lake Cliff includes the historic 12-story Lake Cliff Towers, once a hotel and now an apartment complex. 75

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CITY OF DALLAS NEIGHBORHOODS COMMUNITIES

LOVE FIELD

STEMMONS CORRIDOR

HILTON ANATOLE

PHOTO: ELIZABETH LAVIN

Warehouse-heavy, this entire section is filled with industrial and commercial property. Essentially an extension of the Design District, it’s starting to attract the attention of indie, artist-based businesses and a few trendy restaurants. Still, quite a bit of heavy machinery and production operations dominate the scene. Several large hotels are located along the freeway for which this neighborhood is named. Developers have been eyeing the properties for the proximity to the Medical District and the shortcut to Oak Cliff, so the landscape may change in the near future.

PHOTO: J. P. FAGERBACK / CREATIVE COMMONS

PHOTO: VISIT DALLAS

People of Dallas love their heart-of-the-city airport, Love Field. Recently lifted flight restrictions make it busier than ever—and the nearby neighborhoods more popular than ever. Bluffview is an affluent area tucked around Inwood Village. Cliffs overlooking Bachman Branch, sometimes 50 feet high, give the neighborhood natural charm. Close by is Greenway Parks, a conservation district designed in 1927 in the English commons tradition of clustering houses around private parkways. Perry Heights, south of the landing strip, is a collection of prewar homes and condominiums. Expect big change in the Maple corridor as major development progresses.

ALTA DESIGN DISTRICT

PHOTO: ANDREW SMITH

MEDICAL DISTRICT

PARKLAND HOSPITAL

SPRING 2019

Does it surprise you that large, expanding hospitals congregate here? Parkland Hospital, made famous for treating President John F. Kennedy, Children’s Medical Center, UT Southwestern Medical Center, and Zale Lipshy University Hospital all stand shoulderto-shoulder, peppered with specialized care centers offering top-notch health-care services. Apartments are springing up to accommodate the growth. Next door, Dallas Market Center, The Apparel Mart, and the World Trade Center keep shops across the country stocked with wholesale goods. The Infomart houses Wade College and tech-centric offices.

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OAK LAWN Nestled between Highland Park and Interstate 35, which separates it from the Design District, Oak Lawn has a distinct culture. It’s affectionately called the “gayborhood” by locals for its high population of GLBT-friendly clubs, restaurants, shops, and events like the annual Halloween parade. But the mix of posh, high-rise apartments among renovated post-war homes draws kidless urban professionals of all ages and types who have fine tastes in decor and dining. Retail and restaurant options tend to be unique, ranging drastically from the highest-end to the character-filled and budget-friendly. A block away, Turtle Creek, a winding boulevard of shady green space and Reverchon Park, embodies high-culture attitude as exemplified with the Kalita Humphreys Theater and the five-star Mansion at Turtle Creek.

THE MANSION AT TURTLE CREEK

PHOTO: COURTESY OF ROSEWOOD

COMMUNITIES

CITY OF DALLAS NEIGHBORHOODS

OAK LAWN MURAL PHOTO: IMANI CHET LYTLE

PHOTO: QUINCY CURÉ PRESTON

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CITY OF DALLAS NEIGHBORHOODS COMMUNITIES

OLD EAST DALLAS

SWISS AVENUE HISTORIC DISTRICT

PHOTO:S TANNER GARZA

Sought out for a mix of casual, foodie-centric restaurants and bars alongside older houses, this area rallies around its fun, all-inclusive spirit. You’ll hear it referred to as Lower Greenville, the M Streets, and Knox-Henderson, but it’s actually made up of lots of neighborhoods — many designated as conservation districts of Tudor homes and cottages. Historic mansions on Swiss Avenue neighbor two-story Prairie houses of Munger Place Historic District. Renovated ’60s apartment buildings line Gaston Avenue. Most everything off Ross Avenue is being rehabilitated. Families blend with young singles. Schools are community supported. It’s known for the St. Patrick’s Day Parade, Granada Theater, and joyous eating and drinking.

CITYPLACE The Cityplace District is bestknown for its 1.4-million-squarefoot 42-story office Cityplace Tower (served by a DART station), as well as the 275,000-squarefoot residential-and-retail West Village. Yet this 160-acre, master-planned, mixed-use community, bounded by Haskell and Lemmon Avenues and the Katy Trail also offers the tree-lined Haskell Boulevard, along with its more than 3 million square feet of residential property, 500,000 square feet of retail, and 1.6 million square feet of office space. 75

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PHOTO: MICHAEL SAMPLES

BRYAN PLACE Originally named after Dallas founder John Neely Bryan, Bryan Place of East Dallas contains older houses and structures from the early 20th century, as well as 1980s houses developed by Fox & Jacobs. The primarily residential neighborhood offers townhomes, zero-lot garden homes, and close-by entertainment and restaurants; a 10-minute walk brings residents to the Dallas Arts District. Exall Park, complete with playgrounds, hiking trails, and sports fields, also defines Bryan Place. 75

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COMMUNITIES

CITY OF DALLAS NEIGHBORHOODS WHITE ROCK

PHOTO: MICHAEL SAMPLES

East of White Rock Lake is a host of diverse neighborhoods, plus the beloved Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden with the Rory Meyers Children’s Adventure Garden. Forest Hills rises up from the lake with larger homes and lots. Little Forest Hills is a funky, artistically minded bungalow community that loves to throw vivacious parades. Casa Linda, anchored by Casa Linda Plaza, uses Spanish words for all its street names. Mature trees fill the ’50s-developed neighborhood and the surrounding mid-priced housing areas of Eastwood, Lake Park Estates, and Lochwood. Bath House Cultural Center, just off the lake, features local art exhibits and plays. Public Tenison Golf Course and Samuell Grand Park with its summer Shakespeare Festivals are close by as well.

PHOTO: QUINCY CURÉ PRESTON

LAKE HIGHLANDS

PHOTO: TANNER GARZA

It’s all about family in Lake Highlands. Maintained as a huge farm until 1940, the community is large, composed of more than 40 neighborhoods, but flush with green space, parks, and a creek trail that leads to White Rock Lake. Officially established in 1946, the area was heavily developed throughout the ’60s. There are many value homes to be found here. While part of Dallas, most of the public schools actually fall into the Richardson ISD. That includes Lake Highlands High School, top-ranked nationally. Morgan Fairchild went there, as did recent Grammy winner Annie Clark, a.k.a. St. Vincent.

LAKEWOOD Tight-knit, eclectic in nature, and situated alongside White Rock Lake, Lakewood is adored for character close to downtown. CNN Money ranked it ninth for “Best BigCity” neighborhoods. Prized architects Charles Dilbeck and Clifford Hutsell designed many houses with modern or Spanish styles. Craftsman or Prairie styles fill Junius Heights Historic District. While houses are updated and urban sensibilities integrated, lifestyle here is not unlike the idyllic way it began. Folks still go to the Lakewood Shopping Center landmarked with the Lakewood Theater; walk, run, bike, row, and sail around the lake; or play golf at Lakewood Country Club. And kids still go to Woodrow Wilson High School, one of many International Baccalaureate high schools in Texas. PHOTO: PAUL MANAK

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CITY OF DALLAS NEIGHBORHOODS

PHOTO: DALLAS ATHLETIC CLUB

DALLAS ATHLETIC CLUB

A section of neighborhoods closest to the southern tip of White Rock Lake features tree-filled yards and one-story ranch houses from the ’60s that make great starter homes. Grouped together as White Rock Hills, this area includes Claremont, Casa Linda Forest, and Hillridge. Casa View, built in the post-war building boom, has gained attention as a bargain opportunity. The Creative Arts Center, a neighborhood gem, teaches visual arts classes. Eastfield College offers two-year degrees and continuing education. Private Dallas Athletic Club offers golf and tennis.

With roots tracing back to the early 1800s, much of Southeast Dallas is encompassed by the Trinity River green space. It includes the Trinity River Audubon Center—a nature preserve with hiking and biking trails and a bird sanctuary. Across Elam Creek is McCommas Bluff Preserve—a 111-acre wooded preserve. It’s also home to the Trinity Forest Aerial Adventure Park and Texas Horse Park. Because of the scenery, this area is slated for future development.

PHOTOS: TANNER GARZA

SOUTHEAST DALLAS

TRINITY RIVER AUDUBON CENTER

FAIR PARK Built to host the Texas Centennial Exposition in 1936, Fair Park is a historically protected collection of Art Deco buildings housing museums and exhibits. But everybody knows it as the grounds for the State Fair of Texas. The annual spectacular is a sight like no other. Year-round, people visit the Texas Discovery Gardens, the Music Hall at Fair Park, Starplex Pavillion, The African American Museum, the Children’s Aquarium, and games at the Cotton Bowl. A new initiative by the city just launched to revitalize both the park and the surrounding neighborhoods. Stay tuned. 75

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COMMUNITIES

FAR EAST DALLAS


COMMUNITIES

CITY OF DALLAS NEIGHBORHOODS

SOUTH DALLAS

PHOTOS: TANNER GARZA

South of downtown and surrounding Fair Park, these predominantly AfricanAmerican and Hispanicinhabited neighborhoods are pushing to rise again. Initiatives are underway to invigorate capital improvements and incentivized development. The Dolphin Heights area is a close-knit, family-friendly neighborhood. The South Boulevard/Park Row Historic district is undergoing a revival. Parkdale/Urbandale near the Keeton Park Golf Course is striving for the same. Proximity to the city offers great growth promise.

GRAND PARK SOUTH

BILLY EARL DADE MIDDLE SCHOOL

Grand Park South (GPS) is a 228-acre tax-increment finance (TIF) District in South Dallas and adjacent to historic Fair Park with access to downtown and DART’s light rail green line. Recent development in the district includes 6,000 square feet of retail, 30 single-family homes, and a $36 million, 213,616-square-foot middle school that opened in 2013. 75

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PHOTO: MICHAEL SAMPLES

PARK ROW SOUTH BLVD

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South Boulevard/ Park Row Historic District is part of the Edgewood Historic District in South Dallas. The two-block neighborhood consists of 100 houses on South Boulevard and Park Row which were built by the Jewish community in the early 20th century when Temple Emanu-El was at Harwood Street and South Boulevard. This area is revitalizing with a mix of relatively intact Prairie School, Craftsman bungalow, and historical revival style homes by prominent Dallas Architects of the period 1910-1935. 30

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CITY OF DALLAS NEIGHBORHOODS

PHOTO: ANDREW SMITH

Named for a grove of cottonwood trees, Pleasant Grove was once its own town until annexed in 1954 and combined with other small communities. It’s home to Skyline High—the nation’s first magnet school and 12th largest high school in America. And it is also home to The Trinity Forest Golf Course, which hosted the most successful professional charity golf event on the PGA, for the first time in 2018. SMU’s golf program and First Tee of Greater Dallas are also housed there.

Mountain Creek Lake, the namesake, is actually a reservoir designed to cool the Mountain Creek Power Plant. Today, Dallas Baptist University resides in the hills overlooking the water. Not far away is Potter’s House, led by Oprah-favorite Bishop T.D. Jakes, which gathers large worshipping crowds. The Dallas-Fort Worth National Cemetery rests near the lake. Not only is there access to the park and soccer fields in Mountain Creek Lake Park, but Joe Pool Lake is mere minutes away. Though in Dallas County, residents are educated through the Duncanville ISD.

PHOTO: REAGAN C. ROTHENBERGER / CREATIVE COMMONS

MOUNTAIN CREEK

DALLAS BAPTIST UNIVERSITY

RED BIRD

THE GOLF CLUB OF DALLAS

SPRING 2019

PHOTOS: ANDREW SMITH

DALLAS EXECUTIVE AIRPORT

Hard-working families that are generally Texasborn-and-bred live in the section between Oak Cliff and Duncanville. One nice perk: Housing costs are about half of the Dallas average. The Dallas Executive Airport flies out of Red Bird, maintaining aircraft and making sure those doing business in downtown can fly out at a moment’s notice. For hikers looking for a challenge, head to difficult-rated Boulder Park Trail. Golf enthusiasts will want to experience the last Perry Maxwell-designed course at The Golf Club of Dallas.

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COMMUNITIES

PLEASANT GROVE


P

BEYOND DALLAS

Sanger

Alvord

Aub

COMMUNITIES

Chico

Lake Bridgeport

Kruge Krum Decatur

Bridgeport

Quality of life starts with finding Bay the Runaway right community. The Dallas region is surrounded byParadise dozens of distinctive suburban communities that offer their own unique charms. Looking for a community with a historic downtown, eclectic shops, and restaurants? We’ve got that. What about a master-planned community with a golf course and access to great schools? We’ve got that, too. Whether you prefer to live on a lake, in wide-Springtown open spaces, or near a rodeo, great mall, or nature preserve, there’s a community that’s right Sanctuary for you. In a region that’s so richly diverse, it won’t be easy deciding where to hang your hat.

Corinth New Fairview

DENTON COUNTY

Aurora

Briar CDP

Argyle Northlake

Lewi

Flower Mound

WISE COUNTY

Roanoke Trophy Club

Newark

Westlake

TARRANT COUNTY

Haslet

Grapevine Lake Southlake

Pelican Bay

Azle

Hickory Creek

Double Oak

Rhome

Pecan Acres

Reno

Copper Canyon Highland Village Bartonville

Justin

Boyd

Coppe

Grapevine

Keller

Eagle Mountain CDP

NORTHEAST TARRANT COUNTY Blue Mound Haltom City

Lake Worth

Colleyville

North Richland Hills

Watauga

Saginaw

Bedford

Euless

Irving

Hurst

Richland Hills

River Oaks

White SettlementWestover Hills

Willow Park

Annetta North Weatherford

Oak Point

DISH

Cool Hudson Oaks

Cross Ro

Ponder

Lakeside

Millsap

Denton

DENTON COUNTY

FORT WORTH AREA Aledo

Annetta

Pantego

Fort Worth

Benbrook

Annetta South

Grand Prairie

Dalworthington Gardens Forest Hill

Edgecliff Village

Kennedale

Arlington

Everman

PARKER COUNTY HOOD COUNTY

Crowley

Rendon

Burleson

Cresson

Briaroaks

Oak Trail Shores CDP Granbury

Godley

Joshua

Mansfield

ARLINGTON / JOHNSON GRAND PRAIRIE AREA COUNTY

Midlot

Cross Timber

De Cordova Bend

Alvarado

Venus

Keene Tolar Pecan Plantation CDP

Cleburne

Maype 40

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Pilot Point

Wolfe City Anna Weston

Celina

brey

Blue Ridge

Melissa

Celeste

COMMUNITIES

erville

WEST COLLIN COUNTY Prosper

oads

New Hope

Neylandville

McKinney

Princeton

Lowry Crossing

Little Elm

Farmersville

Campb

Frisco

Shady Shores

Fairview

y

Allen Parker

Hebron

Greenville

Lucas

The Colony

isville

EAST COLLIN COUNTY Josephine

St. Paul

Plano Murphy

Caddo Mills

Nevada

Lavon

Wylie

COLLIN COUNTY

Lon

Royse City

Sachse

Richardson

Carrollton

ell

Addison

Union Valley

Fate

Garland

Rockwall

Farmers Branch

Quinlan

Rowlett

NORTHEAST DALLAS COUNTY

NORTHWEST DALLAS COUNTY

University Park Highland Park

McLendonChisholm

ROCKWALL COUNTY

Heath Sunnyvale

West Tawakoni

KAUFMAN COUNTY

Mesquite Cockrell Hill

HUNT COUNTY

Hawk Cove

Forney

Terrell

Balch Springs

EAST DALLAS AREA Talty Seagoville Duncanville

Hutchins DeSoto

Lancaster

Wilmer

Cedar Hill

thian

Ovilla

Glenn Heights Red Oak

Post Oak Bend City

Crandall

DALLAS COUNTY

Combine

Kaufman

Oak Grove

ELLIS COUNTY

Ferris

Pecan Hill SOUTHERN DALLAS AREA

Oak Ridge

Scurry

Rosser

Cottonwood Grays Prairie

Kemp

Palmer Waxahachie Mabank

Garrett Ennis

earl SPRING 2019

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CRAIG KESSLER

COMMUNITIES

“WE MOVED TO LAKEWOOD BECAUSE OF ITS CLASSIC NEIGHBORHOOD FEEL.”

CRAIG KESSLER CITY: Dallas NEIGHBORHOOD: Lakewood COMPANY/TITLE: Topgolf, Chief Operating Officer When did you move here? Where from? I moved Thanksgiving 2016 from New York City. Where else have you lived? Before moving to Dallas I lived in Chicago, D.C., New York, Boston, London, and quite a few others.

PHOTO: CHASE MARDIS 3/18/19 4Celina-Half-Page-Ad-Changes-Final.indd 2 1:25 / PM D A L L A S REG I O N N E W C O M E R +1 R E L O C AT I O N G U I D E

What made you decide to choose Dallas? Topgolf was a huge driver for my family’s move. I fell in love with the people and the company. I had been traveling back and forth from New York every week for seven months, and I was surprised by how attached I had gotten to the city of Dallas. Moving here was a no-brainer.

How did you choose which part of town to live in? It all came down to research for us. We talked to a lot of people, and we spent every weekend for two months driving around to different neighborhoods throughout the DFW metroplex. We ended up choosing Lakewood, and we couldn’t be happier with our decision. How has your opinion of Dallas-Fort Worth changed since moving here? It has really impressed us. The food scene, the nightlife, the family activities, cost of living, etc., have made this a very easy transition. More importantly, the warm hospitality that our friends and neighbors continue to extend makes us feel at home. Tell us about Lakewood. We moved to Lakewood because of its classic neighborhood feel. Our neighbors are quickly beginning to feel like family, and we’ve already started a weekly Sunday night neighborhood wiffle ball tournament. The area also has great public schools.

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Collin County is a unique blend of new leading edge urban, mixed with traditional, a great quality of life with a business/technology friendly environment. Collin County is one of the fastestgrowing counties in Texas and the nation. More than 900,000 people, a rapidly-growing list of corporate headquarters, and two professional sports teams have chosen this part of North Texas as home. Two large communities — Plano and Frisco — make up West Collin County, Sherman which has every modern amenity you might want from parks and trails to restaurants, shopping, and entertainment.

Gainesville

RUFF RANGE DOG PARK, FRISCO

WEST COLLIN COUNTY BY THE NUMBERS 2018

2023

Population

507,145

579,631

Chico Households

182,615

207,385

2.77

2.79

Alvord

Average Household Size Median Age

Runaway Bay

36.6

36.7

$101,210

$105,830

$128,818

$140,470

$46,501

$50,357

Decatur

Lake Median Bridgeport Household Income Bridgeport

Average Household Income Per Capita IncomeParadise

Boyd

RACE AND ETHNICITY

2018

White Alone

324,348

PERCENT

46,236

American Indian Alone Springtown

2,194

COUNTY

Newark 9.1%

59,245

Pecan Acres

0.4% 2,369 TARRANT

COUNTY

Asian Alone

92,338 Reno 18.2% Pelican127,654 Bay

Pacific Islander Alone

Sanctuary 303

0.1% Azle

4.9% Saginaw

Two or More Races

17,615

3.5%

20,698

3.6%

Hispanic Origin (Any Race)

74,311

Lakeside

Hudson Oaks

Willow Park

SPRING 2019 Annetta North

88,945 Lake Worth 15.3% River Oaks White SettlementWestover Hills

New Hope McKinney

Oak Point

Hickory Argyle Creek Copper Canyon Highland Village Bartonville

Northlake EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT Double Oak

(Population 25+)

Flower Mound

TOTAL

Roanoke Trophy Club Grade Less Than 9th Westlake

Grapevine

High School Graduate

Grapevine

Keller

GED/Alternative Credential

Hills

Bachelor’s Degree

Haltom City

Bedford

Hurst

Lewisville

Fairview Allen The Colony

Lucas Parker

Hebron

St. Paul

Plano Murphy

332,171

Wylie

2.4% Coppell 10.6%

Sachse

Richardson

Carrollton Addison

Garland

Farmers Branch

Rowlett

17.9%

North

Richland Associate Degree

2018

1.5%

Some College, No Degree Colleyville Watauga Blue Mound

Frisco

2.9%

9th-12th Grade, No DiplomaLake Southlake

Lowry Crossing

Little Elm Shady Shores

Corinth

22.0%

28,177

Prosper

Cross Roads

Ponder

0.4% Haslet

4.8%

Denton

Prosper

10.2%

24,113

14.7%

Plano

58.9%

Some Other Race Alone

Melissa

Krugerville

Frisco

Justin

0.1%

Weston

Celina Aubrey

Krum

DENTON COUNTY PERCENT

Eagle Mountain344 CDP

Anna

Celina

Rhome

64.0%WISE 341,143

Briar CDP

Black Alone

2023

Aurora

Pilot Point

WEST COLLIN Sanger COUNTY COMMUNITIES

DISH

New Fairview

COMMUNITIES

PHOTO: ANDREW SMITH

WEST COLLIN COUNTY

Euless

Graduate/Professional Degree

7.0% Irving 36.1%

University Park Highland Park

Sunnyvale

21.8%

Richland Hills

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Balch Springs

Mesquite

Pri


FIELDHOUSE USA

CENTRAL PARK

PHOTO: FRISCO CVB

You might not believe that a mere 20 years ago, Frisco was farmland. Now, it is a bustling microcosm of its own and simply exploding with growth. Even the Dallas Cowboys have moved their training facilities to Frisco, joining a host of sports activity already in play. The Dr Pepper Ballpark featuring the Frisco RoughRiders baseball team and Toyota Stadium with soccer stars FC Dallas are just two of many examples. And shopping? It is plentiful, including Stonebriar Centre Mall and Ikea. The area thrives with activities for families, such as the Frisco Athletic Center with its new indoor water park, Frisco Commons with the town’s largest playground system, and Frisco Discovery Center for science. Something new and exciting opens almost daily, which means we’re just seeing the beginning of all Frisco is to become.

PHOTO: FRISCO CVB

FRISCO

PHOTO: FRISCO CVB

COMMUNITIES

WEST COLLIN COUNTY

STONEBRIAR CENTRE PHOTO: ANDREW SMITH

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WEST COLLIN COUNTY

PHOTO: ANDREW SMITH

HISTORIC DOWNTOWN PLANO

Constantly appearing on “Best City” lists, Plano is a darling of suburbs. Families fill acres of affordable planned neighborhoods, and there are shopping centers galore. Corporate headquarters are flocking to new developments like Legacy West, so while Plano is a commutable distance to just about anywhere, increasingly the jobs will be within miles. That, and every other modern amenity you might want — parks and trails like Arbor Hill Nature Preserve, restaurants, entertainment one-stops such as Shops at Legacy, churches of all denominations, major hospitals, and family-friendly events like the annual balloon festival.

COMMUNITIES

PLANO

THE SHOPS AT LEGACY PHOTO: CITY OF PLANO

PLANO BALLOON FESTIVAL PHOTO: ELIZABETH LAVIN SPRING 2019

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COMMUNITIES

EAST COLLIN COUNTY

n Oaks

Sherman Gainesville

PHOTO: JULIE SANDY

Bridgeport

Two large communities – Allen and McKinney – make up most of East Collin County. This area is home to Allen Premium Outlets, Watters Creek, the Heard Museum, and historic downtown McKinney.

CELEBRATION PARK, ALLEN

EAST COLLIN COUNTY BY THE NUMBERS Pilot Point

2018

2023

Population

383,890

438,756

Households

126,653

144,762

Sanger

Alvord

Average Household Size

3.01

Median Age

34.8

34.6

$98,789

$104,307

$120,035

$132,521

Decatur Income Median Household

Average Household Income

EAST COLLIN COUNTY COMMUNITIES

Parker FairviewKrugervilleMurphy Wylie Lucas Allen

3.01

Krum

Denton

Oak Point

Paradise

RACE AND ETHNICITY

2018

Boyd

Rhome 258,214

WISE 43,906 COUNTY

Black Alone Briar CDP

PERCENT 2023 DENTON

Northlake

Double Oak

62.2%

TOTAL

11.4%

56,409

12.9%

Less Than 9th Grade

0.6%

2,399

Springtown Asian Alone Reno Pacific Islander Alone

45,786 TARRANT COUNTY

0.5%

Westlake

11.9%

Haslet 67,095

15.3%

304 Pelican Bay

0.1%

364

0.1% Keller

Eagle Mountain 19,804 CDP

5.2%

23,544

5.4%

Sanctuary Some Other Race Alone

Azle

Two or More Races

13,663

Hispanic Origin (Any Race)

58,242

Lakeside

15.2%

Lake Worth

Blue Mound

70,489

Haltom City

9th-12th Grade, No Diploma Grapevine

Southlake

GED/Alternative Grapevine Credential Some College, No Degree

Euless

Irving

Graduate/Professional Degree

St. Paul

Plano

239,365

Murphy

Lavon

Wylie

C C

2.8% Addison

2.2%

Farmers Branch

F

Garland

Rockwall Rowlett

19.9%

16.1%

Sachse

Richardson

Carrollton 13.4%

8.9%

Bedford

Lucas Parker

Hebron

33.5%

Hurst

Richland Hills 4 6 / D A L L A S REG I O N N E W C O M E R + R ERiver L O C AT I O N G U I D E Oaks White Willow Park Settlement

The 2018 Colony

Bachelor’s Degree

16.1%

F

Fairview

Associate Degree Colleyville

Richland Hills

Princeton

Frisco

3.2%

Lake Graduate High School Coppell

North 3.6% Saginaw 16,239Watauga 3.7%

Lowry Crossing

Allen

Flower Mound

Roanoke Trophy Club

McKinney

Little Elm

Lewisville

272,708

Pecan Acres

New Hope

Hickory Creek

Copper

67.3%

Newark2,211

American Indian Alone

Prosper

EDUCATIONAL Canyon Highland ATTAINMENT Village25+) Bartonville(Population

PERCENT

COUNTY

Aurora

White Alone

Argyle

Justin

Blue Ri

Melissa

Shady Shores

Corinth DISH

New Fairview

Weston

Celina

Aubrey

Cross Roads McKinney

Ponder $43,912 $39,816

Per Capita Income

Anna

McL Ch

University Park Highland Park

Heath Sunnyvale

KA CO

SPRING 2019 Mesquite

RO CO

Forney


EAST COLLIN COUNTY

HISTORIC DOWNTOWN MCKINNEY

COMMUNITIES

McKINNEY What was once a small town has now blossomed into a mini metropolis. While McKinney has modern advantages, it maintains an active, charming town square and historical district, creating a perfect concoction. It is home to The Heard Museum with its wildlife sanctuary, a skatepark, two disc golf courses, and historical villages and museums for family outings.

Wolfe City

ADRIATICA VILLAGE

idge

COLLIN COLLEGE

Celeste

Commerce

Neylandville

Farmersville

Campbell

Greenville

Caddo Mills

Josephine Nevada

COLLIN COUNTY

Lone Oak

Royse City

Union Valley

Fate

Lendonhisholm

Quinlan

OCKWALL OUNTY

AUFMAN OUNTY

HUNT COUNTY

Hawk Cove

West Tawakoni

ERWIN PARK

PHOTOS: ANDREW SMITH

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This wholesome community was newly built for families. Allen ISD has the largest high school in Texas with an enrollment of 5,100 students. Its football stadium rivals professional operations with seating capacity for 18,000. The Eagles were football state champions in 2014 and three years prior. But the entertainment isn’t all about Friday night lights. Allen Event Center puts on major concerts and national shows. Hydrous Wake Park keeps the kids cool, as does KidMania, one of the largest handicapped-accessible playgrounds and spray grounds in Texas. Watters Creek offers fun times and shopping all in one.

PHOTO: ANDREW SMITH

ALLEN

PHOTO: CITY OF ALLEN

COMMUNITIES

EAST COLLIN COUNTY

ALLEN STATION PARK PHOTO: CITY OF ALLEN

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NORTHWEST DALLAS COUNTY

WATER TOWER THEATER, ADDISON

NORTHWEST DALLAS COUNTY COMMUNITIES

Addison Carrollton Coppell Farmers Branch Irving Las Colinas

PHOTO: IRVING CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU

Irving/Las Colinas calls itself the “Headquarters of Headquarters” for good reason. Seven Fortune 500 companies call the city their global headquarters. What’s to love? Convenience, for one. The central location makes it an easy commute to almost anywhere in the area, especially Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport—which is one reason so many companies have opted to relocate here. Within Irving lies Las Colinas, a mixed-use, master-planned community (one of the first in the United States), developed in 1972 by a wealthy cattle rancher. With luxury hotels, pretty houses, private clubs, urban lofts, and good restaurants, it is the epitome of modern American life. Addison has 118 acres of parks and enough restaurants to seat 20,000 people at a time. The area is a favorite of young, single people, who enjoy the abundant nightlife, the proximity to shopping, easy access to the Dallas North Tollway, and jobs galore. Addison is also a culture hub, with an active theater community, an incredible holiday lights display, and the popular Kaboom Town each July.

COMMUNITIES

IRVING/LAS COLINAS | ADDISON | CARROLLTON

PHOTO: TOWN OF ADDISON

IRVING CONVENTION CENTER

LAS COLINAS

PHOTO: IRVING CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU

SPRING 2019

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Bay

Sanger

Alvord

NORTHWEST DALLAS COUNTY BY THE NUMBERS

An

HOUSEHOLD EXPENDITURES (Average annual amount spent)

2018

$9,887

Krum

$25,051

507,364

Denton Apparel and Services

178,626

192,205

Transportation

Average Household Size

2.63

2.63

Median Age

34.4

34.8

$65,723

$74,144

New $94,328 Fairview

$105,571

471,054

Decatur

Households Bridgeport

Paradise

Median Household Income Average Household Income Per Capita Income

Boyd Aurora

Briar CDP

RACE AND ETHNICITY

2018

$39,994 DENTON COUNTY

Double Oak

WISE COUNTY

Newark PERCENT

Black Alone

2023

Westlake

Haslet

257,343

50.7%

11.3%

Eagle 0.7% Mountain CDP

3,263

0.6%

16.8%

98,276

19.4%

441

0.1%

492

Some Other Race Alone

64,149

13.6%

70,923

Two or More Races

17,286

3.7%

171,762

36.5%

Azle

Asian Alone

78,956

Pacific Islander Alone

Hispanic Origin (Any Race) Willow Park

Lakeside

Saginaw

Weatherford DOWNTOWN CARROLLTON Aledo Annetta Annetta South

25.8%

Graduate/Professional Degree

Allen 14.8%

The Colony

Lewisville

Fairview

Luca

Parker

Hebron

S

Plano Murphy

W

Sach

Richardson

Carrollton

Coppell

Addison

Grapevine

Garland

Farmers Branch

Keller

Ro

Colleyville North Richland Hills

Watauga

Blue

14.0% Haltom City

19,786

Grapevine Lake Southlake

0.1% Mound

Lake Worth

3.9%

Bedford

University Park

Irving

Euless

Highland Park

Hurst

Sun

Richland Hills

River 192,170 Oaks 37.9% White SettlementWestover Hills

Annetta North

6.5%

Bachelor’s Degree

Roanoke Trophy Club

PERCENT

57,280

3,127

Shores

$955

New

18.2%

Flower Mound

50,933 Pelican 10.8% Bay

American IndianSanctuary Alone

17.2% McKinney 2.2%

Associate Degree Frisco

$3,562Shady

Hickory $1,672 Creek Copper Canyon Highland Village Bartonville

Northlake

6.9%

LittleSome Elm College, No Degree

Education Argyle

Justin

Pecan Acres

White Alone

Hudson Oaks

Corinth

Rhome

256,161TARRANT 54.4% COUNTY Reno

Springtown

$2,400

Personal Care Products/Services

8.4%

9th-12th Grade, No Diploma GED/Alternative Credential

$5,992

Entertainment and Recreation

Less Than 9th Grade Prosper

Oak Point

Me

313,248

High School Graduate

$9,124

Health care

DISH

$35,811

$2,569 Cross Roads

Travel Ponder

2018 Weston

TOTAL

Krugerville

Housing

Population

2018

$80,658

Food

2023

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT (Population 25+) Celina

Aubrey

TOTAL EXPENDITURES

Chico

COMMUNITIES

ort

Pilot Point

M Cockrell Hill

PHOTO: IMANI LYTLE Balch Springs

Pantego

Fort Worth

Grand Prairie

Dalworthington Gardens

Benbrook

Forest Hill

Edgecliff Village

Kennedale

Arlington

Duncanville

Hutchins

Everman DeSoto

PARKER COUNTY HOOD COUNTY

Crowley

Rendon

Ovilla Burleson

Cresson

Briaroaks

Oak Trail hores CDP Granbury

Mansfield

Godley

Joshua

JOHNSON COUNTY

Glenn Heights Red Oak

Midlothian

DALL COUN

ELL COU

Ferris

Pecan Hill

Cross Timber

De Cordova Bend

Alvarado

Palmer

Venus Waxahachie

Keene Pecan Plantation CDP

Wilmer

Lancaster

Cedar Hill

Garrett Cleburne Ennis Maypearl

Bardwell

Grandview Glen Rose Rio Vista

Italy

Em

Milford Blooming Grove Frost

50

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D A L L A S REG I O N N E W C O M E R + R E L O C AT I O N G U I D E

SPRING 2019

Barry


COMMUNITIES

DENTON’S HISTORIC TOWN SQUARE

ARTS AND JAZZ FESTIVAL

PHOTO: MIKE MEZEUL II

PHOTO: DENTON FESTIVAL FOUNDATION

DENTON COUNTY

DENTON | LEWISVILLE

DENTON COUNTY COMMUNITIES

Argyle

Denton County includes many communities that offer a small-town lifestyle with only a short drive to bigger-city conveniences. The city of Denton is home to the University of North Texas and Texas Woman’s University which provide an infusion of youthful energy and a lively music scene. A charming historic town square is still the center of much activity. Housing is very affordable, and the neighbors are the kind you can share a cup of coffee with. Go north of Denton, and you’ll realize what “big sky” is all about—and if you want land, we’ve got plenty of it. You can have a ranch. And some animals. And never see your next-door neighbor, if that’s what you want. South of Denton are Highland Village and Flower Mound, among others. The former sits on Lake Lewisville and is popular with people who like trails and good schools. Flower Mound ranked 16th on Money Magazine’s 2018 Best Places to Live list for its pedestrian-friendly Riverwalk development, stellar schools and its small-town feel. Settled shortly after Texas received its statehood in the early 1840s, Lewisville grew rapidly after the completion of an enormous reservoir in 1954, now known as the aforementioned Lake Lewisville. Further growth occurred due to its convenient location at the crossroads of Interstate 35E and the recently completed Sam Rayburn Tollway. Lewisville takes arts, leisure, and recreation seriously with venues such as the Medical Center of Lewisville, Grand Theater, Toyota of Lewisville Railroad Park, 14 miles of trails, and all the outdoor amenities of the lake.

HOUSEHOLD EXPENDITURES (Average annual amount spent)

Chico

475,685

Households

Corinth

171,228

192,390

2.72

Median Age

33.4

Lake 2.72 Bridgeport

Runaway Bay

Bridgeport

34.1

Median Household Income

$74,988

$81,015

Average Household Income

$99,495

$109,851

Per Capita Income

$36,264

$39,960

TOTAL EXPENDITURES

$84,584

Food

$10,247 $2,679

TransportationDecatur

$9,551

Travel

$2,570

Health care

$6,407

Entertainment and Recreation Paradise

$3,779

DENTON COUNTY Krum Denton

Black Alone

48,651

10.2%

63,150

11.8%

Less Than 9th Grade Springtown

3,070

0.6%

3,292

0.6%

36,045

7.6%

50,329

9.4%

404

0.1%

485

0.1%

Some Other Race Alone

36,529

7.7%

44,038

8.2%

Two or More Races

16,202

3.4%

20,291

3.8%

Mineral 102,271 Wells

21.5%

121,593

22.8%

Cool

Millsap

Hudson Oaks

Oak Point

Briar CDP

Hickory Creek Copper Canyon Highland Village Bartonville

Argyle Northlake

Double Oak

Pecan Acres

TARRANT 9th-12th Grade, No Diploma COUNTY Reno Pelican Bay

High School Graduate Sanctuary

GED/Alternative Credential Azle

Eagle Mountain CDP

Some College, No Degree

7.8% 28.6%

Lakeside

Graduate/Professional Degree

Lake Worth

13.3%

River Oaks White SettlementWestover Hills

Hebron

Carrollt Farmers Branch

Colleyville Watauga Blue Mound Haltom City

North Richland Hills

Bedford

Irving

Euless

Hurst

Richland Hills

D A L L A S REG I O N N E W C O M E R + R E L O C AT I O N G U I D E

Annetta North

Coppell

Grapevine

Keller

3.0% 23.3% Saginaw

Grapevine Lake Southlake

15.9%

Bachelor’s Degree

Willow Park

Westlake Haslet

4.2%

Associate Degree

Lewisville

Roanoke Trophy Club

300,655 3.9%

The Colon

Flower Mound

COUNTY

Newark

Little Elm Shady Shores

Corinth

Aurora EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT Rhome 2018 (Population 25+) WISE

TOTAL

Cross Roads

Ponder

Justin

66.0%

PERCENT

Aubrey Krugerville

$1,814

352,715

SPRING 2019

Shady Shores

Sanger

Education

70.4%

Hispanic Origin (Any Race)

Sanger

Hebron

DISH

334,787

Pacific Islander Alone

Ponder

Flower Mound

$1,006

New Fairview

White Alone

Graford

Oak Point Gainesville

Double Oak

Personal Care Products/Services

2018

Asian Alone

Northlake

Denton

$25,842

Apparel and Services

RACE AND ETHNICITY

American Indian Alone

Little Elm

Cross Roads

Boyd

2023

Lewisville

Copper Canyon

2018

Housing

534,307

Average Household Size

PERCENT

Highland Village

The Colony

Alvord

2023

Population

Bartonville

Pilot Point

DENTON COUNTY BY THE NUMBERS 2018

Hickory Creek

/

51

Pantego Grand

Cockrell


COMMUNITIES

PHOTO: MICHAEL SAMPLES

NORTHEAST DALLAS COUNTY

RICHARDSON | GARLAND Two big communities—Richardson and Garland —make up Northeast Dallas County, which includes the Telecom Corridor, named for its concentration of high-tech firms such as Texas Instruments, Ericsson, and Samsung Mobile. Richardson is a fast commute to downtown Dallas or the Plano/Frisco area, with lots of affordable single-family homes, good schools, and a diverse population. DFW’s Chinatown is here, and there is a large Asian Indian immigrant community. The desire for community and culture is behind several popular festivals, as well as the Eisemann Center for Performing Arts. The city has been lauded for being a best workplace for commuters (location is everything) and for excellence in recreation and parks management. As if that weren’t enough,

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D A L L A S REG I O N N E W C O M E R + R E L O C AT I O N G U I D E

it’s been called the “fifth happiest midsize city in America” by real estate blog Movoto.com. The city of Garland website states that “Garland is where things are made.” What things, you ask? Kraft foods, Resistol hats, and a variety of electronics, oilfield equipment, and aluminum parts. It’s an older city with many affordable single-family homes and apartments. The area is quite ethnically diverse with a sizeable Vietnamese population and has made “best” lists for its appeal to both retirees and working parents. Rowlett takes its name from a nearby creek, but Lake Ray Hubbard is the main reason people choose this upscale suburb. Rowlett has more than 30 miles of shoreline and has benefited from recent extensions of the President George Bush Turnpike and DART.

NORTHEAST DALLAS COUNTY COMMUNITIES

Garland Richardson Rowlett Sachse

SPRING 2019


UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT DALLAS

PHOTO: ANDREW SMITH

COMMUNITIES FIREWHEEL TOWN CENTER, GARLAND

Sherman

PHOTO: GARLAND, TEXAS

Gainesville

RICHARDSON

Pilot Point

Sanger

Anna

NORTHEAST DALLAS COUNTY BY THE NUMBERS

Aubrey

Krugerville Krum

2018

2023

Denton

446,599

479,607

Households

152,355

162,771

2.92

Oak Point 2.93

Average Household Size Ponder Median Age DISH

New Average Household Income Fairview Justin

Per Capita Income

DENTON COUNTY

Aurora

Rhome RACE AND

WISE ETHNICITY COUNTY

Newark

White Alone

Pecan Acres

Black Alone

Haslet TARRANT COUNTYAmerican Indian Alone Pelican Bay

Azle

akeside

Asian Alone

Eagle MountainPacific Islander Alone CDP

36.0

36.6

$66,638

$73,608

Corinth

Median Household Income

Northlake

PERCENT

Roanoke Trophy Club

255,726

57.3%

61,336

13.7%

Westlake

257,564

Grapevine 68,738 Lake

Southlake 3,056 0.7%

2,932 Keller 59,632

Lewisville 2023 Flower Mound PERCENT

Grapevine

14.3%

Frisco

Crossing

$5,843Fairview

$3,364

The

Education Colony

City

Coppell

75,216

15.7%

0.0%

254

0.1%

30.6%

Hurst

Richland Hills

154,435

18.8%

Princeton GED/Alternative Credential Lowry

Some College, No Degree

Farmersville

7.5%

Bachelor’s Degree

22.2%

Lucas

Graduate/Professional Degree

$1,538

Parker

Hebron

Murphy

32.2%

11.3% Josephine

St. Paul

Plano

2.9%

21.5%

Associate Degree

Caddo Mills

Nevada

Lavon

Wylie

COLLIN COUNTY

Royse City

Sachse

Richardson

Carrollton Addison Farmers Branch

Fate

Garland

Union Valley

Rockwall Rowlett

Colleyville

136,644 Hispanic Origin (Any Race) Haltom

S P R I N G 2 0 1 River 9 Oaks White

$8,498

Personal Care Products/Services Allen$890

0.6%

Some Other Race Alone Watauga 50,466 North 11.3% 56,069 11.7% Saginaw Richland Blue Euless Two or More Races Mound 16,285 Hills 3.6%Bedford 18,709 3.9%Irving

Lake Worth

High School Graduate

$2,302

Entertainment and Recreation

7.5%

New Hope

53.7%

13.4%

221

Health care

8.2%

9th-12th Grade, No Diploma

McKinney

Celes

293,618

Less Than 9th Grade

$2,351

Transportation

Hickory $88,454 $98,108 Argyle Creek Copper Canyon Highland $30,354 $33,454 Village Bartonville

TOTAL

$22,984

Prosper

Little Travel Elm

Double Oak

2018

$75,258 $9,055

Housing

2018

Melissa

TOTAL EXPENDITURES

Apparel and Services

Shady Shores

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT Blue Ridge (Population 25+)

2018

Food

Cross Roads

Population

Weston

HOUSEHOLD EXPENDITURES Celina (Average annual amount spent)

McLendonChisholm

University Park Highland Park

Heath Sunnyvale

D A L L A S REG I O N N E W C O M E R + Mesquite

ROCKWALL COUNTY

KAUFMAN COUNTY R E L O C AT I O N G U I D E / 5 3 Forney

HUNT COUNTY


COMMUNITIES

PHOTO: ROCKWALL EDC

EAST DALLAS AREA

ROCKWALL | MESQUITE Not to be confused with the East Dallas neighborhood of Dallas, the East Dallas region of DFW is about 14 miles east of Dallas and includes more than half a dozen communities. In the heart of the region lies Lake Ray Hubbard, one of the larger lakes in Texas. Seen together, the area is a mix of city conveniences and room to breathe. Rockwall sprawls along the east side of the lake, and people who live here appreciate the swimming, boating, water skiing, and more that come with living close to the water. The fastgrowing community claims a hometown feel with all of the advantages of a major city, and it draws people from all over to its summer evening concerts by the lake. The city of Mesquite embraces its Texas flavor, but it’s not just home to the Pro Rodeo—it’s also the kind of place where kids can walk to school and families can focus on family, according to the mayor.

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EAST DALLAS AREA COMMUNITIES

Balch Springs Fate Forney Heath Mesquite Rockwall Seagoville Sunnyvale

SPRING 2019


COMMUNITIES

Sherman Gainesville

GOLF IN ROCKWALL PHOTO: MESQUITE RODEO

PHOTO: ROCKWALL EDC

Pilot Point Sanger

Anna Weston

Celina Aubrey

Blue Ridge

Melissa

Krugerville Krum

New Fairview

DENTON COUNTY

Aurora

CDP

no

R Y

Northlake

Double Oak

Rhome

Flower Mound

WISE COUNTY

2018

Population Pecan Acres

94,731

Southlake

Pelican Bay

Median Age

Eagle Mountain Median Household Income CDP Saginaw

Per Capita Income

Watauga

Blue Mound Haltom City

RACE AND Lake Worth ETHNICITY

2018

River Oaks White Black Alone Settlement Westover Hills

White Alone

American Indian Alone

Edgecliff Village

Two or More Races

Hispanic Origin (Any Race)

Hebron

Lake

103,867 Grapevine 3.01

34.0

34.1

$62,427

$69,825

Hurst

2023

PERCENT

TOTAL EXPENDITURES Food

$71,831 $8,712

Parker

Josephine

St. Paul Murphy

Nevada

Lavon

Wylie

Apparel and Services Carrollton

Coppell

Transportation

Royse City

$2,255 Richardson Addison

$8,231

Travel

Farmers Health care Branch

$2,160

Entertainment and Recreation

$3,211

Sachse Fate

Garland

Rockwall Rowlett

$5,590

Personal Care Products/Services IrvingEducation

McLendonChisholm

$850 $1,409 University

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT (Population 25+)

61.5%

188,737

59.6%

TOTAL

52,355

18.2%

59,144

18.7%

Less Than 9th Grade

2,421

0.8%

2,697

0.9%

Forest Hill12.1% 34,775

9,844 Everman

91,857

Pantego

3.8% Dalworthington 13,911 Gardens 0.1% 241 40,248

4.4% 0.1% 12.7%

Arlington Kennedale 3.4% 11,742 3.7%

32.0%

108,816

34.4%

Rendon

Mansfield

COLLIN COUNTY

$21,911

ROCKWALL COUNTY

Heath

Park Highland Park

Sunnyvale

2018

KAUFMAN COUNTY

182,165 7.2%

Cockrell Hill

9th-12th Grade, No Diploma

9.6%

High School Graduate

22.5%

Some College, No Degree

24.2%

Grand Prairie GED/Alternative Credential

Associate Degree

Cedar Hill

SPRING 2019 Ovilla

Glenn Heights

T

Balch Springs Talty

4.2%

16.4%

Graduate/Professional Degree

Forney

Mesquite

Seagoville

7.7%

Duncanville Bachelor’s Degree DeSoto

Crowley

2018 Plano

176,644

Fort 10,797 Worth Pacific Islander Alone 203 Benbrook

Grapevine 316,721

$84,000 Colleyville$95,074 North $28,044 $31,470 Richland Euless Hills Bedford

PERCENT

(Average annual amount spent)

Lucas

Richland Hills

Asian Alone

Some Other Race Alone

2.99

Keller

Average Household Income

Allen

Housing

Westlake 287,038

Haslet Households TARRANT COUNTY Average Household Size

Lakeside

2023

Roanoke Trophy Club

Newark

Azle

Fairview

The Colony HOUSEHOLD EXPENDITURES

Lewisville

Farmersville

Frisco

Shady Shores

Hickory Creek Copper Canyon Highland Village Bartonville

Princeton

Lowry Crossing

MESQUITE Little Elm PRO RODEO

Argyle

Justin

EAST DALLAS REGION BY THE NUMBERS

Boyd

New Hope McKinney

Oak Point

Corinth DISH

Prosper

Cross Roads

HISTORIC HOUSE IN ROCKWALL

Ponder

PHOTO: ROCKWALL EDC

Denton

ur

8.3% Lancaster

Hutchins Wilmer

Post Oak Bend City

Crandall

DALLAS COUNTY

Combine

D A L L A S REG I O N N E W C O M E R + R E L O C AT I O N G U I D E

Kaufm /

55

Oak Gro


COMMUNITIES CEDAR HILL

Sherman Gainesville

PHOTO: CEDAR HILL EDC

SOUTHWEST DALLAS COUNTY

CEDAR HILL | DESOTO

Pilot Point

Sanger

Anna

Alvord Southern Dallas County, often called “the Best Southwest,” is about 15 miles south of the city of Dallas. It encompasses a handful of Weston down-to-earth communities situated among what the partnership of cities there calls “a topographical Celina paradise of beautiful hillsides, Blue Ridge Aubrey Melissa Chico lush natural landscapes, and Joe Pool Lake.” The area goes a long way toward proving Krugervillethat DFW is not all concrete and cowboys— Krum that we enjoy an abundance of nature right out our back door. And you have to see it to believe it. Prosper Cross Roads and civic-minded Decatur The largest of the towns here is DeSoto, which attracts families with affDenton ordable houses neighbors. In fact, the town New Hope Lake McKinney Bridgeport has been named anBridgeport All-America City, an award that nods to the community’s ability to tackle problems with uncommon results. Princeton Lowry Oak Point Crossing Ponder Runaway Bay Broadcast and communications towers make Cedar Hill visible from a distance, but don’tLittle letElmthose harbingers of technology fool you— Farmersville Frisco Shady Fairview Paradise Corinth Shores this is a pretty, lake-adjacent community that prioritizes theDISH natural environment. New Fairview

Boyd

SOUTHERN DALLAS AREA BY THE NUMBERS WISE Aurora

Briar CDP

Northlake

Reno

Population

Sanctuary

COUNTY

98,538

Average Household Size

2.89

Median Age Median Household Income Average Household Income Hudson Oaks

Willow Park

Millsap

Per Capita Income

Annetta North Weatherford

2018

White Alone

122,596

Haltom City

$68,936 River

PERCENT

$2,054

Hurst

Health care

$5,419

Pantego Education

Fort Worth

Highland Park

Bachelor’s Degree

$802

27.9%

KAUFMAN 8.5% COUNTY

Mesquite

Forney

127,209

PARKER 42.2% 127,468 COUNTY

Talty

Arlington

Duncanville

Hutchins

43.8%

HOOD

139,373

DeSoto

Rendon

Ovilla

Cresson 1,499 0.5% COUNTY

1,651

0.5%Burleson

Asian Alone

3,516

4,304

1.4%

Pacific Islander Alone Granbury Some Other Race Alone Two or More TolarRaces Hispanic Origin (Any Race)

184

1.2% 0.1%

De Cordova Bend 27,396 9.4%

7,878

2.7%

Pecan Plantation CDP

67,367

23.2%

227

0.1%

31,451

10.0%

9,234

2.9%

Godley

78,307

Joshua

Briaroaks

JOHNSON COUNTY

Lancaster

Wilmer

Cedar Hill

44.4%

American Indian Alone Oak Trail Shores CDP

Mansfield

Glenn Heights Red Oak

Midlothian

Post Oak Bend City

Crandall

DALLAS COUNTY

Combine

Kaufman

Oak Grove

ELLIS COUNTY

Ferris

Scurry

Pecan Hill

Cross Timber

Rosser

Alvarado

Cottonwood Grays Prairie

Palmer

Venus Waxahachie

Keene

Garrett

25.0%

Cleburne

Ennis Maypearl Alma

56

/

Grandview

D A L L A S REG I O N Glen N ERose W C O M E R + R E L O C AT I O N G U I D E

Bardwell Rice

Rio Vista

Terrell

8.8%

Seagoville

Kennedale

40.6% Crowley

17.3%

Balch Graduate/Professional Degree Springs

Forest Hill

Edgecliff Village PERCENT

HUN COU

Chisholm

ROCKWALL 3.9% COUNTY

Heath

Associate Degree

Cockrell Hill

Union V

7.6%

McLendon21.3%

GED/Alternative Credential Some College, No Degree Sunnyvale

$1,326

Grand Prairie

Dalworthington Gardens

High School Graduate University Park

$3,063

Personal Care Products/Services

Westover Hills

$30,805

2023

Bedford

$7,785

Irving

Euless

4.8% Fate Rockwall

9th-12th Grade, No Rowlett Diploma

$2,113

Entertainment and Recreation

Benbrook

Annetta South

Travel

Less Than 9th Grade Garland

Farmers

$20,682 Branch

Richland Hills

Oaks

Aledo

Addison $8,191

188,065

Sachse

Richardson

Everman

Black Alone Lipan

Hills

White$89,916 $79,779 Settlement

Annetta

RACE AND ETHNICITY

Blue Mound

35.5

$27,617

Coppell

Grapevine

North Transportation Richland

TOTAL

Carrollton

ApparelColleyville and Services

Lake Worth

$62,104

Cool

$68,116

Watauga

2.92

35.2

Lakeside

Southlake

Housing

105,727 Saginaw

2018 COLLIN COUNTY

Lavon

Wylie

Keller

Eagle

Nevada

Royse City

Lake

Food

Mountain 313,709 290,280 CDP

Households

Mineral Wells

Haslet

Pelican Bay

Cadd

Josephine

St. Paul EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT (Population 25+) Murphy

Plano

2018

TOTAL WestlakeEXPENDITURES Grapevine

TARRANT 2023 2018 COUNTY

Lucas Parker

Hebron

Roanoke Trophy Club

Newark

Azle

Allen

The Colony

HOUSEHOLD EXPENDITURES Flower Mound (Average annual amount spent)

Rhome

Pecan Acres

Springtown

Hickory Creek Copper Canyon Highland Village Bartonville Double Oak Lewisville

Argyle

Justin

DENTON COUNTY

SPRING 2019

Oak Ridg


Dallas Relocation Guide Ad 2018 marks & bleeds.pdf 1 8/30/2018

PHOTOS: DESOTO EDC

GLO BEST WESTERN, DESOTO

LANCASTER is a vibrant, growing community where residents enjoy the comfort and safety of friendly neighborhoods only a few minutes from world-class entertainment and activities in Downtown Dallas. Sitting squarely within the boundaries of three major freeways I-35, I-45, and I-20, the city is in close proximity to DFW while maintaining a quaint community vibe where the stars still flicker at night. LANCASTER is recognized by Scenic City, Tree City USA, and Playful City USA, offering a variety of natural beauty and amenities to create a great place to live, learn, work, and play.

C

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

LANCASTER THE

SHINING

STAR OF TEXAS

PHOTOS: CEDAR HILL EDC

SOUTHERN DALLAS AREA COMMUNITIES

Cedar Hill DeSoto Duncanville Ferris

Glenn Heights Lancaster Midlothian Ovilla

Pecan Hill Red Oak Wilmer Waxahachie l i v e . l e a r n . w o r k . p l a y

SPRING 2019

D A L L A S REG I O N N E W C O M E R + R E L O C AT I O N G U I D E

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57


COMMUNITIES

PHOTO: CITY OF GRAND PRAIRIE

ARLINGTON HIGHLANDS PHOTO: CITY OF ARLINGTON

GRAND PRAIRIE PREMIUM OUTLETS

RIVER LEGACY PARK

GENERAL MOTORS, ARLINGTON PHOTO: CITY OF ARLINGTON

PHOTO: CITY OF ARLINGTON

ARLINGTON & GRAND PRAIRIE AREA

ARLINGTON & GRAND PRAIRIE AREA COMMUNITIES

Arlington Dalworthington Gardens Grand Prairie Mansfield Pantego

58

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ARLINGTON | GRAND PRAIRIE Arlington and Grand Prairie are the halfway points between Dallas and Fort Worth. The two communities value both work and play. The area is home to several well-known sports, entertainment, and amusement park venues, as well as The University of Texas at Arlington, American Airlines, Bell, Lockheed Martin, and a GM assembly plant, among others. Arlington officials like to say that the city was built on two words: “We can.” And here you can see a Texas Rangers game, attend a Dallas Cowboys football game, ride a roller coaster at Six Flags Over Texas, or shoot down a water flume at Hurricane Harbor. You can enjoy River Legacy Park’s 1,300 acres of forests and greenbelts. And you can find a lot of down-to-earth folks who work hard to make things like airplanes, cars, and pet products. In Grand Prairie, you can also see a show at Verizon Theatre, watch horseracing at Lone Star Park, or look at weird stuff at Ripley’s Believe It or Not. The city states that “generally speaking, our residents are thirtysomething, dual-income homeowners,” adding that “families who have lived here for generations welcome newcomers … for the same reasons the natives don’t want to leave—location and hometown atmosphere.”

D A L L A S REG I O N N E W C O M E R + R E L O C AT I O N G U I D E

SPRING 2019


COMMUNITIES

Gainesville

Pilot Point Sanger

Alvord

Celina Aubrey Chico

Krugerville Krum Denton

Decatur Lake Bridgeport

Bridgeport

AT&T STADIUM Oak Point

Ponder

Runaway Bay Paradise

COUNTY

Aurora

Population

663,600

703,808

Households

Springtown 228,649

240,845

Average Household Size

2.88

2.90 Reno

Median Age

33.2

33.5

$60,876

$67,113

Sanctuary

Median Household Income

$70,117

Newark

TARRANT Transportation COUNTY

$3,113Colleyville

$81,743

$91,465

Watauga Saginaw Personal Care Products/Services

$28,391

$31,515

Education Lakeside

PERCENT

2023 Willow Park

Hudson Oaks 357,428 53.9%

359,284

51.0%

Black Alone

140,465

158,855

22.6%

Millsap

American Indian Alone Asian Alone Pacific Islander Alone Some Other Race Alone Two or More Races Hispanic Origin (Any Race)

SPRING 2019

Lipan

4,331

21.2%

Annetta North

0.7%

4,445

48,600

7.3%

55,881 Annetta

743

0.1%

Annetta South 816

87,463

13.2%

Weatherford

24,566

3.7%

218,429

32.9%

Aledo

0.1%

96,576

13.7%

27,952

4.0%

PARKER

244,586 34.8% COUNTY

HOOD COUNTY

$1,409

7.7% Carrollton20.1%

Coppell

GED/Alternative Credential Grapevine

Farmers Branch

3.9%

22.7%

Associate Degree

8.1%

Bachelor’s Degree

21.0%

University

Irving Euless Graduate/Professional Degree Bedford

9.5% Park

Highland Park

Hurst

White SettlementWestover Hills

Cockrell Hill Pantego

Fort Worth

Dalworthington Gardens

Benbrook

Grand Prairie

Forest Hill

Edgecliff Village

Kennedale

Arlington

Duncanville

Everman DeSoto Crowley

Rendon

Mansfield

Burleson Briaroaks

D A L L A SJOHNSON REG I O N N E W C O M E R + R E L O C AT I O N G U I D E

COUNTY

Lancaster

Cedar Hill

Ovilla Cresson

Richards

Addison

Richland Hills

River Oaks

0.6% 7.9%

North $831 Richland Hills

Haltom City

Lake Worth

PERCENT

White Alone

Blue Mound

HighLake School Graduate Some College, No Degree

$5,343

Plano

418,753 7.0%

Grapevine

$2,082 Keller

EagleHealth care Mountain CDP Entertainment and Recreation

Hebron

Lewisville

9th-12th Grade, No Diploma

$8,019Southlake

Pelican BayTravel

The Colony2018

Less Than 9th Grade

Westlake $2,219

Pecan Acres Apparel and Services Haslet

Azle

TOTAL

$8,580

Per Capita Income

2018

Hickory Creek

Flower Mound

Roanoke Trophy Club $21,604

Housing

Average Household Income

RACE AND Cool ETHNICITY

Copper

Double Oak

Rhome EXPENDITURES TOTAL

WISEFood COUNTY

2023 Briar CDP

Argyle

Justin

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT Canyon Highland HOUSEHOLD EXPENDITURES 2018 DENTON Village 25+) (Average annual amount spent) Bartonville (Population Northlake

Boyd

2018

DISH

New Fairview

Little Elm Frisco Shady PHOTO: CITY OF ARLINGTON Shores

Corinth

ARLINGTON & GRAND PRAIRIE AREA BY THE NUMBERS

Mineral Wells

Prosper

Cross Roads

Midlothian

Glenn Heights

/

Red Oak

59

Pecan Hill


COMMUNITIES

NORTHEAST TARRANT COUNTY

GRAPEVINE

FIREWORKS OVER LAKE GRAPEVINE

As the oldest city in Tarrant County, Grapevine gladly lives up to its name. Wine flows down the Urban Wine Trail, featuring eight Texas wineries. Every September, Grapefest in Historic Downtown Grapevine pours samples of regional wine by the gallons. But it isn’t all about vino. It’s heaven for families—or at least the kids. The Great Wolf Lodge is a mecca for the young, accompanied by the Grapevine Vintage Railroad pulled by Thomas The Tank Engine™, Sea Life Grapevine Aquarium, LegoLand, and the events at The Gaylord Texas Resort. For the big kids, get ready to boat, ski, windsurf, fish, camp, and picnic at Lake Grapevine or shop the massive Grapevine Mills mall. Centered around almost 30 city parks and playgrounds, neighborhoods of all price ranges boast one of the lowest property tax rates in the area.

GRAPEFEST’S GRAPE STOMP

GRAPEVINE URBAN WINE TRAIL PHOTOS: GRAPEVINE CVB

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D A L L A S REG I O N N E W C O M E R + R E L O C AT I O N G U I D E

SPRING 2019


NORTHEAST TARRANT COUNTY

SOUTHLAKE TOWN SQUARE

COMMUNITIES

SOUTHLAKE PHOTO: SHAWN O’CONNELL

This affluent suburb is forward-thinking with a plan for progress in place through 2030. Already, the city paired with private entities to create a town square housing the town hall and post office along with shopping, a movie theater, and Gainesville a hotel surrounded by parks. Homes in these mostly new planned communities cost a bit more than average and belong to the Carroll ISD. Proximity to Dallas Fort Worth International Airport makes it popular with frequently traveling executives.

McPHERSON PARK

NORTHEAST TARRANT COUNTY COMMUNITIES

Bedford Colleyville Grapevine Euless Hurst Keller

Alvord

PHOTO: SHAWN O’CONNELL

Chico

Decatur Lake Bridgeport

PHOTO: BRIGGS FREEMAN

Bridgeport

2018

HOUSEHOLD EXPENDITURES (Average annual amount spent)

2023

$96,388

Food

$11,513

435,973

Households

155,570

166,395

Average Household Size

2.60

2.61

Travel

Median Age

40.1

40.8

Median Household Income

$80,240

$86,804

Health care Briar CDP

Average Household Income

$114,052

$124,850

$43,887

$47,790

Per Capita Income

Aurora

Transportation

Mineral Wells

2023

WISE COUNTY

Newark

Education

TOTAL

315,753

77.8%

327,345

75.1%

24,798

6.1%

29,876

6.9%

Less Than 9th Grade

2,421

0.6%

2,591

0.6%

9th-12th Grade, No Diploma

24,748

6.1%

30,918

7.1%

High School Graduate Lakeside

2,058

0.5%

2,318

0.5%

5.6%

26,630

6.1%

Two or More Races

13,322

3.3% 16,291 Hudson Oaks

Hispanic Origin (Any Race)

67,498

Millsap

16.6%

81,481

Some College, No Degree

18.7%

Associate Degree

White

Weatherford SPRING 2019

Annetta

Roanoke

Southlake

Benbrook

Coppell Grapevine

Keller 2018

Colleyville

Watauga North 279,919 Saginaw Richland Blue 2.9% Hills Mound

4.0%

15.5%

Haltom City

Irving

Euless

Bedford

Hurst

2.8% 23.1% River

Richland Hills

Oaks 7.9%

Pantego

Fort Worth

Aledo

Trophy Club

Westlake

Bachelor’s Degree SettlementWestover 29.2% Hills Graduate/Professional Degree 14.5%

Annetta North

Lewisvill

Flower Mound

$7,511

Lake Worth

GED/Alternative Credential

Willow Park 3.7%

Double Oak

Pelican Bay

White Alone

22,652

Northlake

$2,971

$1,139 Haslet $2,063

TARRANT COUNTY

Hickory Creek Copper Canyon Highland Village Bartonville

Argyle

$10,766

Personal Care Products/Services

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT Eagle PERCENT Sanctuary (Population 25+) Mountain CDP Azle

Some Other Race Alone

DENTON COUNTY $2,988

$4,327

Pecan Acres

Springtown

DISH Justin

Entertainment and Recreation

Black Alone

PacificCool Islander Alone

Rhome

Sh Sh

Corinth

$29,280

Apparel and Services

Reno PERCENT

Fairview

Housing Boyd

405,753

Asian Alone

Oak Point

2018

TOTAL EXPENDITURES New

Population

American Indian Alone

Cross Roads

Ponder

NORTHEAST TARRANT COUNTY BY THE NUMBERS Paradise

2018

Aubrey

Krugerville

Denton

Runaway Bay

RACE AND ETHNICITY

Krum

Pilot

North Sanger Richland Hills Roanoke Southlake Trophy Club Westlake

Dalworthington Gardens

D A L L A S REG I O N N E W C O M E R + R E L O C AT I O N G U I D E

Forest Hill

Grand Prairie /

61


COMMUNITIES

DOWNTOWN FORT WORTH

PHOTO: DANIEL T. POPE

PHOTO: BRIAN HUTSON COURTESY STOCKYARDS STATION

FORT WORTH STOCKYARDS

BASS PERFORMANCE HALL

PHOTO: DANIEL T. POPE

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D A L L A S REG I O N N E W C O M E R + R E L O C AT I O N G U I D E

FORT WORTH AREA The city of Fort Worth began in 1849 as an army outpost protecting settlers from the raids of native Americans. It grew rapidly after the Civil War due to its location on the Chisholm Trail, on which cattle were driven to Kansas to be transported via train—earning it the nickname “Cowtown.” The name stuck, and the now cosmopolitan city still uses a longhorn steer as part of its official logo and maintains the Fort Worth Stockyards as a historic district and tourist destination. But people who call the area home know this city’s present encompasses more than its past. In the last decade, it has been one of the fastest-growing areas in the country, and Fort Worth is continually recognized by Money, Fortune, and other magazines as one of the best places to live and work in the United States. A healthy job market, affordable housing, and the energy associated with several colleges and universities contribute to its vibrancy. And then you have the cultural offerings: Fort Worth has exceptional museums (including Kimbell Art Museum, Amon Carter Museum of American Art, and The Modern) and galleries, as well as the gorgeous Bass Performance Hall in Sundance Square. The general vibe of Fort Worth is different from that of Dallas, and though the cities are usually tied together by outsiders, they are distinct in many ways.

SPRING 2019


COMMUNITIES

ATTRACTIONS

Amon Carter Museum of American Art Bass Performance Hall

Gainesville

Billy Bob’s Texas Cowtown Coliseum Fort Worth Botanic Garden

Chico

Decatur Lake Bridgeport

Bridgeport

Runaway Bay

PHOTO: JOSEPH HAUBERT COURTESY OF FORT WORTH CVB

Alvord

Fort Worth Stockyards Fort Worth Zoo Sanger

Kimbell Art Museum The Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth

Krum Denton

Sundance Square Ponder

Paradise DISH

New Fairview

FORT WORTH AREA BY THE NUMBERS

HOUSEHOLD EXPENDITURES (Average annual amount spent)

Food

2023

1,152,932

1,259,106

402,101

437,213

Average Household Size

2.82

2.84

Median Age

33.3

Households

Graford

$8,081Briar CDP $20,308 Springtown

Apparel and Services Transportation Travel

33.5

Health care

$5,174

$57,448

$63,474

Entertainment and Recreation

$77,130

$87,030

Personal Care Products/Services

Mineral $27,347 Wells

$30,635

Education

2018

PERCENT

2023

White Alone

709,589

61.5%

746,862

59.3%

TOTAL

Black Alone

201,660

17.5%

231,966

18.4%

Less Than 9th Grade

7,277

0.6%

7,774

0.6%

49,003

4.3%

59,722

4.7%

American Indian Alone Asian Alone Pacific Islander Alone Gordon Some Other Race Alone

Two or More Races Hispanic Origin (Any Race)

1,363

0.1%

144,225

12.5%

39,816

3.5%

390,341

33.9%

1,601 163,826 Lipan 47,353

451,192

$780

Azle

Lakeside

Associate Degree

3.8%

Bachelor’s Degree

Lake Worth

Pantego Dalworthington Gardens

Benbrook

Forest Hill

Edgecliff Village

Kennedale

Crowley

Rendon

Mansfi

22.5%

HOOD COUNTY

7.2% Cresson

18.1%

JOHNSON COUNTY

Burleson Briaroaks

9.0% Godley

Joshua

Cross Timber

De Cordova Bend

D A L L A S REG I O N N E W C O M E R + R E L O C AT I O N G U I D E Keene

Tolar

Arlingt

Everman

PARKER 4.3% COUNTY

Granbury

SPRING 2019

Bedford

Hurst

Richland Hills

8.9%

Oak Trail Graduate/Professional Degree Shores CDP

35.8%

Haltom City

Fort Worth

Aledo 726,343

Some College, No Degree

13.0%

Colleyville North Richland Hills

Watauga Blue Mound

21.8%

GED/Alternative Credential

0.1%

Eagle Mountain CDP

River Oaks White SettlementWestover Hills

8.2% Annetta South

High School Graduate

Keller

Saginaw

Annetta

9th-12th Grade, No Diploma

Southlake

Pelican Bay

Willow Park

Weatherford

Haslet

$2,961

$1,290

Hudson Oaks

Westlake

TARRANT COUNTY

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT 2018 (Population 25+) Annetta North

PERCENT

Flo Roanoke Trophy Club

Newark

Cool

Millsap

Rhome

WISE COUNTY

Sanctuary $1,953

Average Household Income

RACE AND ETHNICITY

Reno

Cop Can

Bartonville Doubl

Northlake

Pecan Acres

$2,078 $7,639

Median Household Income

Per Capita Income

Boyd

$66,272

Housing Population

DENTON COUNTY

Aurora

TOTAL EXPENDITURES 2018

2018

Argyle

Justin

/

63

Alvarado


LIVING AS REGION L I V INI NTHE G DALLHOUSING 64

LIVING IN THE DALLAS REGION

GETTING AROUND EDUCATION HOUSING HOSPITALS

PHOTO: FORT WORTH CVB


The Dallas Region’s booming economy adds an average of nearly 400 additional people per day. These incoming residents have a diverse range of housing choices—from urban lofts, to white picket fences, to rambling suburban estates—in neighborhoods and schools that are equally diverse and nationally recognized. Connecting these communities are one of the fastest-growing public transit and highway systems in the nation.

“IT’S ONE OF THE BEST AND MOST AFFORDABLE PLACES TO LIVE” SAZZA DAHAL

SAZZA DAHAL

What advice would you give to someone who wants to move here? Make sure you speak to your potential neighbors before you sign a lease on your apartment. They will be honest with you, and you can make an informed decision.

CITY: Plano COMPANY/TITLE: Wells Fargo Where else have you lived? Nepal and San Angelo. What made you decide to choose Dallas? My job brought me here but I had strategically applied so that I could live in Dallas. It’s one of the best and most affordable places to live, and the economy of Dallas is booming. For someone like me, who is joining the banking industry, that provides a huge opportunity. How did you choose which part of town to live in? I wanted to be close to work and in a safe neighborhood. I found the neighborhood in Plano to resonate with my lifestyle. It seemed like even architecturally, it was designed to attract millennials, and it sure did a good job attracting me.

PHOTO: YVENA CHOWDHURY

Tell us about your city/neighborhood. What do you like best? What makes it different? The sheer volume of restaurants in Plano blows my mind. I can eat something new every day, and I will still never run out of restaurants. I found this Greek restaurant called Zorba’s near work, and it’s the best Greek food I’ve ever had.

PHOTO: NIGEL YOUNG / FOSTER + PARTNERS SPRING 2019

Where do you go and what do you do on the weekends or days off? I haven’t been here for too long, but so far I’ve explored the Little Elm beach, the Shops at Legacy in Plano, and bars in Uptown Dallas. I also found the parks in the area to be a good place for yoga and relaxation.

What is your passion, and how does Dallas help fulfill it? There are opportunities to get involved and volunteer everywhere. There is always an event or a concert or something going on, and as long as you can have fun and contribute to a good cause at the same time, well, what more do you want! I was worried I might lose myself in a big city and a corporate life but I found many ways to stay grounded through non-profits. What would you miss most about the area if you had to leave? I would definitely miss the food. I literally try a new restaurant every day, and I enjoy it immensely. Tell us about the work environment here. I didn’t realize until I got here that I’m the youngest business banker at Wells Fargo in not just DFW region, but the country. I thought it might be difficult to relate, but it wasn’t. My boss told me the first day that he wants to set me up for success, and he meant it. People think that banking is boring, but it’s all about the people you surround yourself with. If you have a diverse team, anything is interesting. Personally, I love being a business banker. I can’t believe I get paid to do this. Where do you like to shop? Why? I like to shop at The Shops at Legacy in Plano and The Galleria in Dallas. There are just so many options.

D A L L A S REG I O N N E W C O M E R + R E L O C AT I O N G U I D E

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LIVING IN THE DALL AS REGION

TOP-NOTCH HEALTH CARE

$110.28

U.S NEWS BEST HOSPITALS 2018

AVERAGE DOCTOR’S VISIT

BAYLOR UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER Dallas > Nationally ranked in 2 specialties > High performing in 8 procedures/ conditions > Ranked the No. 3 hospital in Texas

$103.33

Dallas-Fort Worth is home to exemplary medical facilities operating with the newest technology and seasoned and qualified professionals. Our state-of-the-art health care is supported by aggressive research and educational programs, and residents here find it easy to maintain a healthy lifestyle with world-renowned physicians and top-notch hospitals providing the highest-quality health care. Wherever you live, there is a medical expert nearby able to treat conditions of all sorts, ranging from serious to minor concerns. But don’t take our word for it: in 2014, 18 Dallas-Fort Worth general hospitals were listed as either nationally ranked or high performing by U.S. News & World Report. Two children’s hospitals made the list.

AVERAGE OPTOMETRIST VISIT

$101.77

UT SOUTHWESTERN MEDICAL CENTER Dallas > Nationally ranked in 7 specialties > High performing in 5 precedures/ conditions > Ranked the No. 2 hospital in Texas

AVERAGE DENTIST VISIT SOURCE: ACCRA 2018 Average Annual

MAJOR HOSPITALS 35

22 30

MEDICAL CITY Dallas > Nationally ranked in 1 specialty > High performing in 5 procedures/ conditions > Ranked the No. 6 hospital in Texas

21 35E 121 75

14

23

TEXAS HEALTH HARRIS METHODIST HOSPITAL SOUTHWEST Fort Worth > High performing in 4 procedures/ conditions > Ranked the No. 13 hospital in Texas

29

121

114

35W

12

24

35E

25

635

5 753

35W 820

19

183 20

27

11 2 7

30

1

161

80

10

13 30 17 16 4 9 6

78

12

360

8

15

175

20

27

CHILDREN’S MEDICAL CENTER DALLAS Dallas > Nationally ranked in 10 specialties

18

COOK CHILDREN’S MEDICAL CENTER Fort Worth > Nationally ranked in 5 specialties

20

35E

28

35W

SOURCE: DRC Research

1 BAYLOR UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER AT DALLAS

11 UT SOUTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL

2 PARKLAND MEMORIAL HOSPITAL

12 THE MEDICAL CENTER OF PLANO

3 TEXAS HEALTH PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL DALLAS

13 TEXAS HEALTH ARLINGTON MEMORIAL HOSPITAL

4 TEXAS HEALTH HARRIS METHODIST FORT WORTH

14 TEXAS HEALTH PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL PLANO

5 MEDICAL CITY DALLAS (INCLUDES MEDICAL CITY CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL)

15 MEDICAL CENTER OF ARLINGTON

6 BAYLOR ALL SAINTS MEDICAL CENTER AT FORT WORTH

17 COOK CHILDREN’S MEDICAL CENTER

7 CHILDREN’S MEDICAL CENTER DALLAS

18 METHODIST CHARLTON MEDICAL CENTER

8 VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL CENTER

19 TEXAS HEALTH HARRIS METHODIST HOSPITAL H-E-B

9 JOHN PETER SMITH HOSPITAL

20 BAYLOR MEDICAL CENTER AT IRVING

10 METHODIST MEDICAL CENTER

66

16 PLAZA MEDICAL CENTER OF FORT WORTH

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D A L L A S REG I O N N E W C O M E R + R E L O C AT I O N G U I D E

45

22 TEXAS HEALTH PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL OF DENTON 23 MEDICAL CENTER OF LEWISVILLE 24 BAYLOR MEDICAL CENTER AT CARROLLTON 25 BAYLOR REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER AT GRAPEVINE 26 DOCTORS HOSPITAL AT WHITE ROCK LAKE 27 TEXAS HEALTH HARRIS METHODIST SOUTHWEST 28 HUGULEY MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 29 METHODIST RICHARDSON MEDICAL CENTER 30 DENTON REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER

21 MEDICAL CENTER OF MCKINNEY

SPRING 2019


FIND YOUR WAY IN THE DALLAS REGION

LIVING

GETTING AROUND

GET GETTING TINGAROUND AROUND

TARRANT COUNTY’S NEW TEXRAIL PROVIDES SERVICE FROM DOWNTOWN FORT WORTH TO DALLAS FORT WORTH INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

PHOTO: TRINITY METRO

MAJOR HIGHWAYS | TOLLWAYS HIGHWAY CONSTRUCTION | DRIVE TIMES PUBLIC TRANSIT | AIRLINES AND AIRPORTS

67


PHOTO: MICHAEL SAMPLES

GET TING AROUND

LIVING

Getting around the Dallas area is easy, thanks to a well-developed network of interstate freeways, state highways, tollways and the Dallas Area Rapid Transit (DART) public transportation system, enabling easy access to key job centers in Dallas and its suburbs. With two major airports, DFW International, situated between Dallas and Fort Worth, and Dallas Love Field, located just 6 miles northwest of downtown, the Dallas Region has quick and easy access to the rest of the world.

“DALLAS HAS EASILY FED INTO MY PASSION” REGAN OLSON CITY: Dallas NEIGHBORHOOD: Lake Highlands COMPANY/TITLE: Consultant at ACAP Health

When did you move here? Where from? March 2016 from Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

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PHOTO: MICHAEL SAMPLES

REGAN OLSON

How did you choose which part of town to live in? I may be diff erent than most transplants, but I knew I didn’t want to be in the heart of the bustle in the Uptown/Downtown space. Growing up in a rural area in South Dakota and working in a small city compared to Dallas, I wanted to live in a quieter neighborhood that was safe and gave me access to parks and trails. I was told White Rock Lake was the location that would satisfy my needs, and I quickly found an apartment that was right off the trail. As I adjusted to life in the big city, I found it a perfect central location.

D A L L A S REG I O N N E W C O M E R + R E L O C AT I O N G U I D E

What is your passion, and how does Dallas help fulfill it? I love meeting new people and experiencing new things. Dallas has easily fed into my passion with constant opportunities to cross paths with quality people. The residents here are genuine and hold true to their southern charm, making conversation easy with just about anyone, anywhere. Dallas is continually expanding, and it seems as if a new restaurant or event is popping up each weekend. I can’t seem to slow down in this lively city, and I don’t intend to anytime soon! What is your favorite outside activity, and where is your favorite place to do it? If I’m not at White Rock Lake, I can often be found at Klyde Warren Park. This is one of my favorite places to take advantage of outdoor activities, especially when there is a concert or event taking place. You can also find a variety of food trucks with delicious options!

SPRING 2019


MAJOR HIGHWAYS

GET TING AROUND

LIVING Source: DRC research

MAKING SENSE OF HIGHWAY NAMES In DFW, we call some roads by their number, like “75,” and some by their name, like “George Bush Turnpike.” Here’s your handy guide to highways with more than one name. ALTERNATE NAME

WHAT IT LOOKS LIKE ON A MAP

Airport Freeway

S.H. 183 from S.H. 114 to the south DFW International Airport entrance

President George Bush Turnpike

PGBT, S.H. 190, S.H. 161 in Las Colinas

John W. Carpenter Freeway

S.H. 183 and S.H. 114 from I-35E to the north Dallas Fort Worth International Airport entrance

C.F. Hawn Freeway

U.S. Highway 75 south of downtown

Lyndon B. Johnson Freeway (LBJ)

I-635, begins at the north entrance of DFW International Airport and circles the city from the north, east, and south; it includes I-20 in the south

Loop 12

Inner-city loop including Northwest Highway on the north, Buckner Boulevard on the east, Ledbetter Drive on the south, and Walton Walker Boulevard on the west

Tom Landry Highway

I-30 between I-35E in Dallas and I-35W in Fort Worth

Marvin D. Love Freeway

U.S. Highway 67 from I-35E to I-635 south of downtown

North Central Expressway

U.S. Highway 75 from downtown to the north

George W. Bush Expressway

U.S. Highway 75 from Walnut Hill Lane to downtown Dallas

Julius Schepps Freeway

I-45 from downtown to the south

Stemmons Freeway

I-35E from downtown to the north

R.L. Thornton Freeway

I-35E south of Dallas and I-30 from downtown to East Dallas

Elmer Weaver Freeway

U.S. Highway 67 from I-635 to the south

Woodall Rodgers Freeway

Spur 366, the short freeway that connects I-35E with U.S. Highway 75 and I-45

SPRING 2019

D A L L A S REG I O N N E W C O M E R + R E L O C AT I O N G U I D E

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69


GET TING AROUND

TOLLWAYS

DALLAS NORTH TOLLWAY

LEWISVILLE LAKE TOLL BRIDGE

8

SAM

Moving around the Dallas area, you might find yourself on one of the North Texas toll roads. Here’s what you need to know before you do.

WAY OLL NT

BUR

RAY

PRESIDENT GEORGE BUSH TURNPIKE

NORTH TEXAS TOLLWAY AUTHORITY (NTTA): The organization sanctioned by the State of Texas to develop and maintain toll roads in North Texas.

LIVING

DALLAS NORTH TOLLWAY (DNT ): Runs northsouth, connecting motorists between downtown Dallas and cities in Collin, Denton, and northern Dallas counties, passing through Dallas, Highland Park, University Park, Addison, Farmers Branch, Plano, and Frisco. It links with the Sam Rayburn Tollway, President George Bush Turnpike, I-635, and I-35. PRESIDENT GEORGE BUSH TURNPIKE (PGBT ): Makes a partial loop around the Dallas area, currently extending from I-20 in the Grand Prairie area west of Dallas; north across I-30 into Irving, Carrollton, and North Dallas; east to Richardson and into Garland; before turning south through Sachse and Rowlett, across Lake Ray Hubbard to the interchange at I-30 in Garland.

MOUNTAIN CREEK LAKE BRIDGE

CHISOLM TRAIL PARKWAY

Existing toll roads

Planned toll roads

Planned toll lanes

Planned partial toll lanes

SAM RAYBURN TOLLWAY (SRT ): Formerly State Highway 121, extends northeasterly from Business 121 near the Dallas/Denton county line to U.S. 75 in Collin County. It links with U.S. 75 and DNT.

Source: DRC Research

If you’re going to be a frequent traveler on one of the tollways or the turnpike, you’ll want to get a TollTag. The self-adhesive transponder sticks on your windshield and debits your NTTA account each time you use a toll road (there are no toll booths on North Texas toll roads). You can skip the whole TollTag business, but you won’t get a free ride. The NTTA bills the registered owner of the vehicle by mail via ZipCash, which costs 50 percent more than paying via TollTag.

WHAT DOES IT COST? NTTA toll road rates align to miles traveled. The farther you drive on a toll road, the more you pay. Rates are reset every other year on July 1. The average rate as of July 1, 2017, was 18.01 cents per mile. Here are a few examples of what you might pay on your commute. ROAD

ROUTE

TOLLTAG

ZIPCASH

DNT DNT

I635 to PGBT

$1.12

$1.68

Legacy to I35

$3.68

$5.52

PGBT

Frankford to I75

$1.70

$2.62

PGBT

I20 to DNT

$4.94

$7.42

SRT

I35 to Legacy

$1.53

$2.30

SRT

121 to I75

$4.24

$6.37

70

/

D A L L A S REG I O N N E W C O M E R + R E L O C AT I O N G U I D E

To open a TollTag account, go to ntta.org or call 972-818-6882. You can also apply for a tag in person at a regional NTTA partner, which includes government offices, libraries, and grocery stores all over the area.

PHOTO: J. P. FAGERBACK / CREATIVE COMMONS

DALLAS NORTH TOLLWAY

BONUS: You can use your TollTag to pay for parking and pass-through at Dallas Fort Worth International and Dallas Love Field airports.

WHAT ARE MANAGED TOLL LANES? Texas has a low gasoline tax relative to many other states which means it needs another way to fund the construction and operation of highways—and that way is tolls, specifically, managed toll lanes. In a nutshell, managed toll lanes are taking the place of what were carpool lanes on freeways. Commuters who want to avoid congestion during peak travel times can take a managed lane for a price.

SPRING 2019


HIGHWAY CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS

GET TING AROUND

DENTON McKINNEY ALLEN

FRISCO LEWISVILLE

PLANO

CARROLTON

GRAPEVINE

BEDFORD

RICHARDSON

GARLAND

LIVING

WYLIE

FLOWER MOUND

ROWLETT

IRVING

EULESS

DALLAS

FORT WORTH

MESQUITE

GRAND PRAIRIE

ARLINGTON

LANCASTER CEDAR HILL

MANSFIELD

DESOTO

Construction Underway or begins soon CURRENT EXPRESS/HOV Construction begins within 4 years & NEW MANAGED LANES Construction begins in 5-10 years Current express/

Corridor Studies, construction in 10+ years HOV lanes New TEXpress managed lanes Transitional high-occupancy

DENTON

segment 3C opening 2021

COLLIN

open 2017

open 2014

HUNT

WISE

vehicle laneEXPRESS/HOV CURRENT Major roadways & NEW MANAGED LANES

open 2015

PARKER

HOT conversion open october 2016 segment 3B fall 2017

open 2018 open 2014

ROCKWALL

The DFW region has the most managed lanes of any metro in the U.S. The area’s regional transportation planning agency has created a program to use managed lanes to ensure that critical transportation, such as buses, are able to maintain 50-70 mph speeds in order to reliably arrive on-time.

segments 3A open 2018 segments 1 & 2W open 2014

TARRANT

JOHNSON SPRING 2019

open august 2016

KAUFMAN DALLAS

Current express/HOV lanes New TEXpress managed lanes Transitional high-occupancy vehicle lane Major roadways

ELLIS D A L L A S REG I O N N E W C O M E R + R E L O C AT I O N G U I D E

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71


It’s common to work in one part of the Dallas-Fort Worth area and live in another. It’s only a matter of getting from point A to point B. More than 90 percent of people who commute to work here do so by car, truck, or van. It’s easy, thanks to our well-developed network of interstate freeways, state highways, and tollways connecting job centers to fast-growing new communities. The following maps—based on morning rush hour—give you an idea of how long you can expect it to take. DOWNTOWN DALLAS

LIVING

GET TING AROUND

DRIVE TIME

HWY 190 AND HWY 75

PHOTO: NTTA

72

/

D A L L A S REG I O N N E W C O M E R + R E L O C AT I O N G U I D E

SPRING 2019


DENTON

DFW INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

SOUTHERN DALLAS

GET TING AROUND

HWY 121 & DALLAS NORTH TOLLWAY

LIVING

DOWNTOWN FORT WORTH

TRAVEL TIME 15 MINUTES

30 MINUTES

45 MINUTES

60 MINUTES

75 MINUTES

90 MINUTES

105 MINUTES

120 MINUTES Source: North Central Texas Council of Governments

SPRING 2019

D A L L A S REG I O N N E W C O M E R + R E L O C AT I O N G U I D E

/

73


CARROLLTON

Downtown Carrollton

ORANGE LINE

Farmers Branch

FARMERS BRANCH

XX

ORANGE LINE

(Peak hours onGRAPEVINE weekdays only)

FARE ZONE BOUNDARY PARKING AVAILABLE NORTH RICHLAND HILLS

IRVING

Akard Station

St. Paul Station

E AV

President George Bush Turnpike

On ly

Deep Ellum Baylor University Medical Center

Union Station Convention Center Cedars COCKRELL

East Transfer Center

Fair Park MLK, Jr. Hatcher Lawnview Lake June BUCKNER

UNT DALLAS

Rosa Parks Plaza Union Station Convention Center Station

DALLAS STREETCAR

Deep Ellum

IS

LE

ST

ST

M-LINE TROLLEY

MESQUITE

Cityplace/Uptown

t

West Transfer West End Center Station

Mockingbird

DALLAS 8th & Corinth Dallas Zoo Tyler/Vernon Morrell Hampton Illinois WESTMORELAND Kiest VA Medical Center Ledbetter Camp Wisdom

Deep Ellum Station

Pearl/Arts District Station

DALLAS

PARK

HILL

M-Line Trolley to CityPlace/ Uptown Station Victory Station

Medical/ Market Center Victory

K PA R N

Y VA ER ST

AR W KL YD

E

6TH ST

74

/

13

CITIES

T UC IAD NV TO US HO

DAVIS ST

ST

BISHOP ARTS DISTRICT

JEFFERSON BLVD

SOURCE: Dallas Area Rapid Transit

SOURCE: MATA

DART BY THE NUMBERS

DALLAS STREETCAR

34

MILES OF COMMUTER RAIL

D A L L A S REG I O N N E W C O M E R + R E L O C AT I O N G U I D E

58

RAIL STATIONS

BL VD

GRIFFIN ST

ERCE

COMM

Park

N

ST

21

C AVE PACIFI T ELM S ST MAIN

Z AN

DO BLVD

JEFFERSON BLVD

D

AR

20

19

COLORA

SO

AK

18

CI JA

D

ER

O NT

N

SA

MAP NOT TO SCALE LV GB

FF

SS

RO

R

16 17

ST

VE

14

E AV

Trinity Railway Express Commuter Rail and Station

RI

ST

15

Y

E

O W

Dallas Streetcar & Stop DART Light Rail and Station

IT

ST

A OD

LEGEND

IN

R LL

L AR IV

OL

13

FW

RS

GE

OD

PE

12

2 MIN WALK

TR

Y

Cedars Union Station

MARSALIS AVE

11

B

JE

AV E

C

ZANG BLVD

NEY A VE LE

McKIN

AP

10

Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center

R

CEDAR SPRINGS RD

M

IV E

6

West End

G G

YR

7

8

Akard

West Transfer Center

IN IT

5

East Transfer Center

St. Paul

TR

T

Victory

ZANG BLVD

LE CO

ST

3 4

IL RA

West Village Cityplace Tower McKinney Plaza The MAC Greenwood Cemetery Uptown Visitors Center Quadrangle Hotel St Germain Maple Manor Hotel Shops at The Crescent Hotel ZaZa The Ritz-Carlton Hotel American Airlines Center Klyde Warren Park AT&T Performing Arts Center Nasher Sculpture Center Dallas Museum of Art Crow Collection of Asian Art Fairmont Hotel Dallas World Aquarium West End

BECKLEY AVE

E

2

W

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21.

BISHOP AVE

E AV

AVE

ON

M AV E

LL

9

ON

HA

TY KA

M

TYLER ST

VD BL

M

LE M

CEDAR HILL AVE

E AC

PL

TY

RE

CI

LE

POLK ST

CA

RL

POINTS OF INTEREST

1

DOWNTOWN ROWLETT

Forest/Jupiter LBJ/Skillman Lake Highlands White Rock

Park Lane

ic istr ts D /Ar ar l Pe aul P St. ard d Ak st En We

T & P STATION

DOWNTOWN DALLAS

Downtown Irving/ Heritage Crossing

Downtown Garland

Walnut Hill

Lovers Lane

ROWLETT

GARLAND

Forest Lane

Inwood/ Love Field Southwestern Medical District/ Parkland Market Center

West Irving

Bell CentrePort/ DFW Airport

LOVE FIELD

University of Dallas

Arapaho Center

LBJ/Central

Irving Walnut Hill/Denton Convention DFW Center Las Colinas Airport Bachman Urban UNIVERSITY Terminal A North Lake Center PARK Burbank College HIGHLAND

XX

Fort Worth ITC

Royal Lane

President Georg eB u

Spring Valley

Belt Line

DFW

Richland Hills

NG E

Trinity Mills

DCTA A-TRAIN

CityLine/Bush

Galatyn Park

RICHARDSON

ADDISON

OR A

TEXRAIL LINE (2018)

N UR KB AC BL

ON

M

M

E AV

LE

N

NORTH CARROLLTON/FRANKFORD

(No Sunday service on TRE)

Downtown Plano

LIN EW eek da yP eak

TRINITY RAILWAY EXPRESS

FORT WORTH

PARKER ROAD

President George Bush Turnpike

npike Tur sh

GET TING AROUND

GREEN LINE

In addition, the Dallas area has two operating streetcar systems. The M-Line trolley system connects the West Village in Uptown with downtown. The new Dallas Streetcar began service in 2015 and connects downtown Dallas with the Bishop Arts District. TEXRail connects Downtown Fort Worth to Northeast Tarrant County, including Dallas Fort Worth International Airport. W LA

PLANO

BLUE LINE

The Dallas Area Rapid Transit (DART) system, which includes light rail and bus service, is the fastestgrowing mass transit network in the United States. It facilitates access to key job centers in Dallas and its suburbs, as well as the Dallas Fort Worth International Airport. DART also interfaces with the Trinity Rail Express (TRE), a commuter train, to transport passengers between downtown Dallas and Fort Worth, with stops at several suburbs in between. Fort Worth residents are served by The T, a bus system that connects to the TRE. The A-Train, operated by the Denton County Transit Authority (DCTA), connects DART riders in Carrollton to an additional five stations ending in Denton.

K OA

to Denton (operated by DCTA)

RED LINE

Dallas North Tollway

LIVING

PUBLIC TRANSIT

DFW RAIL SYSTEM

73

MILES OF HOV LANES

85

MILES OF LIGHT RAIL

128

BUS ROUTES

700

SQUARE MILES

SOURCE: Dallas Area Rapid Transit SPRING 2019


TRA L

EN

LAVON DR

. CE NT R

RD RL AN D

JUPITER RD

AVE K

AD A

BELTLINE

SHILOH

LVADSTERS DR BUCKNER BM

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DR LAVON

I IN ARV M

USE HO ER W AT

RD

AD

PR LA

TT LE W

RD TT LE W RO

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A

ZION

TE N CE

RD

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S AT E O

BELTLINE

RO

RV IL

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LE

RD

SATURN

BROOKLINE

COUNTRY CLUB

MARS E

DAIRY

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BROOKLIN

FIFTH

KIRBY

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RD ND A AD PR LA

O

AT

ES

SHILOH

SHILOH

Y

BELTLINE

MASTERS DR

IH-635ST AUGUSTINE LBJ FR W

MURDOCK

VINE

LBJ FR WY

CHEYENNE

MASTERS DR

ST AUGUSTINE

PRAIRIE CREEK RD

Y D

E N

O

LI

O

LT

W

BE

IH-635

PEACHTREE RD

CHEYENNE

MASTERS DR

BUCKNER BLVD

ST AUGUSTINE

PEACHTREE RD

ST AUGUSTINE ST AUGUSTINE

PRICHARD

HILLBURN

ROWLETT RD

FIRST

SHILOH

LA GAR

RD LE IL RV CEN

JOAQUIN

GUSO FER

LA PRADA

LA PRADA

FIRST

MARS

LBJ FR WY

GLENBROOK

IH-635 FIFTH

MERRITT

NATIONAL EXECUTIVE

TE

SATURN

N

SHILOH

JIM MILLER JIM MILLER

MURDOCK

PEMBERTON HILL

ELL IO

K DR

LAVON

COUNTRY CLUB

GARLAND RD

JUPITER RD

RD D AN RL

SHILOH JOAQUIN

BUCKNER BLVD

PRAIRIE CREEK RD

HILLBURN

PRICHARD

JIM MILLER

FORSYTYHE

PEMBERTON HILL

EE CR RING SP

SHILOH

T

EL LIO

G CR EE K

SP RIN

JUPITER RD CHEYENNE

SHILOH

GA

AM WICKERSH

JUPITER RD

FERNDALE

NATIONAL

VINE

FF CLI

RT H O N

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JIM MILLER

US

HUNNICUT

BUCKNER BLVD

HUNNICUT

DIX

O

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RD

D

AN

ARL

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ND RA

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SHILOH

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O

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N LI DOLPHIN

12

N

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ST AUGUSTINE

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ST AUGUSTINE

AUDELIA

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FERNDALE

S

AK

O

LN

RD

BI

G

N

CKI

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ST AUGUSTINE

Y D O O

N E LI LT BE

W

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JUPITER RD

GL EN NV

LA PRADA

JUPITER RD

PLANO RD

BUCKNER BLVD

PRICHARD

RSHAM

JIM MILLER

AUDELIA

BUCKNER BLVD

FAIR OAKS

FAIR OAKS

AN

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ILL E

GUSON

AVE K FER E ILL NV EN GL

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EN

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AL EXPWY. U.S-75 N. CENTR

ABRAMS

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76

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LA

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Local Bus Route Rail Feeder & Transit Center Bus Route

000

Express Bus Route

TER RD

5E IIHH33 5E

JUPITER RD

RD NO PLA MERRITT

. CE ALMA NTR AL E XPW Y.

WICKERSHA CUSTER RD M

PLA NO

FF

CLI

RD

WATERVAINEW

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COIT RD

LE GREENVIL

76

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DIX

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MATILDA

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GREENVILLE AVE

McMILLAN

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SP

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N

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PARK CENTRAL

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SS

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HOUSTON SCHOOL RD

NSE

HOUSTON SCHOOL RD

HORTE

HOUSTON SCHOOL RD HOUSTON SCHOOL RD

CUSTERNRD O RT

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HILLCREST RD

76 HILLCREST RD BISHOP

L

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Y AV

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JE FF VIA

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AV BECKLEBECKLEY Y AV

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MARSALIS AV

BECKLEY AV

IH 35E R.L. THORNTON FRWY.

5ENTON FRWY. IHO3R IH 35E R.L. TH

G

DALLAS NORT

EWING

BECKLEY AV

MARSALIS

BISHOP

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RNTON BISHOP FRWY.

R.L. THO

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FRWY.

ORNTO N

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US-7 5N

AUDELIA

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O

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FA IR

HILLCREST RD

PRES TON RD

MATILDA

McMILLAN N RD PRES TO

AK O

VE

19

LI

PRESTON RD

BL VD LK M

PRESTON RD

PRESTON RD

H TOLLWAY

DALLAS NORTH

ROPER

AV SYLVAN

12

SYLVAN AV

12 LLEWELLYN

IH 35E

LLEWELLYN

MORNING DEW

IH 35E MORNING DEW

POLK ST

US -75 N. C EN TR US AL McK -75 EX PEST RD N. C INNEY AVE HILLCRW Y. EN C BISHOP

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CAMPBELL

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Mc KIN NE

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KNOLL TRAIL

INWOOD RD

INWOOD RD

INWOOD RD

SE

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IH 35E

HAMPTON RD

GG ED RU

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MONTFORT

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BLUEBONNET

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WESTMORELAND

HARTSDALE

HAMPTON RD

POLK

BROOK SPRINGS

HAMPTON RD

HARTSDALE

MONTFORT

MARSALIS

MIDWAY RD

IH 35E R.L. THORNTON FRWY.

3 82

IH 35E

3 82

82

RD PTON HAM

RD

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HAMPTON RD

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ADAMS

Y. R.L. THO

K

WESTMORELAND RD

FUREY

WESTMORELAND RD GILPIN

WESTMORELAND

G RA N D

DALLAS N. TOLLWAY

PARKWOOD PEAR RIDGE

Y

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ADDISON

MIDWAY

MIDWAY RD

MIDWAY RD

EWING

BECKLEY AV

BISHOP

MARSH LN

LLEWELLYN

MARSH LN

WEBB CHAPEL

BROOK SPRINGS

WEBB CHAPEL

ESMALDA

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FRENCH SETTLEMENT

FUREY

ESMALDA

NORWICH GILPIN COCKRELLL HILL

COCKRELL HILL

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FR W

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PARK CENTRAL PARKWOOD

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JOSEPH HARDIN

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DALLAS NORT H TOLLWAY

VAIL MARSH

3 82

MAR 8SH LN

SYLVAN AV

TYLER

POLK

POLK

WEBB CHAPEL

JOSEY

JOSEY

WEBB CHAPEL

DENNIS PIERCE

SHADY TRAIL

SHADY TRAIL

HAMPTON RD

IH-35E STEMMONS FRWY.

MARSH LN

HARTSDALE

HAMPTON RD

WESTMORELAND

DIPLOMAT GILPIN

KNOXVILLE

DUNCANVILLE

JOSEPH HARDIN

QUORUM

BLUEBONNET

EW

VI

A

BL UFF

MARSH

LUN

ROPER

K

BU RB AN JOSEY LN

NORWICH

FUREY

ESMALDA COCKRELL HILL

Y

W FE

TUMALO D

IFIEL RR ME

BOND

408 UR SP

MARSH LN

JOSEY LN

DICKERSON

TH

OLD DENTON

FRENCH SETTLEMENT HUTTON

COCKRELLL HILL

IH-35E STEMMONS FRWY. TOM BRANIFF

P 12

LOO

P 12 NURSERY

FR W

VE LO W FE

LD MER RIFIE

M

TEAGARDEN

842

to Denton (operated by DCTA)

IH-4

FRITZ

VIEW

7

LE

IE NN

-6

842

842

VIL

ON

US

842

(No Sunday Service on TRE)

000 AS

FR W

IH-20 5

Trinity Railway Express (TRE)

LANC

VE

Balch Springs

OLD SEAGOVILLE

(Selected Weekday Trips Rush Hour Only)

E

LO

Se agoville

O

MM . LE J.J

BO

ON NAM S CIN OAK

IH-20

AN

DAL

00SA

553CV

00SU

D.

000

N

Flex Service (See Service Overview Section) Rapid Ride

722

D-Link/Downtown Dallas Shuttle

Transit Center (parking available)

DeSoto

P Park & Ride

5

US

987

IH-4

-6 7

WINTERGREEN

Weekend Only (consult schedule) Shuttles/Employer Shuttles

CEDAR VALLEY COLLEGE

M AR VI

5

G

VIEW

ASH

-17

A SE

IE

WHTIE

ON N. TOLLWAY DALALDDAISS

WEBB CHAPEL ARBOR

CER KING GEORGE O Y

VI

PR

EISENHOWER LUNA

KNOXVILLE

JOSEPH HARDIN LE

EL

RO

CARL

TOM BRANIFF

LOO D. NURSERY

BRITAIN

AR VIN

M

NURSERY

SENTER

MACARTHUR

MACARTHUR

RNTON FRW

TA N TI

T FI O

OLD DENTON

TURN TUMALO P IK E BOND DUNCANVILLE

CH

E ELL CH RO

O’ CONNOR

BRITAIN

MACARTHUR

CARL NURSERY

7 -6 US

BRITAIN

STORY RD

SENTER

ASH WHTIE

DIPLOMAT

FE

HUTTON

LUNA COWBOY S MACARTHUR

D RR IFIEL ME MACARTHUR

ILL

STORY RD

BRITAIN

O’ CONNOR

MACARTHUR

CENTURY CENTER BLVD

TOM BRANIFF

TH

EISENHOWER

LOSO HP-112 21 DICKERSON

NURSERY

W PRESIDE NT GEO RGE BU SH

BRITAIN

PIKE

NURSERY

H TURN

GE BUS NT GEO R PRESIDE WALTON

EXECUTIVE

408

UR

SP

WALNUT HILL

PLEASANT RUN

ILL

ESTERS

408

E

UR

LL

VI

594

US

5

SP

842 ELAM RD

O AG

842

IH-4

NN

ASH

592

GRADY SPRUCE HIGH SCHOOL

594

S

BO

WHTIE

592

SE

KOMALTY

HAA

CHAUCER

EL LE CH RO

CARL

O’ CONNOR

BRITAIN

COWBOYS

MACARTHUR EXECUTIVE

VIEW EY LL VA

WALNUT HILL

BLOCK

EW

HVI RT O N

COMMUNICATIONS

WEBB CHAPEL

DENNIS

SHADY TRAIL

EXECUTIVE

IH-35E STEMMONS FRWY.

1

SH -12

ARBOR

MACARTHUR

ILL M R W ATE

WALTON

BENT BRANCH

MACARTHUR

ESTERS

BELT LINE RD BELT LINE RD

ELT

ESTERS

EENB

GR

STORY RD

WAY

J FRWY

IH-635 LB

STORY RD

K

EE

OAD

CR

ROSEHILL

K

VALLEY VIEW

B

CLU

UC

D

BR

ROSEHILL

TURNPIKE

Y TR

UN

B

PRESIDENT GEORGE BUSH

CO

CLU

MARSALIS AV

DIPLOMAT

HUTTON

LUNA

JOSEY

BENT BRANCH

WALNUT HILL

PLEASANT RUN

M ILL W AT ER BENT BRANCH EAST AIRFIELD

N TUR P IKE PRESIDENT GEORG E BU SH

RD

BELT LINE RD

L

E

N

LI ROAN

PLEASANT RUN

HEE

W

LT

BELT LINE RD

LIVING

FIRE

BE

VIEW

TI

LN

000 CE

Y

597

LE

SASSAFRASS

T OR

IE

RD

5

MEM

RG

DAR

W

842

842

466, 467, 591, 594, 595, 597 , 842

Hutchins

VIL

E

ERVO

NN

BO

FRITZ

W

TER AS

54

ORY

A OG

Red Line Blue Line Green Line Orange Line Orange Line

5

15

3 55 Lancaster MO

. PK

594

597

O

AL

OND

ON

VAND

VIE

LANC

GA

TIO

3T

55 5

T

ER

TT

SE

CE

PA

15

UNT CAMPUS

.E

5

AG

RB

IE

ON

4

55

N

ELT

IH-20

-17

SE

CA

Y

MM . LE

RE

J.J

MPH

A

KISK

HU

NN BO

RT

WINTERGREEN

Y TR

W

PS

SIM

UN

LAKE JUNE

595

US

842

HANBY STADIUM

282

593

OLD SEAGOVILLE

592

N

BRUTON

Balch597 Springs

467

Shared Rail Lines IH-20 4

55

SINGING HILLS RECREATION CENTER

CO

595

SAMUELL HIGH SCHOOL

594

282

RD

MILITARY PKWY

TO

-17

CEDAR VALLEY COLLEGE RD

UA

GUTHRIE

LAKE RAY HUBBARD TRANSIT CENTER 283 378, 385

SCYENE

HO

US

PAUL QUINN COLLEGE

3K

ST

RD

EENB

GR

FRWY

VIE

LEN GAYG

385

5

282

MAP LEGEND

553CV

ON

AY DW

EK

IH-635 LBJ

IE

KUSHLA

RD

OA

CRE

5

NN

842

US-80

597

155

4 55 5 15

DA

CE

BR

K

592

593

ELAM RD

A. MACEO SMITH HIGH SCHOOL

5

E N

UC

D

SCYENE RD

BUCKNER STATION

591

M

IH-20

41

AG ST

LI

RD

IH-4

BO

R RD

6

46

E

AL

LT BE

E

N

842

E

AS

R

S

LI

LL

VI

HA

LEDB

282

ELAM RD

46

O

Mesquite

GRADY SPRUCE HIGH SCHOOL

TEAGARDEN

LN

PR

282

SA

597

MILITARY PKWY

594

466

. WY FR

BRUTON

592

O

VIEW

6

LT

597

597

COMSTOCK MIDDLE SCHOOL

TE

ET

G

UR

BO

BE

842

475

ASS

38

164W

282

475 467

475, 591, 592, 594

-20 12 IHLOOP

EL HE

RD

T

/B

HANBY STADIUM

593

ON

BOBTOWN

GUTHRIE

E RD

US

AG

KOMALTY

111

HOOD MIDDLE SCHOOL

466, 467, 591, 594, 595, 597 , 842

N

EW

E N

PIEDM

Y

. WY FRCHAHA

385

385

378

FR W

SCYEN

SCYENE RD

593

LAKE JUNE

385

.

N

RN

MILITARY PKWY

N

597

595

282

5

38

R.L

0 IH-3

O TH

282 HO

597

BUCKNER STATION

GLE

J

N TO

O

597

ELAM RD

GAY

FIR

LI

595

594

F

LB

374

Mesquite M

SE

466

A ST. FR

IE

AM NN KS CI LE OA

TE

T

53

5 MEDICAL AN VA RG MO CENTER

5

41

278

TO GLENN HEIGHTS PARK AND RIDE

12

HAWN

5

ER

ELT

OP

BRUTON

41

CH

EENB

N

LO

RT

Y. FRW PPS SHE

OO

NN

HA

N

RY

SO

AS

M

LE

BO

RISO GAR

4

.

IH-

SA

UST

SAMUELL HIGH SCHOOL

595

475, 591, 592, 594

35

RN

O TH

467

597

CI S

FORNEY

Y

592

COMSTOCK MIDDLE SCHOOL

-6

378

283

R.L

30

CHARIOT

593

467

IH

EASTFIELD COLLEGE

283

SCYENE RD

MILITAR Y PKW

Y. RW

DA

ON

RB

ERV VAND

EY

155 5

15

405MEMO

GR

LT

O

A T

N

282

475 467

378

110

US-80

110

ST. FR

CA

KA

KIS

LIUS 5 JU

HR

E

GA

TIO

MILITARY PKWY

MELCER

OATES

467

475

SAMUELL

TOEAST ROWLETTROWLETT DART ON-CALL ZONE

887

INDUSTRIAL

378

MILLER RD

164

HIGHLAND

SCYENE RD

HOOD MIDDLE SCHOOL

594 S

. WY FR

110

LAWNVIEW STATION

591

OW

LL

55

R

LAKE JUNE STATION 591 591

FE

N TO

TE SENA

282, 593, 595, 597

46

FI

LIN

LL

TH

ER

12

IH-4

MP

AL YV

TIO

CKN

OP

75

HU

NN

AS

LEAF

BU

LO

R

US

ZIE

O

WY. PS FR

6

164

0

377

LAKE RAY HUBBARD TRANSIT CENTER 283 378, 385

110

475

LOOP 12

R

OSA

UE

155 155

OIS ELD

NFI

BE

N

5

ER

CR

M

TI LA

SHEP

11

D

O

SU

4

55

US

O

IH-4

GO

LIUS

11

G

UR

BO

ER

CH

W

111

5

HWY 66

DOWNTOWN ROWLETT STATION

Rowlett

LAKE RAY HUBBARD

374

378

RN

HO

T .L.

IH-3

HE

ROWLETT 887 FLEX DART ON-CALL

HWY 66HOPKINS

378

380

283

JOHN WEST

H

D

O

111

595 593

TE

ET

LEDB

D

513

380

GUS THOMASSON

AV Y

110

467

O

597

ON

Y. RW

5 JU

LE

HA

NC LA

FLAME

G

ASS

M

R

IH-4

41

J 164SG FR W Y

PE

OATES

EY

LL VA

T

AN

AS

513

377

-17

LB

513

PLE

AVE. F

377

377

378

467

N CIS

LAKE JUNE STATION 591 591

5

S

O

NE

110 111

Y

PIEDM

US-175 594 C.F. S

FRWY

TH

CK

283

BRUTON

12

164

N

CHARIOT

987

164W

EASTFIELD COLLEGE

283

164

2

2

IH-635 LBJ

E

ER

BU

75

E

GA

LL

CKN

US

G

ER

US

ZI

AL YV

R RD

53553T

VI

O

R

BU

NE

ER

CRO

M

NN

SU

TE

KUSHLA

ER

TT R SE CEBO AR NPA 8W

55

5

MILIT ARY PKW

LAWNVIEW STATION

26

35

E

KINGSLEY RD

US

-6

374

RM

FORNEY

282, 593, 595, 597

MALCOLM X TRANSFER LOCATION

OW

444

P 12

51

CK

N

TI LA

11

D

O

N

ISO

AS NC

4

55 AN

RIA

111

IH-20

60

164

475

SAMUELL

111 L

2,11

ILLIN

CRA

HU

WIL

VA MEDICAL 5 15 CENTER STATION

ATLAS

BU

JASO

GO

RR

GA

LA

FO

RD

8E RT

53

AG

DA

RIDGE

AN

EAST

LARM

RY

L

IH-20

AMESBU

RIA

ST

WHEATLAND

A

DU

ER

ST

CU

444

M

HA

RD

RT

UA

ST

110

O

HATCHER STATION HAWN 12 F

2

LA

SEN

M

EM

IH

467 467

110

JOHN WEST

KE

MILLER RD

374 374

374

HO

571

378

372

110

405

OVE

ON

PS

SIM

N

E

TO CE WN NTE R

ES

987

MAIN

410

RE

RS

L

AVE. B AVE. D

GARLAND

467

McC

380

HIGHLAND

595 282

X

35

LL

FE

PAUL QUINN

ON COLLEGE

RT

405, 415, 444, 466, 515, 553, 554

415

206 278

RIDGE

N

IN

3K

55

8 53

O

11, 19, 76

111

SOUTHERN OAKS

5

CAMP WISDOM RD

161W

ND

FRITZ

VIEW

O

N

IN

AY EW

AG

SINGING HILLS RECREATION CENTER

515

415

LM

155

A. MACEO SMITH HIGH SCHOOL

5

4

541

W

111 595

O

155

15

405, 415, 444, 466, 515, 553, 554

206

MA

IE

Y AMESBUR N JASO

NN

BO

ON

MM

. LE

cK

M

405

41

AG ST

LEDBETTER STATION RED BIRD LN

FIL

ILLINOIS STATION

LOO 19P

EAST

J.J

RD

RIAL

ST

ON

LAR

5

W

TER

AS

DU

6

46

ALC

155 155

155

AN

8W

2

M

DALLAS

53

SE

IH-4

VIE

LANC

IN

TAG

IS

HATCHER STATION FAIRVIEW

12

LD

R

BO

AR

409, 444, 445, 515, 538 55

5

41

UNT CAMPUS

A ST. FR

T OR

IE

ON

N

PEN

IH-20

12 OP LO

ERVO

AS

AM KS CINNOA

O

N

IN

19AA 161

CR

T UR

N

VA MEDICAL CENTER

206

110 111TEN

60 595

E

428

378, 380, 410, 428, 467, 560

475

DALLAS

UE

H VIST D A OO

DE

RE

HO

O

377, 378, 380, 400, 463, 486, 513, 566, 571, 987

EY

LL

CENTERVILLE

467

LA

12 MLK, JR STATION/J.B. JACKSON JR TRANSIT CENTER 12, 26, 409, 595

11

2

A

OS

HE

YSI

McC

GUS THOMASSON

ATE

AD

5 PANDORA 377

513

HO

DOWNTOWN GARLAND STATION

372

KINGSLEY RD

-17

AVE. F

513

377

380

CENTERVILLE

164

D

60 LA

164 SH

410

US

377

SC

BUCKINGHAM RD

VA

T

SA

EA

PL

571

HOPKINS

377

PE

AVY

513

566

486

MILLER RD

WOOD

SOUTH GARLAND TRANSIT CENTER

475

E

WESTWOOD

987

AVE. D

410

467

RM

MALCOLM X TRANSFER LOCATION

FIE

LIN

L MORRELL STATION

WILH

AN

P 12

405, 444, 522, 541

N

LE

DA

HA

NN

BO

cK

M

RD

FO

8E

53 ER

VILL

415

M

HA

444

5 KIEST STATION 51

541

O

VAND

ON

RB

VIEW

R RD

TE

ER

LEDBETTER STATION

CAMP WISDOM RD

SOUTH OAK CLIFF H.S.

AR

OV

LOO

415

206

ASS M

CA

Y

RE

AS RED BIRD LN

AL

2,11

405

VA MEDICAL 541 CENTER STATION

ATLAS

WOODIN

O TH

KA

MPH

IE

NN

BO

LE

HA

N

ISO

19P

M

N 444, 541, 542 TO

ST

CU

515

415 161E SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION

8

53

444

515

RI

111

W

SOUTHERN OAKS

409

Y WA

SANER

405

US

KIS

HU

RR

GA

161

ON

G

MERIT

WY. PS FR

E

278

TAG

R

SHEP

AL YV

278

PEN

19

O

76

2

FAIR PARK

372

AN

HO

571

164SG 60, 164, 372, 374, 377,

LAKE

N

GASTON

EM

60, 111, 409,

2

8TH 541 & CORINTH STATION ILLINOIS GE ROOSEVELT LA VIL HIGH SCHOOL

445 522

NE

MERIT

LIUS

NN

SU

466 WAL-MART

542

WOODIN

515

19, 515, 522 KIEST STATION

161

19ISON M

LA US-175 G C.F.

155

LA

60

164

O

DALLAS 155

541

TOWNVIEW MAGNET SCHOOL ILLINOIS STATION 8TH409, 444, 445, 515, 538

515

CK BU

75

DALL

466

WHEATLAND

161

405, 444, 522, 541

E

GET TING AROUND

R

NE

ER

US

ZI

5 JU IH-4

AY LLW AY . TO LLW AS N . TO AS N

PAN GARA

415

CRO

ER M

L DAL

D O O

NCE NDA

415

11

RT

W

GON

161W

DES MORRELL STATION

206 278

19

TA

ID

372

987

374 374

SASSAFRASS

WHITE

DALLAS

VIS

YS

283

X

3 11 5

467 467

475 ROCK

60 LA

12

283

35

26

EA

DALLAS ZOO STATION

19P

RIDGE

WHEATLAND

574

TI LA

FO

CE

LA

541 PENTA SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION

415

GE

453

CK BU

NT

N

APA

21

415

BAINB

404

D O GO

MO

GAR

CE

GE

CAMP WISDOM RD

404

PB

ORT

D

O

O

CEW

AN

BRID

415 161E

ROOSEVELT CEDARS STATION HIGH SCHOOL

19AA

206 278

RIDGE FAWN19P & W BO ROW AR

155

475

LA

26

EE

ES

N

AVE. B

HWY NORTHWEST 428

428, DART ON-CALL

FAIR PARK STATION LM

Mc

428

LA

11, 19, 76

12

110, 164

EE

WHITE ROCK STATION

LAKEWOOD DART ON-CALL ZONE

AD

TA TE

282 TO

CE WN NT ER

RS

463

GARLAND 560

467

CR

WHITE ROCK LAKE

SH

LA

8TH & CORINTH STATION

DALLAS ZOO

541

SERVED BY LAKE HIGHLANDS AND LAKEWOOD DART ON-CALL

TE

FAIRVIEW

O

2

AR

Mc

N

111

155 CONVENTION CENTER STATION

26, 722

515

WHITE ROCK STATION

60

M

ALC

475

410

PANDORA

KE

76

BAYLOR UNIV. GO MEDICAL CTR. W

722 409

SANER

405

161

161

278

OR

466

M CA

NTF

LA

1

GE

21 453

GE ST.

278

404

B MP CA

MO

E AV

LE

AP

161

21

21 453 KIEST BLVD

453

BAIN

NC

N

O

S

G

ND

DeSoto

WHEATLAND RD

RIN

PE

453

PREFFERRED

466

21, 278, 453

466

PE DE

415

1

WAL-MART

RED BIRD TRANSIT CENTER

DALLAS EXECUTIVE AIRPORT

547

IN

CAMP WISDOM

574

SP

DE

R KE AL W 0

278

453

BRONZE WAY

466

466

RED BIRD TRANSIT CENTER

OR

GE

161

SOUTH OAK CLIFF H.S.

206 ON

21, 278, 453

404

IH-2

Duncanville

42

466466404

547

1

LL

428

428, DART ON-CALL

LOVERS LN

1

BAYLOR UNIVERSITY MED. CENTER STATION

KE

444, 541, 542

11

19

AS

ES

60, 164, 372, 374, 377, 378, 380, 410, 428, 467, 560

12

1GASTO

M

N

M

542

19 21 11

445

206 278

CAMP WISDOM RD

ST.

278

11

LA

DALLAS ZOO STATION

522

IN

35

26

S

2

19 19

DELAWARE

541 PENTAG

21

445

WHEATLAND

PLATINUM WAY

EAF

AR

IN

N

453

404

PREFFERRED

R

BETTE

415

466

574

D

GROVEVIEW

404 LEDBETTER

FLAMEL

CE

TO AL W

466

COUNTRY CREEK

Dun canville

E

12

LED

CAMP WISDOM

M

R

OP

574

404, 445, 547, 549, 568, 574

PENTAGON

547

APL

KE AL W

LO

SH-160

DALLAS EXECUTIVE AIRPORT

161

21

& W BO ROW AR

278 405

HT

BRONZE WRIG WAY

466

1

161

21

ILLINOIS AV

0

444

TOWNVIEW MAGNET SCHOOL 8TH

LOOP

76

1

24BIA

11 GTO

WOOD

HO

L

MARIE CURIE

372

SOUTH GARLAND TRANSIT CENTER TEAGARDEN

LAKEWOOD DART ON-CALL ZONE

LU

SH

374, 475, 583

IH-20

UNIVERSITY

60, 111, 409, 111 595

11 11

TA TE

WALNUT HILL LN

HWY NORTHWEST 428

TARGET

583

FAIR PARK STATION

31 31

560

374, 488, 551, 560, 583

LAKE HIGHLANDS STATION

LAKE HIGHLANDS STATION

N

BAYLOR UNIV. MEDICAL CTR.

N

475

374

374, 475, 583

428

768

19

CO

SO

E RD

M

377, 378, 380, 400, 463, 486, 513, 566, 571, 987

410

486

374 374 LBJ/SKILLMAN STATION

KI

ER

SCYEN

AA

TO CE WN NTE R

M

513 DOWNTOWN BAYLOR GARLAND STATION MEDICAL CTR.

FOREST/JUPITER STATION

GRADY SPRUCE HIGH ISOSCHOOL NMILLER RD

ARK

FIREWHEEL TOWN CENTER

NP IK E

MARS

NT

N

BUCKINGHAM RD

566

372, 410, 486 , 987

M

TU R

AA

MARS

MAIN

LAKE HIGHLANDS LAKE HIGHLANDS ZONE ON-CALL ZONE ON-CALL DART DART SUPER

12

EST

51 PE FAIR PARK DEEP 110, 164ELLUM AK STATION BIA M 11, 19 MLK, JR STATION/J.B. LU JACKSON JR W 283 H TRANSIT CENTER CO12, 26, 409, 595 A

DE

72

278

722

L

N

39

EA

206 12 278

DALLAS ZOO

24

502 LO OP

BAYLOR UNIVERSITY MED. CENTER STATION

EL

825

CEDARS STATION

19, 515, 522

FAWN RIDGE

LEDBETTER

WESTMORELAND 547 547 STATION PLATINUM WAY

IH-2

42

KIEST BLVD

21, 405, 444

453

161

ADAMSON H.S.

21 453

1

ASK

155 CONVENTION CENTER STATION

26, 722

MERCE

1

522

542

63

19

H

722

161

35 11

HOSPITOL

121

L

INEN

278

METHODIST DELAWARE

W ASH

583

76

24

AK

11, 19

521INGTO

31 11 3139 11

2

COM

YORKTOWN

42

21

31

72 19 21 11 TA

ADAMSON H.S.

405

445

466

466 547 549 404

E

M

N TO AL W

TER

BET

547

547

SH-180

ILLINOIS AV

HAMPTON STATION

568

49 49

NT

CO

11

405 21

42

TYLER/VERNON STATION

42, 453,

S M G LE

N

RI

12

LED

445 ILLINOIS AV

444

42

453

GROVEVIEW

404

COUNTRY CREEK

AV

SP

OP MOUNTAIN VIEW COLLEGE

12

RN

AR

ES

583 WALNUT HILL LN

410

374

H

400

400

463

BU

N

AN 513 372 MILITARY SC PKWY

571

RG E

TOWN RN FIREWHEELCENTER PI KE CETOWN

O

372

372

FOREST/JUPITER STATION

428, 502, 506, 702

ER

76

1

521CEDAR VALLEY COLLEGE

BU

27

2939

63

24 1

24

M

374 374 LBJ/SKILLMAN STATION KOMALTY 374, 488, 551, 560, 583

TU

MARIE CURIE

372, 410, 486 , 987

PARK LANE STATION

SERVED N BY LAKE HIGHLANDS AND LAKEWOOD DART ON-CALL

521

1

Y

FOREST LN

GE O

566

HO

WESTWOOD

G

H

282

FOREST LNBAYLOR MEDICAL CTR.

551 560

ID EN T

BUCKINGHAM RD

463

IN

SS

583

374 N

GLE

GAY

RW

CRO

BU

400

551

987

463

JF

551 560

582

466 583

374

D

506

W

LOVERS LN

24

51 PE DEEP ELLUM STATION

409

CK

SCOTTISH RITE HOSP.

MERCE

21 722

542

42

BLA

COM

59

52522

TRE, 11, 19, 21, 51, 60, 76

FT

39

825

N

RID SUPER TARGET G EC RE ST

UTH

1

768

743

24

583

PIN

502

SO

UNIVERSITY

521

521

31

LN

RY

MO

24

553CV 521

URN

L

35

405 UNION STATION

12 TYLER/VERNON STATION

PENTAGON

444

59

YORKTOWN

42

521

24

LOOP 582 12

TEXAS HEALTH PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL DALLAS

582

LB

987

Y

488

EO RG E

566 282

571

ST

RD

566

SPRING VALLEY

BUCKINGHAM RD

UT

SAMUELL HIGH SCHOOL

583

CR

HW

-20 IH743 76

1

24

31, 36, 409, 521, M-Line BL AC 409 Ave Streetcar McKinney KB

27

UT

583

35

ST

RW

G

IN

OSS

502

SO

NUT

JF

COMSTOCK MIDDLE SCHOOL

428, 502, 506, 702

506

ST

TE CARUTH HAVEN RN

LN. LOVERSME

7681

SMU

CITYPLACE/UPTOWN STATION

409 409

HOSPITOL

21, 405, 444 COLORADO

574

568

36

TA

INEN

NT

GA

TIO

768

D

571WALN

467

-6

W AL

410

SPRING VALLEY

RICHLAND COLLEGE

CR ROYAL LN

AID

RE

ES

3

MOCKINGBIRD LN

405 MARKET CNTR. STATION

49, TRE-Green Line

AVE

AN

RG

MO

SCOTTISH RITE HOSP.

405

42

TH WOR

428 428

5 768 Mustang 768 1, 24, 76, 521,5743, Express, 521 GA 743 TIO Cities DART ON-CALL Lakewood and Park

MOCKINGBIRD LN

36

409 409

CO

521

SE

AN

EC

5 LOVERS LANE STATION 15 768 502, 583, Campell Ctr. LN. ELOVERS Shuttle 4 55

CE

PA

Medical City E-Shuttle,B

506

PARK LANE DALLAS

CENTER

463

551

IH

FOREST LN

IH

PARK LANE STATION

702RIDG

NORTHPARK

PARK LANE SHOPPING DALLAS

PAUL QUINN CARUTH HAVEN COLLEGE

HIGHLAND PARK

49 49

VICTORY STATION 1

35 SH-180

722

D 404, 445, 547, 549, 568, 574

BLV SON 547

WO

502

AID

702

NORTHPARK SHOPPING

RICHLAND COLLEGE

828 582 583

ELA

RICHARDSON SQUARE MALL

ST AR

N FO AA RE MA ST N

410

SQUARE MALL

597 400

BELT LINE RD

LBJ/CENTRAL STATION

RD

372

N FO AA RE MA ST N

372 RICHARDSON

SCYENE RD

571

475 467

234, 582 TI Shuttle

5 488, 488 234, 360, 451, 486, 486 L 582, 987

HEALTH PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL DALLAS

EL

HOOD MIDDLE SCHOOL

582 583

-6 STATION FOREST LANE 3

582

A. MACEO SMITH HIGH SCHOOL

CENTER 428521 428

571

TI Shuttle 830

R TE LN ROYAL ET LEDB

46 ADOW TEXAS

ME

551,

SCYENE RD

ST AR

566 BELT LINE RD

551

360, 400, 463, 571

463

551

372

400

SPRING VALLEY STATION

LE

TE

400

SPRING VALLEY STATION

T

H

372

360, 400, 463, 571

ON

RT

841

M

CO

PR US-80 ES ID EN TG

ARAPAHO CENTER STATION

PIEDM

NO

410

ARAPAHO CENTER STATION

FORNEY

TE

PR ES

BRECKINRIDGE

RESEARCH

410

CO

LE

RESEARCH

. WY FR

N TO

RN

HO

.T

360, 361, 362, 372, 551, DART ON-CALL

C IS COLLINS CHARIOT

360, 361, 362, 372, 463 DART ON-CALL 360

400

FOREST LN

6502

G

UR

BO

N

SMU 743 MOCKINGBIRD STATION T

29453, 27, 29, 49, 404, 405, 408, 409, 525, 544, 703, 822 UTSW Shuttle 183

52

AVE

COLORADO

IGH

WESTMORELAND 11 STATION

506

E

H

841

M

283

RENNER RD

841

824 Palisades Shuttle

OD

D

T

360 GALATYN PARK STATION

R.L

COLLINS

843

OU

RT

BRECKINRIDGE

824 Palisades Shuttle

CAMPBELL RD.

-30

T

360 283

FM 544

OK

410

551 IH

OU

467

372

LBJ/CENTRAL STATION 486

830

OK

CAMPBELL RD.

N

LO

PLANO PKWY

ILL

400

PRESTONWOO

582

LO

EENV

PRESTONWO

Medical City E-Shuttle,

O 415

ST

5

571

234, 582

NYO

843

841841

551

C

N.

CAMPANELLA

828

PI

4 502, 583, Campell Ctr. 55 E Shuttle

31, 36, 409, 521, M-Line McKinney Ave Streetcar

Orange Line METHODIST

WR

542

LA

N

O

AR

FT

HAMPTON STATION

542 542

LL

1, 24, 76, 521, 743, 768 Mustang Express, ER and Park Cities DART TT ON-CALL

SWMD/PARKLAND STATION

TRE, 11, 19, 21, 51, 60, 76

RTH

52N

P

453

582

-7 US

463 360

488

N

NYO

CA

E

155STON

521

362

827

571

451

14TH

870

NO

RENNER RD

841

870

GALATYN PARK STATION 372

GR

SAMUELL

CAMPBELL RD.

C 826 N.

WAL-MART

826

827

CA

NE

LOVERS LANE STATION

5

824

FOREST LANE STATION 234234, 360, 451, 486, 488, 582, 987

S

OW

FE N

LD

5

CITYPLACE/UPTOWN STATION

49

49

722

444

205 208

ATE

SEN

HIGHLAND

WAL-MART

MIDPARK

360

360

830 CAMPANELLA

451

234

FIE

LIN

41

AG ST

15 210 HIGHLAND 183 3T PARK 55

31

31

UNION STATION

453 59

360

506

Lakewood LOVERS LN.

210

183

STATION

59 UTSW Shuttles

542 542

42, 453,

234

4

SWMD/PARKLAND STATION INWOOD/LOVE FIELD 39 27, 29, 49, 404, 405, 408, 409, 453,

RK

27

568

EM MIDPARK

360

486

155

5 15 521

Orange Line

12

568

BANNER

55

544, 703, 822 UTSW Shuttle 183 55 39,525, 524, 526, 39 39 526 526527, 529 27 31 MARKET CNTR. STATION

PA

568

DAVIS T

STATION

55 39, 524, 526, 39 39 526 526527, 529

VICTORY STATION

D

568

JEFFER

RK

6

D

BELT LINE RD

5 KIT -7 US

ILY

BANNER

ILY

EM

11

OIS

46

400

BELT LINE RD

KIT WAY CHURCHILL

CHURCHILL WAY

ILLIN

234

M

HA

RD

49, TRE-Green Line

BLV

12

547 549 404

ILLINOIS AV

CLARENDON DR

WHEATLAND RD

M

CED

LO

574

KIEST BLVD

574

M

SON

404

PA

703

11

MEREDITH

JEFFER

445

ST

35

DAVIS

31

63 63 MEDICAL/MARKET CTR. 52N STATION 206 TRE, 822/823

52W

542 549

RE

453

404

SOUTHERN OAKS

FO

SINGING HILLS RECREATION CENTER

LE

ES

549

MEREDITH

549 542

COCKRELL HILL TRANSFER LOCATION

568

ST

KER

35

2

ER HILL STATION 506 CR 205 38E T WALNUT CH 502,AN506, , 582 502 UR FIL 208 5WWALNUT ILH L ADOW HILL ON-CALL STATION DART ME 205 502, 506, R , 582 405 208210 183 183DART BO AR ON-CALL ER N ST 210 CU 183 155 183 AN 538W

INWOOD/LOVE FIELD 39

703

RE

S

376

451

NORTH DALLAS 405 DART ON-CALL ZONE

N TO ER OV LN ROYAL

UE

H

O

O

W

SPRING VALLEY

W

36

5

5

UNT CAMPUS

UTSW Shuttles

12

2

O

824

JOHN WEST

362

METHODIST RICHARDSON MEDICAL CTR.

830 NORTH DALLAS 486 488 DART ON-CALL ZONE

987

41

31

453

COLORADO

361

SPRING VALLEY

PARK CITIES MOCKINGBIRD STATION 205 4 DART ON-CALL ZONE 55 208 15

31

415

63 63 MEDICAL/MARKET CTR. STATION TRE, 822/823

52W

35

155

3K PARK CITIES 55 DART ON-CALL ZONE

M

IN

OAKBROOK

H RY

CLYMER

52N

KUSHLA

R

HAR

404

LK HILL

HILL

R

SH-160

376

RD OOD INW

S

KRIVE

7

BIC

COLORADO DR CLARENDON

568

574

FO

52

52 CHILDREN’S MEDICAL CTR.•

549

568

RD

NE

OAKBROOK

R

52N

26 G

MEDICAL CITY DALLAS HOSPITAL

VA MEDICAL CENTER

ATLAS

AL

451

UNIVERSITY PARK

IH-20

D

U.T.S.W. ST. PAUL HOSPITAL•

RI

361

MEDICAL CITY

UNIVERSITY PARK

415

Y HI RR

404

409

404

0 TOM LANDRY FRWY. IH-3542

547 KEENELAND

7

525

CHA

CHALK

CLYME

549

KIEST BLVD

52

RECORD CROSSING

525

404

SINGLETON

987

LOVERS LN.

529

HA

29

FO

CHILDREN’S MEDICAL CTR.•

KEENELAND

574

409

U.T.S.W. ST. PAUL HOSPITAL• CROSSING RECORD

IRVING BLVD

Y WA

EM

2

IH-63535 LBJ FRWY

LO

428

529

524 31

U.T. S.W./PARKLAND HOSPITAL•

SINGLETON

DAVIS

GE

LA

M

UTD

FAIRVIEW

CAMPBELL RD.

RICHARDSON 824 CTR. MEDICAL

FR W 410 Y

BUSH TURNPIKE STATION

883 UTD Shuttle, 841-843 FLEX

E EASTFIELD COLLEGE ILL EENV BUSH TURNPIKE STATION GR 883 UTD Shuttle, 841-843 FLEX

A

OS

RM

HE

883

843

PLANO PKWY

841841

METHODIST RENNER RD

362

IH-635 LBJ FRWY DALLAS HOSPITAL

NORTHWEST HWY 12 HWY NORTHWEST OP

428

206

EN CTR. N. CAMPUS• U.T. S.W. MEDICAL RB

59

TAG 31 ON

19P

BIC TOM LANDRY FRWY. IH-30

DAVIS

574

ND

BE

ER

RIV

527

IRVING BLVD

525

515

PEN

524 31

59 U.T. S.W. MEDICAL CTR. N. CAMPUS• S KER

COCKRELL HILL TRANSFER LOCATION

376

KIEST BLVD

527

525

526

KRIVE

R

11, 376, 444, 542, 549

547

5

R

BROO

25

O

59

52

35

POTTER’S HOUSE

52

O

EMPIRE CENTRAL

63

LEATH

AL

RN

BE

59

11, 376, 444, 542, 549

376

AD

19AA

VE

549

POTTER’S HOUSE

SH-30

AN GARAP

SS

408

563

408

AL

RN

BE

W

BA

526

BROO

AD

527

RO

527

527

RO

SS

35

LEATH

RS

WALNUT HILL LN

29

EMPIRE CENTRAL

527

WALNUT HILL LN

12 OP LO P 12

161E

544 161W

SS PRE ROW

O

36 486

36

DALLAS

N

400

463

HARVEST HILL

362

-6 843 35 LB J

PARK BLVD

410

870

824

E

O

ARAPAHO RD

ROYAL LN

SANER

31

19P 544

EM

RN

VALLEY VIEW MALL

VALLEY VIEW MALL

515

O

DRIVE A.

400

362 486

HARVEST HILL

8

LOVE FIELD

LOVE FIELD

SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION

VE

W

BA

MOUNTAIN VIEW COLLEGE

JEFFERSON

D

S

LOOP 12

59

SH-180

SH-180

O

Y HINE HARR

525

GO

409

53

161

RI U.T. S.W./PARKLAND HOSPITAL•

59

568

COCKRELL HILL

KBANK

525

S PRES ROW

Y

428

525

EM

AC

59

JEFFERSON

BROC

HINES

408

M

DALLAS

59

O

BANK

NK

HARRY

RS

549

35, 59, 549

35, 59, 549

31

528

AM

Y

NO

M

DALLAS

549

BERNAL/SINGLETON COCKRELL TRANSFER LOCATION HILL

KIEST BLVD

CK O

BROCKBA

CE

DIP

WOODIN

206

LOO

525

W

AC

VER

LESTON A

BERNAL/SINGLETON TRANSFER LOCATION

LOOP 12

IRVING

CEW

BANK ES CK RY HIN O HAR

AN

ND

OM

GO

W

RO

AL

RE

LO

FRWY.

LA

TON

ES

PE

RE

PL

63

529

BACHMAN STATION

428

RO

525 GAL

LESTON

NDRY IH-30 TOM LA

466

29, 525

BRID29, GE

DI

408

466

BURBANK STATION

BAIN

527

63

Y FRWY. NDR IH-30 TOM LA

SH-30

31

GE

BURBANK 453 STATION

G

IRVING BLVD

PENTAGON

PARK

31, 428, 528, 535, 544

535

466

527

DALLAS

SOUTH OAK CLIFF H.S.

31

31, 428, 528, 535, 544 528

OR

GE ST.

278

WHEATLAND

IRVING BLVD

ING

AR

535

21

PARK

21 535 453

48

SP

2

48

UR

SP

OOD

DEN

Y HIN HARR

DE

UR

INW

ON

IN

840840

840

508

IRV

IRVING

HUNTER FERRELL

HUNTER FERRELL

GY

453 2

522

155

AR

TURNPIKE

ID

IS

TATUM

LA

488

VIL

31

&

BACHMAN STATION 161

GY

LO

840

IRVI OAKDALE NG

TRE, 63, 401, 408, 501, 504, 507, 508, 514, 549, 840 FLEX

OAKDALE

R

6TH

549

TRE, 63, 401, 408, 501, 504, 507, 508, 514, 549, 840 FLEX

549

DOWNTOWN IRVING/ HERITAGE CROSSING STATION

840

6TH

DOWNTOWN IRVING/ HERITAGE CROSSING STATION

EAF

840

KE

5TH

AL W

574 5TH

SHADY GROVE

840

O

D

BLV

840

FLAMEL

NO

515

206 234

WLNW WALNUT HILL 31 278 BO RO

544

31

LO

508

508

501

®

840

507

401

®

30 501

AS

G

501

408

514

30 840

EL LAG

O

N IRVI

401

N TO AL WRIVERSIDE

N

514

507 408

SHADY GROVE

IH-30 TOM LANDRY FRWY.

LI

GRAUWYLER

307

WEST IRVING STATION TRE, 505, 514

514

VD BL

514

505

504

504

NORTHGATE

466

183

FOREST LN

445

FAWN RIDGE

WALNUT HILL LN

WILLOWBROOK

NO

PREFFERRED

AIRPORT FREEWAY

508 514

31

535

466

528

505 508

0

DENTON STATION

31

WILLOWBROOK TECH

183

405

529

528

CAMPNORTHGATE WISDOM

1

11

ROOSEVELT HIGH SCHOOL

532

19

M

N

ARAPAHO 883 RD

ADDISON

488

488

GALLERIA

FOREST LN

234 161

LA

GALLERIA

987

19

488

205 205 208 210 208 TOWNVIEW 210 MAGNET

532

362

ADDISON 463

S

WY FR

J

529

ROYAL LN

21

DE

183

YS

361

35

26

870

841

DRIVE A.

AD

TE

FAIR PARK

ARAPAHO RD

463

COLLIN CREEK MALL

PLANO PKWY

FM 544

IH

RD

18TH

13TH

14TH

870

350

15TH

AVY

RICHARDSON 883 RICHARDSON DART ON-CALL ZONE

362

350 362

PE

870

15TH COLLIN COUNTY COMMUNITY

13TH COLLEGE

CENTERVILLE PARK BLVD

RENNER RD

PARK BLVD

410

870

410

883

RICHARDSON

350 883

UTD

TATUM

RICHARDSON DART ON-CALL ZONE 400

722

SCHOOL 8TH

488

D

155 CONVENTION CENTER36 STATION

EA

161

11

532

532

1

BRONZE WAY

TECH

IH-2 505 508

514 GRAUWYLER FREEWAY AIRPORT NG IRVI

505

BAYLOR MEDICAL CENTER CONFLANS

UNIVERSITY OF DALLAS

505

544

PLATINUM WAY

11 4

987

BR

453

31

234

LEDBETTER

LAS COLINAS 466 URBAN CENTER STATION 503

505, 508

11 4

507 BAYLOR MEDICAL CENTER

401

SH

987

987

LR

15TH

GASTO SH N BU E76 LA GE SIDE NT GESHOVIRSTA

451

883 361

36

463 362

WALNUT HILL/ KIEST BLVD DENTON STATION WALNUT HILL/ 161

404

23431

528

CO

ROCHELLE

EER

S

401

E

507

PION

LA

ROCHELLE

574 504 505

LE

ROCHEL

504 501

507

SH

505, 508

466

503

DE LAS CK COLINAS ER URBAN CENTER STATION 503

503

EL LAG

R

ROCHELL

408

514

12 234

AS

408

O’C

401

KE

234, 400, 501, 510

234

528

486, 532, 535, 529, 532

BR

GROVEVIEW

532

486

987

FOREST LN

529

183

362PR

883

McCALLUM

11

347

536

EL

L

362

841

870 FLEX

JACK HATCHELL TRANSIT CENTER

BAYLOR UNIV. MEDICAL CTR.

31

208 210 208 210

SPRING VALLEY

161

B 5L

3

535

ROYAL LANE STATION ROYAL LN

987 544

234

WALNUT HILL LN

21

42

1 21 DELAWARE 987

IH-6

405

535

RO

278

19

WY F11R 987

532

FOREST LN

987

987

21 722

486

987

532 445 ROYAL LANE STATION

PENTAGON

NORTH IRVING TRANSIT CENTER

507 547 ONN

UNIVERSITY OF DALLAS

505

IRVING MALL

FREEWAY 505 AIRPORT 501

400 501 510

234, 400, 501, 510

507

507 ROCHELLE

IRVING MALL

501

DEC

532

5 3488

IH-6

42

488

EL

N

BROOKHAVEN COLLEGE

J LB

DALLAS MEDICAL CENTER

NORTHAVEN 486, 532, 535, 529, 987 532

T

IGH

WR

STATION 400, 501, 507, 510, 528

WALNUT HILL LN 234

OR

NORTHGATE

501

30

234 IRVING

IRVING 505

OP

501 401

COUNTRY CLUB

408

HR UT O LN N W A ON

O’C

234

547

NORTH IRVING528 COUNTRY TRANSIT CENTER 503 CREEK

HIDDEN RIDGE

N

CLUB

HILL

574

NORTH LAKE COLLEGE

504

LI

COUNTRY DFW AIRPORT CONSOLIDATED AUTO RENTAL

401, 501, 504

987 453

NORTHAVEN

547 549 544 404

400 568 ROYAL LN

234

528

400 MEADOW 501 CREEK 510 528

CO

501

H

NORTH LAKE COLLEGE STATION

510

234

503

HIDDEN RIDGE

445

234

400 IRVING CONVENTION CENTER STATION 400, 501, 507, 510, 528 IRVING CONVENTION CENTER

CORPORATE

S

SOUTH AIRFIELD

SOUTH REMOTE PARKING

WALNUT

UT LN POLARIS WA

528

GA TEWA Y

NORTH LAKE COLLEGE

504

401

LA

408

401, 501, 504

WY .

POTTER’S HOUSE

GREENWAY

501

BELT LINE STATION MEADOW 500, 509, 510 CREEK

NORTH LAKE COLLEGE STATION

LO

CORPORATE

E

GA TEW AY

BELT LINE STATION 500, 509, 510

LE RC S CI PU M CA CORPORATE

GATEWAY

501

SH-30

VALLEY VIEW

535

DENT

MOUNTAIN VIEW COLLEGE

568

400 ROYAL LN

SID

CORPORATE

531 535

544

ROYAL LN

PREMIER

DFW AIRPORT

802

568

CLARENDON DR

RIVER

TERMINAL C

533

400

ROYAL LN

TERMINAL E

535

544

KEENELAND

405

488

SH-180 FARMERS BRANCH 987 DART ON-CALL ZONE 722

VALLEY VIEW

FARMERS BRANCH STATION DALLAS MEDICAL

488, 531, 533, 535, 544 CENTER 11400, DART ON-CALL

19 21 11

488

ASK

IN

SPRING VALLEY

1

H

ARAPAHO RDGTO

534 350 205 205 488 36 400

333

YORKTOWN

42

METHODIST HOSPITOL

BROOKHAVEN 522 COLLEGE

42

VALWOOD PKWY

568

DAVIS

N O

DIPLOMAT

401

SH 509 -11 ROYAL LN 4J OH 510 NW SH 500 DFW AIRPORT STATION @ -11 .C TERMINAL A AIRPORT SHUTTLES 4J AR OH 510 500 PE NW 801 NT .C 510 AR ER ROYAL LN500 509 PREMIER PE FR 401 NT CLE IR 510 801 GATEWAY W509 510 ER SC Y PU . M GREENWAY CA 400FR234

531 535

533

MEREDITH

549

RANCH TRAIL

EW

ADDISON TRANSIT CENTER CE

MER 036, 183, 205, 333,COM 347, 350, 361, 362, 400, 463, 488, 534, 333536

COLORADO

453

404 STATION FARMERS BRANCH

VI

N

CH

IN cK

N

M

RA

TE IN

HACKBERRY

LBJ FR WY

533

400 533

AVE

RTH

WO

531

VALWOOD 400, 488, 531, 533, 535, 544 DART ON-CALL

DAVIS

400

FARMERS FARMERS BRANCH 12 BRANCH DART ON-CALL ZONE FT

488

35

AK

PLANO

ER

RK

PA

PARK BLVD

18TH

870

PLANO PKWY

PARK BLVD

210, 350, 451, 452, 841 FLEX McCALLUM

19

D

883 Fri/Sun

883 Fri/Sun

374

350

RNPIKE SH TU BU GE NT GEOR DOWNTOWN PLANO STATION

ES IDE

841

883

1

350 362

PE W ASH

TG

LR

PARKER ROAD STATION

RD

ER

PA

377

COLLIN CREEK MALL

350, 410, 452 DART ON-CALL , TI Shuttle, Texoma Express

451

WAL-MART

829

HWY 15TH NORTHWEST

452

841

MEDICAL CENTER OF PLANO

76 210

350

EL

12

COLLIN COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE

410 377

DOWNTOWN PLANO STATION 870 FLEX

210, 350, 451, 452, 841 FLEX

WAL-MART

PR

451

1 REGIONAL BAYLOR MEDICAL CTR.

362

208

1

Mc PARK CR BLVD EE

JACK HATCHELL TRANSIT CENTER

LOVERS LN

UNIVERSITY

76

24

347

210536

W

53663

59

35

BELT LINE RD

VALWOOD PKWY

RN VE

ES

KELLLER SPRINGS L TA INEN NT CO

TRY UN CO

BRANCH

400

COLORADO

DIPLOMAT

401

531

400

533 549

RIAL ST

LEY RANCH VAL

S

CFARMERS A RROLLTON 59

WHITLOCK

DOWNTOWN CARROLLTON STATION

35

333

400 536

VALWOOD

BELT LINE RD

DU

REGENT

ROYAL

533

SH-180

AK

549

KE

BU

RO

350

377

RK

350, 410, 452 DART ON-CALL , TI Shuttle, Texoma Express

350

210

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RN

24

24

409

CK

TG

350 488 36 400 VE

IN

RANCH TRAIL

O

59

35

453

BLA

ES

W

24

521

534

333

KELLLER SPRINGS

536

49

036, 183, 205, 333, 347, 350, 361, 362, 400, 463, 488, 534, 333536

Y LL

PLANO PKWY

208

534

ADDISON AIRPORT

ADDISON TRANSIT CENTER

BELT LINE RD

S

BICKER

536

1

841

210

183

SCOTTISH RITE HOSP. 183 347

TRINITY MILLS

TRY UN CO

PLANO

MEDICAL CENTER OF PLANO

BAYLOR REGIONAL MEDICAL CTR.

TE

TA TE

SPRING CREEK PKWY

SUPER TARGET

PARKER RD

521

PARK BLVD

347 210

409

KELLLER SPRINGS

49

63 333

531

59

FRANKFORD RD

534

27

ES

350

743

SMU

WY

347 534

SQUIRE

EL

IH-635

500

401

404

AT IO NA L PK

31

333

333

536

CARROLLTON

347

ADDISON AIRPORT

703

534

Y LL

KE

DOWNTOWN CARROLLTON STATION

LEATH400

39

TIMBERGREEN

ND

BE

ER

RIV

AL LAKE SANDY RN BE

400

RK

RECORD CROSSING

525

IRVING BLVD

UR

534 536 536

BELT LINE RD

PA

SQUIRE

AP

MACAR

59

ST

KELLLER SPRINGS

WHITLOCK HALSEY

534, 536 549 A-Train to Denton

RE

LOVERS LN.

W

ES

NORTH PLANO DART ON-CALL ZONE

374, 475, 583

SO

UTH

DART SYSTEM

EXCHANGE PKWY

N

LAKE HIGHLANDS STATION

451

451

PARKER RD

347

208

RN

841

210 347

SHOPS AT WILLOWBEND

841

534

S

CH

W

RY BU

RT

PO

EE

FR

VIE

TS IN SA

509

CH

536

Y.

R

531

TRINITY MILLS G

N

500 401

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534

FO

409

333

531404

31

N

RA

LO

RI SP

RY UT Training HACKBERRY Center DEVRY

FR W

SANDY LAKE

59

401

S

509 LBJ FR WY

W

63

TRINITY MILLS STATION

DEO RO

AK

Aviall

IH-635

REGENT

RO AD

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O

MARY KAY

LK HILL CHA

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EL

BU TS

IN SA

AP

63

NS

CLYMER

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CH

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RS

SS

LOOP 12

401

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IRV

HUNTER FERRELL

O

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ST

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RN

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5E 534, 536 A-Train to Denton 549

EMPIRE CENTRAL ROSEMEADE PKWY

VE

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W

RO

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534 536 536

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BR

HE

29

BROO

Y.

401

534 AR CED

MARY KAY

FR W

507 408

208

347

FRANKFORD RD

HEBRON

AN

PLANO PKWY

183

333

524 31

SS PRE ROW

NS

GRAUWYLER

R

CONFLANS

EM

MO

534

531

EL

D

CARUTH HAVEN

LOVERS LN.

31

529

TIMBERGREEN

CREEK

CHEYENNE

BAYLOR MEDICAL CTR. AT CARROLLTON

N

RI452 DG EC SPRING CREEK RE PKWY ST

428

SO

PARKER ROAD STATION

A

AIRPORT FREEWAY

534

FRANKFORD RD

PI

PARK BLVD

NORTHPARK SHOPPING PARK LANE CENTER DALLAS LAKESIDE MARKET

RIDGE

S507 TE M

2

48

UR

SP

451

ND

NORTHGATE

183

208

KI

452 PARKER RD

MA

531

NORTH CARROLLTON/FRANKFORD STATION

401

350

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11 4

428

535

829

AR

LEGACY DR

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E

PIONEE

DFW AIRPORT STATION

GY

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ME

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841

534

ROSEMEADE PKWY

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M

LAR

NO

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208

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ROCHELL

BAYLOR MEDICAL CENTER

CENTREPORT

KBANK

TECH

SH

to Denton (operated by DCTA)

ROCHELLE

-35

E

801 802 804

BROC

IH

500

BANK

507

E

ON

ST

PARKER RD

SHOPS AT LEGACY

TENNYSON

NORTHWEST HWY 347

463

451

NYO

CA

AID

TEXAS HEALTH PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL PLANO

ST

488

452

N

234

346 346

347

ROUND GROVE

IRVING MALL

COWBOYS MERCHANDISE CENTER

ES

AS

ON

BR

347

SHOPS AT WILLOWBEND

428

NUT

234

LEGACY DR

183, 208, 346, 347, 348, 451, 452

P 12

NORTH PLANO DART ON-CALL ZONE 463

W AL

SPRING CREEK PKWY

NORTHWEST 347 PLANO PARK AND RIDE

LOO

RICHLAND COLLEGE

CAMPANELLA

488

346

31

529

463

LEGACY DR

BANNER

CHURCHILL WAY

LAKESIDE MARKET

205 348208183 452 210 183

HEBRON

O EL LAG

N LI

ER

348

531

31

234

CK

1

EM

451 MEDICAL CITY DALLAS HOSPITAL

348

31

31 CREEK

CHEYENNE

BAYLOR MEDICAL CTR. AT CARROLLTON

CO

DE

TEXAS HEALTH PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL PLANO

12

SH

CK O

S LA

234

COUNTRY CLUB

ROCHELLE

183, 208, 346, 347, 348, 451, 452

234

BR

RY HIN

R

NO

ON

O’C

HAR

234

NORTH LAKE COLLEGE

529

183

208

NORTHWEST PLANO PARK AND183 RIDE

532

486

EXCHANGE PKWY

ILY

MERIT

TON

IDE

400 234

CORPORATE

HE

NORTHAVEN

P

RICHARDSON SQUARE MALL

KIT

AY LLW . TO

DEN

234

ROYAL LN

FR WY .

GREENWAY

NORTHGATE

509

LB

35

IH-6

347

400

MIDPARK

AS N

535

LAKE LEWISVILLE

GA TEWA Y

HILL

Y RW JF

400

EW

RIVERS

LE RC S CI PU M CA CORPORATE

GATEWAY

WALNUT

532 488

DIPLOMAT

VI

532

SH -11 ROYAL LN 4J OH NW .C AR 500 PE NT ER 509 PREMIER

500

CH

5

400

400

452

SHOPS AT LEGACY

346 346IH-635 LBJ FRWY TENNYSON

MALL

VERNON

N

348

DALL

RA

LBJ FR WY

REGENT

ROYAL

401

S

RANCH TRAIL

IH-635

500

36 VALLEY 452 VIEW 486

GALLERIA

BROOKHAVEN COLLEGE

-7 US

463

LEGACY DR

488

BROOK SPRINGS

AK

RY BU

500

O

WALTON

TS IN

EL

348

348

488

400

C N.

SKILLMAN ST

GE B PRESIDE NT GEO R

COWBOYS

ILL M W ATE R SA

AP

183 205 210 208 210

1

12

SH

346

RT

H

488

FO

Y RANC

531

NT

DEO

LE VAL

400

463 MO

RO

CH

E

350 400

488

400 400

McMILLAN

333

LAKE LEWISVILLE

Point of Interest

Hospital

Transfer Location

School

Fare Zone Boundary (See Ticket Pricing)

Lancaster

This map will help you use the DART Bus & Rail System. For specific route and schedule information, please refer to individual route timetables or visit us at www.dart.org or www.transportedart.org 214 • 979 • 1111

SCALE IN MILES

Source: Dallas Area Rapid Transit SPRING 2019

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GET TING AROUND

LIVING

PHOTO: CITY OF IRVING

DALLAS FORT WORTH INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

AIRPORTS 8

AIRPORTS HELICOPTERS AND VERTICAL TAKE-OFF AND LANDING AIRCRAFT ONLY

5

15

3

4 9 16

1 2 7 17

10

14

6

12

18 13

11 1 DFW INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT 2 LOVE FIELD 3 FORT WORTH ALLIANCE AIRPORT 4 ADDISON AIRPORT 5 MCKINNEY NATIONAL AIRPORT 6 DALLAS EXECUTIVE AIRPORT

SOURCE: DRC research

7 FORT WORTH MEACHAM INTERNATIONAL 8 DENTON MUNICIPAL 9 ROCKWALL MUNICIPAL 10 NAS FORT WORTH JOINT RESERVE BASE 11 FORT WORTH SPINKS

12 ARLINGTON MUNICIPAL 13 LANCASTER REGIONAL AIRPORT 14 MESQUITE METRO 15 NORTHWEST REGIONAL 16 GARLAND/DFW HELOPLEX 17 DALLAS CBD VERTIPORT 18 DESOTO HELIPORT

BY THE NUMBERS DFW INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

DALLAS LOVE FIELD

189,350 DAILY PASSENGERS 918,130 TOTAL CARGO (TONNAGE) 8,741,030 INTERNATIONAL PASSENGERS 69,112,607 TOTAL PASSENGERS

44,464 DAILY PASSENGERS 231,110 TOTAL OPERATIONS 16,229,151 TOTAL PASSENGERS

TAKING FLIGHT

Whether you are a family of four traveling to Mexico for vacation, a business traveler headed to Chicago for the day, or a busy corporate executive flying private, take-offs and landings are easy here. Dallas is home to the world’s largest global airline—American Airlines—and the U.S.’s largest domestic carrier—Southwest Airlines—as well as three full-service general aviation airports serving private and executive clients. Situated between Dallas and Fort Worth, Dallas Fort Worth International Airport is the highestcapacity commercial airport in the world, connecting the area to the entire planet. The airport offers travelers a high-frequency schedule and access to any major city in the continental United States in less than four hours. More than a dozen new international routes have been added in the last two years, and more are on the way. Plus, DART’s orange line runs to DFW International, meaning it’s possible to take public transportation to the airport. Dallas Love Field is a convenient generaluse airport located just seven miles from downtown Dallas that is home to low-cost carrier Southwest Airlines. Alaska Airlines also provides service out of Love Field after acquiring Virgin America in 2017. The airport recently completed a $519 million renovation that included a centralized terminal with 20 gates, a new lobby, and an expanded baggage claim area. Together, these things mean a big future for this little airport. Corporate jets most often operate out of Addison Airport, in North Dallas; McKinney National Airport, 30 miles north of Dallas; or Dallas Executive Airport, just south of downtown. These airports offer state-of-the-art infrastructure and amenities and firstclass service to their clients.

Source: Dallas Fort Worth International Airport and City of Dallas

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SPRING 2019


DALLAS LOVE FIELD

GET TING AROUND

DALLAS FORT WORTH INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

LIVING

PHOTO: VISIT DALLAS PHOTO: DFW INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

DALLAS FORT WORTH INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT DOMESTIC DESTINATIONS ANCHORAGE

SEATTLE 76 flights per week

DENVER 148 flights per week

SAN FRANCISCO 99 flights per week

BOSTON 81 flights per week MINNEAPOLIS 88 flights CHICAGO NEW YORK per week 176 flights per week PHILADELPHIA 163 flights per week 82 flights per week DETROIT 77 flights per week WASHINGTON D.C. 125 flights per week CHARLOTTE 91 flights per week

LAS VEGAS 89 flights per week LOS ANGELES 163 flights per week

ATLANTA 160 flights per week

PHOENIX 96 flights per week AUSTIN SAN ANTONIO 102 flights per week 100 flights per week HOUSTON 163 flights per week

HONOLULU MAUI

ORLANDO 71 flights per week MIAMI 69 flights per week SAN JUAN

LOVE FIELD NONSTOP DESTINATIONS SEATTLE/TACOMA PORTLAND BOSTON (LOGAN)

MINNEAPOLIS BOISE

MILWAUKEE CHICAGO (MDW)

SACRAMENTO

RENO

SAN FRANCISCO OAKLAND (SFO) SAN JOSE

OMAHA DENVER KANSAS CITY

LAS VEGAS BURBANK LOS ANGELES (LAX) ONTARIO ORANGE COUNTY SANTA ANA PHOENIX SAN DIEGO TUSCON

ALBUQUERQUE

ST LOUIS RALEIGH/DURHAM

TULSA OKLAHOMA CITY DALLAS LOVE FIELD

NEW YORK (LaGUARDIA)

DETROIT

PHILADELPHIA PITTSBURGH BALTIMORE / WASHINGTON (BWI) COLUMBUS WASHINGTON DC (REAGAN NATIONAL) INDIANAPOLIS

SALT LAKE CITY

NASHVILLE MEMPHIS LITTLE ROCK

CHARLOTTE GREENVILLE/SPARTANBURG

ATLANTA

CHARLESTON

BIRMINGHAM

NEW ORLEANS

ORLANDO TAMPA WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE

SPRING 2019

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NONSTOP FLIGHT TIMES FROM DALLAS FORT WORTH INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT GET TING AROUND ACCESS

DESTINATION — FLIGHT TIME IN MINUTES

ASIA TOKYO-NARITA, JP — 817 BEIJING, CN — 855 SEOUL, KR — 892 SHANGHAI, CN — 916 HONG KONG, CN — 1022

SOUTH AMERICA

LIVING

BOGOTA, CO — 329 LIMA, PE — 418 SANTIAGO, CL — 565 SAO PAULO-GUARULHOS, BR — 609 BUENOS AIRES, AR — 621

MIDDLE EAST DOHA, QA — 870 DUBAI, UAE — 883

AUSTRALIA SYDNEY, AU — 1012

EUROPE KEFLAVIK, IS — 451 LONDON-HEATHROW, GB — 538 DUBLIN, IR — 567 MADRID, ES — 569 PARIS-DE GAULLE, FR — 569 FRANKFURT, DE — 585 AMSTERDAM, NL — 655 ROME, IT — 659 MUNICH, DE — 669

ALASKA & HAWAII ANCHORAGE, AK — 378 KONA, HI — 439 KAHULUI/MAUI, HI — 490 HONOLULU/OAHU, HI — 511

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MEXICO

CARIBBEAN

MONTERREY, MX — 97 CHIHUAHUA, MX — 115 TORREON, MX — 120 DURANGO, MX — 122 ZACATECAS, MX — 123 SAN LUIS POTOSI, MX — 128 AGUASCALIENTES, MX — 138 LEON/GUANAJUATO, MX — 143 QUERETARO, MX — 145 MAZATLAN, MX — 149 CANCUN, MX — 152 GUADALAJARA, MX — 153 COZUMEL, MX — 153 MEXICO CITY, MX — 153 MORELIA, MX — 158 OAXACA, MX — 160 PUERTO VALLARTA, MX — 161 SAN JOSE DEL CABO, MX — 172 IXTAPA/ZIHUATANEJO, MX — 172 TEGUCIGALPA, HN — 200

NASSAU, BS — 181 GRAND CAYMAN ISLAND, KY — 197 MONTEGO BAY, JM — 215 PROVIDENCIALES, TC — 226 SANTA DOMINGO, DO — 262 SAN JUAN, PR — 274 PUNTA CANA, DO — 275 ORANJESTAD, AW — 293 ST KITTS AND NEVIS, KN — 314

D A L L A S REG I O N N E W C O M E R + R E L O C AT I O N G U I D E

CENTRAL AMERICA BELIZE CITY, BZ — 171 SAN PEDRO SULA, HN — 187 GUATEMALA CITY, GT — 189 ROATAN, HN — 190 SAN SALVADOR, SV — 203 LIBERIA, CR — 227 MANAGUA, NI — 230 SAN JOSE, CR — 237

SPRING 2019


U.S. MIDWEST BRANSON, MO — 51 KANSAS CITY, MO — 67 WICHITA, KS — 70 JOPLIN, MO — 74 SPRINGFIELD, MO — 74 ST. LOUIS, MO — 77 OMAHA, NE — 81 MANHATTAN, KS — 82 COLUMBIA, MO — 89 SIOUX CITY, IA — 89 GARDEN CITY, KS — 89 INDIANAPOLIS, IN — 101 GRAND ISLAND, NE — 101 SPRINGFIELD, IL — 106 EVANSVILLE, IN — 108 DES MOINES, IA — 108 PEORIA, IL — 110 MILWAUKEE, WI — 111 CHAMPAIGN, IL — 113 CEDAR RAPIDS, IA — 113 BLOOMINGTON, IL — 114 MOLINE, IL — 114 COLUMBUS, OH — 119 SIOUX FALLS, SD — 121 DETROIT, MI — 126 CINCINNATI, OH — 129 MADISON, WI — 129 CHICAGO-MIDWAY, IL — 130 DAYTON, OH — 131 FORT WAYNE, IN — 132 CHICAGO-O’HARE, IL — 137 RAPID CITY, SD — 140 GRAND RAPIDS, MI — 140 MINNEAPOLIS/ST. PAUL, MN — 142 FARGO, ND — 152 CLEVELAND, OH — 152 TRAVERSE CITY, MI — 153 BISMARCK, ND — 162 SOUTH BEND, IN — 209

U.S. NORTHEAST PITTSBURGH, PA — 135 WASHINGTON-NATIONAL DC, DC — 149 PHILADELPHIA, PA — 162 NEW YORK-LA GUARDIA, NY — 172 WASHINGTON-DULLES, VA — 172 BALTIMORE, MD — 172 BUFFALO, NY — 174 HARRISBURG, PA — 176 HARTFORD, CT — 198 NEWARK, NJ — 208 NEW YORK-JFK, NY — 213 BOSTON, MA — 218

SPRING 2019

RALEIGH/DURHAM, NC — 134 STILLWATER, OK — 134 JACKSONVILLE, FL — 134 GAINESVILLE, FL — 136 COLUMBIA, SC — 136 SAVANNAH, GA — 140 FORT LAUDERDALE, FL — 141 CHARLOTTE-DOUGLAS, NC — 146 GREENSBORO, NC — 149 ASHEVILLE, NC — 152 AUGUSTA, GA — 152 WEST PALM BEACH, FL — 155 MYRTLE BEACH, SC — 157 KEY WEST, FL — 159 MIAMI, FL — 160 RICHMOND, VA — 163 NORFOLK, VA — 167 WILMINGTON, NC — 191

LIVING

U.S. SOUTH OKLAHOMA CITY, OK — 35 WACO, TX — 38 HOUSTON-HOBBY, TX — 42 TULSA, OK — 42 TYLER, TX — 43 SAN ANTONIO, TX — 43 WICHITA FALLS, TX — 47 KILLEEN, TX — 48 ABILENE, TX — 48 LUBBOCK, TX — 48 LAWTON, OK — 49 LONGVIEW, TX — 49 LITTLE ROCK, AR — 49 COLLEGE STATION, TX — 50 MIDLAND/ODESSA, TX — 51 TEXARKANA, AR — 52 SHREVEPORT, LA — 54 SAN ANGELO, TX — 57 FORT SMITH, AR — 59 AUSTIN, TX — 60 MEMPHIS, TN — 63 NEW ORLEANS, LA — 64 NORTHWEST ARKANSAS, AR — 64 ALEXANDRIA, LA — 65 MONROE, LA — 66 BEAUMONT/PORT ARTHUR, TX — 67 HOUSTON-INTERCONTINENTAL, TX — 67 HARLINGEN, TX — 68 VICTORIA, TX — 68 LAKE CHARLES, LA — 70 DEL RIO, TX — 71 AMARILLO, TX — 74 LAFAYETTE, LA — 75 BATON ROUGE, LA — 77 JACKSON, MS — 77 EL PASO, TX — 79 CORPUS CHRISTI, TX — 80 LAREDO, TX — 80 MERIDIAN, MS — 85 NASHVILLE, TN — 86 MCALLEN, TX — 88 GULFPORT/BILOXI, MS — 90 BROWNSVILLE, TX — 90 MOBILE, AL — 93 BIRMINGHAM, AL — 96 HUNTSVILLE/DECATUR, AL — 100 MONTGOMERY, AL — 102 PENSACOLA, FL — 103 FORT WALTON BEACH, FL — 111 PANAMA CITY, FL — 111 CHATTANOOGA, TN — 113 KNOXVILLE, TN — 117 LOUISVILLE, KY — 118 TAMPA, FL — 119 TALLAHASSEE, FL — 120 EL DORADO, AR — 120 GREENVILLE, MS — 120 HARRISON, AR — 120 HATTIESBURG/LAUREL, MS — 120 HOT SPRINGS, AR — 120 SARASOTA, FL — 120 ATLANTA, GA — 122 LEXINGTON, KY — 124 ORLANDO, FL — 125 CHARLESTON, SC — 126 FORT MYERS, FL — 129 GREENVILLE/SPARTANBURG, SC — 132

GET TING AROUND

CANADA TORONTO, ON, CA — 176 MONTREAL-PET, QC, CA — 206 CALGARY, AB, CA — 229 VANCOUVER, BC, CA — 257

U.S. WEST ROSWELL, NM — 88 DENVER, CO — 89 SANTA FE, NM — 104 CLOVIS, NM — 105 CHEYENNE, WY — 107 ALBUQUERQUE, NM — 109 COLORADO SPRINGS, CO — 111 FLAGSTAFF, AZ — 115 PHOENIX, AZ — 115 CARLSBAD, NM — 120 DURANGO, CO — 122 ASPEN, CO — 123 GUNNISON, CO — 128 SALT LAKE CITY, UT — 128 MONTROSE, CO — 134 GRAND JUNCTION, CO — 135 LAS VEGAS, NV — 136 TUCSON, AZ — 137 VAIL, CO — 141 STEAMBOAT SPRINGS, CO — 141 BOZEMAN, MT — 147 SAN DIEGO, CA — 149 YUMA, AZ — 154 LOS ANGELES, CA — 156 JACKSON HOLE, WY — 174 SACRAMENTO, CA — 178 SAN JOSE, CA — 179 OAKLAND, CA — 181 PALM SPRINGS, CA — 182 SAN FRANCISCO, CA — 182 ONTARIO, CA — 183 BAKERSFIELD, CA — 184 BILLINGS, MT — 190 BOISE, ID — 190 ORANGE COUNTY, CA — 193 SAN LUIS OBISPO, CA — 195 KALISPELL, MT — 198 SANTA BARBARA, CA — 198 MISSOULA, MT — 199 PORTLAND, OR — 199 BURBANK, CA — 202 MONTERREY, CA — 204 SEATTLE/TACOMA, WA — 204 FRESNO, CA — 207 RENO, NV — 208 SANTA ROSA, CA — 211 SPOKANE, WA — 223

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EDUCATION EDUCATION

EDUCATION

SOUTHERN METHODIST UNIVERSITY

CHOOSING THE RIGHT SCHOOL FOR EVERY CHILD PUBLIC SCHOOL DISTRICTS | THE DISTRICTS SPEAK | CHOOSING A DISTRICT BEST HIGH SCHOOLS | PICK YOUR PATH | PRIVATE SCHOOLS | HIGHER EDUCATION MONTESSORI SCHOOLS | FAQS | ALTERNATIVE SCHOOLING

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S P RPHOTO: I N G 2 0SMU 19


PHOTO: KEVIN MARPLE

EMPLOYER: Teacher, Durham Intermediate School, Carroll ISD CITY: Hurst How long have you been a teacher and what subject do you teach? This is my 18th year as a teacher. I am teaching sixth grade gifted/ talented language arts. What do you enjoy most about that? I enjoy the teachable moments the most. I love the moments when the children take your lesson down a path you weren’t expecting. This is when true learning occurs—both for

SPRING 2019

students and for me. What do you love most about teaching in Carroll ISD? I love the sense of community. From the time a child enters CISD, he or she is a Dragon. This means something. Kids grow up with heroes who attend Carroll Senior High School. These heroes are debate team members, band/color guard/Belles members, Carroll Theatre members, football players, cheerleaders, the list goes on. They want to excel in their areas of passion.

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LIVING

MELISSA BAILEY

EDUCATION

WHY I LOVE TEACHING AT CARROLL ISD

Choosing the right school for your child is a key component when selecting where to settle down and raise a family. The Dallas Region offers a variety of schooling options: public, public charter, private or parochial, and homeschooling. Whether you have little ones in need of early childhood or are looking for quality higher education for your college-bound student, our breakdown will help you find the perfect fit for your family.


EDUCATION

SCHOOL DISTRICTS

SANGER ISD 2,679 | 1427

SLIDELL ISD 253 | 1437

CHICO ISD 603 | 1328 KRUM ISD 2,090 | 1435 DECATUR ISD 3,129 | 1446

28 PONDER ISD 1,328 | 1535

LIVING

School districts in the DallasFort Worth region are locally administered and independent of each other. District lines generally relate to city boundaries, but they are not exclusive to them. For example, the Richardson ISD includes students in Richardson and parts of Dallas and Garland. The Dallas Independent School District—or DISD, as it is known locally—is the region’s largest school district, with nearly 155,100 students and a nationallyrecognized magnet program. Students attending Dallas ISD schools live in Addison, Balch Springs, Carrollton, Cockrell Hill, Dallas, Farmers Branch, Garland, Highland Park, Hutchins, Mesquite, MILLSAP Seagoville, University Park, and ISD 971 | 1280 Wilmer. Since 2007, the district has more than quadrupled the number of schools that have reached the state’s highest accountability BROCK ISD rating. In Tarrant County, Fort 1,333 | 1543 Worth ISD dominates, with more than 85,000 students.

ALVORD ISD 721 | 1414

BRIDGEPORT ISD 2,084 | 1399 PARADISE ISD 1,170 | 1436

ARGYLE ISD 2,429 | 1637

BOYD ISD 1,243 | 1374 NORTHWEST ISD 21,964 | 1525 POOLVILLE ISD 551 | 1361

CARROL 8,190 |

SPRINGTOWN ISD 3,470 | 1389 KELLER ISD 34,570 | 1526 AZLE ISD 6,330 | 1432

PEASTER ISD 1,115 | 1593

EAGLE MT-SAGINAW ISD 19,591 | 1439 BIRDVILLE ISD 23,767 | 1453

HURST-EUL 23,

LAKE WORTH ISD 3,503 | 1293 WHITE SETTLEMENT ISD 6,794 | 1359

WEATHERFORD ISD 7,991 | 1478

CASTLEBERRY ISD 4,002 | 1300

FORT WORTH ISD 87,233 | 1215

ALEDO ISD 5,426 | 1599

CROWLEY ISD 15,185 | 1329

A 6

KENNEDA 3,126 |

EVERMAN ISD 5,874 | 1217

MANSF 34,26

BURLESON ISD 11,850 | 1452

LIPAN ISD 379 | 1526

GRANBURY ISD 7,030 | 1461

GODLEY ISD 1,873 | 1443

JOSHUA ISD 5,286 | 1454

KEENE ISD 1,057 | 1420

ALVARADO ISD 3,722 | 1347

TOLAR ISD 791 | 1508 CLEBURNE ISD 6,749 | 1389

WHICH SCHOOL?

GRANDVIEW 1,174 | 14

Visit SayYesToDallas.com to find out which school is right for you.

GLEN ROSE ISD 1,756 | 1479

RIO VISTA ISD 737 | 1392

Source: Texas Education Agency

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PILOT POINT ISD 1,357 | 1444

ANNA ISD 3,214 | 1455

CELINA ISD 2,425 | 1589

EDUCATION EDUCATION

COMMERCE I 1,603 | 14

CELESTE ISD 510 | 1508

BLUE RIDGE ISD 758 | 1570

MELISSA ISD 2,624 | 1569

AUBREY ISD 2,397 | 1472 PROSPER ISD 9,970 | 1562

DENTON ISD 8,382 | 1473

MCKINNEY ISD 24,711 | 1567 PRINCETON ISD 4,137 | 1388

FRISCO ISD 55,745 | 1601

LAKE DALLAS ISD 3,947 | 1473

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ALLEN ISD 20,852 | 1630

LEWISVILLE ISD 53,182 | 1608

LL ISD 1748

GRAPEVINECOLLEYVILLE ISD 13,804 | 1629

FIELD ISD 62 | 1447

BOLES ISD 531 | 1372

ROYSE CITY ISD 5,456 | 1399

GARLAND ISD 57,029 | 1412

MESQUITE ISD 40,945 | 1330

GRAND PRAIRIE ISD 29,287 | 1219

QUINLAN ISD 2,623 | 1418

ROCKWALL ISD 15,717 | 1541

TERRELL ISD 4,391 | 1315

FORNEY ISD 9,681 | 1413

DALLAS ISD 157,787 | 1187

DE SOTO ISD 9,742 | 1203

CRANDALL ISD 3,750 | 1405

LANCASTER ISD 7,634 | 1174

CEDAR HILL ISD 7,866 | 1333

RED OAK ISD 5,740 | 1382 MIDLOTHIAN ISD 8,406 | 1523

FERRIS ISD 2,580 | 1312

KAUFMAN ISD 3,841 | 1373

SCURRY-ROSSER ISD 1,013 | 1405

PALMER ISD 1,185 | 1335

VENUS ISD 2,077 | 1315

ISD 447

LONE OAK IS 1,031 | 142

SUNNYVALE ISD 1,737 | 1552

DUNCANVILLE ISD 12,792 | 1299

ALE ISD | 1412

CADDO MILLS ISD 1,696 | 1505

WYLIE ISD (COLLIN) 14,972 | 1468

IRVING ISD LESS-BEDFORD ISD 34,725 | 1236 ,065 | 1487

ARLINGTON ISD 62,085 | 1397

LOVEJOY ISD 4,055 | 1657

RICHARDSON ISD 39,170 | 1524

HIGHLAND PARK ISD (DALLAS) 7,024 | 1790

CAMPBELL I 334 | 135

GREENVILLE ISD 5,354 | 1406

COMMUNITY ISD 2,082 | 1372

PLANO ISD 53,931 | 1694

CARROLLTONCOPPELL ISD 12,349 | 1709 FARMERS BRANCH ISD 25,196 | 1451

BLAND ISD 665 | 1483

LIVING

LITTLE ELM ISD 7,361 | 1372

FARMERSVILLE ISD 1,586 | 1391

WAXAHACHIE ISD 8,399 | 1476

KEMP ISD 1,540 | 1360

ENNIS ISD 5,842 | 1401

MABANK ISD 3,458 | 1439

LEGEND

MAYPEARL ISD 1,098 | 1507

ISD NAME

2017 ENROLLMENT | 2015 AVERAGE SAT SCORE

CITY BOUNDARIES

AVALON ISD 403 | 1401 ITALY ISD 584 | 1496 SPRING 2019

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THE DISTRICTS SPEAK Though all school districts strive to give students a quality education, there are differences from district to district. The following information was provided to us by each of the school districts. School districts not included here simply didn’t respond to our survey prior to press time, but they may have responded later. For more extensive information on these and other DFW area school districts, go to mydallasmove.com. If possible, before you choose a school or a district, call and ask for a tour. There’s no substitute for getting a personal feel for a school and the people who run it.

ALLEN ISD

SIZE: 21,600 students, pre-K through grade 12 KEY ATTRIBUTES: Allen ISD is recognized as one of the top school districts by numerous third-party rating systems, including Niche.com, which gives Allen ISD an A+ rating and ranks the school district as best district in Colin County and the sixth best district in Texas. Money Magazine ranked the City of Allen as the secondbest place to live in America, citing the school system as a major factor. While Allen High School is one of the largest schools in the state, having one high school lends to the feeling of community in Allen, and allows the district to offer a wide variety of programs to students. PHILOSOPHY: Allen ISD cultivates innovation in education that empowers every learner to realize his or her full potential.

ARLINGTON ISD

SIZE: 59,924 students, pre-K through 12 KEY ATTRIBUTES: Arlington ISD is centrally located between Dallas and Fort Worth and is known for its collaboration and innovative opportunities for students. Home to the Texas Association of School Boards’ 2016 Texas Superintendent of the Year—Dr. Marcelo Cavazos—and the 2014 Outstanding School Board of Texas, AISD has maintained a vision to be a premier school district and leader in education. PHILOSOPHY: The mission of the Arlington ISD is to empower and engage all students to be contributing, responsible citizens striving for their maximum potential through relevant, innovative, and rigorous learning experiences. The vision is that the AISD will be a premier school district and a leader in education.

AUBREY ISD

SIZE: 2,450 students, pre-K through 12 KEY ATTRIBUTES: Aubrey ISD is a fast-growth district located in the Dallas-Fort Worth region along the Highway 380 corridor in northeastern Denton County. Aubrey is just 18 miles from the Dallas North Tollway yet still has that small-town atmosphere. Aubrey ISD serves the communities of Providence Village, Krugerville, Cross Roads, and Aubrey. Aubrey was a small rural district housed in one building for 20 years until the first elementary school was built in 1986. Today, 84

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Aubrey ISD has grown to over 2,400 students spread over five campuses. The district is expected to grow by 800 students in the next five years. PHILOSOPHY: Aubrey ISD is a small district with a big vision. The district’s plan has a vision of inspiring passion, empowering excellence, and nurturing innovation. The school district is challenging its students and teachers to be world class. The community is very excited about the progress made. Aubrey hires outstanding teachers who are focused on the individual needs of their students. Teachers are challenged to be world class, and to incorporate Aubrey ISD family values (integrity, respect, compassion, loyalty, service, and excellence) into everything they do.

BIRDVILLE ISD

SIZE: 23,565 students, pre-K through 12 KEY ATTRIBUTES: Birdville ISD is the fifth-largest school district in Northeast Tarrant County. The district’s 33 campuses serve the community of Richland Hills and portions of Haltom City, Hurst, North Richland Hills, Watauga, Colleyville, and Fort Worth. During the 2019–20 school year, BISD will continue its Schools with a Specialization (SWAS) initiative by adding an additional campus to the offerings. These programs go above and beyond the state-required curriculum. PHILOSOPHY: BISD’s vision of “Excellence, Integrity and Service” is the foundation for continued student and staff excellence in its 21 elementary schools, seven middle schools, four high schools, and one career and technology campus.

has awarded CHISD 180 distinctions. In 2018, the district was named to the AP Honor Roll because of its efforts to increase student participation in AP exams. PHILOSOPHY: CHISD’s curriculum focuses on rigorous STEAM education. Science, technology, engineering, art, and math are brought to life at every grade level. Also, CHISD develops scholar life skills through Longhorn Essentials, or 10 expectations. Students at every grade level are required to make eye contact when someone is speaking, stand to answer questions, and be the best person they can be. See a complete list at chisd.net.

COMMUNITY ISD

SIZE: 540 students, pre-K through 12 KEY ATTRIBUTES: Boles ISD received a B rating in Texas’ A-F accountability system. All three campuses— elementary, middle and high school— are located next to one another, making it convenient for parents who have children at multiple campuses. We have a small teacher-to-student ration, high academic achievement, and competitive extra-curricular activities. Boles ISD does not charge a transfer fee. PHILOSOPHY: Boles ISD produces productive people.

SIZE: 2,400 students, pre-K through 12 KEY ATTRIBUTES: Community ISD is a fast-growing district loaded with the small-town and rural charm you would expect in an area with deep agricultural roots. Community ISD was formed in 1947, when Lavon, Nevada, Copeville, and Josephine consolidated to form a single school district. Located in southeast Collin County, the district spans 89 square miles and is within a 25 minute drive of Greenville, Rockwall, Wylie, McKinney, Garland, Mesquite, and Rowlett. PHILOSOPHY: Come to Community ISD and #ExperienceTheBLUE! Home of the Brave Nation, where we are inspiring students, staff, and the community to believe, lead, unite, and excel.

CEDAR HILL ISD

COPPELL ISD

BOLES ISD

SIZE: 8,000 students, pre-K through 12. KEY ATTRIBUTES: In the last five years, the Texas Education Agency

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SIZE: 12,895 students, pre-K through 12. KEY ATTRIBUTES: Coppell ISD is

considered a premier public school system with a statewide reputation for educational excellence and a storied legacy of focusing on educating the whole student. While the City of Coppell is just over 14 square miles, Coppell ISD encompasses more than 23 square miles. Within Coppell ISD boundaries, 63 percent of the district is comprised of the City of Coppell, 33 percent the City of Irving, 3 percent the City of Lewisville, and 1 percent the City of Dallas (Cypress Waters). PHILOSOPHY: The district’s mission states: “Working together, we are committed to profound learning experiences for each child, while nurturing meaning relationships to positively impact our world.” Coppell ISD achieves our mission through our Core Values, which revolve around the themes of Engagement, Great Teaching, Redefining Success, and Relationships. Coppell ISD’s new mission and core values evolved from the district’s recent Strategic Design process. Details on this process can be found at www.coppellisd.com/ strategicdesign.

CROWLEY ISD

SIZE: 15,700 students, pre-K through 12 KEY ATTRIBUTES: Crowley ISD is an acclaimed school district serving the southwest Fort Worth and Crowley communities. It’s bordered by two major interstates, I-20 and I-35W. The new Chisholm Trail Parkway runs through the middle of the district with more interchanges of the Parkway in CISD than any other school district. A majority of the district’s 23 campuses are located in the city of Fort Worth. The district is home to two high schools: Crowley High School (5A) and North Crowley High SPRING 2019


THE DISTRICTS SPEAK

SIZE: 155,100 students, pre-K through 12 KEY ATTRIBUTES: Dallas ISD is the 14th largest school district in the U.S. and is home to several of the state and country’s top-rated schools, including the School for the Talented and Gifted, the School of Science and Engineering, and the Irma Lerma Rangel Young Women’s Leadership School, Texas’ first all-girls public school. Dallas ISD schools are among those perennially selected as National Blue Ribbon Schools by the U.S. Department of Education based on improved student academic achievement. A 2019 rating of “B” from the Texas Education Agency reflects significant growth in student academic achievement. PHILOSOPHY: Taken together, these accolades have earned Dallas ISD the reputation as one of the country’s most-improved school districts. It boasts a growing selection of innovative school choice options, including magnet, STEAM, collegiate academies, Montessori, International Baccalaureate, single gender schools and more — all highlight the district’s mission, “Educating all students for success.”

DENISON ISD

SIZE: 4,647 students, pre-K through 12 KEY ATTRIBUTES: Bordered on the north by the biggest and best lake in Texas, and set amid rolling hills and lush landscapes, Denison’s award-winning schools offer teaching and learning environments in one of the friendliest and most welcoming communities in Texas. Stimulating, supportive, encouraging, and challenging, Denison ISD’s educational philosophy is firmly rooted in student-centered learning facilitated by collaboration, innovation, and state-of-the-art technology. It is a progressive school district that supports its students and teacher with time, expert training, and valuable resources. Denison ISD values, recognizes, celebrates, and rewards the many successes of its teachers and students. Denison ISD is an integral part of a great community of friendly

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DENTON ISD

SIZE: 30,311 students, pre-K through 12 KEY ATTRIBUTES: Excellent schools and a community grounded in public education since 1882 are key factors that make Denton County one of the 10 fastest-growing communities in the country. Recently named one of the “Top 100 Best Places to Live in America,” Denton ISD covers 180 square miles and is one of the fastest growing school districts in the DallasFort Worth area. Denton ISD serves all or parts of 18 communities in the North Texas region. PHILOSOPHY: Empowering lifelong learners to be engaged citizens who positively impact their local and global community.

FORNEY ISD

SIZE: 11,223 students, pre-K through 12 KEY ATTRIBUTES: Forney ISD offers a number of college and career opportunities for high school students through the district’s Dual Credit program, the Synergy Program, and through the Career Technical Education (CTE) Program. Students can earn college credits while still in high school as well as earn trade certifications in such fields as cosmetology, welding, electrical, and health services. The district’s Synergy Program allows high school students to work hand-in-hand with district administrators and local businesses to real world work environments. PHILOSOPHY: In partnership with parents and the community, Forney ISD shall create and sustain an environment to maximize the potential of each learner.

FORT WORTH ISD

SIZE: 85,000 students, pre-K through 12 KEY ATTRIBUTES: With over 85,000 students in 83 elementary schools, 29 middle schools and 6th grade centers, 18 high schools and 16 other

campuses, Fort Worth ISD enjoys a diverse student population and strong community partnerships. Under the leadership of the superintendent and the board of education, the district is undergoing a series of initiatives that will redesign, transform, and revitalize Fort Worth ISD schools. Fort Worth ISD is controlled locally through a board of education trustees elected by voters within each district. Nine trustees serve as single-member district representatives. All of the trustees serve four-year terms without pay. PHILOSOPHY: Our motto is singleness of purpose. Our mission: Preparing students for success in college, career and community leadership. Our vision: Fort Worth ISD: Igniting in every child a passion for learning. Fort Worth ISD’s values include: student achievement, stakeholder collaboration, leadership development, respect for diversity, equity in access, perseverance and commitment, and continuous improvement.

FRISCO ISD

SIZE: 60,581 students, pre-K through 12 KEY ATTRIBUTES: “Student opportunities model”—Frisco ISD has multiple high schools that are smaller than those in many school districts in the area and of similar size, with enrollment up to approximately 2,100 students in grades 9-12. This provides many academic and extracurricular opportunities and allows students to be more involved and engaged at school. PHILOSOPHY: Our mission is to know every student by name and need. That means meeting the needs of the whole child, including students’ academic, physical, social, emotional, and mental health needs.

GARLAND ISD

SIZE: 56,000 students, pre-K through 12 KEY ATTRIBUTES: We’re a large suburban district offering big-city benefits with a small-town feel, true school choice, selective magnets, innovative programs, and strong communities. Garland ISD also offers a tradition of excellence dating back more than 100 years; Chromebooks for every middle school student and iPads for every high school student; free PSAT, SAT, AP, and IB tests; exceptional fine arts and extracurricular programs; a new natatorium opening in August 2019; a new, state-of the-art career and technical center with over a hundred career, training, and certification programs; and competitive athletics. PHILOSOPHY: An exceptional education has long been the focus of Garland ISD. Our top responsibility is to provide a rigorous, innovative educational experience that prepares all students for life in college, career, or the military, along with developing meaningful relationships between schools, families, and the community in a safe and secure environment.

GRAND PRAIRIE ISD

SIZE: 29,078 students, pre-K through 12 KEY ATTRIBUTES: Open enrollment, district of choice with numerous schools and programs of choice. Specializations and program offerings include international baccalaureate, dual language, early college high schools, district/charter partnership, in-district charters, full-day pre-K, employee childcare, after school care, early head start, career high school, single-gender schools, STEM, leadership, and fine arts academies. PHILOSOPHY: Grand Prairie ISD’s mission statement is: “We will ensure student success through engaging learning experiences, collaborative leadership, and a focus on maximizing student achievement.” The district’s vision statement is: “We are a learning community vigorously pursuing student success.”

HIGHLAND PARK ISD

SIZE: 6,834 students, pre-K through 12 KEY ATTRIBUTES: More than 97 percent of Highland Park ISD graduates attend college, with many attending the most prestigious universities in the country. Highland Park High School students consistently score well above the national and state average on college entrance exams. In the 2017-18 school year, Highland Park HS students scored a composite 27.5 on the ACT, 6.9 points above the state average. PHILOSOPHY: Highland Park ISD, grounded in tradition and with an unyielding commitment to excellence, academics, integrity, citizenship, and service, empowers each and every student to achieve post-secondary success.

HURST-EULESSBEDFORD ISD

SIZE: 23,364 students, pre-K through 12 KEY ATTRIBUTES: HEB ISD is one of only 61 school systems statewide to earn the Postsecondary Readiness Distinction. HEB ISD is consistently ranked among the top Texas school districts by Education Resource Group based on a combination of student performance and operating efficiency. The district attracts and retains the highest-quality teachers in the area through a reputation for excellence and the strongest teacher salaries in the region. HEB ISD has a history of leadership that prioritizes what’s best for students and leads intentional, continuous improvement district-wide; the school board was one of only eight governing teams selected as an inaugural Lone Star Governance Exemplar Cohort by the Texas Education Agency. Stellar fine arts programs have placed HEB ISD on the prestigious listing of the “Best Communities for Music Education” for 12 years in a row. PHILOSOPHY: The mission of

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DALLAS ISD

people who truly love, value, respect, and support their schools, teachers, and students. PHILOSOPHY: We believe our students are unique and valuable individuals capable of higher levels of learning. Therefore, our commitment is to maintain high expectations so that students take responsibility for their learning. DISD designs learning experiences to accommodate students’ mastery of tasks in different ways and at different times. We expect students to assume responsibility for behaviors and actions. Our faculty and staff provide each student the information, assistance, and support that enable him or her to develop educational and career goals. We believe every employee of the district has the responsibility to provide and support quality learning experiences for student success. Denison ISD focuses on our core business: student learning.

EDUCATION

School (6A). CISD has the highest percentage of high school students in Tarrant County enrolled in career and technical courses at the district’s B.R. Johnson Career and Tech Center. The district receives unprecedented community support from dedicated families, educators, corporations, and community leaders. PHILOSOPHY: Crowley ISD students benefit from a laser focus on excellence in education—academics, arts, athletics, and real-world applications. Our mission is to provide all students with excellence in education so they may achieve their full potential. Crowley ISD provides all students with a world-class, high-quality education, inspiring and empowering them to succeed in the global community.


THE DISTRICTS SPEAK

LIVING

EDUCATION

LAKE WORTH ISD

PHOTO: DALLAS ISD

the Hurst-Euless-Bedford ISD is to continue its proud tradition of excellence as a diverse, highperforming organization committed to ensuring each student is empowered today to excel tomorrow.

IRVING ISD

SIZE: 33,427 students, pre-K through 12 KEY ATTRIBUTES: Irving ISD’s distinguishing initiatives include its Lady Bird Johnson Middle School, the largest net-zero middle school (which produces as much energy as it consumes) in the world, and the district’s year-long Attendance Success Initiative designed to keep students in school. The district has partnerships with T-Mobile and Sprint, and is collaborating with Verizon to expand its Verizon Innovative Learning program for middle schools for 24/7 free access to technology in the classroom and at home. The district opened the Elise Walker Outdoor Learning Center to give students of all ages a chance to experience science outside the classroom. Irving ISD is home to the Robert Scott Pohl Planetarium at Nimitz HS, which is one of the first school planetariums in Texas. The district off ers the comprehensive and nationally recognized Signature Studies Program which off ers students career focused classes while in high school. The district also has three early childhood schools which off er half day and full-day, tuition-based pre-K. Irving ISD is only one of 11 districts in the state to off er H.I.P.P.Y (Home Instruction for Parents of Preschool Youngsters) to empower parents to become their child’s first teacher and to prepare them for preschool and beyond. Through Partners in Education, more than 200 companies and nonprofit organizations partner with Irving ISD schools and programs to provide time, talent, and treasure. PHILOSOPHY: District administrators and teachers are focused on maximizing the potential of every student.

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JOSHUA ISD

SIZE: 5,600 students, pre-K-12 KEY ATTRIBUTES: The district writes its own rigorous curriculum maps with learning objectives that are designed to challenge students at every grade level. Lessons are evaluated on a regular basis using the Continuous Improvement Model for student success. Students are encouraged to take Advanced Placement classes and to take advantage of the dual-credit program with Hill College. In order to better integrate technology, the Bring Your Own Device program has been implemented in grades 9 to 12. JISD off ers the opportunity for students to prepare for and take the GED, as well as implements a rigorous credit recovery program at the middle and high school levels. JISD provides full-day kindergarten at each campus. Full-time guidance counselors and licensed nurses are available at all campuses. For more information, go to joshuaisd.org. PHILOSOPHY: Joshua ISD will be a highly acclaimed model of educational excellence. Joshua ISD develops productive citizens of exceptional character who are lifelong learners.

KELLER ISD

SIZE: 35,000 students, pre-K through 12 KEY ATTRIBUTES: Keller ISD has been one of the fastest growing school districts in the state of Texas over the last 20 years. Of the district’s 42 campuses, 26 of them are less than 17 years old. KISD serves a diverse population composed primarily of students living in Keller and Fort Worth but includes families from seven other municipalities as well. The district stretches from I-35W to Colleyville and Hwy. 170 to Haltom City. PHILOSOPHY: The community of Keller ISD will educate our students to achieve their highest standards of performance by engaging them in exceptional opportunities.

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SIZE: 3,096 students, pre-K through 12 KEY ATTRIBUTES: Lake Worth ISD is a mid-sized district in northwest Tarrant County. The heart of the district is nestled between Lake Worth and Marine Creek Lake. The district serves the City of Lake Worth, along with small portions of Samson Park and Forth Worth. PHILOSOPHY: Lake Worth ISD believes that every student has worth, is capable of learning, and can achieve high standards; that education and communication are the shared responsibility of the student, school, home, and community; in inspiring each other and holding one another accountable in a safe, supportive, and collaborative environment; that all members of the school community are lifelong learners; and in the power of effective instruction, using sound research, data, and fidelity of practice.

LEWISVILLE ISD

SIZE: 52,000 students, pre-K through 12 KEY ATTRIBUTES: Lewisville ISD (LISD) consistently has one of the highest numbers of National Merit Scholars across the state. In addition, the district has six National Blue Ribbon Schools of Excellence, the highest designation a school can earn from the United States Department of Education. LISD has four 6A high schools, one 5A high school and two career centers. LISD provides access to many digital resources while maintaining sound data security and privacy practices. Because of this, Lewisville ISD is one of a small number of school districts across the nation, and one of three schools in Texas, to earn the distinguished Trusted Learning Environment Seal from CoSN. PHILOSOPHY: Lewisville ISD’s promise to our students, staff, parents, and the communities we serve is simple—all of our students enjoy thriving, productive lives in a future they create. The district ensures it fulfills its mission by designing and implementing a learning organization that provides engaging, innovative experiences every day. LISD’s vision is built on four cornerstones: student experience, community engagement, resource stewardship, and student learning. These guiding principles underscore our commitment to real innovation and limitless opportunities for our students.

LITTLE ELM ISD

SIZE: 7,768 students, pre-K through 12 KEY ATTRIBUTES: Little Elm ISD offers a smaller community feel with big opportunities for students and families. We are a one-high school district where we are all Lobos. This unique characteristic sets us apart from other districts in our area. We offer a multitude of opportunities for our students, families, and community to explore a robust educational experience. PHILOSOPHY: The Mission of Little Elm ISD is: to engage, equip, and

empower each student to realize their full potential. The vision of the Little Elm ISD Community is to be “THE destination district.”

LOVEJOY ISD

SIZE: 4,400, pre-K through 12 KEY ATTRIBUTES: Lovejoy ISD is one of four school districts in Texas achieving the high rating of an A and 97 percent. Lovejoy ISD will always be a district with just one high school, with a projected enrollment not to exceed 1,900 students. Lovejoy is a Pre-AP-for-all school district and requires each senior to complete a senior project to satisfy the Lovejoy ISD graduation requirements. PHILOSOPHY: The mission of the Lovejoy ISD is as follows: A school in partnership with parents and community, committed to providing opportunities for students to reach their academic and personal potential in a changing world. In Lovejoy we work to ensure that each student is: intellectually equipped, open to the challenges of learning, well-rounded, fair and respectful of others, engaged in a healthy lifestyle, and working for justice through community service.

MANSFIELD ISD

SIZE: 35,256 students, pre-K through 12 KEY ATTRIBUTES: Mansfield ISD is a Texas Education Agency “A” Rated School District. Mansfield ISD is a highly sought-after school district, and the community recognizes that it’s a great place to live, learn, and teach. The district spans across Johnson and Tarrant County and encompasses sections of Mansfield, Arlington, Grand Prairie, and small portions of Burleson, Fort Worth, Venus, Alvarado, and Kennedale. PHILOSOPHY: Mansfield ISD is a destination district committed to excellence. The mission of Mansfield ISD is to inspire and educate students to be productive citizens. The values of the district are: students first, continuous improvement, integrity, communication, positive relationships, and resiliency. Read more about the district’s Vision 2020 Strategic Plan.

MAYPEARL ISD

SIZE: 1,165 students, pre-K through 12 KEY ATTRIBUTES: Maypearl ISD is located west of Waxahachie and south of Midlothian in scenic Ellis County. Maypearl ISD is a smaller district that offers great opportunities for our students without losing the hometown environment. We may be small, but we have a big future ahead! PHILOSOPHY: Our staff work hard to teach and care for each of our students like they are our own. We have a very positive and supportive environment among our parents and community. The mission of Maypearl ISD, a tradition-rich community, is to cultivate the unique potential of all students through innovative education. The vision of Maypearl ISD, where all learners will embrace their

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THE DISTRICTS SPEAK

MESQUITE ISD

SIZE: 40,000 students, pre-K through 12 KEY ATTRIBUTES: A cultural shift is underway in the Mesquite ISD community thanks to Mesquite ISD’s ReadPlayTalk (RPT) initiative. RPT is our research-based, communitysupported initiative to champion early childhood literacy among our students. Through volunteer, business, organization, and campus partnerships, we

SPRING 2019

MIDLOTHIAN ISD

SIZE: 9,410 students, pre-K through 12 KEY ATTRIBUTES: In Midlothian ISD, we believe our culture is the heart and soul of our schools. Our culture provides more than a legacy of excellence— it’s something much more meaningful. Our culture speaks to how much we truly care for every child, teacher, and staff member, along with their families. We are passionate about our students and learning. We treat each person with respect, and kindness always matters in every interaction. We believe in celebrating the power of diversity. Honoring and celebrating every individual is powerful. It’s where heart and kindness fosters a family environment. Because we see each person as an individual, learning is personalized, resulting in achieving new heights. PHILOSOPHY: In Midlothian ISD, we inspire excellence today to change the world tomorrow. We believe that safe, engaging, rigorous, and diverse learning environments provide the best opportunity for students to reach their fullest potential. We believe a high quality staff with appropriate resources is essential to creating educational experiences that promote student success. We believe that eff ective communication, purposeful collaboration, and strong partnerships create an atmosphere of trust and a

MILLSAP ISD

SIZE: 1,010 students, pre-K through 12 KEY ATTRIBUTES: Millsap ISD is a small, rural community with traditional values where students’ needs are met on an individual basis and we do whatever it takes to make each child’s dreams come true. Your child, their dreams, our mission. PHILOSOPHY: Every decision is based on the district mission to inspire, develop, and educate every student in a safe environment to be a productive, responsible citizen prepared for lifelong success. We value the development of the whole child, community/ parental partnerships, and mutual respect; value positive relationships with students, staff, and parents; believe student success is our ultimate measure; and practice ethical behavior and personal integrity.

NORTHWEST ISD

SIZE: 24,200, pre-K through 12 KEY ATTRIBUTES: Northwest ISD is uniquely situated in Fort Worth and serves families in more than 14 different communities, spanning 234 square miles, and parts of three counties (Denton, Tarrant, and Wise). As one of the fastest growing school districts in the area, demographic projections show enrollment in NISD will increase by 6,800 students during the next five years, exceeding an enrollment of 30,900 by 2023-2024 and reaching 38,000 by 2028-2029. As a fast-growth district, NISD strategically plans for new facilities that enhance the student learning environment. PHILOSOPHY: Northwest ISD, in collaboration with students, families, communities, and global partners, will engage in a culture of learning that prepares all students to confidently navigate their future. Built on a dream to provide children with the best educational program possible, Northwest ISD was formed in 1948 when four single-schoolhouse districts joined together. Now 70 years later, our community’s belief to put kids first and provide the best education possible is still evident.

PLANO ISD

SIZE: 53,057 students, pre-K through 12 KEY ATTRIBUTE: Plano ISD is ranked among the top school districts in Texas and the nation. Plano ISD has been recognized among the best places to work, most recently “Best Place to Work in Plano” by

PHOTO: DISD

SIZE: 24,700 students, pre-K through 12 KEY ATTRIBUTES: McKinney ISD is one of the few school districts in Texas that establishes middle and high school attendancezone boundaries based on socioeconomic factors. This approach allows the district to maintain greater socioeconomic parity among its secondary schools, and this results in greater opportunities for all of our students. MISD boasts a number of innovative career and technology education programs. The district off ers an aviation program and is one of the few public high school programs in the country featuring an FAA-approved flight simulator upon which students can log flight hours toward their pilot certification. Aviation course off erings prepare students to pursue careers as pilots or aviation mechanics. The district also off ers a dual language program aff ording students an opportunity to become fluent in both English and Spanish at the conclusion of the program. The program is currently off ered at Caldwell Elementary in all grade levels. The classes at Caldwell comprise approximately onehalf native English speakers and one-half native Spanish speakers. Students learn the academic curriculum through both languages simultaneously. Students serve as language models for each other, while accelerating their learning. PHILOSOPHY: We are a cohesive, diverse community providing engaging learning experiences for all. We will provide engaging learning experiences so students can become effective communicators, quality contributors, and socially responsible citizens.

strong sense of community vital to student achievement.

LIVING

MCKINNEY ISD

are encouraging parents and guardians to read, play, and talk with their children from birth. Our goal by 2020: all third-graders will be on a grade 3 reading level. Reaching this milestone statistically quadruples the odds for these students to graduate high school. In August 2021, MISD will debut a choice career high school. Unlike the district’s traditional high schools, the choice high school will not off er extracurricular programs like fine arts and athletics; rather, the curriculum will be intensely focused on academics and career or college preparation. Students from across the district and every feeder pattern will be allowed to attend this new high school if they select one of the paths of study off ered there. PHILOSOPHY: The mission of the Mesquite ISD is to educate all students and empower them to expand their opportunities to enrich our community. Mesquite ISD operates within a set of four core values: people first; cultivating culture; continuous learning; and commitment to community.

EDUCATION

unique potential to excel, is for students to serve others and own their future. At Maypearl ISD, we value: every student as our first priority; building relationships; safe, secure environments; collaboration and teamwork for all; and a commitment to excellence.

CHOOSING A DISTRICT In Texas, public school districts operate independently and are governed by elected school boards that implement state guidelines through a selection of instructional programs, curriculum, and local expectations that often exceed state minimums. Districts are governed by an independently elected school board of trustees that hires a superintendent as CEO; sets a district philosophy (vision and mission) and local policies; selects a curriculum within the state guidelines; and sets the ISD tax rate, budget, and district boundaries. Here’s what you need to consider in finding the right school district for you. THE DISTRICT AND SCHOOL’S PHILOSOPHY VS. YOUR FAMILY’S INTERESTS AND NEEDS > > > > >

Vision, mission, goals Size of school and class size Grade-level alignment (K-4, K-5, K-6, etc.) Curriculum variations Parent engagement

STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT AND PERFORMANCE (INCLUDING STAFF AND TEACHER PERFORMANCE)

The Dallas County area education coalition, COMMIT!, and its partners offer a way of best assessing student achievement within schools and districts. Find it online at commit2dallas.org. PROGRAM OFFERINGS AND COMPATIBILITY WITH YOUR CHILD’S INTERESTS AND NEEDS > Athletics > Career and technology > Dual credit > Extracurricular activities > Fine arts > Gifted and talented > Performing arts > Special education DISTRICT CHARACTERISTICS Each district has a unique profile. Visiting district websites and reading the expanded district profiles at mydallasmove.com will reveal their distinct features and offerings.

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THE DISTRICTS SPEAK Star Local Media. Strong academic and extracurricular programs make Plano ISD home to a number of state, national, and international winners and champions in fine arts, athletics, science, and career and technical education. PHILOSOPHY: Plano ISD schools empower students to be able to adapt to new learning and career opportunities throughout their lives, and collaborate with and contribute to the global community, and to be disciplined and creative in their thinking. The district’s mission is to provide an excellent education for each student. District goals include ensuring continued improvement in student success, and ensuring efficient use of financial resources.

PROSPER ISD

SIZE: 14,600 students, pre-K through 12 KEY ATTRIBUTES: Prosper ISD is the fastest-growing school district in DFW with enrollment expected to more than double by 2025. Prosper ISD currently offers a wide variety of CTE and STEM options, G/T and AP offerings, a comprehensive SPED program, and an unrivaled dual language program through middle school. PHILOSOPHY: Prosper ISD believes that students are first in all decisions. We value their success and wellbeing. Innovation in curriculum and technology is important and to be intentional in creating opportunities that will propel students forward. We believe in recruiting, hiring, and retaining employees with the Prosper heart. We also value the importance of a supportive and demanding community and try to protect our small-town feel. We have a commitment to the Graduate Profile and in providing a safe and nurturing environment for students and staff. We are grounded by tradition and soaring to new beginnings.

RED OAK ISD

SIZE: 5,900 students, pre-K through 12 KEY ATTRIBUTES: Red Oak ISD is a highly acclaimed district currently ranked top 3 percent in the nation and No. 1 for teachers in Ellis County by Niche.com. At the state accountability level, we received a B rating with 11 distinctions. We are a small, suburban district covering 42 square miles just 20 miles south of Dallas, in north Ellis County. We serve 5,900 students from Red Oak, Glenn Heights, Ovilla, Pecan Hill, and Oak Leaf, with seven campuses and over 900 employees. Highly ranked for diversity and safety, we off er excellent academic and extracurricular programs toward our mission of Realizing Our Individual Students’ Dreams (ROISD). PHILOSOPHY: All Red Oak ISD students and staff strive to incorporate the 4 Talons of the Hawk – Academic Readiness, GRIT (Growth, Resilience, Integrity, Tenacity), Character and Service toward our mission of

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Realizing Our Individual Students’ Dreams (ROISD).

RICHARDSON ISD

SIZE: 39,000 students, pre-K through 12 KEY ATTRIBUTES: Richardson ISD is an established, successful, tradition-rich school district with commitment to the success of all students. Smaller, neighborhood schools with history of parent and community involvement and support put a strong emphasis on college and career readiness & STEM. Richardson ISD’s offerings include: school-wide enrichment model blending gifted instruction and techniques into general curriculum for all students; focus on differentiated instruction for each student based on individual learning profile and understanding of curriculum; commitment to smaller, neighborhood schools; magnet school options at all grade levels; wide range of career and technical education offerings across many industries; high community expectations and exceptional community support for schools; a wide range of co- and extracurricular options; investment in teachers and staff development for professional and paraprofessional employees; emphasis on school safety and security. PHILOSOPHY: Richardson ISD’s mission is to serve and prepare all students for their global future. Whether students will continue their education in college or are interested in entering the workforce, RISD seeks to equip all graduates with the knowledge, skills, and ability to confidently succeed in whatever path they choose.

ROCKWALL ISD

SIZE: 16,536 students, pre-K through 12 KEY ATTRIBUTES: Rockwall ISD is composed of 14 elementary schools, two high schools, one alternative high school, and one college and career academy. The Dr. Gene Burton College & Career Academy, which opened in 2018, is a vital part of the STEM program for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math. The academy offers pathways designed to provide students with an opportunity to explore career options and professional certifications. Rockwall ISD’s high-school graduation rate is 97.6 percent; 88 percent of the district’s students met STAAR standards. The average years of experience for each Rockwall ISD teacher is 12.4 years. PHILOSOPHY: Rockwall ISD empowers learners to embody independence, value relationships, and achieve excellence as thriving members of a dynamic global community.

ROYSE CITY ISD

SIZE: 6,254 students, pre-K through 12 KEY ATTRIBUTES: RCISD encompasses 74.48 square miles and claims a tri-county boundary: Rockwall, Collin, and Hunt Counties.

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FOR EXPANDED DISTRICT PROFILES, VISIT SAYYESTODALLAS.COM. All campuses in the district are accredited by the Texas Education Agency and our secondary campuses by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. From kindergarten to high school, diverse programs are available to support the regular curriculum along with gifted and talented and special needs students. Royse City ISD is located in a rural-but-growing area located 30 miles east of Dallas. PHILOSOPHY: The mission of Royse City ISD is to provide meaningful and innovative educational experiences that cultivate a passion for learning. We believe that every student is capable and deserves to learn each day in order to meet his or her unique potential; that building relationships is key to educating every student; that uniquely meaningful work engages students in profound learning; that Royse City ISD will prepare students for successful, meaningful, and fulfilling futures; and in upholding the traditions and values of the district and community

WAXAHACHIE ISD

SIZE: 8,900 students, pre-K through 12 KEY ATTRIBUTES: Waxahachie ISD is home to one traditional high school, one early college high school, three junior high campuses, eight elementary schools, an early learning (pre-K) center, and an alternative education campus. Waxahachie ISD’s mission is “excellence in education,” and the district consistently outperforms the state averages in STAAR testing and SAT/ACT scores. In its state-of-the-art Career and Technical Education center, WISD provides training in 15 of the 16 career clusters. The district’s fine arts programs are among the best in the state: Waxahachie ISD is home to this year’s TMEA honor band. In addition, WISD is a top athletic competitor, even in the “district of doom,” which many say is the toughest 6A district in the state. PHILOSOPHY: We believe that meaningful engagement and relationship building are essential for student success; that students have unique qualities and deserve a unique education; that parents, educators, and the community guide each student in designing and fulfilling his or her educational vision; and that every student deserves the opportunity to learn through success, failure, and discovery. We also believe that change and growth occur best in a stimulating and innovative learning environment; that students learning to voice their individual thoughts is imperative for progress in both themselves and the community, and

that all students deserve to be taught by highly effective teachers who are committed to professional growth and passionate about learner success.

WHITE SETTLEMENT ISD

SIZE: 6,900 students, pre-K through 12 KEY ATTRIBUTES: White Settlement ISD, home of the Fightin’ Brewer Bears, offers a hometown, community atmosphere with all the benefits of city living. The district is comprised of nine schools and has nearly 900 employees. WSISD offers four elementary campuses (one of which will be a certified STEAM Academy in 2019-20), a Fine Arts Academy, an intermediate school (grades 5 and 6), a middle school (grades 7 and 8), a high school (grades 9 through 12), and an alternative campus. WSISD is a growing suburban school district that serves more than 6,900 students who reside in the City of White Settlement and a portion of the City of Fort Worth. PHILOSOPHY: WSISD fosters a culture of excellence in which all Brewer Bears are empowered to be innovators and leaders of tomorrow through engaging, hands-on instruction, the latest technology, and extracurricular programs that meet the needs and interests of every student.

WYLIE ISD

SIZE: 16,500 students, pre-K through 12 KEY ATTRIBUTES: For more than 100 years, Wylie ISD has emphasized academic excellence through outstanding educational opportunities and award-winning extracurricular activities, all based on community values. And as we continue through the 21st Century, we remain focused on ensuring our students are prepared for a lifetime of success through a world-class education. Wylie ISD offers an outstanding academic program with a focus on character education beginning in elementary school. The curriculum includes a wide range of programs from culinary arts to television production. The district emphasizes technology in the classroom and as a communications tool for parents. PHILOSOPHY: The Wylie Way is a movement in our schools that fosters responsible, caring, and ethical young people through an emphasis on the core values of the Wylie ISD community. The core values are fundamental beliefs of Wylie ISD. They are the guiding beliefs that dictate the behavior and actions of our employees and students. They include: respect and responsibility, caring and giving, grit and preparation, and gratitude and celebration.

SPRING 2019


CHARTER SCHOOLS

LIFE SCHOOL

SIZE: 5,600 students at eight locations in North Texas KEY ATTRIBUTES: Life School is a tuition-free open enrollment public charter school that offers a wide array of academic, athletic, and extra-curricular activities to develop the whole person. As character educators, we help to shape the character of students so they are ready to learn, ready to lead, and ready for life. PHILOSOPHY: The mission of Life School is to develop leaders with life skills through strong academics, character training, and partnerships with parents and the community. Our vision is to develop leaders by providing excellence in education to enhance the communities we serve.

LUMIN EDUCATION

SIZE: 300 students. Students range from 3- to 6-years-old and grades 1 through 3. KEY ATTRIBUTES: Lumin Education provides Association Montessori Internationale-certified teachers, before- and after-school care, emphasis on parent involvement, and free public educations. PHILOSOPHY: Lumin Education is guided by the Montessori philosophy of education. That philosophy is rooted in the conviction that, unless severely impaired, “children naturally have the same drive to develop in a cognitive sense as they SPRING 2019

THE PEGASUS SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES

SIZE: 70 students, K-12 KEY ATTRIBUTES: Located in Downtown Dallas, Pegasus School of Liberal Arts & Sciences is a tuition-free public school serving an ethnically, racially, and economically diverse student population. Pegasus School’s mission is to educate individuals in the liberal arts and sciences in order to prepare them for productive and meaningful lives in an increasingly complex world. Pegasus’ vision is to be an interdisciplinary public school committed to continuous improvement with a focus on developing and educating serious learners. PHILOSOPHY: A well-rounded liberal arts education provides a strong foundation preparing students for meaningful futures by enhancing students’ problem solving skills and helping them develop strong character and self-discipline.

RICHLAND COLLEGIATE HIGH SCHOOL

SIZE: 617, students in grades 11 and 12 KEY ATTRIBUTES: Serving Dallas County and its six contiguous counties, Richland CHS is an open enrollment charter school on the campus of Richland College,. The program focuses on the college experience. All classes are taught by college professors in college classrooms with college adults. Students earn their associate degrees by graduation. PHILOSOPHY: The educational philosophy of the Richland Collegiate High School rests upon the maxim that a successful education program addresses the whole student. A mind-body-spirit approach is designed to enlighten a student’s mind while enriching that his or her spirit through learning experiences attuned to skills and abilities; to best use those abilities; and to develop each student’s intellectual, emotional, and social foundation. At Richland College, this philosophy is summarized as “Teaching, Learning, Community Building.”

TEXANS CAN ACADEMIES SIZE: 3,379 students across eight campuses; two in Fort Worth and six in Dallas. Grades 9 through 12. KEY ATTRIBUTES: Texans Can

Academies provides a safe and healthy learning environment to students who may not have succeeded elsewhere. Each classroom is home to a rich environment fostering reading and thinking skills, bringing struggling students up to grade level and beyond and creating confidence and a positive outlook. PHILOSOPHY: Texans Can Academies’ mission is to provide the highest quality education for all students in order to ensure economic independence. Studentcentered learning, a rigorous curriculum based on reading and thinking skills, and a sense of urgency in fulfilling every aspect of our mission mark our core values. Reading, we believe, is the key to empowerment, personal fulfillment, success, and employment; personal responsibility, character, values, and passion lead to good citizenship; and learning is best accompanied in a nurturing yet structured environment.

TRINITY BASIN PREPARATORY

SIZE: 3,550 students, four campuses, pre-K3 through grade 8 KEY ATTRIBUTES: Trinity Basin Preparatory is a free public charter school of choice that has served the Dallas-Fort Worth community for over 20 years. As a public charter school, TBP meets all accountability and instructional standards as set by the Texas Education Agency. TBP meets these standards by providing students with a structured learning environment that is individualized for their specific learning needs. Our classrooms are smaller, compared to traditional public schools, and generally have fewer than 22 students. Uniforms are required, and strict discipline is enforced to help ensure students feel safe and free to participate in the learning experience. PHILOSOPHY: The mission of Trinity Basin Preparatory is to inspire every student to do more, expect more, and be more. To make this mission a reality, every student and employee of Trinity Basin Preparatory is expected to exemplify the following core values of a TITAN: 1. TRUTHFUL: We seek and speak the truth. We operate with integrity and honesty. 2. INNOVATIVE: We are creative and use resourcefulness in solving problems. 3. TENACIOUS: We are unshakable, determined, and we possess true grit. 4. ACCOUNTABLE: We are transparent in our actions and are accountable to each other. 5. NURTURING: We build

relationships and deeply care about all members of the TBP family. UPLIFT EDUCATION SIZE: 18,500 across 40 schools, pre-K through 12 KEY ATTRIBUTES: Uplift provides a whole scholar approach that sees each learner as an individual and supports their academic, social, and emotional well-being through curriculum and academics, a nurturing school community, supportive families, and unmatched college preparation. PHILOSOPHY: Uplift Education is the largest public charter school network in North Texas. We have grown to a network serving more than 18,500 scholars in pre-K through 12th grade at 40 schools in North Texas. Uplift’s mission is to create and sustain public schools of excellence that empower students to reach their highest potential in college and the marketplace, and that inspire in students a life-long love of learning, achievement, and service. Each school provides free, college-preparatory education in a community that has limited high quality public education options. Our goal is to completely close the achievement gap between students, regardless of their ethnic or socio-economic background, while ensuring that 100 percent of our students graduate and enroll in college. Uplift’s big goal is for 70 percent of its graduates to earn a college degree within six years.

LIVING

SIZE: 3,119 students, grades Pre-K through 12 KEY ATTRIBUTES: KIPP public charter schools are a non-profit network of college-preparatory schools educating students Pre-K through grade 12. KIPP Texas is dedicated to preparing students in educationally underserved communities for college success and choice-filled lives. KIPP Texas is part of the national KIPP network of college-preparatory public charter schools. KIPP schools are part of the free public school system and enrollment is open to all students. PHILOSOPHY: We envision that KIPP Texas—DFW will have a transformational impact on the community of Dallas-Fort Worth. It will prove what is possible to city leaders and education entities and set an example of excellence that can be emulated in other school districts. It is our goal that KIPP Texas—DFW students will serve as role models to their families and communities. We aspire for our college graduates to return to their communities, give back, and demonstrate the impact that education has had on their lives.

do in a physical sense. The desire of an elementary student to master equivalent fractions can be just as strong as the desire of the infant to crawl, unless the desire has been diminished by the circumstances of the child’s life.”

EDUCATION

KIPP TEXAS— DALLAS-FORT WORTH

WINFREE ACADEMY CHARTER SCHOOL

SIZE: 2,800 students, grades 9 through12 KEY ATTRIBUTES: Winfree Academy is a free, public high school that has been serving the Dallas-Fort Worth community for over 18 years. With six Dallas-Fort Worth campuses located in Irving, Lewisville, Richardson, Grand Prairie, North Richland Hills, and Dallas, we work with learners from over 86 ISDs. Learner ages range from 14-26. With four-hour school days, Winfree Academy meets the educational needs of learners who prefer a non-traditional way of learning and thrive on individualized instruction. This makes Winfree a great choice for learners who are self-driven, need credit recovery, or are unable to attend high school during traditional school hours. PHILOSOPHY: Winfree Academy Charter School’s mission is to create a safe, supportive environment that educates, motivates, and trains learners so they can graduate from high school prepared with the skills and abilities needed for higher education, employment, and life.

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FAQ: NAVIGATING THE SYSTEM

WHAT IS THE SCHOOL YEAR CALENDAR? Public schools begin the last week in August and include 180 days of instruction per year. Each district sets its own holiday calendars, typically including winter and spring breaks. Testing typically takes place in the spring for public schools. Private schools typically start earlier in August, and testing takes place in January or February.

I JUST HAD A BABY. HOW DO I FIND A DAY CARE OR PRESCHOOL? To search for a licensed child care center or home, go to the Department of Family and Protective Services website (dfps. state.tx.us). Other resources include DFW Child (dfwchild. com) and Child Care Group (childcaregroup.org).

WHAT ARE MY OPTIONS FOR PRIVATE OR PAROCHIAL SCHOOL? HOW ABOUT HOME SCHOOLING? You have many options. Explore tea.state.tx.us for information on charter schools and home schooling. See the map in this section of the book and check out tepsac.org for information on private schools in your area.

MY CHILD IS READY FOR KINDERGARTEN. WHAT DO I NEED TO KNOW ABOUT ENROLLING HER? Kindergarten is encouraged but not required in Texas. Students turning 6 as of Sept. 1 are required to attend school. To enroll your child in any Texas school, you must have: > Birth certificate or other proof of identity > Immunization records > Student records from recently attended school > Proof of residency in the district

DOES TEXAS FOLLOW THE NATIONAL COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS? No. Texas does not follow the Common Core State Standards program. State of Texas learning standards are called the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS). Every grade level and every subject have learning standards that drive curriculum development. WILL MY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL STUDENT NEED TO RETEST FOR GIFTED AND TALENTED?

Yes, most likely. You’ll need to confirm with your new district and school.

learning opportunities. You’ll need to confirm with your individual district and school to be sure.

WILL MY MIDDLE SCHOOL STUDENT HAVE TO TEST-IN FOR HIS GRADE LEVEL? HOW ARE THE GRADE LEVELS ALIGNED IN TEXAS? No. If your child has passed the sixth grade in your state, he or she will start in the seventh grade in Texas. Grade-level alignment varies by district.

WILL TRANSPORTATION TO AND FROM SCHOOL BE PROVIDED FOR MY CHILD? It depends. Bus service is provided to students living more than two miles away from their schools. Transport is also provided in cases where students might face hazardous conditions, such as crossing a major roadway or no crossing guard. Confirm with your new school.

MY SON WILL BE STARTING HIGH SCHOOL RIGHT AFTER WE MOVE. WILL HE BE ABLE TO JOIN THE BASKETBALL TEAM? Each district schedules its own tryouts, summer practices, and calendars. Speak with your new school to determine eligibility. MY DAUGHTER WILL BE STARTING 10TH GRADE. WILL SHE LOSE HER CREDITS TOWARD GRADUATION? Probably not. Meet with your new school counselor as soon as possible to discuss graduation requirements. MY CHILD HAS ALWAYS TAKEN AP CLASSES. WILL THEY BE OFFERED IN TEXAS? WHAT ABOUT DUAL CREDIT? Yes. Most districts in the DFW region offer AP classes, International Baccalaureate programs, and dual-credit

MY SON HAS AUTISM. WILL THE DISTRICT PROVIDE SERVICES UNTIL THE AGE OF 22? Yes. Your son will continue to be educated under an IEP as dictated by federal and state law. Get in touch with the district as soon as you can to ensure a seamless transition. IF MY CHILD WANTS TO START COLLEGE AT A PUBLIC TEXAS SCHOOL, DO WE HAVE TO PROVE TEXAS RESIDENCY? Yes. To be classified as a Texas resident and be entitled to pay resident tuition, a person must establish a domicile and maintain continuous residence in Texas for 12 months preceding the school census date.

As we

REIMAGINE SCHOOL,

your student puts their learning into action.

Visit us online at parishepiscopal.org

or contact our Admission office at 972.852.8737

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SPRING 2019


Two Twoworld-class world-classcurricula. curricula. One Onelife-enriching life-enrichingexperience. experience.

® ® The The Montessori Montessori Baccalaureate Baccalaureate Education Education + International + International

at Alcuin at Alcuin cultivates cultivates thethe unique unique potential potential of students of students from from 18 months 18 months to 18 to years 18 years old.old.

A vibrant, A vibrant, nuturing, nuturing, and non-sectarian and non-sectarian academic academic community community serving serving students students from from toddler toddler to 12th to grade, 12th grade, Alcuin Alcuin School School provides provides robust robust preparation preparation for life. forWith life. With faculty faculty support, support, Alcuin Alcuin students students use critical use critical thinking thinking to question to question the status the status quo, are quo,eager are eager to embrace to embrace change, change, and are andwell are prepared well prepared for their for their futurefuture as leaders as leaders in a global in a global society. society.

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TRANSFORMING THE WORLD BY FAITH, EDUCATION, AND SERVICE

St. Philip’s School & Community Center is a noted private Christian school in Dallas. With more than 70 years of educational excellence, we are committed to developing bright and compassionate leaders of tomorrow. To us, the “and” is the most important word in our name. By combining an innovative school with a thriving community center, we have an environment where the whole is greater than the sum of its parts.

To learn more, visit stphilips1600.org or call 214-421-5221

Located minutes from downtown Dallas, our school provides robust academics, project based learning, differentiated instruction, STEM, robotics, and fine arts to students from PreK2 to 6th grade (ages 2–12). St. Philip’s offers full day PK2-PK4.


EDUCATION

THE BEST HIGH SCHOOLS Fifty-one schools in the Dallas-Fort Worth region were featured in U.S. News & World Report’s 2018 America’s Best High Schools list. The ranking of the best 2,000 public high schools in the nation identified those that have proven the most effective in turning out college-ready graduates based on variables such as graduation rate, college acceptance rate, SAT/ACT scores, students enrolled in AP/IB/AICE courses, and others.

CITY

NATIONAL RANK

11

School For The Talented And Gifted (TAG)

Dallas

761

Young Women's Leadership Academy

Fort Worth

13

School of Science and Engineering Magnet

Dallas

799

Harmony School of Innovation - Forth Worth

Fort Worth

49

Imagine International Academy of North Texas

McKinney

801

Fort Worth Academy of Fine Arts

Fort Worth

79

Westlake Academy

Westlake

860

Creekview HS

Carrollton

129

Irma Lerma Rangel Young Women's Leadership School

Dallas

879

Uplift Luna Preparatory Secondary School

Dallas

133

Booker T. Washington HS for the Performing and Visual Arts

Dallas

905

A Maceo Smith New Tech HS

Dallas

134

Uplift Education - North Hills Prep HS

Irving

922

Wakeland HS

Frisco

139

Uplift Education - Summit International Preparatory

Arlington

936

Richardson HS

146

Uplift Williams Preparatory

Dallas

945

Kathlyn Joy Gilliam Collegiate Academy

Dallas

170

Highland Park HS

Dallas

1023

Dr. Wright L Lassiter Jr Early College HS

Dallas

198

Judge Barefoot Sanders Law Magnet

Dallas

1039

Centennial HS

Frisco

208

Uplift Peak Preparatory HS

Dallas

1082

Keller HS

Keller

231

Lovejoy HS

Lucas

1091

Smith HS

Carrollton

333

Founders Classical Academy

Lewisville

1136

Harmony School of Nature and Athletics

Dallas

337

Harmony Science Academy - Carrollton

Carrollton

1161

Independence H S

Frisco

389

School of Health Professions

Dallas

1223

Flower Mound HS

Flower Mound

390

School of Business and Management

Dallas

1224

Heritage HS

434

Rosie Sorrells School of Education and Social Services HS

Dallas

1254

International Leadership of Texas Garland HS

516

Liberty HS

Frisco

1291

Aledo HS

526

Coppell HS

Coppell

1359

Texas Academy of Biomedical

528

Harmony Science Academy - Dallas

Dallas

1405

Trinidad Garza Early College At Mountain View

Dallas

546

Grand Prairie Fine Arts Academy

Grand Prairie

1451

Woodrow Wilson HS

Dallas

627

McKinney Boyd HS

McKinney

1483

L. D. Bell HS

Hurst

628

Harmony Science Academy - Euless

Euless

1668

North Garland HS

705

McKinney North HS

McKinney

1704

Uplift Hampton Preparatory HS

1744

John Dubiski Career HS

SCHOOL

CITY

Richardson

Frisco Garland Aledo Fort Worth

Garland Dallas Grand Prairie

Source: U.S. News & World Report SPRING 2019

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NATIONAL RANK


EDUCATION

PICK YOUR PATH

FINAL PickYourPath-DallasRegionalChamber-Generic Print.pdf 1 7/18/2014 4:00:26 PM

LIVING

This step-by-step guide will help you move down the path to High School graduation. Check off milestones as you go to keep track of your progress.

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P O ST END

There was a time that making a career choice came after high school graduation— sometimes well into college for some students. But Foundation High School Program requirements for 2018 graduates mean that students in Texas now select one of five careerrelated pathways at the end of the eighth grade. It’s a big decision, which is why the Dallas Regional Chamber launched Pick Your Path, step-by-step guidelines designed to identify the requirements and track milestones for an endorsement in one of five areas of study: STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics), business and industry, public service, arts and humanities, or multidisciplinary studies. The effort launched in the Dallas Independent School District in the spring of 2014 in both English and Spanish and is being used in other school districts as well.

D A L L A S REG I O N N E W C O M E R + R E L O C AT I O N G U I D E

TH

AN

OOL SCH

SE CONFIRM FINAL COUR LE DU HE SC & N IO SELECT

GET YOUR SCHEDULE

C

AN

E

OR TH

AIM F

PL ISHED

GU

DISTIN

E

JUNIOR YEAR SPRING: TAKE SAT/ACT/TSI TESTS

JUNIOR &

EARS:

SENIOR Y

YEA SENIORAT LEA O APPLY T

SPRING 2019


WHAT IS THE FOUNDATION HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAM?

WHAT IS AN ENDORSEMENT? EDUCATION

An endorsement is a broad area of interest that guides a student’s path of study through his or her high school years. All eighth-grade students select this plan to complete the required credits for graduation.

The Foundation High School Program is a core set of classes in the areas of math, English, science, social studies, foreign language, fine arts, physical education, and electives that all students must complete as a foundation to graduate from high school in Texas.

LOOK FOR VIDEOS ON JOBS

TRY CAREER CRUISING!

LIVING

TALK WITH ADULTS ABOUT THEIR JOBS

NSIDER YOUR OPTIONS AFTER HIGH SCHOOL

RESEARCH COLLEGES ST EM

BUS IN

VISIT HIGH

SCHOOL WEBSITES

ATTEND COLLEGE & CAREER OPEN HOUSES AND FAIRS

ESS AND IN

DUSTR

Y

APPLY TO

PUBLIC SERVICES

HIGH SCHOOL

IES ANIT UDIES M U T H YS AND AR ART N I PL SCI I D LTI MU

CAN YOU EA

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INDUSTRY C

ERTIFICATE

LAN!

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LLEGE AST 3 CO

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PICK YOUR

ENDORSEMENT CLASSES

RY E INDUST COMPLETFICATIONS CERTI

: SENIOR YEAR SPRING A FS FA APPLY FOR

LL D ENRO N A D E CEPT HOOL GET AC OUR NEW SC IN Y

APPLY F

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GRADUATE WITH AN

ENDORSEMENT! SPRING 2019

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PRIVATE SCHOOLS

LIVING

EDUCATION

35

38

41

35E

121

36

35E

23 1 40 52

20

121

114

35W

3 47

29 43

45

35W

183

820

48

37

33

75

39 44

21 288 5 32 10 30 25 31 35 11 635 6 24 7 12 9 4 2 17 22 75

26

19 78 16 53

30

51

161 80

12

30

15 13

42 27

18 49

14 34

50

360

175

20 20

46 35E 35W

LEGEND PRIVATE SCHOOL 45

TOP 50 PRIVATE SCHOOL (Ranked by tuition)

PRIVATE SCHOOLS ( RANKED BY TUITION )

1 Fusion Academy— Plano, $35,400 2 Fusion Academy— Dallas, $35,400 3 Fusion Academy— Southlake, $35,400 4 St. Mark's School of Texas, $31,750 5 Greenhill School, $31,675 6 The Hockaday School, $31,620 7 Alcuin School, $30,596 8 Shelton School, $30,100 9 The Episcopal School of Dallas, $29,495 10 Parish Episcopal School, $29,435 11 Yavneh Academy, $28,000 12 The Winston School Dallas, $27,905 13 Fort Worth Country Day, $24,260 14 Trinity Valley School, $24,190

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15 All Saints Episcopal School Fort Worth, $23,440 16 Lakehill Preparatory School, $23,400 17 The Cambridge School of Dallas, $23,100 18 The Oakridge School, $22,950 19 Dallas Academy, $22,300 20 The St. Anthony School, $22,000 21 Trinity Christian Academy Addison, $21,980 22 Ursuline Academy of Dallas, $21,900 23 Prestonwood Christian Academy, $21,835 24 Bending Oaks School, $21,600 25 Dallas International School, $21,400 26 Fulton School, $21,225 27 Hill School of Fort Worth, $20,990

D A L L A S REG I O N N E W C O M E R + R E L O C AT I O N G U I D E

28 The Fairhill School, $20,900 29 Novus Academy, $20,850 30 Vanguard Preparatory School, $20,450 31 The Covenant School of Dallas, $19,850 32 The Westwood School Upper School Campus, $19,695 33 Great Lakes Academy, $19,200 34 Southwest Christian School-Prep Campus, $19,150 35 Jesuit College Preparatory School, $19,150 36 Liberty Christian School, $19,020 37 Cistercian Catholic Preparatory School, $18,800 38 The Selwyn School, $18,800 39 John Paul II High School Plano, $18,550

40 Prince of Peace Christian School Carrollton, $18,510 41 Legacy Christian Academy, $18,500 42 Key School, $18,300 43 Grapevine Faith Christian School, $17,350 44 Wind Roase Academy, $17,200 45 Fort Worth Christian School, $17,050 46 Canterbury Episcopal School Desoto, $17,000 47 E.A. Young Academy, $16,500 48 The Highlands School, $16,000 49 Northstar School, $15,900 50 Cristo Rey Dallas College Prep, $15,725 51

Dallas Christian School, $15,721 52 The Clariden School, $15,650 53 Bishop Lynch High School, $15,200

SPRING 2019

SOURCE: Texas Private School Accreditation Commission, school websites

Parents choose to send their children to private schools for all kinds of reasons. Some elect private schools for their kids for religious or moral reasons. Others are concerned about having smaller class sizes and more individual attention for their students. Others still are focused on the highest possible learning standards and rigorous college prep.


RESEARCHING SCHOOLS

PHOTO: KYLA DAVIDSON

LIVING

> Learning diff erences schools – These schools provide for students with learning diff erences across the spectrum and can range from pre-K through 12th grade. > Boarding schools – Several of the single-gender private schools off er full-time boarding as well as day student options. > Language/culture specific – Some schools off er immersion in specific languages, such as French, Chinese, and Japanese. Many of these schools off er Saturday and summer options for families who want students to attend a traditional school and supplement with cultural and language immersion. > Montessori method – A childcentered educational approach based on scientific observations of children from birth to adulthood. Schools incorporating this self-direction and discovery method are located across the region, but they generally do not extend beyond elementary. A number of public districts also have a Montessori choice option within the district. > Classical – Usually characterized by small class sizes and a classics-based education, normally with fewer team athletic options. > College preparatory – Focused on academic rigor in preparation for demanding collegiate programs. > Religious/parochial – Some schools are associated with specific religious denominations or churches and incorporate religious teaching as part of the curriculum.

EDUCATION

The Dallas region offers a variety of private school options. Some of the terms you will encounter as you look at private school options include:

GLOBALLY INSPIRED. DISTINCTLY DIFFERENT.

WHICH SCHOOL?

Visit SayYesToDallas.com to find out which school is right for you. SPRING 2019

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EDUCATION EDUCATION

PHOTO: ISTOCK

LIVING

ALTERNATIVE SCHOOLING In addition to the state’s more than 1,000 public school districts, Texas offers a variety of alternative schooling options for parents. These include public charter schools, which are monitored and accredited under the statewide testing and accountability system; private schools, which may or may not be accredited through various organizations; and home schooling, which is not accredited or regulated by any state agency or commission in Texas. Families may also be interested in online learning programs and high school equivalency programs.

CHARTER SCHOOLS

HOME SCHOOLING

In 1995, the 74th Texas Legislature passed legislation giving the state the authority to create open-enrollment charter schools. These schools are subject to fewer state laws than other public schools with the idea of ensuring fiscal and academic accountability without undue regulation of instructional methods or pedagogical innovation. Like school districts, charter schools are monitored and accredited under the statewide testing and accountability system.

In 1995, the Texas Supreme Court affirmed the decision in the class action lawsuit Leeper vs. Arlington Independent School District that home schools can legally operate as private schools in Texas. According to the ruling, home schools must be conducted in a bona fide manner, using a written curriculum consisting of reading, spelling, grammar, math, and a course in good citizenship. The Texas Education Agency has no regulatory authority over home schools, and the state of Texas does not award diplomas to students who are home schooled.

PRIVATE SCHOOLS The Texas Education Agency does not have oversight of private schools in Texas; however, the agency works with the Texas Private School Accreditation Commission to ensure that students can easily transfer from nonpublic to public schools and that teacher service at nonpublic schools is recognized at public schools for salary purposes. Private schools may be accredited by a variety of organizations, but many private schools in Texas are not accredited by any organization.

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TEXAS VIRTUAL SCHOOLS NETWORK Texas Virtual Schools Network (TxVSN), which launched in 2009, provides Texas students and schools access to interactive, collaborative, instructor-led online courses taught by statecertified and appropriately credentialed teachers. The TxVSN is made up of two components: the TxVSN statewide course catalog, which provides supplemental online courses to students in grades 8-12; and the TxVSN online schools program, which offers full-time virtual instruction through eligible public schools to Texas public school students in grades 3-12.

D A L L A S REG I O N N E W C O M E R + R E L O C AT I O N G U I D E

HIGH SCHOOL

EQUIVALENCY PROGRAM

The High School Equivalency Program, or In-School GED Option Program, is designed to provide an alternative for high school students ages 16 and over who are at risk of not graduating from high school and earning a high school diploma.

TEXAS CERTIFICATE OF

HIGH SCHOOL EQUIVALENCY

Anyone age 18 and older who has not earned a high school diploma and is not currently enrolled in an accredited high school is eligible to earn a Texas Certificate of High School Equivalency. Any exceptions must meet eligibility requirements to test for the high school equivalency. This information was provided by the Texas Education Agency. For more, go to tea.texas.gov.

SPRING 2019


The first step in picking a preschool is making a short list of local preschools and touring each during its next open house. Afterward, take a few minutes to write down your impressions of the visit. Pay attention to your intuition, Munson advises. Other parents who have already put their kids through preschool can offer firsthand recommendations, but make sure you do your own research and familiarize yourself with the school’s educational philosophy or mission, be it language immersion, the Montessori method, or a traditional approach. Begin your search of Dallas-area resources for education and child care by browsing through the extensive DFWChild Everything guide online at dfwchild.com/everything.

CHOOSING A SPECIAL NEEDS SCHOOL When your child with special needs is ready to begin school for the first time, selecting one that will provide the best education and proper (and affordable) care is paramount to your child’s health and well-being. The key to finding the best fit? According to educational consultant, special needs parenting coach, and special education advocate Adina Rich, it takes asking the right questions and being honest about your child’s needs and abilities. To avoid waiting lists, begin your search no later than the previous semester, and even if you’re set on one school, open yourself to more possibilities by giving several programs a closer look. To get started, browse through the extensive directory of special needs resources online at dfwchild.com/thrive.

PHOTO: MICHAEL SAMPLES

— Elizabeth Smith, DFWChild Magazines

LIVING

PICKING A PRESCHOOL

While the education reform debate for public schools rages on, schools that adhere to the Montessori method take a different path. “The underlying philosophy of Montessori is that children are individual, self-motivated learners who are assisted in learning by their teachers, or ‘guides,’ as they are called,” says educational consultant Eleanor Munson, Ph.D. Instead of focusing on test taking, highly-trained educators encourage their students— who are typically in mixed-aged classes— to move at their own pace, follow their own interests, and work independently. The schools you’ll find in Dallas, which may serve kids from pre-K through 12th grade, are governed by one of two accrediting bodies: Association Montessori Internationale (AMI) and American Montessori Society (AMS). “If you’re looking for a ‘pure’ Montessori experience for your child, you’ll want an AMI school,” says Munson. “If you want your child’s education to include computers, technology, et cetera, you’ll want an AMS school.” Not sure if this type of education is right for your child? “Your child doesn’t necessarily have to attend a Montessori-accredited school to enjoy the benefits of this type of educational philosophy,” Munson says. “Some preschools take the best of what each educational philosophy offers and combine these to form their curriculum.” For an extensive look at both public and private Montessori schools, and more educational resources in Dallas, browse through the DFWChild Everything guide online at dfwchild.com/everything.

EDUCATION

WHAT IS A MONTESSORI SCHOOL?

SPRING 2019

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HIGHER EDUCATION The Dallas Region offers a variety of public and private institutions, with robust programming in life sciences, engineering, and the arts. The University of North Texas, the University of Texas at Dallas, and the University of Texas at Arlington are among Texas’ seven emerging research universities and are currently expanding program capabilities and funding in an effort to become “tier one” research institutions, which are nationally recognized for the highest levels of innovation and academic excellence. UT Southwestern Medical Center is among the nation’s best in biology and biochemistry research, boasting countless clinical breakthroughs and innovations.

4

WEATHERFORD COLLEGE (WISE COUNTY)

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH TEXAS

NORTH CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE (FLOWER MOUND)

TARRANT COUNTY COLLEGE (NORTHPORT)

TARRANT COUNTY COLLEGE (NORTHEAST)

WEATHERFORD COLLEGE (MINERAL WELLS)

Below is a sample of other institutions of higher learning in Dallas-Fort Worth.

TEXAS WOMAN’S UNIVERSITY

NO TE

TARRANT COUNTY COLLEGE (NORTHWEST)

INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER LEARNING

2

TARRANT COUNTY COLLEGE (TRINITY RIVER) UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT ARLINGTON (FORT WORTH) WEATHERFORD COLLEGE

TARLETON STATE 7 SOUTHWEST METROPLEX CENTER TEXAS CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH TEXAS HEALTH SCIENCE CENTER

12

15

TEXAS A&M LAW

TERRELL SCHOOL OF TARLETON STATE

SOUTHWESTERN BAPTIST THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY

Bethel University

UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT ARLINGTON RESEARCH INSTITUTE

10

TEXAS WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY

TARRANT COUNTY COLLEGE (SOUTH)

Grand Canyon University

ARLINGTON BAPTIST UNIVERSITY

1

UNIVERSITY OF AT ARLINGTON

UNIVERSITY OF PHOENIX ARLINGTON CAMPUS TARRANT COUNTY COLLEGE (SOUTHEAST)

Kaplan College Le Cordon Bleu Institute of Culinary Arts LeTourneau University

HILL COLLEGE (BURLESON)

National University Ogle School - Dallas

NA

Parker University Platt College Texas Barber Colleges and Hairstyling Schools University of Phoenix West Coast University

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WEATHERFORD COLLEGE (GRANBURY)

l l l

PRIVATE UNIVERSITY PUBLIC UNIVERSITY COMMUNITY COLLEGE

HILL COLLEGE (GLEN ROSE)

SOUTHWESTERN ADVENTIST UNIVERSITY

HILL COLLEGE (JOHNSON COUNTY)

SPRING 2019


UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT DALLAS

EDUCATION

PHOTO: ANDREW SMITH

PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK

UNIVERSITY COLLIN COLLEGE (CENTRAL PARK)

COLLIN COLLEGE (HEALTH EDUCATION CENTER)

ORTH CENTRAL EXAS COLLEGE COLLIN COLLEGE (PRESTON RIDGE)

COLLIN COLLEGE (ALLEN)

AMBERTON UNIVERSITY (FRISCO)

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH TEXAS - FRISCO

3

UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT DALLAS

TEXAS A&M AG EXTENSION LETOURNEAU UNIVERSITY

DCCCD (BROOKHAVEN) DCCCD (NORTH LAKE WEST)

DCCCD (RICHLAND) DCCCD (RICHLAND GARLAND)

UNIVERSITY OF PHOENIX DALLAS CAMPUS

DALLAS CHRISTIAN COLLEGE

PARKER UNIVERSITY SOUTHERN ART INSTITUTE DCCCD METHODIST OF DALLAS (NORTH UNIVERSITY LAKE) TEXAS TECH SMU UD 6 11 EVEREST HEALTH SCIENCE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE CENTER OF DALLAS DCCCD WEST COAST (EASTFIELD) UT SOUTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY 13 TEXAS WOMAN’S UNIVERSITY DCCCD INSTITUTE (NORTH LAKE 14 OF HEALTH SOUTH) SCIENCES

DCCCD (MOUNTAIN VIEW)

F TEXAS N

AVARRO COLLEGE (MIDLOTHIAN)

8

DALLAS BAPTIST UNIVERSITY

PAUL QUINN COLLEGE

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH TEXAS AT DALLAS

NORTHWOOD UNIVERSITY

9

41,712 38,094

3 The University of Texas at Dallas (UTD)

27,638

4 Texas Woman’s University (TWU)

15,322

5 Texas A&M University (TAMU) - Commerce

13,065

6 Southern Methodist University (SMU)

11,789

7 Texas Christian University (TCU)

10,298

8 Dallas Baptist University (DBU)

5,067 2,587

11 University of Dallas (UD)

2,510

12 University of North Texas Health Science Center - Fort Worth

2,288

13 University of Texas Southwestern (UTSW)

2,237

14 University of North Texas College of Law - Dallas

423

15 Texas A&M University School of Law - Fort Worth

412

COLLIN COLLEGE (ROCKWALL)

AMBERTON UNIVERSITY (GARLAND)

DALLAS THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY CRISWELL COLLEGE TEXAS A&M HEALTH SCIENCE CENTER ABILENE CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY AT CITYSQUARE BAYLOR COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY DCCCD (EL CENTRO) UNIVERSITY OF NORTH TEXAS LAW (DALLAS) DCCCD (BILL J. PRIEST)

DCCCD (EASTFIELD PLEASANT GROVE)

COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISTRICTS INSTITUTION

DCCCD (CEDAR VALLEY)

2017 ENROLLMENT

Dallas County Community College District

SOUTHWESTERN ASSEMBLIES OF GOD

72,089

Tarrant County College District

57,389

Collin County Community College District

31,696

North Central Texas Community College District

10,344

Navarro College

9,784

Trinity Valley Community College

6,547

Weatherford College

6,366

DFW Total Community College Students

NAVARRO COLLEGE (WAXAHACHIE)

5 TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY COMMERCE

3,513

10 Texas Wesleyan University

COLLIN COLLEGE (COURTYARD) ABILENE CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY DALLAS

1 The University of Texas at Arlington (UTA) 2 University of North Texas (UNT) - Denton

9 University of North Texas (UNT) - Dallas

COLLIN COLLEGE (SPRING CREEK)

DCCCD (NORTH LAKE NORTH)

2017 ENROLLMENT

LIVING

MAJOR UNIVERSITIES

194,215

The Texas Workforce Commission provides funding for continuing education courses within the community college system. A total of 12,849 students enrolled in Continuing Education (CE) courses in the districts and colleges listed above in Fall 2017.

Source: Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board

SPRING 2019

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HOUSING

LIVING IN THE DALLAS REGION

HOUSING FIND A HOME FOR YOUR FAMILY

HOME SALES COMPARISONS | HOUSING COSTS | WHAT YOUR MONEY BUYS | SUBDIVISIONS UTILITY RATES | INSURANCE RATES | HOMEBUILDERS | APARTMENT RENT RATES SENIOR LIVING | LIVE-WORK-PLAY

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PHOTO: ANDREW SMITH


“EVERYTHING WE NEED IS WITHIN 15 MINUTES DRIVING.” MONICA DENAVARRO CITY: Frisco NEIGHBORHOOD: The Arbors at Willow Bay COMPANY/TITLE: Hilti, Senior Manager When did you move here? Where from? May 2015, from Tulsa, Oklahoma Where else have you lived? Leon, Mexico (born and raised), LA, San Diego, Aliso Viego, CA, Tulsa What made you decide to choose Dallas? There are many reasons why my husband and I jumped at the opportunity to move to the Dallas area when our company headquarters relocated to Plano. Affordable housing, safe neighborhoods, great schools and universities, a diverse population, and a variety of entertainment options are among some of the reasons. We also love the great restaurants, from local farm-to-table concepts to international ethnic cuisine. We enjoy the local breweries, parks, manageable traffic, plus two major airports that provide easy connections to the rest of the world.

How did you choose which part of town to live in? Proximity to work, a great school district, new homes, and neighborhood safety were our main criteria. Tell us about your city/neighborhood. What do you like best? What makes it different? Everything we need is within 15 minutes driving. I’m close to my favorite grocery stores, and there are a lot of restaurants and things to do close by McKinney, Plano, and Allen are really close. We are not far from the main airports, Downtown Dallas museums and Dallas restaurants. What advice would you give to someone who wants to move here? My husband and I love the fact that downtown Dallas is not far from our home in Frisco and our office in Plano. We love the amazing museums like the DMA and Perot Museum, just to name two. The Dallas Aquarium has a great variety of sea life. Our company hosted an employee event there recently and watching the families and

MONICA DENAVARRO children enjoy the space was very nice. Also, the arboretum is beautiful, and it is always changing with seasonal decorations. We’re now DFW sports fans.

HOME SALES COMPARISONS NEW YORK, (MANHATTAN), NY

$1,901,222

SAN FRANCISCO, CA

$1,243,239

ORANGE COUNTY, CA

$938,441

SAN DIEGO, CA

$830,914

DENVER, CO

$489,272

CHICAGO, IL

$500,332 $327,946

DALLAS, TX ATLANTA, GA

$319,590

PHOENIX, AZ

$319,590 $315,436

HOUSTON, TX AUSTIN, TX

$312,376

SPRING 2019

SOURCE: Quarter 4, 2018: Price Report for Urban Area and State, ACCRA

$275,461

FORT WORTH, TX $180,000

MEDIAN NEW HOME PURCHASE PRICE: 2,400 SQ FT LIVING AREA 8,000 SQ FT LOT 4-BEDROOMS, 2-BATHS

$210,000

$240,000

$270,000

$300,000

$330,000

$360,000

$390,000

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HOUSING

LIVING

HOUSING The Dallas and Fort Worth areas are replete with convenience and charm in lifestyle and housing opportunities. Whether you are a temporary business traveler or a family of five, the region offers diverse housing options for individuals and families of all sizes. If you lean toward urban chic, relocate to a trendy loft with skyline views and a cool-kid downtown ambiance. Want something walkable? The newest trend in housing here is mixed-use developments, where you can live above shops and restaurants and access pretty much everything you need on foot. Established neighborhoods with an abundance of singlefamily homes with yards are plentiful. Or, for a more relaxed small-town feel, neighboring communities provide homegrown pride (and lots of space), mixed with big-city conveniences and friendly neighbors. Whatever your style, the Dallas Region has the home for you. All you have to do is find it. What’s more, housing in the Dallas area is very affordable. If you’re moving from another major metro area, you’re going to be surprised to find out just how far your money goes.

HOW MUCH HOUSE CAN I BUY?

3,4

39

SQ

[3 S U 19 S Q NN YVA M] LE

5 BEDS 4 BATHS

4 BEDS 2.1 BATHS

04

SQ

[20 5 DEN SQ M TO N ]

3,4

88

SQ

The housing selections shown here were provided by CENTURY 21 Judge Fite Company. They are representative of the options available at press time. They may or may not still be on the market, and they are not intended to represent every choice in every area of our city.

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5 BEDS 3.1 BATHS

$438,000

97

SQ

[2 L E W 04 S Q I S V M] ILL E

FT

4 BEDS 2.1 BATHS

H I C [324 KO SQ M RY CR ] EEK

SQ

FT

$315,000 1,9

90

SQ

[18 5 PL A SQ M NO ]

FT

3 BEDS 3.1 BATHS

FT

$300,000 2,1

$312,500

02

[2 F O R 60 S Q T W M] OR TH

FT

$397,900 2,2

3 BED 2.1 BATH

2,8

FT

$462,000 SPRING 2019


Photos provided by CENTURY 21 Judge Fite Company

85

SQ

[29 KA 6 SQ U F M M] AN

7,6

08

SQ

[7 C E D 07 S Q A R M] HIL L

FT

DO

FT

2,5

24

SQ

W N [234 S TO W Q M ND ] ALL A

HOUSING

3,1

FT

S

LIVING

4 BEDS 3 BATHS

$398,000

6 BEDS 6.2 BATHS

4,0

64

SQ

[3 A R 76 S Q L I N M] GTO N

5 BEDS 4 BATHS

37

SQ

SPRING 2019

$630,000

13

2 BEDS 2 BATHS

SQ

[38 2 FRI SQ M SC ] O

FT

5 BEDS 3.1 BATHS

[42 2 DA S Q M LL A ] S

5 BEDS 4 BATHS

4,1

$472,203 4,5

$1,250,000

58

SQ

FT

$699,000

96

SQ

[3 C O 43 S Q LLE Y V I M] LLE

FT

4 BEDS 4 BATHS

[42 3 I RV S Q M ING ]

4 BEDS 4.2 BATHS

3,6

$499,000 4,5

$1,400,000

$535,000 3,3

11

SQ

[30 8 KEL SQ M LER ]

FT

4 BEDS 4 BATHS

FT

FT

$434,990

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HOUSING

LIVING

BUYING A HOME Based on the cost of housing compared to median family income, home prices in the DFW region are some of the most affordable in the country, according to the Urban Institute. Stability characterizes the DFW housing market. Its ability to remain strong during global economic fluctuations has been sustained through a combination of a lower cost of living compared with other major metropolitan areas and a diverse economic base that has kept unemployment figures well below national levels. The bottom line for families is that a dollar buys more square feet per home in North Texas. The ease of travel between smaller cities and major job centers means that employees can choose from a wide variety of communities and neighborhoods to accommodate their lifestyles and price points.

HOME PRICES AROUND THE REGION < $100,000

$250,001-$500,000

$100,001-$250,000

> $500,000

Sa

Krum 380

Decatur

Bridgeport Ponder

Runaway Bay Paradise New Fairview

Justin Aurora

35W

WISE CO.

Roanoke

DENTON CO.

Westl

Haslet

Springtown Reno

Keller Azle Saginaw

Watauga North Richland H Haltom City

820

Lake Worth

Richland H

River Oaks White Settlement

Weatherford

Fort Worth

20

Aledo Benbrook Edgecliff Village

Forest Hill Kenne

35W

PARKER CO.

TARRANT CO.

JOHNSON CO.

HOOD CO.

Crowley Burleson

Cross Timber Granbury

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Godley

Joshua

SPRING 2019

Rendon


HOUSING

anger

Aubrey

LIVING

75

Prosper

Cross Roads

Denton

Celeste

Melissa

Krugerville

380

McKinney

Princeton

Little Elm

380

Frisco

Corinth

Allen

Argyle 35E

Lewisville

Flower Mound

Plano Wylie

Coppell

Southlake

Hills

Bedford Euless

Northwest Dallas Irving

Hurst

Fate

North Dallas Northeast Dallas

Garland

Rowlett

Rockwall 30

HUNT CO.

Park Cities

635

Heath

McLendon-Chisholm ROCKWALL CO.

East Dallas

Oak Lawn

Hills

Sunnyvale

Dallas

KAUFMAN CO.

Mesquite

30

30

Royse City

Sachse

Richardson 75

Farmers Branch

D/FW Airport

COLLIN CO.

Far North Dallas

Carrollton

Grapevine Colleyville

Fairview

The Colony

lake

Forney

Grand Prairie Oak Cliff

Terrell

Balch Springs 20

Arlington

20

South Dallas

Duncanville

edale

n

Weston

Celina

35

Mansfield

Cedar Hill

DeSoto

35E

Lancaster

Southeast Dallas

Wilmer-Hutchins

67

Red Oak Oak Leaf Pecan Hill

Kaufman

DALLAS CO.

Glenn Heights Ovilla

Combine

Ferris

ELLIS CO.

45

Midlothian Kemp Venus

Waxahachie

Palmer

SOURCE: North Texas Real Estate Information System

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HOUSING

LIVING

PHOTO: JohnnyH5 via iSTOCK

FROM THE GROUND UP If you search and don’t find just the right house for your needs, there’s always the custom-built route. Choosing every detail of a home, from the floor plan to the doorknobs, is exciting for a lot of people. Costs amount to about the same as buying a pre-owned home, and you get exactly what you’ve always wanted. The Dallas-Fort Worth area has many reputable homebuilders, and housing starts hit a seven-year high in early 2014. One- and two-story traditional and contemporary single-family homes are the foundation for most new subdivisions, though patio homes (zero-lot-line houses) are also very popular in our area. It’s also possible to customize a townhouse or condominium that’s in the early stages of construction or preconstruction.

TOP 25 SUBDIVISIONS ( 2018 )

SUBDIVISION

RANKED BY NUMBER OF NEW HOME STARTS

18 35

11

14

20

17 13

22

2

8

3

23 15

35E

4

19

1

121

75

35E

12

24

121 114

35W

10 635

7

75

16

35W

78

30

183

820

5

161 80

25

9

12

30 360

175

20 20

35E 35W

45

21 6

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25

AVERAGE SALES PRICE

(IN THOUSANDS)

HARVEST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $241-$504 WESTRIDGE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $274-$458 TRAILS AT RIVERSTONE . . . . . . . . . . . $212-$259 CRAIG RANCH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $320-$2,500 VIRIDIAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $266-$1,000 HEARTLAND . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $197-$330 HAWTHORNE MEADOWS. . . . . . . . . . $241-$306 VALENCIA ON THE LAKE . . . . . . . . . . . $248-$498 DEVONSHIRE (KAUFMAN CO) . . . . . $203-$500 WOODCREEK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $200-$374 PALOMA CREEK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $205-$366 INSPIRATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $287-$537 ARTESIA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $286-$451 WINDSONG RANCH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $295-$978 FRISCO LAKES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $248-$420 VILLAGES OF EAGLE MOUNTAIN . . $211-$263 LIGHT FARMS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $275-$965 WINN RIDGE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $200-$335 TRIBUTE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $304-$1,171 TRINITY FALLS (MCKINNEY) . . . . . . $282-$599 VINTAGE MEADOWS ADDITION . . . . $204-$249 PARK TRAILS (PRINCETON) . . . . . . . $230-$269 LEXINGTON COUNTRY (FRISCO) . . $380-$946 CASTLE HILLS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $363-$2,000 TRAVIS RANCH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $168-$541 SOURCE: Metrostudy

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BUILDING BLOCKS Mixed-use developments are on the rise.

Central heat and air conditioning are standard in new homes in DFW. 7 Golf course communities aren’t just pretty places to live and play, they are also plentiful here. 7 Planned residential developments follow a particular design from start to finish and provide a variety of housing options and efficient use of land.

7

7

Transit-oriented developments on the DART line are catering to commuters.

7

New construction is abundant, should you wish to live in a finished house where no one has lived before.

7

Unlike some parts of the country, it’s unusual to find a basement in our area.

Slab foundations are common, and should be watered during the summer.

7

7

35

35E 121

75

35E

121 114

35W

It’s not a dream home

TRIM LIVE BLE COL

without natural gas.

PUB New CON Sam sam 214-

Whether it’s heating your water, warming your home or helping you cook for family and friends, natural gas is the smart energy choice that saves you both time and money. It’s also safer, more efficient and better for the environment than other traditional energy resources. So spend less energy powering your dream home — and more energy enjoying it. Choose natural gas.

VACANT DEVELOPED LOTS VACANT DEVELOPED LOTS are the lots on a recorded plat with streets and utilities in place, ready for a home to be built.

CLIE JOB 2019

635

atmosenergy.com/dreamhome

75 35W

78

30

183

820

161 80

12

30 360

175

20

0-24

20

35E

25-77

35W

78-154

45

155-315 316-733

SOURCE: Metrostudy

FUTURE LOTS FUTURE LOTS are lots that are planned but have not yet been developed with any or all infrastructure, such as streets and utilities.

35

35E 121

75

35E

121 114

35W

635 75 35W

78

30

183

820

161 80

12

30 360

175

20 20

1-246

35E

247-912

35W

45

913-2,240 2,241-4,162 4,163-11,687 SOURCE: Metrostudy

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REL INS


The Dallas Region ranks close to the national median in terms of overall electric rates. Reliability in the system is better here because 85 percent of Texas operates on a separate power grid from that of the rest of the country. Since Texas has a deregulated electricity market, residents have the power to choose their providers, which creates flexibility in pricing and service. Powertochoose.org is the official electric choice website of the Public Utility Commission of Texas, and the place where you can compare providers’ offers and select the plan that is right for you. Many providers offer rates well below the national average, but you have to take the time and make the effort to get a good rate—it doesn’t happen automatically. Though most of the region sits atop two aquifers, our residential water supply comes primarily from surface water (reservoirs and lakes). Water rates for moderate users are lower than in many comparablesize cities in the country. Most cities in DFW have programs to encourage water conservation and some impose watering restrictions due to drought conditions. Natural gas prices are relatively low here, due in part to natural underground gas fields such as the Barnett Shale. The charts here represent real-life examples of what you might expect in terms of power and insurance costs. Every home is different, and many factors contribute to insurance pricing. The prices you pay may or may not compare to these. COMPARE RATES & SAVE MONEY powertochoose.org - The official and unbiased electric choice website of the Public Utility Commission of Texas allows electricity providers to list their offers at no charge, so consumers can compare and choose what’s best for them. helpinsure.com - The free service of the Texas Department of Insurance and Office of Public Insurance Counsel helps Texans with their auto, commercial, and residential property insurance needs.

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TYPICAL MONTHLY TEMPERATURE RANGES NORMAL TEMPERATURE (FAHRENHEIT)

HOUSING

LIVING

POWER AND PROTECTION 110° 100° 90° 80° 70° 60° 50° 40° 30° 20° 10° 0°

84° 68° 56°

Jan

Feb

78° 75°

71°

75°

77° 67°

68°

64° 47°

39°

96° 88°

76°

60°

36°

96°

91°

57°

57°

55°

37°

EXTREME HIGH TEMPERATURES EXTREME LOW TEMPERATURES

Mar

Apr

56°

46°

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

UTILITY COST EXAMPLES

Nov

Dec

Electricity

ANNUAL

Gas

$300.00 $250.00 $200.00 $300.00 $150.00 $250.00 $100.00 $200.00 $50.00 $150.00 $0

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

$100.00 $250.00 Family Home: 1,755 Square Feet, 1 Story, Brick, Built in 1953, Dallas, TX (Dallas County) Single $50.00 Majority gas, including heating, gas water heater and cooktop Utilities:

Rental $200.00 Insurance Rate: Monthly: $28.25 $0

$150.00 $250.00 $100.00 $200.00 $50.00 $150.00 $0 $100.00 $800.00 $50.00 $700.00 $600.00 $0

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

$500.00 Condominium: 1,700 Square Feet, 3 Story, Brick, Built in 2017, Dallas, Tx (Dallas County) $800.00 $400.00 Utilities: Gas heat $700.00 $300.00 Homeowner Policy Amount: $155,000 bdg/$155,000 property, Monthly Insurance Payment: $110.00 $600.00 $200.00 $500.00 SPRING 2019 G U$100.00 IDE $400.00


Electricity

Propane

$800.00 $250.00 $100.00 $700.00

$150.00 $0 $400.00

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

AUTO If you have a car accident in Texas and you are at fault, Texas law requires you to pay for the damage to the other person’s vehicle and for any medical expenses that person might incur as a result of the accident. To that end, the law requires all drivers to have basic liability coverage. The current minimum limits in Texas are $30,000 for each injured person, up to a total of $60,000 per accident, and $25,000 for property damage per accident. But cars are expensive and medical care more so. The minimum amounts might not be enough to pay all of the other driver’s costs if you’re in an accident, and the other driver can sue you to collect the difference. Consider buying more than the basic limits to protect yourself financially. The cost of auto insurance in Texas is near the national average.

Dec

$250.00 $400.00 Family Home: 4,009 Square Feet, 2 Story, Brick, Built in 2002, Dallas, Tx (Dallas County) Single $800.00 Electric Air Conditioning and Propane Gas Heating gas water heater and cooktop Utilities: $300.00 $200.00 Home $700.00 Insurance Rate: $525,000 (property), $300,000 (liability) $200.00 Rate: $218.00 Monthly $600.00 $100.00 $150.00 $500.00 $0 $400.00 $100.00 Electricity $250.00 $300.00 $50.00 $200.00 $200.00 $100.00 $0

$200.00 $200.00 $50.00 $150.00 $150.00 $0 $100.00 $100.00 $250.00

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Apartment: 629 Square Feet, 1 Story, Concrete, Built in 2015, Dallas, Tx (Dallas County) $50.00 All electric, including heating Utilities: $50.00 Rental Insurance Rate: $15,000 (Property), $50,000 (Liability), Monthly Rate: $28 Home $200.00 $0 $0 $150.00 $250.00 $100.00 $200.00 $50.00 $150.00 $0 $100.00 $50.00 $0

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Condominium: 2300 Square Feet, 2 Story, Brick, Built in 1994, Dallas, Tx (Dallas County) Utilities: All electric, including heating Home Insurance Rate: Policy Amount:$150,000, Monthly Rate: $67.00

SPRING 2019

Dec

PHOTO: ANDREW SMITH

$0 $150.00 $250.00 $250.00 $100.00

LIVING

$300.00 $100.00 $800.00 $200.00 $700.00 $100.00 $50.00 $600.00 $0 $0 $500.00

HOUSING

$600.00 $200.00 $50.00 $500.00

PHOTO: TIAGO_FERNANDEZ VIA ISTOCK

$50.00 $200.00 $0 $0 $150.00

HOME The average home insurance policy cost in Texas is higher than in many other places, but policies are different here which makes comparing our rates with those of other states tough. The most common nationwide policy (called the HO-3) is not sold in Texas, though there are plenty of policies to choose from. When comparing insurance policies, pay attention to limits (the maximum amount the insurance company will pay for damages), perils covered (situations the insurance company covers), and the deductible (how much you pay out of pocket before your coverage kicks in). Policies with low deductibles, a high number of covered perils, and high limits cost more. As in other states, discounts on home insurance premiums are available in Texas for people who don’t make claims for several years, older homeowners, and homes with safety equipment such as smoke detectors and alarm systems.

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HOUSING

BY NOELLE JABAL

Ready to build a new home? You’ve either made a list of customizations you want or selected your plan, picked a possible lot location and chosen your builder/contractor. What’s next? The most important part: getting a homebuilder’s/construction loan. A COUPLE OF THINGS TO KEEP IN MIND While it sounds easier to get a loan from your personal bank, some national banks don’t offer homebuilder’s/ construction loans. A few Dallas banks that do offer this loan are Regions Bank, BB&T, and Wells Fargo. Some banks offer a program called Construction to Permanent Loans. This will help smooth the transition so you can start payments on your house as soon as you finish. 9More details in later steps.) Wish there were someone to help you out with the entire process from start to finish? Good news. There are people who help take care of the nitty-gritty work. They’re called mortgage officers. Any bank will have one. Their job is to make sure you get the appropriate documentation and disclosures needed for building a new home. Next, the bank will review your eligibility, the builder you have chosen, and will check your finances. Your new home will also have to meet requirements for the loan approval process. Every bank is different, so check what your options are. Completing an application is the next step. It’s important to have a copy of the construction agreement you have with your builder (this includes the lot value, customizations, and an estimated cost of your home), a

SPRING 2019

blueprint of the floor plan, and, if possible, a deed to the land. Every bank has a different application, so qualifications will vary. Once your application is approved, which usually takes about 48 hours, a licensed appraiser will review your information and determine an estimated market value of your home by comparing it to surrounding homes. You will then pay out-of-pocket for closing costs and the first down payment on your home. At this point in the process, it’s best to get homeowner’s insurance. This will protect you from any financial responsibility for any damage/liability that occurs during the construction of your home. This is where all the real fun starts. You begin drawing on your loan. Loan disbursements will be based on what’s getting accomplished. As a task is completed, it’s inspected in order to move forward. Banks want to make sure the money that is being drawn from your loan is being used for its initial intent. Draws will also be based on a schedule you’ve set with your builder. The final step of this process is the construction to permanent loan program that is offered by certain banks (ex: Regions BB&T). Instead of going through a hassle to find another loan to start your payments on your home, the construction to permanent loan automatically converts your construction loan to a regular loan so that you can immediately begin payments on your home.

LIVING

BUILDING YOUR LOAN

CHECKLIST PRE-CONSTRUCTION ❏ Choose a builder ❏ Make a list of wants and needs ❏ Choose location of home ❏ Talk to a mortgage officer and ask about loan options ❏ Review your eligibility ❏ Have copy of construction agreement with builder ❏ Have a blueprint of floor plan ❏ Have a deed to the land, if possible ❏ Apply! CONSTRUCTION ❏ Application approved ❏ Licensed appraiser reviews your information and determines estimated cost of home ❏ Pay for closing costs and first down payment ❏ Attain homeowner’s insurance ❏ Loan disbursements begin ❏ Inspection per task completed ❏ Post-construction ❏ Construction loan will convert to permanent loan ❏ Begin monthly payments on your new home ❏ Move in!

DID YOU KNOW? There are some banks that will allow you to get pre-qualified for a loan without choosing a builder or having an estimated price on your lot. Check with your banker to see what options he or she has for you. BANKS WITH HOMEBUILDER’S/ CONSTRUCTION LOAN > American Bank of Commerce > Amegy Mortgage > BB&T > BBVA Compass > Pegasus Bank > Regions > Wells Fargo

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Find Your New Home in the Dallas-area

D A R L I N G H O M E S | TAY L O R M O R R I S O N

Visit Our Websites to Learn More Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re proud to be Dallas-area homebuilders and we invite you to discover for yourself what thousands of delighted home buyers across America already know, we build homes people love to live in!

New homes from the low $200s to over $1M

All information (including, but not limited to prices, views, availability, incentives, floor plans, site plans, features, standards and options, assessments and fees, planned amenities, programs, conceptual artistsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; renderings and community development plans) deemed reliable as of publication date but not guaranteed and remains subject to change daily or delay without notice. Floor plans and elevations are an artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s conception and are not intended to show specific detailing. As-Built Condition will control.


DH

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

D A R L I N G H O M E S C O M M U N I T I E S - New homes from the mid $300s to over $1M Auburn Hills - From the $360s Bering Heights at Parkside - From the $590s Canals at Grand Park - From the $430s Chapel Creek Bridge View - Fom the $660s Edgestone at Legacy - From the $560s Estates at Shaddock Park - From the $500s

7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.

Lakewood at Brookhollow - From the $390s Angel Field East - From the $370s Montgomery Farm Estates - From the $560s Newman Village Patio - From the $540s Phillips Creek Silvertail - From the $420s Spicewood at Craig Ranch - From the $390s

13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18.

Stonegate - From the $500s The Terraces at Las Colinas - Coming Soon The Tribute Somerset - From the $390s The Tribute Tullamore Meadows - From the $500s Tucker Hill - From the $420s Windsong Ranch - From the $390s

35W

17 289 377

15 8

Denton

21

35E

14

22

287

Highland Village

7

114

3

18

280 380

75

16 7

23

Prosper 380 13 10 12 10 6 3 11 12 5 4

16

Frisco

17 78

McKinney

380

9 8

2

5

78 75

35W

Plano

Flower Mound 1

18

1

Carrollton 6

114

Grapevine

2

Richardson

14

13

635

30

78

75

35E

4

199

Rockwall

Garland

19 35W

360

Fort Worth 30

30

Arlington

820

820

30

Dallas

30

Mesquite

35E

80

20 9

24

35W

20

TM

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

20

11

T A Y L O R M O R R I S O N C O M M U N I T I E S - New homes from the low $200s to the high $600s

Caraway - From the $350s Estates of Lakeshore - From the $340s Falls of Prosper - From the $360s Founders Parc - Coming Soon Hamilton Park - From the $350s Mercer Crossing - From the $490s Montalcino Estates - From the $640s Northlake Estates - From the $340s

9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16.

Overland Grove - Coming Soon Park West - From the $360s Saddlebrook Estates - From the $210s Silverado - From $300s Somerset Park - From the $380s Steeplechase - From the $450s Sutton Fields - From the $340s Sweetwater at Light Farms - From the $260s

17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24.

The Bridges at Preston Crossings - From the $350s The Resort on Eagle Mountain Lake - From the $310s Travis Ranch - From the $220s Travis Ranch Marina - From the $510s Valencia on the Lake Starting From the $330s Waterford Point at the Tribute - From the $300s Willowcreek at Auburn Hills - From the $320s Windmill Farms - From the $200s

Price(s) shown may not reflect lot premiums, upgrades and options. Photos are for illustration only and do not necessarily represent a specific community. All homes subject to prior sale. Maps and plans are not to scale and all dimensions are approximate. Not an offer in any state where prohibited or otherwise restricted by law. Please see a Community Sales Manager for details and visit www.darlinghomes.com or www. taylormorrison.com for additional disclaimers. Š March 2019. Darling Homes of Texas, LLC and Taylor Morrison of Texas, Inc., respectively. All rights reserved.


HOMEBUILDERS

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

OVERLAND GROVE IN FORNEY IS GRAND OPENING THIS SUMMER FROM THE HIGH $200s Overland Grove gives you the tools to grow your family and lifestyle. A timeless, master planned community situated on the eastern edge of Dallas, convenient to entertainment options, schools, and employment centers. Though nestled away from the bustle of city life, the community’s all-encompassing on-site amenity center and abundance of resident amenities throughout offer plenty of activities, play areas, and water features. Overland Grove is a picturesque locale featuring extraordinary homes set among tree-lined streets, breathtaking natural beauty, operating orchards, and working community gardens. A variety of amenities and activities for all ages, from outdoor events, to luxurious pools and cabanas, to play areas, to extensive hiking trails. Join your neighbors to pick fruits and nuts from mature trees, and fish from well-stocked ponds. The amenities are endless at Overland Grove – indoor/outdoor resident facilities, outdoor grilling and dining areas, a dog park, a fitness lawn with strengthening station, Disc golf course, and baseball field. Carefully selected builders Taylor Morrison and Lennar offer plenty of new home designs perfectly tailored to fit a

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variety of lifestyles and budgets. Choose from 50’-, 60’-, and 70’-wide home sites with spacious yards, plenty of cul-de-sac options, and premier lots overlooking beautifully preserved green space. Overland Grove residents benefit from the highly-acclaimed Forney ISD school system.

D A L L A S REG I O N N E W C O M E R + R E L O C AT I O N G U I D E

This thoughtfully planned community recreates the timeless feel of Forney’s early agricultural days with winding trails which snake through lush foliage, as first-class homes blend with rustic-style fences and community buildings. Model Homes are Grand Opening this Summer, come grow with us!

SPRING 2019


Forney ISD

Homes $ 20 0 s

From t he high

THE GROVE RESIDENT AMENITY COMPLEX INDOOR & OUTDOOR RESIDENT FACILITIES EVENT LAWN DOG PARK DISC GOLF COURSE FISHING POND AND PIER COMMUNITY GARDENS PARKS & PLAYGROUNDS MILES OF ON-SITE TRAILS

Builders

TAYLOR MORRISON LENNAR

o v e r l a n d g r ov e . c o m All development plans for the community are subject to change without notice. Rendering and illustrations are artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s impressions only and cannot be regarded as representations of facts and are subject to modification.


Many older people love Dallas-Fort Worthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mild climate, travel accessibility via DFW International Airport and Love Field, outstanding health care, and senior-friendly activities and organizations. Many families relocating to Dallas will opt to relocate an older loved one with them. Nearly 10 percent of the population in Dallas-Fort Worth is 65 or older, according to 2013 U.S. Census Bureau data, and the area has a wide variety of housing options for seniors. In recent years, active adult communities catering to an older population have been reimagined as age-restricted subdivisions with golf courses, swimming pools, walking trails, and more, while independent living facilities provide a chance for seniors to live rich, full lives without the hassles of homeownership. Many builders have products aimed at active adult buyers. These are often in communities with traditional buyers. The active agetargeted residential subdivisions shown on the map are specifically targeted to active adult buyers. Not shown below are affordable housing/subsidized properties.

LIVING

HOUSING

SENIOR LIVING PHOTO: DEAGREEZ VIA iSTOCK

INDEPENDENT LIVING FACILITIES PIONEER RIDGE GRACIOUS RETIREMENT LIVING

GOOD SAMARITAN SOCIETY DENTON VILLAGE

DOGWOOD ESTATES

ROBSON RANCH

THE CHATEAU

FRISCO LAKES

AUTUMN OAKS

LAKE FOREST GOOD SAMARITAN VILLAGE

PARKVIEW IN ALLEN

FRANKLIN PARK LEWISVILLE

CONSERVATORY AT PLANO

MEADOW LAKES

EL DORADO TRADITION OF PRESTONWOOD

MACARTHUR HILLS SOUTH COLLEYVINE RANCH

MY RETIREMENT HOME SUMMER GLEN

ATRIA AT HOMETOWN

THE BENTLEY

PARC PLACE THE WELLINGTON AT NORTH RICHLAND HILLS

EMERALD RIDGE TOWNHOMES

PARKWOOD

EMERITUS AT IRVING

THE STAYTON AT HOME FOR AGED MUSEUM WAY MASONS CLINIC LAKEWOOD NURSING CENTER TOWN VILLAGE MOUNTAIN CREEK VILLAGE WATERFORD THE HILL VILLA RETIREMENT LIVING RIDGMAR TRINITY AT PANTEGO TERRACE TOWN VILLAGE HORIZON BAY ARLINGTON THE VANTAGE AT CITYVIEW FOX RUN ARLINGTON PLAZA ESTATES THE BROADWAY PLAZA ARBROOK TRINITY COURTYARD WATERFORD AT FORT WORTH

HERITAGE PLACE AT HUGULEY

SENTE MEADOWS DUPLEX

THE WATERFORD AT PLANO

WATERCREST AT MANSFIELD/ ISLE AT WATERCREST

CRESCENT POINT/ CRESCENT PLACE

TREEMONT MEADOWSTONE PLACE PLAZA AT EDGEMERE

WELLINGTON AT ARAPAHO TOWN VILLAGE NORTH DALLAS PRESBYTERIAN VILLAGE NORTH FIVE STAR PREMIER RESIDENCES WHITEROCK COURT CHAMBREL AT CLUB HILL

LIBERTY HEIGHTS GRACIOUS

CHURCHILL ESTATES MONTCLAIR ESTATES OF GARLAND GREENWAY VILLAGE AT CHRISTIAN CARE CENTER

C C YOUNG THE MEMORIAL HOME TRADITION THREE THE FOUNTAINS FORUM LAKELAND HILLS

WATERFORD AT MESQUITE

TOWER PLACE

INDEPENDENT LIVING FACILITIES (NUMBER OF UNITS) 75-129

THE WATERVIEW

130-178

LAKESTONE TERRACE QUAIL PARK

179-240 THE GARDENS AT CHISHOLM TRAIL

KERALA ESTATES

PRESTON PLACE ATRIA CANYON CREEK HIGHLAND SPRINGS

CHRISTUS ST JOSEPH VILLAGE THE REMINGTON AT VALLEY RANCH

CONSERVATORY AT KELLER TOWN CENTER

COTTONWOOD ESTATES

CORINTHIANS LAKEVIEW AT JOSEY RANCH

WATERMERE AT SOUTHLAKE/ ISLE AT WATERMERE

LEGACY AT WILLOW BEND

SUNRISE PLANO

LEWISVILLE ESTATES

PINEWOOD HILLS

CHAMPIONS CIRCLE/GREENS

VILLA ASUNCION

PARKVIEW IN FRISCO

241-371 372-559

ACTIVE AGE-TARGETED RESIDENTIAL SUBDIVISIONS

SOURCES: National Investment Center, Metrostudy

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CYPRESS WATERS

HOUSING

LIVING TEMPORARY HOUSING

PHOTO: BILLINGSLEY COMPANY

APARTMENT LIFE Apartment dwelling in the DFW area depends on your preferences: all types and sizes are found throughout our region. Communities range from traditional apartment complexes to luxury high-rise buildings to large-scale communities with every bell and whistle imaginable. Some newer apartment communities offer amenities such as dog runs, workout facilities, tanning services, and community activities ranging from movies on the lawn to wine tastings to Monday Night Football parties. In recent years, mixed-use communities—which include not only multiple apartment buildings, but also restaurants, shops, movie theaters, and underground parking—have popped up all over, appealing to a segment of people who desire an urban, walkable neighborhood experience without the responsibilities of homeownership.

TWO-BEDROOM RENT RATES

What if you need to relocate to Dallas before you find a place to live? Should your company want you to start your job in Dallas right away, or if you’ve sold your house before you have a new one to move into, you need a company that specializes in temporary housing. These companies keep ready-to-go units in apartment buildings that are stocked with everything you need to be comfortable— furniture, kitchen wares, bedding, electronics—and all the utilities already turned on. All you have to do is show up with your suitcase. You can work through a real estate agent or your corporate relocation company to find a business that specializes in this service. Typically, the length of your stay will depend on the number of days approved by your company’s relocation policy.

35

35E 121

AT YOUR SERVICE

75

35E

121 114

35W

635 75 35W

78

30

183

820

161 80

12

30 360

AVERAGE MONTHLY RENT $650-$1,018

175

20

$1,018-$1,256

20

$1,256-$1,559

35E 35W

$1,559-$2,226 45

$2,226-$4,439 SOURCE: RealPage, December 2018

SPRING 2019

You may want to live in an apartment building with a concierge. Several Dallas-area luxury apartment buildings employ people who not only monitor who enters and leaves the building, but who also assist residents, collecting mail when they are away on vacation, letting in repairmen when they can’t be home, taking in packages and other deliveries, and handling emergencies if they are away. Talk to your real estate agent or work with an apartment locator who specializes in high-end rentals to find the right level of service for you.

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Modern developments in every corner of the region make the transition of a Dallas move easier than ever. These well-thought-out living centers make it possible to have a community where you literally walk from the place you live to shopping, dining, entertainment, green space, public transport, and sometimes even your workplace. Imagine how much time that frees up, and how flexible your schedule becomes â&#x20AC;&#x201D; not to mention the social opportunities it affords. In Dallas-Fort Worth, you are lucky to have many options for this style of living. We highlight just a few notable locations. Many more are in the process of being built.

DOWNTOWN DENTON

McKINNEY URBAN VILLAGE

20 FRISCO SQUARE

9

DOWNTOWN McKINNEY

THE GATE

FRISCO STATION THE STAR LEGACY WEST GRANDSCAPE

12 WATTERS CREEK

10 LEGACY TOWN

CENTER

HIGHLAND VILLAGE

15

17 DOWNTOWN PLANO

PARKER SQUARE

18

CITYLINE AMLI GALATYN STATION

ADDISON CIRCLE

DOWNTOWN ROANOKE

14

DOWNTOWN GRAPEVINE

SOUTHLAKE TOWN SQUARE

CYPRESS WATERS

19

13 ALLIANCE TOWN CENTER WATER STREET

16 EASTSIDE

11

BRICK ROW

DOWNTOWN CARROLLTON

FIREWHEEL TOWN CENTER

VILLAGE AT ROWLETT

PRESTON HOLLOW VILLAGE

PARK LANE PLACE

ROCKWALL COMMONS

1 MOCKINGBIRD STATION VIRIDIAN TRINITY RIVER VISION WEST 7TH

7

WEST VILLAGE/CITYPLACE 2 VICTORY PARK 3 TRINITY GROVES/WEST DALLAS 5

BISHOP ARTS DISTRICT

ARLINGTON CITY CENTER

MAGNOLIA AVENUE

DEEP ELLUM

MAIN ST 6 CEDARS/SOUTHSIDE

4

8 SUNDANCE SQUARE

LOWER GREENVILLE

LANCASTER URBAN VILLAGE DUNCANVILLE MAIN STREET DESOTO TOWN CENTER DOWNTOWN MANSFIELD DOWNTOWN BURLESON

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LIVE-WORK-PLAY

DALLAS Centered around a park and ride DART Station. Houses an Angelika Film Center, restaurants, shopping, loft-style offices, and dwellings.

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SOUTHSIDE ON LAMAR

DALLAS Conversion of an old Sears distribution center into lofts with community space for artists, bars, and retail.

11

ADDISON CIRCLE

ADDISON You’ll remember it for the giant blue steel sculpture in the center of a roundabout. You’ll visit for events like Kaboom Town and Oktoberfest.

16

EASTSIDE

RICHARDSON Next to a DART line for a downtown commute and the Telecom Corridor. Services plus a variety of dining options on-site could render you car-free.

SPRING 2019

WEST VILLAGE

DALLAS Pioneering walkable district in the heart of Uptown. Accessed by DART and the M-Line Trolley. Magnolia Theatre joins scene-packed dining and unique retail.

7

WEST 7TH

FORT WORTH The former headquarters of Acme Brick is now a pedestrian-friendly urban entertainment district not far from downtown, near TCU.

12

WATTERS CREEK

ALLEN The first LEED-certified retail complex in Texas offers open-air shopping, dining, office space, and apartments along with concerts and events.

17

McKINNEY URBAN VILLAGE

MCKINNEY This still-in-progress hub of apartment living, working, and playing will also incorporate a medical district nearby.

3

VICTORY PARK

DALLAS Anchored by the American Airlines Center with a big crowdgathering screen-filled plaza. High-rise living is upscale and serviceoriented.

8

SUNDANCE SQUARE

FORT WORTH Park free on the 35 blocks of brick-paved streets in downtown Fort Worth. Features restored turnof-the-century buildings and an expansive plaza.

13

ALLIANCE TOWN CENTER

FORT WORTH National large retailers shoulder grocery stores, a Cinemark movie theater, casual restaurants, and three residential complexes.

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DOWNTOWN ROANOKE

ROANOKE They redesigned the town’s established Oak Street and plaza, but maintained the historic downtown feel.

4

BISHOP ARTS

DALLAS First built in the 1920s around Dallas’ busiest trolley stop. Recent redevelopment maintains the vintage artsy character with 160 shops and restaurants.

9

FRISCO SQUARE

FRISCO Incorporates Frisco’s City Hall and public library along with lots of shopping, apartment buildings, and office space.

14

SOUTHLAKE TOWN SQUARE

SOUTHLAKE The city made a modernized “old-tyme” town square with City Hall and post office in the center of sidewalk shopping and eating.

19

CYPRESS WATERS

DALLAS This thousand-acre planned community sits around a 36-acre lake near Coppell. Includes one of the nation’s first “net-zero” elementary schools.

5

MAIN STREET DISTRICT

DALLAS Downtown Dallas urban revival at its best. Preserved buildings let hotels pair with residences. Active nightlife and dining.

10

GRANITE PARK

PLANO A new boardwalk is planned for this modern design grouping of office towers, a Hilton Hotel, restaurants, and retail.

15

PARKER SQUARE

FLOWER MOUND Newly built but antiquelooking awning-covered storefronts surround a park with gazebo. Also home to the campus of North Central Texas College.

20

DOWNTOWN McKINNEY

MCKINNEY The revamped original historic town square sits in the middle of quaint shops, local restaurants, and entertainment venues.

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LIVING

MOCKINGBIRD STATION

2

HOUSING

1


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CULTURE

PEOPLE, ARTS, ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS DALLAS & FORT WORTH ARTS DISTRICTS | ENTERTAINMENT DISTRICTS FAMILY ACTIVITIES | SHOPPING | SPORTS | RELIGION INTERNATIONAL STUDIES AND DIVERSITY GLBT | DEMOGRAPHICS | POPULATION | MARKET TAPESTRY

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AURORA, A PUBLIC ART EVENT IN DOWNTOWN DALLAS

PHOTO: MICHAEL SAMPLES


BENJAMIN LUCZAK

CITY: Dallas NEIGHBORHOOD: Oak Lawn COMPANY/TITLE: Dallas Summer Musicals, Director of Individual Giving When did you move here? Where from? I relocated to Dallas in April 2018. I previously resided in Omaha, where I was the associate director of development, donor relations, at Omaha Performing Arts. Where else have you lived? Pittsburgh, New York City, and the greater Washington, D.C. area. What made you Say Yes to Dallas? I have a BFA in Musical Theatre, an MS

The Dallas Region is diverse and changing every day. The rapid influx of people has made us the fastest-growing U.S. metro over the past decade. Whether you’re looking for fine arts, entertainment, professional sports, or giving back, you’ll never run out of activities in Dallas — fun here knows no bounds.

in Arts Management and a Certificate of Fundraising Management. The performing arts has always been my passion. With Dallas Summer Musicals’ recent partnership with Broadway Across America, and with one of the largest Broadway touring venues in the country – The Music Hall at Fair Park – the opportunity to relocate to Dallas for a newly created position was one I couldn’t pass up. How did you choose where to live in the Dallas Region? Honestly, on a whim! My partner Jimy and I love Oak Lawn because of the walkability to restaurants and nightlife, and because it provides a dog-friendly neighborhood for our three fur babies.

CULTURE

PHOTO: DANA McCURDY

“DALLAS IS A DESIRABLE, ECONOMICAL, COSMOPOLITAN CITY.”

LIVE IN AN

Extraordinary Community Named #1 Healthiest Housing Market in Texas by SmartAsset

Close proximity to Dallas

NA

TIO N

W

4%

ID E

TOP

makes Mesquite an ideal location Mesquite ISD recognized in the top 4

percent of school districts nationwide

for music education by the National Association of Music Merchants

Mesquite ISD Class of 2018 students earned nearly $19 million in scholarships Come Live Mesquite and find out what makes us an extraordinary community!

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PHOTO: MICHAEL SAMPLES

DALLAS MUSEUM OF ART

PHOTO: MICHAEL SAMPLES

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WINSPEAR OPERA HOUSE

MODERN ART MUSEUM OF FORT WORTH

The Dallas Region has not one but two major arts districts. The Dallas Arts District, which is anchored by the Dallas Museum of Art, Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center, Nasher Sculpture Center, and AT&T Performing Arts Center, is nearly 70 acres— the largest urban arts district in the country. Here, you can catch a performance of Texas Ballet Theater, a Broadway touring production, classical or local musicians, a night of live storytelling, TED talks, movies and music under the stars, festivals, art exhibits, and so much more. We’d be willing to bet you could spend every weekend in our Arts District and never run out of new things to do. What’s more: The Fort Worth Cultural District claims five internationally recognized museums, including the Kimbell Art Museum, the Amon Carter Museum of American Art, and Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth. Beyond our fantastic cultural centers, the Dallas Region is home to hundreds of smaller museums and public galleries, scores of professional and community theaters, dozens of local symphony and chamber orchestras, dance troupes, and opera associations. No matter what artistic pursuit you’re into, you can find it here.

MORTON H. MEYERSON SYMPHONY CENTER

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PHOTO: KIMBELL ART MUSEUM

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PHOTO: MICHAEL MCGARY

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PHOTO: DALLAS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

KIMBELL ART MUSEUM

TURTLE CREEK CHORALE

PHOTO: JOSEPH HAUBERT COURTESY OF VISIT DALLAS

ART AND SOUL

CROW COLLECTION OF ASIAN ART

PHOTO: CROW COLLECTION OF ASIAN ART

SPRING 2019


GET YOUR TICKETS

CULTURE

PHOTO: TIM HURSLEY COURTESY OF NASHER SCULPTURE CENTER

NASHER SCULPTURE CENTER

HAMILTON: AN AMERICAN MUSICAL April 2 - May 5 Music Hall at Fair Park fairpark.org SOLUNA 2019: MUSIC AND THE BRAIN April 17 Moody Performance Hall artandseek.org TAYARI JONES April 23 Dallas Museum of Art dma.org REAL WOMEN HAVE CURVES April 26 - May 19 Kalita Humphreys Theater attpac.org UNT ONE O’CLOCK LAB BAND SPRING SHOWCASE May 3 Maddox Muse Center dfwi.org ‘TIL MIDNIGHT AT THE NASHER May 17 Nasher Sculpture Center nashersculpturecenter.org DALLAS FESTIVAL OF BOOKS AND IDEAS May 28 - June 1 Dallas Institute of Humanities and Culture dallasinstitute.org A CONVERSATION WITH MARTHA STEWART May 29 Winspear Opera House www.attpac.org

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THAT’S ENTERTAINMENT Dallas is an entertainment field of dreams. You could start with the 75-acre master-planned development that is Victory Park—packed with trendy shops and restaurants; the House of Blues and Hard Rock Cafe; The W Hotel; and American Airlines Center, home of the Mavericks and the Stars, as well as a concert venue extraordinaire—and move on to McKinney Avenue, which teems at night with hordes of pretty people going from hot spot to hot spot all the way from The Rattlesnake Bar at The Ritz-Carlton to The Magnolia Theatre at the West Village. For something a little more laid-back (but no less entertaining), you could hit Greenville Avenue for its funky shops, rooftop bars, and live music at the historic Granada Theater; or you could bop around Bishop Arts, Oak Cliff’s repository of everything cool and home to some of Dallas’ most sought-after restaurants (Lucia, Stock & Barrel, Oddfellows—to name just a few) and bars. The suburbs have more than their fair share of things to do, too. Plano’s Shops at Legacy brim with boutique shopping, best-in-class restaurants and bars, and the Angelika Film Center, while Frisco Square has Cinemark Next Gen-XD Theater, Toyota Stadium, and amenities such as the Black Box Theatre at Frisco Discovery Center. But we’re only scratching the surface here; there’s so much more to explore.

AMERICAN AIRLINES CENTER PHOTO: DANA MCCURDY

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WEST VILLAGE

CULTURE

PHOTO: WEST VILLAGE

GRANADA THEATER ON LOWER GREENVILLE AVENUE

PHOTO: TANNER GARZA

PHOTO: VISIT DALLAS

SPRING 2019

FRISCO SQUARE

PHOTO: LK PHOTOGRAPHY - LARA K. HANSEN

PECAN LODGE IN DEEP ELLUM

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FORT WORTH STOCKYARDS

BISHOP ARTS DISTRICT

PHOTO: FORT WORTH CVB

PHOTO: DANA MCCURDY

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WHERE THE FUN IS

31 32

34

33 29

121 114

36

27

28

17

35 16

18 15

37

26 25 24 23

2 21

22

12 13 14 10 11 9 34 8 5

6

7

1

20

19

ENTERTAINMENT DISTRICTS 1 BISHOP ARTS DISTRICT

11 KNOX-HENDERSON

2 TRINITY GROVES

12 HIGHLAND PARK VILLAGE

3 DESIGN DISTRICT

13 MOCKINGBIRD STATION

4 VICTORY PARK

14 GREENVILLE AVENUE

5 DOWNTOWN DALLAS

15 NORTHPARK/PARK LANE

6 THE WEST END

16 GALLERIA

7 SOUTH SIDE

17 FIREWHEEL TOWN CENTER

8 DEEP ELLUM

18 THE HARBOR AT ROCKWALL AND ROCKWALL COMMONS

20 ARLINGTON HIGHLANDS/ THE PARKS 21 DOWNTOWN ARLINGTON 22 ARLINGTON ENTERTAINMENT DISTRICT 23 SUNDANCE SQUARE 24 FORT WORTH CULTURAL DISTRICT 25 WEST SEVENTH STREET DISTRICT 26 FORT WORTH STOCKYARDS 27 SOUTHLAKE TOWN SQUARE

19 UPTOWN VILLAGE

28 HISTORIC DOWNTOWN GRAPEVINE

9 UPTOWN 10 OAK LAWN

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29 PARKER SQUARE 30 HISTORIC DOWNTOWN DENTON 31 FRISCO SQUARE 32 STONEBRIAR CENTRE 33 LEGACY TOWN CENTER 34 WATTERS CREEK 35 ADDISON CIRCLE/BELTLINE ROAD 36 OLD DOWNTOWN CARROLLTON 37 TOYOTA MUSIC FACTORY

SPRING 2019


Boutique Chic

CULTURE

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7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

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7

7

7

Mockingbird Station - Dallas West Village Dallas Victory Park Dallas Southside on Lamar - Dallas Park Lane Place - Dallas Montgomery Plaza - Fort Worth Museum Place Fort Worth Sundance Square Fort Worth Legacy Town Center - Plano Frisco Town Square - Frisco Village on the Parkway Addison Rockwall Commons - Rockwall Midtowne - Midlothian Southlake Town Square Southlake Parker Square Flower Mound

Historic downtowns are being redeveloped into regional shopping destinations, including those in Plano, McKinney, Denton, Carrollton, and Grapevine.

SHOP ’TIL YOU DROP Dallas is a fashionable place in every respect. Our ladies love to dress, our men love to look good, and we all love our houses and gardens to seem like something right out of a magazine. Home and high-end clothing retailers Neiman Marcus and Stanley Korshak, as well as more casual companies such as JCPenney, Fossil, and Pier 1, help us come by it naturally. And there’s no shortage of places to shop. The Dallas Region has every modern retail wonder you might imagine: posh indoor malls packed with amenities (think: modern sculpture, an ice skating rink, spas, and more) and every major retail brand; relaxed, open-air centers that encourage you to wear out your credit cards, grab a bite, and linger long after you meant to go home; and boutique districts that beckon with independent businesses with individual flair. We’ve got outlet malls for bargain shoppers and scores of vintage shops for those who love history. In short, you’ll find whatever your heart desires. SHOPPING CENTERS

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3 STONEBRIAR CENTRE

22 17 16

23 3

35W

8 THE SHOPS AT WILLOW BEND

8

9 RIDGMAR MALL

5

20

6

24 14

2

18

9 19

13

10 TOWN EAST MALL 11 THE SHOPS AT LEGACY 12 VISTA RIDGE MALL 13 LA GRAN PLAZA

1 26 820

5 GRAPEVINE MILLS MALL 7 SOUTHWEST CENTER MALL

12 21

4 THE PARKS AT ARLINGTON 6 GALLERIA

11

14 IRVING MALL

15

10 635

30

15 WEST VILLAGE 16 THE VILLAGES AT ALLEN 17 THE VILLAGES AT FAIRVIEW 18 HULEN MALL 2019

4

FIREWHEEL TOWN CENTER

20 ARLINGTON HIGHLANDS

7

21 SOUTHLAKE TOWN SQUARE 22 GOLDEN TRIANGLE MALL

25

23 CENTRE AT PRESTON RIDGE

= SHOPPING CENTER 45 35W

SPRING 2019

1 NORTHPARK CENTER 2 NORTHEAST MALL

SOURCE: Dallas Business Journal, DRC Research

7

PHOTO: FORT WORTH CVB

Modern mixed-use centers are where people live, work, and play—and shopping is a large part of the latter. Here are a few that have come online in recent years. They offer lots of opportunity for fashionable acquisitions.

35E

24 ALLIANCE TOWN CENTER 25 UPTOWN VILLAGE AT CEDAR HILL 26 THE SHOPS AT PARK LANE

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FAMILY

Moms and dads know that when it comes to kids, entertainment is key. And entertainment in the Dallas Region comes in many forms, from flatout fun to fun with an educational aspect. Whether you have animal lovers, nature fans, budding Einsteins, aspiring sports stars, or kids who just want to play ’til they pass out, we have the perfect activity for your family. The lists here are only the beginning. For many more suggestions on what to do with kids in the Dallas Region, go to dfwchild.com.

DALLAS ARBORETUM - Dallas DALLAS WORLD AQUARIUM - Dallas DALLAS ZOO - Dallas FORT WORTH MUSEUM OF SCIENCE AND HISTORY - Fort Worth FORT WORTH STOCKYARDS Fort Worth FORT WORTH ZOO - Fort Worth FRONTIERS OF FLIGHT MUSEUM - Dallas FOUNDERS PLAZA PLANE OBSERVATION PARK - DFW Airport GALLERIA ICE SKATING CENTER - Dallas GRAPEVINE VINTAGE RAILROAD Grapevine GREAT WOLF LODGE - Grapevine HYDROUS WAKE PARK Allen, Little Elm I-FLY (INDOOR SKYDIVING) - Frisco, Hurst

ANNUAL KID-FRIENDLY EVENTS KIDFILM FESTIVAL (Jan) SOUTHWESTERN EXPOSITION AND LIVESTOCK SHOW & RODEO (Jan) DALLAS BLOOMS AT THE ARBORETUM (Mar) DEEP ELLUM ARTS FESTIVAL (April) FORT WORTH MAYFEST (May) ADDISON KABOOM TOWN (July) GRAPEVINE GRAPEFEST® (Sept) PLANO BALLOON FESTIVAL (Sept) STATE FAIR OF TEXAS (Sep – Oct) AUTUMN AT THE ARBORETUM (Sept-Nov) AURORA DALLAS (Fall) THE TRAINS AT NORTHPARK (Nov – Dec)

LEGOLAND DISCOVERY CENTER – Grapevine

ROAD TRIPS FOR KIDS

MCKINNEY AVENUE TROLLEY - Dallas

PEROT MUSEUM OF NATURE AND SCIENCE - Dallas SCI-TECH DISCOVERY CENTER - Frisco SIX FLAGS OVER TEXAS - Arlington

PHOTO: HOUSTON SPACE CENTER

NOBLE PLANETARIUM - Fort Worth

PHOTO: SEA WORLD SAN ANTONIO

NATIONAL COWGIRL MUSEUM AND HALL OF FAME - Fort Worth

PHOTO: HANNAH RIDINGS

IN-TOWN ADVENTURE

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SeaWorld San Antonio: 4.5 hours SPRING 2019


CULTURE DALLAS WORLD AQUARIUM

PHOTO: SCHLITTERBAHN WATERPARK

SPRING 2019

PHOTO: FOSSIL RIM WILDLIFE CENTER

PHOTO: DINOSAUR VALLEY STATE PARK

Dinosaur Valley State Park: 1.5 hours

Fossil Rim Wildlife Center: 1.5 hours

Schlitterbahn Waterpark: 3.75 hours

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SPORTS Baseball. Basketball. Football. Hockey. Soccer. Whatever your passion, Dallas has a winning professional team to cheer on (and if you prefer a professional team from elsewhere, that’s cool, too, because chances are that team will be in town in the future). Riding the NBA’s longest active sellout streak, the Dallas Mavericks won the 2011 NBA Championship and hold two conference titles (2006, 2011). The Dallas Cowboys — who call billion-dollar state-of-the-art AT&T Stadium in Arlington home — hold five Super Bowl titles (1971, 1977, 1992, 1993, and 1995), and they have the legendary Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders. The Texas Rangers brought the World Series to Globe Life Park in Arlington in 2010 and 2011, and have made eight appearances in the MLB postseason. Major League Soccer’s FC Dallas (formerly the Dallas Burn) has been a member of the league since its inception. The Dallas Stars claimed hockey’s holy grail, winning the Stanley Cup in 1999, and hold two President’s Trophies and two

HOUSTON ASTROS VS. TEXAS RANGERS April 19-21 Globe Life Park in Arlington mlb.com/rangers

GLOBE LIFE PARK

USA VOLLEYBALL GIRL’S 18s JUNIOR NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP April 26-28 Kay Bailey Hutchinson Convention Center teamusa.org

PHOTO: VISIT DALLAS

minor league football team, the Texas Elite Women’s Football, the Texas Legends NBA D-League minor league basketball team, the Allen Americans hockey team of the ECHL, the Lone Star Brahmas junior hockey team, the Frisco RoughRiders AA baseball team, the Grand Prairie AirHogs baseball team, the Fort Worth Cats baseball team, and the Dallas Sidekicks soccer team all keep sports fans entertained year-round.

Western Conference titles. And that’s just the tip of the hockey stick, so to speak. The Dallas Region hosts two PGA Tour events. The AT&T Byron Nelson will move to its new home at the Trinity Forest Golf Club in 2018, and the DEAN & DELUCA Invitational takes place at Colonial Country Club in Fort Worth each spring. There’s auto racing at Texas Motor Speedway. We’ve also got minor league teams galore. The Texas Revolution indoor

FC DALLAS VS. SAN JOSE EARTHQUAKES April 27 Toyota Stadium & Soccer Center fcdallas.com FRISCO ROUGHRIDERS VS. ARKANSAS TRAVELERS May 1 Dr Pepper Ballpark milb.com/frisco AT&T BYRON NELSON May 6-12 Trinity Forest Golf Club attbyronnelson.org THE U.S. FINALS May 11 Kay Bailey Hutchinson Convention Center theusfinals.com

35

SPORTS VENUES 1 3

35E 121

2

1 TOYOTA STADIUM 2 DR PEPPER BALLPARK

75

3 ALLEN EVENT CENTER 4

4 TEXAS MOTOR SPEEDWAY

35E

5 NYTEX SPORTS CENTRE 6 COWTOWN COLISEUM

121 114

35W

7 LAGRAVE FIELD 8 PENNINGTON FIELD

635

9 GLOBE LIFE PARK IN ARLINGTON 75 35W

13

5 820

8

11 LONE STAR PARK AT GRAND PRAIRIE

30

12 QUIKTRIP PARK 13 TPC FOUR SEASONS LAS COLINAS

161

30

78

183

6 7

10 AT&T STADIUM

11 12

14

80

12

9 10

15

14 AMERICAN AIRLINES CENTER 15 RESISTOL ARENA

360

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RELIGION

The Dallas Region is a marvelous mix of people of all faiths, Christian and non-Christian alike. Members of every Protestant group will find church homes here, as well as Catholics, Mormons, Seventh-Day Adventists, and Unitarian Universalists. Non-Christian faiths represented here include Judaism, Islam, Buddhism, and Hinduism, as well as smaller groups such as Bahá’í Faith, Jain, Sikh, Tao, and Zoroastrian.

CATHEDRAL SHRINE OF THE VIRGIN OF GUADALUPE

CHAPEL OF THANKSGIVING

CHUA DAO QUANG BUDDHIST TEMPLE, GARLAND

PHOTOS: MICHAEL SAMPLES

> MegaFest, a family-oriented inspirational festival led by Bishop T.D. Jakes, drew 80,000 attendees from more than 30 countries to Dallas in August 2017.

SPRING 2019

> Cathedral Shrine of the Virgin of Guadalupe, in the Arts District portion of downtown Dallas, has the largest Latino parish congregation in the nation.

> Approximately two dozen Buddhist temples are located in the region, among them the Kadampa Meditation Center, offering meditation classes and workshops.

> Temple Emanu-El, founded in 1875, was the first Jewish congregation in North Texas and is the largest reform synagogue in the South and Southwest United States.

> There are five Sikh temples—among them the Gurudwara Singh Sabha in Richardson. > Dallas hosts the “world’s largest gay church,” Cathedral of Hope, with more than 4,000 members.

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Folks from Argentina to Zimbabwe call DFW home. According to the DFW International Community Alliance, more than 230 languages are spoken here. With a vibrant and growing immigrant population, the region provides all kinds of opportunities for people of many nations and ethnic groups to come together and share their cultures, talents, and perspectives on the world. The maps below represent clusters of various foreign-born populations in the Region. SOURCE: U.S. Census American Community Survey 2012 fi ve-year estimates. Population groups are mapped by census tract. Individual dots are randomly located within a particular tract. 35

PHOTO: KASUMI CHOW PHOTOGRAPHY

CULTURE

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES

35

CHINA

INDIA

35E

35E 75 121

75 121

35E 35E 114

35W

114

35W

635

635

75

75 78

30

183

820

78

35W 35W

80 30

30

183

820

161

161

12

80 30

12

35E 360 35E 360

175

20

20 20

175

20

20 20

1 DOT = 20 PEOPLE

35W

1 DOT = 20 PEOPLE 35W

35

35 45

EL SALVADOR

JAPAN

45 35E

35E

75 75

121

121 35E 35E

35W

114

35W

114

635 635 75 75 78 78

30

30

183

820

183

820

35W

35W

161 80

161 30

80 30

12

12 35E 360

35E 360

175

20

20

175

20

20

20

20

1 DOT = 20 PEOPLE

1 DOT = 5 PEOPLE 35W

35W

35

35 45 45

KOREA

VIETNAM

35E

35E

75

75

121

121

35E

35E

114

35W

114

35W 635

635 75

75 78

30

78

183

820

35W 161

161

80 30

80 30

12 35E 360 175

20

20

20

1 DOT = 20 PEOPLE 35W

1 DOT = 20 PEOPLE 35W

45

D A L L A S REG I O N N E W C O M E R + R E L O C AT I O N G U I D E

175

20

20

20

/

12 35E

360

134

30

183

820

35W

45

SPRING 2019


A DIVERSE REGION POPULATION DIVERSITY 35

WHITE 35E

BLACK

121

75

ASIAN 35E

HISPANIC 121

OTHER RACE/ NATIVE AMERICAN

114

35W

635

1 DOT = 50 PEOPLE

75 35W

78

30

183

820

161 80

12

30 360

175

20 20

35E 35W

SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau 45

OAK LAWN

GLBT COMMUNITY

PHOTO: IMANI LYTLE

The GLBT community thrives in the Dallas Region, with a widespread sentiment of welcome throughout the cities and business communities. Many company headquarters based in the region, such as American Airlines, Southwest Airlines, Texas Instruments, Sabre Corporation, GameStop, and Dallas Mavericks are leading the fight for diversity and gay rights in the state — and those are just a few of the business supporters. KEY NEIGHBORHOODS

> OAK LAWN – This neighborhood, affectionately called “The Gayborhood,” hosts a high concentration of GLBT residents, shops, restaurants and nightclubs. Popular joints include Round-Up Saloon, Jr’s Bar & Grill, Sue Ellen’s, Station 4 (S4), and The Rose Room. > OAK CLIFF – Home to the Bishop Arts District, Trinity Groves, Kessler Park and many historic designated neighborhoods. Favorite restaurants include Hattie’s, Jonathan’s, Spiral Diner (vegan) and Hunky’s Old Fashioned Hamburgers.

SPRING 2019

LOCAL RESOURCES

> BLACK TIE DINNER – Largest fund raising dinner for the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender community in the nation. > CATHEDRAL OF HOPE – Dallas hosts the “world’s largest gay church,” Cathedral of Hope, with more than 4,000 members. > THE DALLAS VOICE – Keep in touch with the Dallas GLBT community through the weekly magazine. > NORTH TEXAS GLBT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE – Achieving equality through business and proponents of the GLBT WE Zone.

> OUT OF THE CLOSET THRIFT STORE – Offers free HIV testing and other medical support. The proceeds of shopping and donating go to support the Aids Healthcare Foundation. > RESOURCE CENTER – The Dallas-based center provides culturally sensitive, GLBT-friendly services including low-cost mental health counseling, vaccinations, lab work, transgender health and HIV services.

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The racial makeup of the Dallas Region is more diverse than you may think. Though the majority of our residents are Caucasian or Hispanic, our racial representation spans the world, encompassing ethnicities from every corner of the globe. Pockets of people from various countries pepper the metro area, giving the region a rich, international texture.


AARON THRONEBERRY CITY: Dallas NEIGHBORHOOD: Uptown COMPANY/TITLE: Dallas Cowboys, Special Events Sales Manager When did you move here? Where from? In 2014, from Conway, Arkansas.

How did you choose which part of town to live in? Being in the heart of the city where I could experience the big city life was important to me. I did my research online and with my friends, and Uptown, Deep Ellum, Lower Greenville, and the Bishop Arts district were all contenders. I ultimately chose Uptown for its proximity to everything—food galore, parks and trails, nightlife, and other young professionals. Not to mention that it was only a 25-minute commute to work. Has your opinion of Dallas-Fort Worth changed since moving here? Yes it has. The cost of living can be affordable. There are plenty of options in the down town/Uptown area. Tell us about your city/ neighborhood. What do you like best? What makes it different? I like Uptown because everything you need is within walking distance. Klyde Warren Park is my go to—they have a dog park, food trucks, free concerts and entertainment, yoga classes, and more. My favorite restaurants in the area are Favor, Uchi and Next Door.

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AARON THRONEBERRY Where do you go and what do you do on the weekends or days off? I am constantly exploring the city. As an avid outdoorsman, I spend my time at the trails on White Rock Lake, and the Dallas Arboretum is a mustsee. I scored a deer and duck hunting permit, so I will be spending a lot of time on Lake Grapevine and Lake Lewisville, both of which are only a little over a half hour away. What advice would you give to someone who wants to move here? If you’re considering a move to Dallas, do your basic research and make sure your commute to work is opposite of the rush hours. What would you miss most about the area if you had to leave? I would miss that there is always something fun, entertaining, and usually free to do. What is your favorite outside activity, and where is your favorite place to do it? Elm Fork Shooting Sports is the most impressive gun range and skeet course I have ever seen. Favorite festival/event? Dallas’ hugely popular annual St. Patty’s Day Parade on Greenville Avenue is my favorite for people watching.

D A L L A S REG I O N N E W C O M E R + R E L O C AT I O N G U I D E

PHOTO: MEREDITH MILLS

What made you decide to choose Dallas? Since Dallas was only a 6-hour drive from where I grew up, I had been on vacations and work trips to the area many times. I chose to live here because Dallas is thriving with innovation and entrepreneurs, which is inspiring.

PHOTO: UNIVERSITY OF NORTH TEXAS

CULTURE

“DALLAS IS THRIVING WITH INNOVATION AND ENTREPRENEURS”

DEMOGRAPHICS Demographics in the Dallas Region are changing as the population diversifies. Just over 18 percent of residents are foreign-born, with Hispanics accounting for the largest minority group in both the region and the state. The region’s low cost of living means we enjoy a higher standard of living on a lower median household income than most other large metro areas.

MORE THAN 947,000 RESIDENTS WERE ADDED TO THE DFW AREA FROM 2010 TO 2017

THE RAPID INFLUX OF RESIDENTS HAS LED DFW TO BECOME ONE OF THE FASTER GROWING U.S. METROS IN THE PAST DECADE

TOTAL POPULATION: 7,399,662 11,200,000 WILL LIVE IN THE DFW AREA BY 2040 SPRING 2019


29.2% 21.3% 28.0% 17.5% 4.1% 34.6

FOREIGN-BORN POPULATION

18.1%

CULTURE

AGE

0-19 YEARS 20-34 35-54 YEARS 55-74 YEARS 75+ YEARS MEDIAN AGE

WORLD REGION OF BIRTH OF FOREIGN BORN

FOREIGN BORN

EUROPE ASIA AFRICA OCEANIA LATIN AMERICA NORTHERN AMERICA

4.2% 27.1% 7.1% 0.3% 60.1% 1.2%

RACE/ ETHNICITY

WHITE BLACK OR AFRICAN AMERICAN ASIAN OTHER HISPANIC

47.6% 15.1% 6.3% 2.7% 28.4%

LABOR FORCE

[OCCUPATIONS OF PERSONS 16 AND OLDER]

PHOTOS: ISTOCKPHOTO

38.7%

SERVICE OCCUPATIONS

15.7%

SALES AND OFFICE OCCUPATIONS

24.6%

NATURAL RESOURCES, CONSTRUCTION, AND MAINTENANCE OCCUPATIONS

9.4%

PRODUCTION, TRANSPORTATION, AND MATERIAL MOVING OCCUPATIONS

11.6%

EDUCATION

LESS THAN 9TH GRADE 9TH TO 12TH GRADE, NO DIPLOMA HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATE/GED SOME COLLEGE/NO DEGREE ASSOCIATE DEGREE BACHELORâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S DEGREE GRADUATE/PROFESSIONAL DEGREE

7.5% 7.7% 22.4% 21.9% 6.8% 22.2% 11.6%

HOUSEHOLD INCOME

AVERAGE HOUSEHOLD SIZE 0 - $34,999 $35,000 - $74,999 $75,000 - $149,999 $150,000 + MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME

[PERSONS 25 AND OLDER]

SPRING 2019

MANAGEMENT, BUSINESS, SCIENCE, AND ARTS OCCUPATIONS

2.81 26.2% 30.9% 28.2% 14.6% $63,870

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1980â&#x20AC;&#x201C;2017 CITY AND COUNTY POPULATION FINAL CENSUS 4/1/80

FINAL CENSUS 4/1/90

FINAL CENSUS 4/1/00

FINAL CENSUS 4/1/10

COLLIN COUNTY ALLEN ANNA CELINA FAIRVIEW FARMERSVILLE FRISCO LAVON LOWRY CROSSING LUCAS MCKINNEY MELISSA MURPHY PARKER PLANO PRINCETON PROSPER WYLIE

144,762 8,314 855 1,520 893 2,360 3,499 185 443 1,371 16,256 604 1,150 1,098 72,331 3,408 675 3,152

264,036 18,309 904 1,737 1,554 2,640 6,141 303 865 2,205 21,283 557 1,547 1,235 128,713 2,321 1,018 8,716

491,675 43,554 1,225 1,861 2,644 3,118 33,714 387 1,229 2,890 54,369 1,350 3,099 1,379 222,030 3,477 2,097 15,132

782,341 84,246 8,249 6,028 7,248 3,301 116,989 2,219 1,711 5,166 131,117 4,695 17,708 3,811 259,841 6,807 9,423 41,427

969,603 100,685 12,753 9,836 8,950 3,466 177,286 3,140 1,737 7,483 181,330 9,212 20,673 4,610 286,143 10,159 20,312 49,826

187,414 16,410 4,539 3,818 1,729 171 60,197 917 36 2,240 50,170 4,466 2,796 877 26,286 3,406 10,789 8,155

23.96% 19.47% 55.26% 63.44% 23.94% 5.19% 51.41% 41.25% 2.12% 42.72% 38.25% 94.10% 15.64% 23.49% 10.12% 50.44% 113.29% 19.57%

DALLAS COUNTY ADDISON BALCH SPRINGS CEDAR HILL COCKRELL HILL COPPELL DALLAS DESOTO DUNCANVILLE FARMERS BRANCH GARLAND GLENN HEIGHTS GRAND PRAIRIE HIGHLAND PARK HUTCHINS IRVING LANCASTER MESQUITE RICHARDSON ROWLETT SACHSE SEAGOVILLE SUNNYVALE UNIVERSITY PARK WILMER

1,556,390 5,553 13,746 6,849 3,262 3,826 904,078 15,538 27,781 24,863 138,857 1,033 71,462 8,909 2,837 109,943 14,807 67,053 72,496 7,522 1,640 7,304 1,404 22,254 2,367

1,852,810 8,783 17,406 19,976 3,746 16,881 1,006,877 30,544 35,748 24,250 180,650 4,564 99,616 8,739 2,719 155,037 22,117 101,484 74,840 23,260 5,346 8,969 2,228 22,259 2,479

2,218,899 14,166 19,375 32,093 4,443 35,958 1,188,580 37,646 36,081 27,508 215,768 7,224 127,427 8,842 2,805 191,615 25,894 124,523 91,802 44,503 9,751 10,823 2,693 23,324 3,393

2,368,139 13,056 23,728 45,028 4,193 38,659 1,197,816 49,047 38,524 28,616 226,876 11,278 175,396 8,564 5,338 216,290 36,361 139,824 99,223 56,199 20,329 14,835 5,130 23,068 3,682

2,618,148 15,458 25,357 48,710 4,251 41,941 1,341,075 53,568 39,487 37,088 238,002 13,084 193,837 9,208 5,627 240,373 39,386 143,949 116,783 62,868 25,937 16,715 6,491 25,201 4,136

251,372 2,396 1,460 3,718 58 3,282 143,251 4,525 954 8,472 11,141 1,938 18,368 645 296 24,088 2,722 4,431 17,555 6,626 5,650 1,811 1,323 2,133 422

10.62% 18.34% 6.11% 8.26% 1.38% 8.49% 11.96% 9.23% 2.48% 29.61% 4.91% 17.39% 10.47% 7.53% 5.55% 11.14% 7.42% 3.18% 17.69% 11.78% 27.85% 12.15% 25.60% 9.25% 11.36%

DENTON COUNTY ARGYLE AUBREY BARTONVILLE CARROLLTON COPPER CANYON CORINTH DENTON DOUBLE OAK FLOWER MOUND HICKORY CREEK HIGHLAND VILLAGE JUSTIN KRUM LAKE DALLAS LEWISVILLE LITTLE ELM NORTHLAKE OAK POINT PILOT POINT PONDER PROVIDENCE ROANOKE SANGER SHADY SHORES THE COLONY TROPHY CLUB

143,126 1,111 948 441 40,595 465 1,264 48,063 836 4,402 1,422 3,246 920 917 3,177 24,273 926 143 387 2,211 297 NI 910 2,574 813 11,586 NI

273,525 1,575 1,138 849 82,169 978 3,944 66,270 1,664 15,527 1,893 7,027 1,234 1,542 3,656 46,521 1,255 250 645 2,538 432 NI 1,616 3,508 1,045 22,113 3,922

432,976 2,365 1,500 1,093 109,576 1,216 11,325 80,537 2,179 50,702 2,078 12,173 1,891 1,979 6,166 77,737 3,646 921 1,747 3,538 507 NI 2,810 4,534 1,461 26,531 6,350

662,614 3,282 2,595 1,469 119,097 1,334 19,935 113,383 2,867 64,669 3,247 15,056 3,246 4,157 7,105 95,290 25,898 1,724 2,786 3,856 1,395 4,786 5,962 6,916 2,612 36,328 8,024

836,210 4,100 3,391 1,732 135,710 1,457 21,152 136,268 3,079 76,681 4,596 16,587 3,847 5,020 7,958 106,021 46,548 2,776 4,218 4,342 1,949 7,127 8,135 8,255 2,890 42,721 12,340

173,673 853 781 166 16,614 137 1,409 19,904 207 12,006 1,184 1,503 601 902 847 10,628 20,671 1,051 1,434 332 558 2,315 2,173 1,333 274 6,413 4,310

26.21% 26.27% 29.92% 10.60% 13.95% 10.38% 7.14% 17.10% 7.21% 18.56% 34.70% 9.96% 18.52% 21.90% 11.91% 11.14% 79.88% 60.93% 51.51% 8.28% 40.12% 48.11% 36.45% 19.26% 10.47% 17.66% 53.67%

ELLIS COUNTY ENNIS FERRIS ITALY MIDLOTHIAN OAK LEAF OVILLA PALMER RED OAK WAXAHACHIE

59,743 12,110 2,228 1,306 3,219 NI 1,067 1,187 1,882 14,624

85,167 13,883 2,212 1,699 5,141 984 2,027 1,659 3,124 18,168

111,360 16,045 2,175 1,993 7,480 1,209 3,405 1,774 4,301 21,426

149,610 18,513 2,436 1,863 18,037 1,298 3,492 2,000 10,769 29,621

173,620 19,261 2,622 1,935 25,254 1,486 4,114 2,073 12,780 35,340

24,013 775 201 63 6,590 98 601 79 2,047 5,802

16.05% 4.19% 8.30% 3.37% 35.31% 7.06% 17.11% 3.96% 19.07% 19.64%

HOOD COUNTY GRANBURY

17,714 3,332

28,981 4,045

41,100 5,718

51,182 7,978

58,273 9,923

7,105 1,943

13.89% 24.35%

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ESTIMATED POPULATION 7/1/17

GROWTH 2010-2017

GROWTH RATE 2010-2017

SPRING 2019


FINAL CENSUS 4/1/90

FINAL CENSUS 4/1/00

FINAL CENSUS 4/1/10

HUNT COUNTY CADDO MILLS COMMERCE GREENVILLE QUINLAN WEST TAWAKONI WOLFE CITY

55,248 1,060 8,136 22,161 1,002 840 1,594

64,343 1,068 6,825 23,071 1,360 932 1,505

76,596 1,149 7,742 24,117 1,370 1,462 1,581

86,129 1,338 8,078 25,557 1,394 1,576 1,412

93,872 1,566 9,145 27,443 1,483 1,895 1,442

7,711 196 1,072 1,902 104 150 43

8.95% 14.31% 13.28% 7.45% 7.54% 8.60% 3.07%

JOHNSON COUNTY ALVARADO BURLESON CLEBURNE GRANDVIEW JOSHUA KEENE VENUS

67,649 2,701 11,734 19,218 1,205 1,470 3,013 518

97,165 2,918 16,113 22,205 1,245 3,828 3,944 977

126,811 3,288 20,976 26,005 1,358 4,528 5,003 1,892

150,934 3,785 36,690 29,337 1,561 5,910 6,106 2,960

167,301 4,124 46,145 30,230 1,706 7,778 6,440 3,581

16,359 372 9,244 593 145 1,469 322 653

10.84% 9.91% 25.05% 2.00% 9.29% 23.28% 5.26% 22.30%

KAUFMAN COUNTY COMBINE CRANDALL FORNEY KAUFMAN KEMP MABANK TALTY TERRELL

39,015 688 831 2,483 4,658 1,035 1,443 NI 13,225

52,220 1,329 1,652 4,070 5,238 1,184 1,739 NI 12,490

71,313 1,788 2,774 5,588 6,490 1,133 2,151 1,028 13,606

103,350 1,942 2,858 14,661 6,703 1,154 3,035 1,535 15,816

122,883 2,177 3,624 20,336 7,322 1,184 3,446 2,450 17,842

19,519 272 627 6,512 722 145 454 568 1,777

18.88% 14.28% 20.92% 47.11% 10.94% 13.96% 15.17% 30.18% 11.06%

PARKER COUNTY ALEDO ANNETTA HUDSON OAKS RENO SPRINGTOWN WEATHERFORD WILLOW PARK

44,609 1,027 454 309 1,174 1,658 12,049 1,113

64,785 1,169 672 711 2,322 1,740 14,804 2,328

88,495 1,726 1,108 1,637 2,441 2,062 19,000 2,849

116,927 2,716 1,288 1,662 2,494 2,658 25,250 3,982

133,463 4,232 3,090 2,335 3,300 2,911 30,654 5,340

16,515 1,531 343 651 126 256 4,872 1,378

14.12% 56.68% 12.49% 38.66% 3.97% 9.64% 18.90% 34.78%

ROCKWALL COUNTY FATE HEATH MCLENDON-CHISHOLM ROCKWALL ROYSE CITY

14,528 263 1,459 NI 5,939 1,566

25,604 475 2,108 646 10,486 2,206

43,080 463 4,149 914 17,976 2,957

78,337 6,357 6,921 1,373 37,490 9,349

96,788 12,090 8,720 2,983 44,208 12,567

18,464 4,950 1,391 1,575 6,652 3,263

23.57% 69.33% 18.98% 111.86% 17.71% 35.07%

4,154 NI

5,360 1,949

6,809 2,122

8,490 2,444

8,845 2,627

354 183

4.17% 7.49%

860,880 160,113 5,822 20,821 13,579 2,169 6,700 5,852 1,100 2,695 24,002 5,387 11,684 385,164 11,801 29,014 262 31,420 4,156 2,594 4,394 957 8,102 30,592 2,431 NI 7,977 6,890 5,736 3,921 2,808 10,284 3,651 13,508

1,170,103 261,721 8,868 43,762 19,564 2,133 12,724 6,974 1,758 2,715 38,149 5,672 11,482 447,619 29,202 32,856 795 33,574 13,683 4,096 4,591 816 15,607 45,895 2,371 1,271 7,978 6,580 8,551 3,928 7,065 20,009 2,350 15,472

1,446,219 332,969 9,600 47,152 20,208 2,388 19,636 7,467 2,186 2,550 46,005 5,836 12,949 534,694 42,059 39,018 1,134 36,273 27,345 5,850 4,618 1,040 28,031 55,635 2,318 1,505 8,132 6,985 12,374 4,181 21,519 21,908 2,124 14,831

1,809,034 365,438 10,947 46,979 21,234 2,394 22,807 12,838 2,259 2,776 51,277 6,108 12,355 741,206 46,334 42,409 1,517 37,337 39,627 6,763 4,584 1,307 56,368 63,343 2,394 1,547 7,801 7,427 19,806 4,686 26,575 23,497 2,472 16,116

2,054,475 396,394 12,495 49,486 23,590 2,482 26,674 15,389 2,387 3,021 55,174 6,348 12,953 874,168 53,982 44,417 1,844 39,051 47,266 8,338 4,960 1,391 68,928 70,441 2,543 1,750 8,052 7,703 23,014 5,836 31,824 24,602 2,726 17,828

243,861 31,058 1,613 2,492 2,263 89 3,869 2,551 128 245 3,894 240 598 129,209 7,648 2,050 323 1,716 7,639 1,600 293 89 12,507 7,098 149 205 265 284 3,208 1,156 5,249 1,105 254 1,712

13.47% 8.50% 14.82% 5.30% 10.61% 3.72% 16.97% 19.87% 5.67% 8.83% 7.59% 3.93% 4.84% 17.34% 16.51% 4.84% 21.24% 4.60% 19.28% 23.75% 6.28% 6.84% 22.17% 11.21% 6.22% 13.27% 3.40% 3.83% 16.20% 24.70% 19.75% 4.70% 10.28% 10.62%

26,575 874 889 3,737 890 4,104 466 478 504

34,679 865 1,041 3,581 800 4,252 651 605 700

48,793 1,007 1,099 4,827 947 5,201 887 551 1,104

59,127 1,334 1,207 5,976 1,002 6,042 1,005 1,522 1,286

66,181 26,474 1,411 6,596 1,116 6,721 1,161 1,747 1,492

7,071 2,235 204 621 101 687 154 217 206

11.96% 9.22% 16.90% 10.39% 9.95% 11.39% 15.29% 14.18% 16.02%

SOMERVELL COUNTY GLEN ROSE TARRANT COUNTY ARLINGTON AZLE BEDFORD BENBROOK BLUE MOUND COLLEYVILLE CROWLEY DALWORTHINGTON GARDENS EDGECLIFF VILLAGE EULESS EVERMAN FOREST HILL FORT WORTH GRAPEVINE HALTOM CITY HASLET HURST KELLER KENNEDALE LAKE WORTH LAKESIDE MANSFIELD NORTH RICHLAND HILLS PANTEGO PELICAN BAY RICHLAND HILLS RIVER OAKS SAGINAW SANSOM PARK SOUTHLAKE WATAUGA WESTWORTH VILLAGE WHITE SETTLEMENT WISE COUNTY ALVORD BOYD BRIDGEPORT CHICO DECATUR NEWARK RHOME RUNAWAY BAY NI = NOT INCORPORATED

SPRING 2019

ESTIMATED POPULATION 7/1/17

GROWTH 2010-2017

GROWTH RATE 2010-2017

CULTURE

FINAL CENSUS 4/1/80

SOURCE: US Census Bureau, US Dept of Commerce

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The market tapestry is a fascinating snapshot of lifestyle choices. Based on demography and geography, the main purpose of this type of data is targeted marketing efforts, but the high-level picture of types of neighborhoods and the people who live in them based on the activities and expenses of those people is a compelling story all on its own. Some segments develop as a result of age, some show up as a result of money, and still others result from ethnic influence.

PHOTO: AMON CARTER MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART

CULTURE

MARKET TAPESTRY

SOURCE: DRC Research

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SPRING 2019


MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME

MEDIAN NET WORTH

POPULATION

PERCENTAGE OF DFW POPULATION

$123,500

$534,000

1,015,664

18.2%

$99,800

$271,900

158,238

2.8%

$80,200

$42,900

232,404

4.2%

$77,000

$197,000

693,823

12.4%

$62,600

$169,400

346,092

6.2%

$58,600

$173,300

237,841

4.3%

$55,600

$84,300

1,281,949

22.9%

$51,200

$38,700

309,033

5.5%

$47,400

$115,600

87,994

1.6%

$43,200

$83,600

234,602

4.2%

$36,400

$12,600

464,677

8.3%

$35,400

$24,700

187,039

3.3%

$36,400

$13,000

279,305

5.0%

$29,500

$10,600

56,039

1.0%

AFFLUENT ESTATES

Established wealth— educated, well-traveled married couples

UPSCALE AVENUES

Prosperous, married couples in higher density neighborhoods

UPTOWN INDIVIDUAL

Younger, urban singles on the move

FAMILY LANDSCAPES

Successful younger families in newer housing

GEN X URBAN

Gen X in middle age— families with fewer kids and a mortgage

COZY COUNTRY LIVING Empty nesters in bucolic settings

ETHNIC ENCLAVES

Established diversity— young, Hispanic homeowners with families

MIDDLE GROUND Lifestyles of thirtysomethings

SENIOR STYLES

Senior lifestyles reveal the effects of saving for retirement

RUSTIC OUTPOSTS

Country life with older families, older homes

MIDTOWN SINGLES

Millennials on the move — single, diverse and urban

HOMETOWN

Growing up and staying close to home — single householders

NEXT WAVE

Urban denizens — young, diverse, hardworking families

SCHOLARS & PATRIOTS College campuses and military neighborhoods SOURCE: ESRI Business Analyst, ESRI Market Tapestry 2018, For median household income: Economic Profile by LifeMode Group

SPRING 2019

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ESRI’s Tapestry Segmentation, shown on the map below, combines the “who” of lifestyle demography with the “where” of local neighborhood geography to create a model of various lifestyle classifications or segments of actual neighborhoods with addresses—distinct behavioral market segments. To create this map, U.S. census tracts are divided into 65 distinctive segments based on socioeconomic and demographic characteristics to provide an accurate, detailed description of U.S. neighborhoods. These segments are then grouped into the 14 Tapestry Segmentation LifeMode Summary Groups, which are characterized by lifestyle and lifestage, and share an experience such as being born in the same time period or a trait such as affluence.


PARKS & OUTDOORS

ARBOR HILLS NATURE PRESERVE, PLANO

PHOTO: ANDREW SMITH

PARKS & OUTDOORS PLACES TO PLAY AND MORE

PARKS | DOG PARKS | TRAILS | LAKES GOLF COURSES | HIDDEN GEMS

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MARGOT MARTIN

“THERE IS INSPIRATION AROUND EVERY CORNER.”

CITY: Dallas NEIGHBORHOOD: Preston Center COMPANY / TITLE: The Ballet Burn – Owner, Founder When did you move here? From where? 2014 from Raleigh, North Carolina Where else have you lived? New Orleans, Dallas, Seattle, Raleigh, back to Dallas What made you decide to Say Yes to Dallas? I have family here, and Dallas was the kind of city I was looking for to further my career. There is inspiration around every corner, and the market is teeming for more growth.

PHOTO: MERISSA DE FALCIS

How did you choose where to live in the Dallas Region? I chose Preston Center to open my business because it is a major hub of Dallas. Being located near the crossroads of two major thoroughfares and easily accessed from the toll road and 75 makes it a breeze to get to. There are a ton of fantastic restaurants, places to shop, and spas for extra pampering.

MARGOT MARTIN

SPRING 2019

What do you do on the weekends or days off? I spend a lot of time on the Katy Trail and at Mutts Canine Cantina. The city is surprisingly dog friendly, so my pup and I venture out to various patios for excellent people watching. I love the

PARKS & OUTDOORS

Dallas has over 230 sunny days a year, and lots of sunshine means lots of time to be outside. Dallasites have access to countless outdoor activities with sprawling parks, green spaces, and several lakes featuring boating, water sports, and trails for mountain biking, road biking, and hiking — you won’t have to go far to find your favorite spot. Dallas Museum of Art and Klyde Warren Park. What is your passion, and how does Dallas help fulfill it? I am a retired ballerina turned entrepreneur. My passion lies in teaching people how to move not only their bodies, but also their lifestyles, relationships, and hearts for the better. Dallas has an avid dance scene and an even more avid fi tness scene. I knew that my passion would thrive here because of the nature of the city: fast paced, healthy, fi t, and conscious. Tell us about the work environment here. Commuting in Dallas can be a challenge, but it is manageable once you learn the ropes. There is a constant sense of hustle, which keeps me motivated to stay on my game. What is your favorite restaurant in the region? Mesero. I would eat there every day if I could. What is your favorite outdoor activity, and where is your favorite place to do it? Dog Parks are a priority, and Dallas has several. I am a member at Mutts Canine Cantina, which is a great place to meet people. What is your favorite festival/event? The Easter Parade on Turtle Creek is a blast!

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CEDAR HILL STATE PARK Cedar Hill 7 Fishing, boating, and kayaking on Joe Pool Lake 7 1,200 acres with 15 miles of mountain biking trails 7 Walking trails through open fields and wooded areas 7 More than 350 wooded campsites 7 Penn Farm Agricultural History Center

1

PARKS AND TRAILS

Big cities are known for their big, pretty, and functional parks. And though parks are not the first things that come to mind when you think of Dallas, our city is no exception. Downtown’s Klyde Warren Park isn’t just a green space—it’s an award-winning innovation. Situated over Woodall Rodgers Freeway between Pearl and Saint Paul streets, it is a park built on thin air. And it’s an urban wonder. Within its 5 acres are a performance pavilion, a restaurant, walking trails, a mini dog park, a children’s playground, water features, an expansive lawn, and much more. White Rock Lake lies in East Dallas. The crown jewel of Dallas’ park system, the lake itself comprises more than 1,015 acres and offers a view of downtown. The lake and surrounding park areas attract walkers, bicyclists, and rollerbladers, and offer kayak, canoe, and paddleboard rentals. Or you can just lay out a picnic for a lazy day along the shore. But these are only two of the lovely parks in the Dallas Region. You won’t have to go far to find your favorite spot.

Nature Centers Who says there’s no nature in Dallas? We know better. Here are a few more spots to take in the bounty and beauty of the land.

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Cedar Ridge Preserve - Dallas Children’s Aquarium at Fair Park - Dallas 7 Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden - Dallas 7 Dallas World Aquarium - Dallas 7 Dallas Zoo - Dallas 7 Dinosaur Valley State Park Glen Rose 7 Dogwood Canyon Audubon Center - Cedar Hill 7 Fort Worth Botanic Garden Fort Worth 7 7

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Fort Worth Japanese Garden Fort Worth 7 Fort Worth Nature Center and Refuge - Fort Worth 7 Fort Worth Zoo - Fort Worth 7 Fossil Rim Wildlife Center Glen Rose 7 Heard Natural Science Museum & Wildlife Sanctuary - McKinney 7 River Legacy Park - Arlington 7 Trinity River Audubon Center - Dallas

PHOTO: MICHAEL SAMPLES

WHITE ROCK LAKE PARK

RIVER LEGACY PARK Arlington 7 1,300 acres of forests and greenbelts 7 10 miles of cross-country trails 7 A treetop playground that looks like a giant treehouse 7 A canoe launch with access to up to 8 miles of paddling 7 River Legacy Living Science Center

2

ARBOR HILLS NATURE PRESERVE Plano 7 200 acres of rolling hills for exploring 7 Off-road biking trails 7 Picnic pavilion and kids’ playground 7 Butterflies, birds, and other wildlife 7 Dog friendly

3

7

MEADOWMERE PARK Grapevine 7 252 acres on the shore of Lake Grapevine 7 Sloping sandy beaches and camping 7 Swimming, paddleboarding, kayaking 7 Large, colorful children’s playground area 7 Migratory bird viewing

4

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PARKS

TRINITY PARK Fort Worth 7 Next to the Fort Worth Zoo, along the banks of the Trinity River 7 Annual events such as Mayfest and the National Veterans Day Run 7 Miniature Railroad 7 Natural surface trails for hiking, biking, and running 7 Fishing and duck feeding

5

3 4 WHITE ROCK LAKE PARK Dallas 7 9.33-mile hike and bike trail 7 Shoreline picnic areas 7 Kayak and paddleboard rentals 7 Audubon Society bird watching area 7 Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden

6

6 7

2 5

1

PHOTO: CITY OF FORT WORTH

KLYDE WARREN PARK Dallas 7 5.2 acres downtown 7 Performance pavilion, walking trails, dog park, childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s playground, games area 7 Free events such as book signings, group exercise, movies, music, and more 7 Food trucks every day 7 Accessible by M-Line Trolley, DART, and D-link

7

SOURCE: DRC Research

TRINITY PARK, FORT WORTH

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PARKS & OUTDOORS

GREEN SPACE IN DFW


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1

DOG PARKS

PARKSLIVING & OUTDOORS IN DFW

1 MCKINNEY DOG PARK

35E

2 FRISCO DOG PARK

3

2 121

3 CANINE COMMONS DOG PARK 4 JACK CARTER PARK DOG PARK

75

5 TOYOTA OF LEWISVILLE RAILROAD PARK

4

6 NORTHBARK DOG PARK

5

7 BUSH CENTRAL BARKWAY

6

8 WAGGING TAIL DOG PARK

26

9 COPPELL DOG PARK 10 REDDING TRAIL DOG PARK

121

114

35W

9

11 LES LACS TRAIL DOG PARK

7 8

11 10

12 TIPPS CANINE HOLLOW

635

13 BEDFORD BARK PARK 14 EULESS DOG PARK 15 WESTMINSTER DOG PARK 16 MOCKINGBIRD POINT DOG PARK

75

12 35W

14

13

15 183

820

17 CENTRAL DOG PARK 18 MUTTS CANINE CANTINA 20 MY BEST FRIEND’S PARK (AT KLYDE WARREN PARK)

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21 MEADOWS FOUNDATION DOG PARK

360

24 CENTRAL BARK DOG PARK

20

25 TAILS N’ TRAILS

25

26 BOOBOO’S BUDDIES DOG PARK (AT BOB JONES PARK)

35E 35W

RELOCATING WITH A FURRY FRIEND There are more than two dozen public dog parks in the Dallas Region. Some are small, with just enough room for curious canines to romp a bit, but others are magnificent puppy playgrounds with separate areas for large and small dogs, agility equipment, and even places for dogs to swim. Being a pet owner is also a responsibility. Here’s what you need to know about having a pet in DFW. If you are uncertain about something, contact animal control in your community or ask your veterinarian.

Texas requires that your pet be vaccinated against rabies every year and that he or she wear current proof of that vaccination on his collar.

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Dogs (and cats) must be registered with the city you live in and wear current registration tags. To register your pet, you will have to provide a current certificate of vaccination and pay a small annual fee.

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80

DINING WITH DOGS

24

23 FORT WOOF DOG PARK

30

12

30

22 BARK PARK CENTRAL

78

18 19 20 21 22

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19 THE POOCH PATIO

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Although Texas state law requires that only dogs known to be dangerous be leashed, most DFW-area cities have laws that require your dog to be leashed if he or she isn’t inside your house or in a fenced yard.

Though there are scores175 of restaurants with pet-friendly 20 patios all over Dallas-Fort Worth, it’s the rare establishment that caters specifically to those who don’t want to leave home without their furry best friends. That’s where Mutts Canine Cantina (muttscantina.com) and The Pooch Patio (thepoochpatio. com), both in Uptown Dallas, come in. 45 the shops Tucked among and apartments of the West Village, Mutts is a privatelyowned park for dogs of all sizes to play off-leash and owners to socialize with friends and make new acquaintances. Separate areas for large and small pups, and a patio where people can eat without having to share their meals with their pets, mean everybody’s happy. Membership is by the day or month. Pooch Patio is a dog wash, doggie daycare, and bark boutique that also has a coffee and wine bar. Dogs are free to romp around both inside the building and out, and you’re welcome to bring in a doggie bag, er, lunch if you wish. No membership required.

Likewise, many cities in our area have passed pooper scooper laws, so if your pet poops on someone else’s property or public property, pick it up. It’s not only the nice thing to do, it’s illegal not to. SPRING 2019


PARKS & OUTDOORS

MORE NOTEWORTHY TRAILS Arbor Hills Nature Preserve - Plano 7 Big Cedar Wilderness Trails - Dallas 7 Blue Ridge Park Trail Allen 7 Cedar Hill State Park Cedar Hill 7 Connemara Conservancy - Allen 7 Fort Worth Nature Center & Refuge - Fort Worth 7 Heard Natural Science Museum & Wildlife Sanctuary - McKinney 7 Joppa Preserve Dallas 7 Oak Cliff Nature Preserve - Oak Cliff 7 Parkhill Prairie – near Farmersville 7 Post Oak Preserve Seagoville 7 Scyene Overlook/ Piedmont Ridge Southeast Dallas 7 Spring Creek Forest Preserve Garland 7 Spring Creek Nature Area - Richardson 7 Tandy Hills Natural Area - Fort Worth 7 Texas Buckeye Trail – Southeast Dallas 7 Trinity River Audubon Center - Southeast Dallas 7 Twelve Hills Nature Center - Oak Cliff 7

PHOTO: CITY OF ALLEN

CONNEMARA CONSERVANCY, ALLEN

WALK AND ROLL

On average, there are 232 sunny days a year in the Dallas Region, and lots of sunshine means lots of time to be outside. Walking, running, hiking, and biking are popular here, and we’ve got plenty of places to explore outdoors. The city of Dallas has more than 100 miles of hike and bike trails—and outside the city, where urban life gives way to more pastoral pursuits, you’ll find so many more. The Katy, Santa Fe, and White Rock trails are lovely paved paths, but if a walk (or ride) in the woods is more to your liking, it’s only a matter of effort. Certified Master Naturalist Bill Holston recommends Cedar Ridge Preserve in South Dallas for its wooded hills and wildlife, Dogwood Canyon in Cedar Hill for its hilly terrain and flowering trees in spring, and Oak Point Park and Nature Preserve in Plano for its creeks, ponds, and easy-to-follow routes.

TRAILS

1 ERWIN PARK

1

2 FRISCO NW COMMUNITY PARK TRAIL

35

2

3 KNOB HILLS 4 ARBOR HILLS

35E 121

3

4 35E

THE FIVE MOST POPULAR TRAILS, ACCORDING TO DORBA* 1 2 3 4 5

Big Cedar Wilderness Trail - Dallas Boulder Park - Dallas Northshore Trail – Flower Mound River Legacy Parks Mountain Bike Trail - Arlington Rowlett Creek Preserve - Garland

*Dallas Off-Road Bicycle Association For more information, go to dorba.org.

5 9

114

35W

5 NORTHSHORE TRAIL

75

6 KATIE JACKSON

6

121

7 8

635 75

78

10 HARRY MOSS PARK

30

183

820

12

161

11

80

12

30

15

175

14

20

11 L.B. HOUSTON NATURE TRAILS 12 RIVER LEGACY

13

360

20

8 ROWLETT CREEK PRESERVE 9 HORSESHOE

10 35W

7 SQUABBLE CREEK

16

35E 35W

13 OAK CLIFF NATURE PRESERVE 14 BOULDER PARK 15 BIG CEDAR 16 GOAT ISLAND PRESERVE

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PARKS & OUTDOORS WHITE ROCK LAKE PHOTO: MICHAEL SAMPLES

LAKES The Dallas Region has shores galore (though we do have to replace the surfboard with a wakeboard). The roughly 8,000-acre Grapevine Lake in Grapevine (where else?) is best known for its diversity of watersports. You can engage in many types of activities there, from swimming and boating to jet skiing and windsurfing. The lake also has good fishing and nice campgrounds. Joe Pool Lake, southwest of Dallas, is nearly as big, at roughly 7,000 acres. Joe Pool Marina and Lynn Creek Marina have hundreds of wet slips for all kinds of boats; rentals are available, too. Though the lake has great camping in Cedar Hill State Park and nice beaches, it is best known for its excellent fish stock: largemouth black bass; white, striped, and yellow bass; carp; catfish; crappie; gar; and sunfish. Reeling one in is as easy as baiting a hook.

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MORE PLACES TO MAKE A SPLASH Lake Arlington - Arlington Benbrook Lake - Southwest Tarrant County 7 Eagle Mountain Lake - Northwest Tarrant County 7 Lake Lavon - near Wylie 7 Lake Worth - Fort Worth 7 Lake Tawakoni - near Greenville 7 Cedar Creek Reservoir - Henderson & Kaufman counties 7 7

SPRING 2019


LAKES

PARKS & OUTDOORS

RAY ROBERTS LAKE

LAKE BRIDGEPORT LAVON LAKE

LEWISVILLE LAKE

GRAPEVINE LAKE NORTH LAKE

EAGLE MOUNTAIN LAKE LAKE MINERAL WELLS

WEATHERFORD LAKE

WHITE ROCK LAKE

LAKE WORTH

NEW TERRELL CITY LAKE

MOUNTAIN CREEK LAKE

LAKE ARLINGTON

LAKE PALO PINTO

LAKE TAWAKONI

LAKE RAY HUBBARD

JOE POOL LAKE

BENBROOK RESERVOIR

KAUFMAN LAKE

LAKE GRANBURY ALVARADO PARK LAKE SQUAW CREEK LAKE

LAKE WAXAHACHIE

LAKE PAT CLEBURNE

CEDAR CREEK RESERVOIR

LAKE BARDWELL

RICHLAND CHAMBERS RESERVOIR

LAKE HALBERT

PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK

PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK

PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK

PHOTO: MICHAEL SAMPLES

WHITE ROCK LAKE

LAKE RAY ROBERTS

LAKE RAY HUBBARD

LEWISVILLE LAKE

East Dallas 7 Fishing and picnicking 7 Kayak, canoe, and paddleboard rentals 7 Corinthian Sailing ClubWhite Rock Rowing 7 9-mile running and biking trail around the lake

Northeast of Denton 7 Great fishing (bass, catfish, crappie) 7 Lake Ray Roberts Marina 7 Boating, including boat rentals 7 Walk-in campsites and picnic pavilions 7 Lantana Resort, with horse stalls

Dallas, Kaufman, Collin, and Rockwall counties 7 Great fishing (bass, catfish, crappie) 7 Boating, including boat rentals 7 Three marinas, a number of boat ramps, and several yacht clubs 7 The Harbor Rockwall, featuring restaurants, shops, and entertainment

Lewisville 7 Boating, including boat rentals 7 Five marinas 7 Lots of beaches and picnic areas 7 Nice campgrounds 7 Party cove

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Each year, the Dallas Region hosts two PGA Tour tournaments: the AT&T Byron Nelson that moved to the Trinity Forest Golf Club and the Dean & DeLuca Invitational at Colonial Country Club in Fort Worth. No, you don’t have to be a pro to play these courses — and you’ve got plenty of other options, too. We have more than 100 public golf courses in the area, and they touch on all skill levels and price points. Golf Digest named Dallas National Golf Club in Southwest Dallas the top course in the state. Cowboys Golf Club in Grapevine makes several “best” lists. It’s an “overthe-top NFL-themed golf course once owned by Jerry Jones,” according to the Golf Channel—and a superb course despite the theme-park-sounding description. The Tribute and Old American golf clubs in The Colony also pop up on list after list, but there are many more worth a swing.

PHOTO: ROCKWALL EDC

PARKS & OUTDOORS

GOLF

1

TOP-RATED DFW COURSES 1 THE BRIDGES 2 BROOK HOLLOW 3 CLEBURNE GOLF LINKS

35

4 COLONIAL 5 COUNTRY VIEW

2414

7 COWBOYS GOLF CLUB

16

121

675

21

35E

8 COYOTE RIDGE

8

9 DALLAS NATIONAL

15

121

10 FRISCO LAKES

114

7

11 THE GOLF CLUB FOSSIL CREEK

635

No.

35W 75

12 HIDDEN CREEK

11

13 IRON HORSE 14 OLD AMERICAN

23

78

19 161

80

820

17

30

16 RIDGEVIEW RANCH

360

4

17 STEVENS PARK 18 SUGARTREE

12

9

20

19 TEXAS STAR

20 35E

21 TOUR 18 DALLAS

35W

22 TPC CRAIG RANCH

5

12

23 TPC FOUR SEASON LAS COLINAS

45

200

Number of golf courses in the Dallas Region

24 THE TRIBUTE GOLF CLUB 25 TWIN LAKES

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ranking of DFW on its list of Top 20 Cities for Golf (2019)

175

20

20 TIERRA VERDE

150

1

Golf Digest ’s

30

2

183

13

15 PRESTON TRAIL

18

22

10

35E

6 THE COURSES AT WATTERS CREEK

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This list was compiled by cross-referencing lists from Golf Advisor, Golf Channel, Golf Digest, Golf Week, and the Dallas Business Journal.

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PARKS & OUTDOORS

HIDDEN GEMS

Obscure-yet-public spaces still exist in the Dallas region, for those willing to strap on sturdy/sensible footwear and step into the unknown. Say Yes to Dallas has compiled an inaugural list of places in the Dallas Region — both living, dead, and spirit-infused — that urban explorers should visit, if they really want to be considered such. Our criteria were straightforward: These places must be accessible without committing misdemeanors, i.e., the need for hypnosis of groundskeepers or the use of chloroform on distracted security guards. They must be physical destinations as much as states of mind, and they must be places that most people pass by, but are mostly bypassed because they’re not places anyone has to be.

> DALLAS HERITAGE VILLAGE

6500 GREAT TRINITY FOREST WAY, DALLAS, TEXAS 75217

1515 S HARWOOD ST., DALLAS, TEXAS 75215

Note the asterisk at the address above. That’s because this place is so wild, even Google has trouble pegging it with an accurate location. That address belongs to the Trinity River Audubon Center, one of 12 destinations and multiple trailheads within a 6,000-acre plot of land in Southern Dallas. Much of the forest is a landfill that nature (and the City of Dallas) has reclaimed. Gear up if you’re planning a deep exploration. Far into the forest, in a place called Big Swamp, naturalists have reported lairs of water moccasins, snorting feral hogs, hand-size spiders and chest-high poison ivy.

More than 100 years ago, before Interstate 30 spliced Dallas in half, the Cedars neighborhood was a premier destination filled with Victorian homes. Every week, mesdames and messieurs would depart their mansions, stroll past greenhouses to hear concerts at the neighborhood bandstand. Dallas Heritage Village has re-created this experience, right down to a reconstructed plantationstyle (haunted?) mansion known as Millermore. Side note: Stanley Marcus of Neiman Marcus fame was born here. Second sidenote: Bring your wallet.

Dragons are nestled in the green space a few blocks from Dallas’ exhaustively traveled Katy Trail. Facebookers have described this place as a “little oasis in the midst of a major city.” Aside from the (of course) dragon, an archangel issues a clarion call and a griffin (winged lion) stands guard at the park’s entrance. Though the address is listed on Cedar Springs, it’s best to enter from Hood Street.

SPRING 2019

2917 SWISS AVE, DALLAS, TEXAS 75204

The Swiss Avenue Historic District is renowned as a showplace for early 20th Century architecture, from Prairie, Craftsman to Italian Renaissance. Within the district lies our hidden gem for dog lovers: a place known to some just as the “Swiss Avenue Dog Park.” This hunk of green space, owned and operated by the Meadows Foundation, encourages users to abide by their own code of conduct: Bring your own water, be sure to clean up, and owners of small or leaping dogs must be mindful that the park’s fence can be compromised, especially by escape artists.

PHOTO: MICHAEL SAMPLES

3520 CEDAR SPRINGS ROAD, DALLAS, TEXAS 75219

> MEADOWS FOUNDATION DOG PARK

PHOTO: HARWOOD

PHOTO: CHASE MARDIS

> DRAGON PARK

PHOTO: MICHAEL SAMPLES

PHOTO: DANA McCURDY

PHOTO: TANNER GARZA

> THE GREAT TRINITY FOREST

> MARIE GABRIELLE RESTAURANT AND GARDENS

> MYSTERIOUS TEDDY BEAR SCULPTURES IN LAKESIDE PARK

2728 N HARWOOD ST., DALLAS, TEXAS 75201

4601 LAKESIDE DRIVE, HIGHLAND PARK, TEXAS 75205

Another example of urban green space, Marie Gabrielle hides in the shadows of foliage, and can be easily missed. An English garden and reflecting pools often serve as makeshift picnic spots for patrons of Marie Gabrielle Restaurant, but many people visit or happen upon this place out of pure curiosity. Like a woodland sprite, much of Marie Gabrielle’s charm lies in her seclusion — and in the delight that comes in discovering her.

On Christmas Day 1995, the Harlan Crow family donated several larger-thanlife Teddy Bear statues to the town of Highland Park, where they remain to this day. Sure, there’s a waterfall, lily pads and a rolling creek. But it always comes back to the Teddy Bears. The largest bear stands 8-feet-5 inches tall as a cub perches on its left hind leg.

FOR MORE HIDDEN GEMS, VISIT WWW.SAYYESTODALLAS.COM D A L L A S REG I O N R E L O C AT I O N + N E W C O M E R G U I D E

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JOBS

JOBS

AN OVERVIEW OF DFW EMPLOYMENT MAJOR EMPLOYERS | KEY OCCUPATIONS | WHAT PEOPLE EARN INDUSTRY CLUSTERS | FORTUNE 1000 HEADQUARTERS | THE INNOVATION ECOSYSTEM

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PHOTO: TEXAS S P R I NINSTRUMENTS G 2019


VISIT SAYYESTODALLAS.COM

TO FIND JOBS IN THE DALLAS REGION

BIG-TIME BUSINESSES CONSTRUCTION Austin Industries Balfour Beatty Brandt Byrne Construction Services Carter & Burgess Centex Corporation D.R. Horton Eagle Materials Entact Fluor Corporation Hill & Wilkinson Hunt Construction Group Jacobs Engineering Kiewit Corporation Lehigh Hanson Company Manhattan Construction McCarthy Building Cos. MEDCO Construction PLH Group Primoris Services Corp TD Industries The Beck Group Trinity Lightweight Turner Construction U.S. Concrete VCC

ENERGY Alon USA Energy Ambit Energy Atmos Energy Corporation Basic Energy Services Bass Enterprises

Denbury Resources Energy Transfer Equity EnLink Midstream Partner Exco Resources ExxonMobil HollyFrontier Hunt Oil USA Luminant Matador Resource Company Oncor Electric Delivery Pioneer Natural Resources Range Resources Regency Energy Partners RSP Permian Sharyland Utilities Stream Gas & Electric Sunoco Texas-New Mexico Power Company TXU Vistra Energy XTO Energy

JOBS

Every day, the Dallas Region’s population increases by nearly 400, saying “yes” to quality jobs and an exceptional quality of life. Because Dallas ranks as one of the most diverse economies in the nation, companies and organizations are drawing from a broad cross section of skills to fill positions in nearly every major discipline. Aside from being home to a broad range of established national and global companies, the Dallas Region is home to a booming tech/startup sector and a strong can-do attitude.

HEALTH CARE Baylor Scott & White Health Blue Cross Blue Shield of Texas Carter Blood Care Children’s Medical Center CHRISTUS Health CIGNA Healthcare Concentra Health Services Cook Children’s Health CVS Health Corporation Golden Living CONTINUED ON P.159

“MY PASSION IS HELPING OTHERS SUCCEED. DALLAS HAS HELPED ME FULFILL THAT END.” CANAAN BAKER

CANAAN BAKER CITY: Lewisville COMPANY/TITLE: Confidant Coaching Services

PHOTO: MERISSA DE FALCIS

When did you move here? From where? 2015, from Tampa, Florida

SPRING 2019

Where else have you lived? Born and raised in Jacksonville, Florida. What made you Say Yes to Dallas? My job transferred me to Dallas in 2015. Since being here, I have

received three promotions in less than three years. During this time, I have successfully completed my master’s degree and launched my side-career of coaching business, Confidant Coaching Services.

Tell us about your city/ neighborhood. What do you like best? What makes it different? I really like the Frisco/Plano area of the region. It’s a nice area, but it’s not so luxurious that I feel like I don’t fit in.

How did you choose which part of town to live in? I currently live in Lewisville. I was initially attracted to this area because it is close to the Frisco/Plano area. In the future, I would like to own a home in that area.

What is your passion, and how does Dallas help fulfill it? My passion is helping others succeed. Dallas has helped me fulfill that end by providing me with opportunities to advance my career, as well as resources to build my network and personal brand.

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SHOW ME THE MONEY

Though median wages and salaries in the Dallas-Fort Worth region generally track slightly below national levels, it is less expensive to live here than in some other major metropolitan areas. An abundance of affordable housing, lower grocery bills, and cheaper healthcare tip the cost-of-living scale in our favor. Below you can see the numbers of workers in various job sectors, median wages, and salaries in the DFW area compared to the entire United States.

MANAGEMENT OCCUPATIONS

176,052 | TOTAL WORKERS $102,233 | DF W MEDIAN $91,286 | U.S. MEDIAN

LEGAL OCCUPATIONS 31,063 | TOTAL WORKERS $88,386 | DF W MEDIAN $78,800 | U.S. MEDIAN

FOOD PREPARATION AND SERVING RELATED OCCUPATIONS

CONSTRUCTION AND EXTRACTION OCCUPATIONS

329,588 | TOTAL WORKERS $20,755 | DF W MEDIAN $21,818 | U.S. MEDIAN

189,090 | TOTAL WORKERS $35,560 | DF W MEDIAN $39,558 | U.S. MEDIAN

BUILDING AND GROUNDS CLEANING AND MAINTENANCE OCCUPATIONS

INSTALLATION, MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OCCUPATIONS

BUSINESS AND FINANCIAL OPERATIONS OCCUPATIONS

EDUCATION, TRAINING, AND LIBRARY OCCUPATIONS

COMPUTER AND MATHEMATICAL OCCUPATIONS

ARTS, DESIGN, ENTERTAINMENT, SPORTS, AND MEDIA OCCUPATIONS

PERSONAL CARE AND SERVICE OCCUPATIONS 137,414 | TOTAL WORKERS $20,967 | DF W MEDIAN $23,158 | U.S. MEDIAN

198,501 | TOTAL WORKERS $32,034 | DF W MEDIAN $33,900 | U.S. MEDIAN

ARCHITECTURE AND ENGINEERING OCCUPATIONS

HEALTHCARE PRACTITIONERS AND TECHNICAL OCCUPATIONS 197,068 | TOTAL WORKERS $68,634 | DF W MEDIAN $66,279 | U.S. MEDIAN

SALES AND RELATED OCCUPATIONS

423,127 | TOTAL WORKERS $30,844 | DF W MEDIAN $28,675 | U.S. MEDIAN

TRANSPORTATION AND MATERIAL MOVING OCCUPATIONS

LIFE, PHYSICAL, AND SOCIAL SCIENCE OCCUPATIONS

HEALTHCARE SUPPORT OCCUPATIONS

OFFICE AND ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT OCCUPATIONS

COMMUNITY AND SOCIAL SERVICE OCCUPATIONS

PROTECTIVE SERVICE OCCUPATIONS

FARMING, FISHING, AND FORESTRY OCCUPATIONS

213,470 | TOTAL WORKERS $72,045 | DF W MEDIAN $67,051 | U.S. MEDIAN

143,569 | TOTAL WORKERS $88,189 | DF W MEDIAN $82,468 | U.S. MEDIAN

67,080 | TOTAL WORKERS $83,988 | DF W MEDIAN $78,118 | U.S. MEDIAN

16,073 | TOTAL WORKERS $66,603 | DF W MEDIAN $66,146 | U.S. MEDIAN

43,583 | TOTAL WORKERS $49,227 | DF W MEDIAN $43,349 | U.S. MEDIAN

198,969 | TOTAL WORKERS $53,205 | DF W MEDIAN $47,507 | U.S. MEDIAN

66,368 | TOTAL WORKERS $41,659 | DF W MEDIAN $40,989 | U.S. MEDIAN

92,140 | TOTAL WORKERS $28,510 | DF W MEDIAN $28,620 | U.S. MEDIAN

77,626 | TOTAL WORKERS $38,531 | DF W MEDIAN $39,923 | U.S. MEDIAN

132,802 | TOTAL WORKERS $22,818 | DF W MEDIAN $24,511 | U.S. MEDIAN

160,249 | TOTAL WORKERS $41,973 | DF W MEDIAN $43,198 | U.S. MEDIAN

PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS

306,123 | TOTAL WORKERS $32,383 | DF W MEDIAN $31,869 | U.S. MEDIAN

650,264 | TOTAL WORKERS $35,558 | DF W MEDIAN $34,764 | U.S. MEDIAN

6,926 | TOTAL WORKERS $21,780 | DF W MEDIAN $24,348 | U.S. MEDIAN

SOURCE: 2018Q4 QCEW, EMSI

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KEY OCCUPATIONS IN DFW TARGET INDUSTRIES OCCUPATION

2019 JOBS

2020 JOBS

2021 JOBS

DFW MEDIAN

54,383

51,377

53,036

54,457

$115,506.82

9,728

7,724

8,027

8,287

$151,940.79

Financial Managers

14,616

13,566

14,177

14,711

$133,130.20

Accountants and Auditors

35,107

43,721

44,906

45,915

$73,809.40

8,389

10,411

10,730

11,001

$82,725.10

Loan Officers

12,662

8,185

8,369

8,533

$69,450.65

Computer Systems Analysts

16,964

22,420

23,048

23,565

$91,736.13

9,962

8,385

8,479

8,536

$81,659.85

Software Developers, Applications

22,262

29,849

31,264

32,506

$109,657.98

Software Developers, Systems Software

13,208

9,823

10,125

10,387

$107,889.91

3,335

4,182

4,291

4,383

$94,434.40

Network and Computer Systems Administrators

10,805

11,991

12,281

12,523

$90,409.40

Computer User Support Specialists

17,027

22,072

22,713

23,255

$51,300.19

6,174

5,588

5,711

5,816

$90,753.40

55,789

61,063

63,420

65,475

$73,688.12

12,378

11,283

11,459

11,606

$57,245.95

38,204

37,344

38,273

39,058

$59,571.56

Bill and Account Collectors

12,715

11,153

11,335

11,483

$38,104.41

Bookkeeping, Accounting, and Auditing Clerks

45,176

43,412

44,245

44,932

$41,915.64

Customer Service Representatives

76,912

88,013

89,848

91,351

$34,130.48

9,394

11,307

11,434

11,553

$45,306.63

Receptionists and Information Clerks

25,507

19,932

20,699

21,361

$27,116.34

Executive Secretaries and Executive Administrative Assistants

17,678

10,932

11,008

11,053

$59,841.33

Office Clerks, General

75,250

104,912

106,632

108,007

$33,897.79

12,904

13,766

13,972

14,134

$61,017.36

6,380

10,430

10,270

10,103

$30,066.78

26,977

23,069

23,105

23,113

$29,415.98

11,848

15,204

15,214

15,200

$38,160.24

1,231

2,183

2,166

2,147

$38,074.53

General and Operations Managers Computer and Information Systems Managers

Financial Analysts

Computer Programmers

Database Administrators

Mechanical Engineers Registered Nurses First-Line Supervisors of Non-Retail Sales Workers First-Line Supervisors of Office and Administrative Support Workers

Loan Interviewers and Clerks

First-Line Supervisors of Production and Operating Workers Electrical, Electronic, and Electromechanical Assemblers, Except Coil Winders, Tapers, and Finishers Assemblers and Fabricators, All Other, Including Team Assemblers Inspectors, Testers, Sorters, Samplers, and Weighers Semiconductor Processors

SOURCE: 2018 Q4 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, and Self-Employed

SPRING 2019

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2018 JOBS


JOBS

WHERE THE JOBS ARE

The Dallas area is home to a large and diverse array of companies. Whatever your field, you will find many options for work here. These maps illustrate the industry clusters—from high-tech to hospitality—in DFW.

75

HIGH-TECH 35E

121

35W

190

820

30

635

183 360 30

12

20

20

Number of HIGH-TECH Advanced Services Businesses NUMBER OF INDUSTRY BUSINESSES 175

1

17

1

75

67 35E

ADVANCED SERVICES ADVANCED SERVICES traditionally have meant headquarters, but also include financial, professional, and technical services ranging from management consulting firms to business insurers, accountants, and legal services.

760

121

35E 35W

88

60

35W

45

190

183

820

30

635

360 30 20

12

20 175

Number Advanced Services Businesses NUMBER of OF ADVANCED SERVICES BUSINESSES 67

1 35E

Source: DRC Research

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35W

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60

1

60

45

760

760

SPRING 2019


75 35E

75 35E

121

35W

MANUFACTURING

FINANCIAL

121

35W

190

190

360

30

635

183

820 360

30

30

12

20

12

20 20

20 175

175

Number Advanced Services Businesses 67 MANUFACTURING BUSINESSES NUMBERofOF

Number Advanced Services Businesses NUMBER of OF FINANCIAL INDUSTRY BUSINESSES 67

35E

1

5

1

35W

JOBS

30

635

183

820

60

45

35E

75

41

760

12

1

35W

121

TELECOMMUNICATIONS

35E

1

60

45

170

760

HOSPITALITY

35W

121 35W

35E 75

190 190

30

635

635

183

820

30

183

820

12 30 20

360 30

20

12

175

20 Number Advanced Services Businesses NUMBER OFofTELECOMMUNICATIONS BUSINESSES

Number of Advanced Services Businesses NUMBER OF HOSPITALITY BUSINESSES 35E

67

175 35W

1

1

4

HEALTH CARE

10

1

760

35E

45

1

39

60

67

60

760

35E

45

35W

112

121

35W 75

190

635

75 820 360 30

30 12

175

20

20

35W

45

67

20

35E

Number AdvancedINDUSTRY Services Businesses NUMBER OFofHEALTHCARE BUSINESSES 1

Source: DRC Research

SPRING 2019

1

35

60

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305

760

/

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JOBS

SABRE HEADQUARTERS, SOUTHLAKE

PHOTO: MICHAEL SAMPLES

FORTUNE 1000 HEADQUARTERS

Dallas-Fort Worth continues to draw Fortune and Global 500 headquarters by growth and expansion of local companies as well as by relocations of headquarter operations. It is both a testament to the vibrant, diverse economy in DFW today as well as a natural progression for this region that is so recognized internationally for its strengths in advanced services and headquarter operations.

DENTON

SALLY BEAUTY HOLDINGS

PLANO

[611]

J.C. PENNEY ALLIANCE DATA SYSTEMS YUM CHINA HOLDINGS DR PEPPER SNAPPLE GROUP CINEMARK HOLDINGS RENT-A-CENTER

GRAPEVINE/NORTH DALLAS/ SOUTHLAKE GAMESTOP SABRE NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE

IRVING

EXXON MOBIL FLUOR KIMBERLY-CLARK CELANESE PIONEER NATURAL RESOURCES VISTRA ENERGY MICHAELS COS. COMMERCIAL METALS DARLING INGREDIENTS FLOWSERVE NEXSTAR MEDIA GROUP

ARLINGTON D.R. HORTON

FORT WORTH

AMERICAN AIRLINES GROUP

FORT WORTH CBD RANGE RESOURCES

McKINNEY TORCHMARK

[322] [647] [897]

RICHARDSON

[620] [775]

LENNOX INTERNATIONAL FOSSIL GROUP

[2] [153] [163] [455] [497] [499] [505] [525] [634] [635] [848]

[235] [365] [397] [418] [736] [793]

DALLAS LOVE FIELD SOUTHWEST AIRLINES

[142]

DALLAS-LBJ CORRIDOR

[192] [714] [724] [959]

TEXAS INSTRUMENTS BRINKER INTERNATIONAL ATMOS ENERGY VALHI

DOWNTOWN/UPTOWN AT&T ENERGY TRANSFER EQUITY TENET HEALTHCARE HOLLYFRONTIER JACOBS ENGINEERING GROUP DEAN FOODS BUILDERS FIRSTSOURCE NEIMAN MARCUS GROUP TRINITY INDUSTRIES COMERICA PRIMORIS SERVICES

[211]

[71]

[806]

[591]

[9] [64] [147] [206] [297] [362] [400] [548] [633] [702] [853]

10 FORBES TOP PRIVATE COMPANIES (2018) 52 71 84 115 119 158

| | | | |

/

REPUBLIC NATIONAL DISTRIBUTING COMPANY, Grand Prairie SAMMONS ENTERPRISES, Dallas NEIMAN MARCUS GROUP, Dallas MARY KAY, Addison BEN E KEITH, Fort Worth D A L L A S REG I O N N E W C O M E R + R E L O C AT I O N G U I D E

133 152 177 213 222

| | | | |

HUNT CONSOLIDATED/HUNT OIL, Dallas GOLDEN LIVING, Plano FREEMAN, Dallas SRS DISTRIBUTION, McKinney SOURCE: Forbes Magazine AUSTIN INDUSTRIES, Dallas SPRING 2019


BIG-TIME BUSINESS CONTINUED FROM P.153

HOSPITALITY & ENTERTAINMENT American Airlines Center AT&T Stadium Ben E. Keith Co. Brinker International CEC Entertainment Cheddar’s Casual Café CiCi’s Pizza Cinemark Holdings Cinépolis ClubCorp Holdings Dave & Buster’s Fiesta Restaurant Group Fuzzy’s Taco Holdings Gaylord Texan Great Wolf Lodge Hilton Worldwide Hotels.com La Madeleine Lone Star Park LSG Sky Chefs USA Main Event Entertainment Omni Hotels Pei Wei Pizza Hut Republic National Distributing Company Six Flags Entertainment Park Smoothie King Southern Glazer’s Wine and Spirits Texas Motor Speedway Top Golf

MANUFACTURING Abbott Laboratories Airbus Helicopters Alcon Laboratories American Leather Atlas Copco Drilling Solutions Bell Helicopter Bimbo Bakeries USA/ EarthGrains Borden Dairy Builders Firstsource Celanese Corporation Commercial Metals Dal-Tile Corporation SPRING 2019

Darling Ingredients Dean Foods Diodes Dresser Encore Wire Ericsson Essilor Flowserve Corp. Frito-Lay Fujitsu Network Communications General Electric General Motors GKN Aerostructures GRUMA HOYA Vision Care North America Interceramic Interstate Battery Justin Brands Inc. Keurig Dr Pepper Kimberly-Clark Kubota Lennox International Lockheed Martin Maxim MillerCoors Mission Foods Motorcycle Aftermarket Group NCH Corporation Occidental Petroleum Corporation Overhead Door Corp Owens Corning PepsiCo Peterbilt Motors Poly-America Inc. Qorvo Inc Raytheon SAFRAN Electrical & Power Sanden International USA Smith & Nephew Solar Turbines STMicroelectronics Tetra Pak Texas Industries Texas Instruments Triumph Aerostructures Turbomeca USA TXI Tyson Prepared Foods

PROFESSIONAL & BUSINESS SERVICES Accenture ACTIVE Network Alliance Data Allstate CA Technologies CBRE

VISIT SAYYESTODALLAS.COM TO FIND JOBS IN THE DALLAS REGION Comerica Comparex USA Compucom Systems Conifer Health Solutions Core Logic CROSSMARK CVE Technology Group CyrusOne Deloitte DexYP Epsilon Data Management EY Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas FedEX Office HKS HP Enterprise Services Huawei Technologies Intuit JLL KPMG L-3 Communications Liberty Mutual McAfee McKesson NTT Data PFSweb PriceWaterhouseCoopers Real Page Research Now Ryan Sabre Corporation Safety-Kleen Sammons Enterprises SoftLayer State Farm The Richards Group Tyler Technologies VCE Verizon Communications ZTE

TRADE & SERVICES 7-Eleven ACE Cash Express Amazon Amerisource Bergen At Home Aviall Cash America International Consolidated Electrical

JOBS

HCA Health Services of Texas HMS Holdings JPS Health Network LabCorp of America Tenet Healthcare Texas Health Resources UnitedHealthcare USPI Group Holdings UT Southwestern Medical Center

Distributors Copart USA Fidelity Fossil Group Galderma Gamestop Gearbox Software GM Financial Half Price Books Hilti North America JC Penney Company Mary Kay Match.com Minyard Food Stores Moneygram International Nationastar Mortgage Nebraska Furniture Mart Neiman Marcus Group Nokia Solutions and Networks ORIX USA Pier 1 Imports Rent-A-Center Sally Beauty Holdings Santander Sewell Village Cadillac Company The Container Store Group The Michaels Companies Torchmark Corporation TTI Tuesday Morning Yum China Holdings

TRANSPORTATION AECOM Hyperloop American Airlines Group BNSF Dallas Love Field DFW International Aiport Frozen Food Express Industries Greyhound Lines MV Transportation Neovia Logistics Southwest Airlines Stevens Transport Toyota North America Trinity Industries Uber Elevate Texas Central Union Pacific XPO Logistics

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THE INNOVATION ECOSYSTEM JOBS

Texas is arguably the No. 1 state in the country in which to do business, and Dallas-Fort Worth is one of the best places in the country to start a business. An explosion of new startups, coworking spaces, incubators, and accelerators are building a thriving entrepreneurial ecosystem in Dallas-Fort Worth.

DALLAS IS THE BEST PLACE FOR STARTUPS

— U.S. CHAMBER OF COMMERCE FOUNDATION

DFW IS A TOP 10 REGION FOR FAST-GROWTH COMPANIES

Deloitte Greenho Innovation Lab

— INC. MAGAZINE Panther Lab Makerspace

NTE

The Backlot CoLAB Common Desk

The Makerspace at Walsh

Criterion Craftwork Coffee Co.

WeWork WorkLodge TECH Fort Worth AccerlerateDFW

Ensemble Locavore WeWork

Benbrook Makerspace

Alcon Experience Center

THE DALLAS INNOVATION ALLIANCE The Dallas Innovation Alliance (DIA) is a public-private partnership dedicated to supporting the design and execution of a smart cities plan for the City of Dallas that leverages data, technology, and community to improve economic development, resource efficiency, and, most importantly, quality of life. The mission is to develop a scalable smart cities model for the City of Dallas that leverages the city’s distinctive strengths in order to leave a legacy of innovation, sustainability, and collaboration for future generations. Initial efforts have been centered in the West End district of downtown, where a confluence of multimodal transit, walkability, historic buildings, and a burgeoning innovation district serves as ground zero for the city as a living lab. A three-pronged strategy focuses on infrastructure, mobility, and connected living. The DIA has partnered with The DEC, AT&T, Cisco, Microsoft, and the University of Texas at Dallas to build a dedicated Smart Cities Incubator—Innov8te—to support startups addressing key challenges facing cities at a local and regional level. www.dallasinnovationalliance.com SOURCE: DRC Research

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The Forge UNT Factory

TechMill Stoke UNT Collab Lab Inspire Park

JOBS

Makerspace at Sci-Tech Discovery Center

25N Coworking

Venture X Formation Serendipity Labs WeWork Common Desk Capital One Garage NTT Data Collaboration Center Venture X USAA Innovation Lab Industrious Ericsson Experience Center City Central Toyota Connected Cowork Suites

ouse ab

Spaces

INCUBATOR OR ACCELERATOR TheLab.ms

HeadSpace

AT&T Foundry

City Central

Sabre Innovation Hub

COWORKING CORPORATE INNOVATION OR EXPERIENCE CENTER MAKERSPACE

Nod

City Central

!

Samsung Research America

Venture Development Center (UTD) Addison Treehouse Blackstone LaunchPad Dallas Collide Village UTDesign Makerspace Makerspace Venture X IBM Innovation Common Desk Center ! TI Kilby Labs VET Program Microsoft Essilor Technology !Revolving Kitchen Center Innovation Center Intelligent Office

Collective Office

Solera R3PI Spaces GameStop Technology Institute The Maker Spot

LIFT

ATOS Business Technology & Innovation NEC Center Executive Briefing Venture X Center

Rockwall Openspace

Rockwall Makerspace

DFW Global CoWork

Venture X Moneygram Innovation Lab WeWork Engage Parkland Center for SMU Incubator SMU DIG Clinical Innovation DFW Excellerator (PCCI) Pipeline at Spryrocket The Mix !Biocenter Capital Factory + DEC Scale Up ! The Study, Irving The Slate Venture X Innovation Center The Work Lodge

EETC

!

Union Worx TechFW@UTA UTA Technology Incubator UTA FabLab StartupLounge Pinn Station

The Kessler Co-Op Arts Mission Oak Cliff Tyler Station

!

Common Desk

Women Veterans’ Enterprise Center Paul Quinn College

UNTD Red Bird Entrepreneur Center

WeWork

Industrious

Hana

Serendipity Labs

Spaces

35

Common Desk

WeWork EY Cybersecurity Center

717 Harwood

BCBS C1 Innovation Lab United Way Sam’s Club Technology Center Social Innovation Tech Common Desk Accelerator Wildcatters

Accenture Dallas Digital Studio Dallas Entrepreneuer Center Innov8te Smart Cities Incubator RevTech

WeWork WeWork Labs

Novel USPTO Regional Office

Common Desk Health Wildcatters Cause Studio

AT&T Executive Briefing Center

GeniusDen

TopDesk

CoLab

Dallas B.R.A.I.N.

Impact House Goodwork Selah Education and Empowerment Center

The Cedars Union

Acme Creation Lab

SPRING 2019

45

Bill J. Priest Institute

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GET TO WORK WHILE YOU GET TO WORK.

Ask your employer about getting your DART ePass today. Visit DART.org/epass


ESSENTIALS

ESSENTIALS

NUTS AND BOLTS YOU NEED TO KNOW MOVING CHECKLIST | YOUR FIRST 30 DAYS IMPORTANT LAWS | TAX RATES HELPFUL NUMBERS AND WEBSITES

PHOTO: S P RMICHAEL I N G 2 0 1SAMPLES 9

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ESSENTIALS

CAMERON WOODS

CAMERON WOODS CITY: The Colony COMPANY/TITLE: Student Employment Coordinator, University of Texas at Dallas When did you move here? From where? I moved here from Chicago in August 2017.

PHOTO: ROBIN BALL

“THERE ARE ALL STRIPES OF PEOPLE HERE, LIVING AND WORKING TOGETHER. IT’S A VERY ENCOURAGING THING TO SEE.”

Where else have you lived? Florida, Pennsylvania What made you Say Yes to Dallas? My reasons for choosing Dallas and returning to Texas were numerous, including: family ties, cost of living and new opportunities in general. How has your opinion of the Dallas Region changed since moving here? I think the level of diversity has been a great surprise. There are all stripes of people here, living and working together.

It’s a very encouraging thing to see. Tell us about your city/neighborhood. What do you like best? What makes it different? I live on the edge of Lewisville in The Colony, and it’s basically a nice and quiet enclave just north of the city. I really enjoy the space, friendly people and general “cleanliness” of the area, if that makes sense. Where do you go and what do you do on

the weekends or days off? Well since I’m from East Texas (Tyler) and also have immediate family down in Round Rock, I spend a lot of weekends road tripping to catch up with family and friends. When I’m not on the road, I love finding new food places, catching good movies OR going to places where I can get both – Alamo Drafthouse!!

MOVING CHECKLIST STEP 1: DECIDE WHEN YOU WANT TO MOVE Moving can be both exciting and stressful and as you pick up your entire life to start over somewhere new. If you have the freedom to pick when you want to move, there are a few things to consider. If cost is a factor, moving during the off-season, such as in spring or late fall, will give you the least expensive rates from moving companies. Try to avoid booking your move on the weekends, during the summer, or on the first of the month as rates can be their highest. If you have children in school, you may need to move during the summer as it’s least disruptive to them. Once you’ve weighed the pros and cons and figured out when to move, use our 8 Week Moving Checklist to help you plan an organized move to get you settled in your new place. EIGHT WEEKS UNTIL MOVE: GET ESTIMATES & MAKE LISTS

❏ Relocating for a job? Find out

what expenses your employer will cover. ❏ If buying a home, contact a real estate agent in Dallas. ❏ Decide if you want to hire a moving company and start getting estimates. SIX WEEKS UNTIL MOVE: PURGE & START PACKING

❏ Begin organizing your closets 164

/

and sorting out clothing, accessories and shoes you do not want to keep.

❏ Choose what you can donate to charity and schedule a charity organization of your choice to pick them up (for example Salvation Army or a veterans’ charity).

❏ Have a garage sale or sell

online (on CraigsList or eBay) value items and things that are not worth the cost of moving, but which you don’t want to give away for free.

FOUR WEEKS UNTIL MOVE: UPDATE ADDRESS

❏ Submit a change-of-address

form. Go to your local post office and submit a changeof-address form in order to ensure that all your mail will be properly forwarded. You can do this online in order to save time.

❏ Request 1 or 2 days off from

your work for date(s) planned for your move (unless you are changing jobs).

❏ Find a new primary doctor

(and pediatrician, if you have children) and dentist and arrange for your medical records to be transferred.

❏ If you have children, check the

pre-registration procedures for enrolling children in school.

❏ Talk to the current and future

school/daycare to transfer school records and make plans for a smooth transition.

D A L L A S REG I O N N E W C O M E R + R E L O C AT I O N G U I D E

THREE WEEKS UNTIL MOVE: TAKE CARE OF SPECIAL ITEMS

❏ Gather important documents, jewelry, and valuables and pack them separately in your personal bags or to ship them with a trackable delivery with insurance.

❏ If you’re driving long distance to your new home, have your car checked up and serviced for a long drive.

❏ Take an inventory of your

most expensive or cherished possessions and take photos of them, to have proof in case of damage.

TWO WEEKS UNTIL MOVE: FINISH UP LOOSE ENDS

❏ Check the pre-registration procedures for enrolling children in school.

❏ Use up food from the

refrigerator, freezer, and pantry, to minimize waste.

❏ Double check that you’ve

updated your address everywhere where needed.

❏ Notify movers ahead of time

in case you’re moving big appliances which may need special handling; likewise, for gas appliances, consult with your gas utility provider.

❏ Refill your medication

prescriptions and keep them easily accessible by packing them in your hand bag.

❏ Keep some cash on hand for

tips and small expenses, as you may not be able to pay by credit card everywhere.

❏ Update your shipping address

on amazon, ebay, paypal and other online shopping sites you use, and direct any scheduled or future shipments to the correct address.

ONE WEEK UNTIL MOVE: TAKE CARE OF FINAL DETAILS

❏ Plan to transfer utilities.

Call your utility companies – electricity, water, gas, telephone, mobile, internet, TV cable, sewer, trash – and put in a request to turn off utilities at the old address on the day after your move.

❏ Pack a personal suitcase

with toiletries, essentials, valuables and comfortable clothes for each person in your household; keep these suitcases with you.

❏ Do a final box count, to have an accurate count for your records and for the moving company, if they request it.

❏ Confirm the important details

with your moving company to avoid any last minute misunderstandings: phone numbers on both sides, contact person’s name, destination address, date and time when the truck will arrive, etc.

MOVING DAY: You’re off to your new home! SPRING 2019


24 THINGS TO DO IN YOUR

ESSENTIALS

FIRST 30 DAYS

WHAT YOU NEED TO DO TO GET ESTABLISHED, MAKE CONNECTIONS, AND FEEL AT HOME Settling into a new community takes time and often requires a checklist. Here are the things you need to do during those first few weeks to get established, make connections, and feel at home.

PHOTO: MONKEYBUSINESSIMAGES VIA iSTOCK

1. FIRST THINGS FIRST: MEET YOUR NEIGHBORS. Research shows that knowing the people who live around you is good for both your physical and mental health. Don’t wait for your neighbors to come to you—be your own welcome wagon. 2. READ UP ON SPECIFIC TEXAS AND DALLASFORT WORTH LAWS that could impact you. 3. GET YOUR VEHICLE INSPECTED. Texas requires an annual state emissions inspection. Many mechanic shops, gas stations, and oil change locations offer these inspections. Find one near you at txdps.state.tx.us/rsd/vi/ vIactivestationlocator. Be sure to take your driver’s license and proof of insurance. 4. GET YOUR TEXAS VEHICLE REGISTRATION STICKER AND LICENSE PLATES. You can do this at your county tax assessor-collector’s office. You’ll need to show proof of ownership, such as registration or title from your previous home state, as well as proof of insurance. 5. APPLY FOR A TEXAS DRIVER’S LICENSE at the Texas Department of Public Safety office in your area. To find the location nearest you, go to txdps.state.tx.us or call 512-424-2600. 6. If you’re going to commute to work via public transportation, FIND YOUR NEAREST DART STATION OR BUS STOPS and plot your route. Buy passes and do a test ride. 7. If you’ll commute by car, MAP OUT FIRST AND SECONDARY HIGHWAY ROUTES. If toll roads are in your future, get a TollTag. Test out your routes. 8. DRIVE OTHER STUFF, TOO. DFW is a big place, and it can be difficult to budget for traffic. As you have time, pick a neighborhood that is not your own and drive to it. Do it a couple of times during different parts of the day. Then challenge yourself to get there and back home without using GPS. This will help you orient yourself to the area and make life easier when you need to get someplace out of your comfort zone. 9. PRINT OUT EMERGENCY NUMBERS, such as fire, ambulance, police, etc. Program these numbers into your phone as well. 10. LOCATE THE HOSPITAL EMERGENCY ROOM NEAREST YOUR HOME. Take a test drive to determine the fastest route before you need it. Likewise, find the nearest urgent care center to your home and office—and review

SPRING 2019

your health insurance policy to discover what it covers. 11. FIND A NEW DOCTOR. Find a new dentist. Find a new a hairdresser. Find a guy to fix your car when it breaks. Having the people you will need in place before you need them is peace of mind. We think the best way to do this is ask neighbors and co-workers for referrals. 12. IF YOU HAVE KIDS, REGISTER THEM IN SCHOOL. If they’ll be walking to classes, map out their routes and do a test run. If they’ll be taking the bus, find out the schedules and routes. If school has already started, arrange a parent-teacher conference to kick things off right. 13. If you have a dog, SCOUT OUT DOG PARKS. Ask around for a veterinarian referral or check out a veterinarian’s office close to your home. Locate the all-night emergency vet clinic in your neighborhood. 14. GET UP TO SPEED ON CURRENT LOCAL NEWS. Subscribe to the newspaper or a community magazine or bookmark the related websites. Check your cable television channels for local news stations and program your radio with your favorites. 15. READ UP ON OUR COLORFUL PAST. 16. JOIN A GYM near your home or office. It’s a good way to meet people and maintain a healthy lifestyle. Alternatively, you may want to join a club, professional organization, or special interest group. DFW has an abundance of running clubs, book clubs, car clubs, environmental groups, theater troupes, etc. You’re sure to find something

that suits your interests. 17. If you’re keen on local politics, ATTEND A TOWN HALL MEETING. Call the one in your community and ask about open meetings. 18. REGISTER TO VOTE and locate your polling place. Go to votexas.org for information. 19. GET TO KNOW YOUR NEW CO-WORKERS. Join an after-work happy hour or ask someone to lunch or coffee. 20. If religion is an important part of your life, EXPLORE THE CHURCHES, TEMPLES, OR SYNAGOGUES in Dallas-Fort Worth. Our area has a plentiful and diverse selection of places to worship, so if your first selection isn’t the right fit, there’s likely another choice just around the corner. 21. GET OUTSIDE. DFW has a lot to offer an outdoors enthusiast, including hiking trails, cycling paths, running trails, lakes, parks, and more. 22. SUPPORT THE HOME TEAM. Whatever your interest—football, basketball, baseball, hockey—we’ve got game (and a lot of trophies!). It’s also fun to connect with your college alumni group so you can support your own teams. It’s a good way to meet people with a background similar to yours and feel more at home. 23. VOLUNTEER. It’s good to give back, but helping out in your new community is a great way to meet likeminded people. 24. GET SOME SLEEP. Moving is stressful. Take care of yourself.

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ESSENTIALS

SALES TAX RATES

TAX PREP

STATE: 6 1/4% (.0625) CITY: 1/4% (.0025) – 2% (.02) , depending on local rate COUNTY: 1/2% (.005) – 1.5% (.015) , depending on local rate TRANSIT: 1/4 % (.0025) – 1% (.0025 - 0.01) , depending on local rate SPECIAL PURPOSE DISTRICTS: 1/8% (.00125) – 2% (.00125 - 0.02), depending on local rate

DFW COMMUNITIES SALES TAX SAMPLE 2018 Rates PER $100

When you move to Texas, you won’t pay a personal income tax at the state or local level. You also won’t pay a local occupation tax or local wage tax. This means more money in your paycheck. Instead, you pay for local government services, such as education, through local property taxes, sales taxes, and business taxes. It’s a balance, to be sure, but for people who are moving to DFW from high-incometax states, this change can feel like a financial windfall.

COUNTIES Collin Dallas Denton Ellis Hood Hunt Johnson Kaufman Parker Rockwall Somervell Tarrant Wise

RATE $0.180785 $0.243100 $0.225574 $0.338984 $0.377698 $0.511899 $0.441700 $0.478700 $0.302318 $0.328400 $0.461590 $0.234000 $0.322500

CITIES Addison Allen Anna Arlington Azle Balch Springs Bedford Benbrook Burleson Carrollton Cedar Hill Celina Cleburne Cockrell Hill Colleyville Commerce Coppell Corinth Crowley Dallas Decatur Denton DeSoto Duncanville Ennis Euless Everman Fairview Farmers Branch

$0.550000 $0.498000 $0.591288 $0.634800 $0.667287 $0.803000 $0.561862 $0.640000 $0.735000 $0.594970 $0.697028 $0.645000 $0.804018 $0.988947 $0.320800 $0.820000 $0.569500 $0.530000 $0.709000 $0.776700 $0.667000 $0.620477 $0.721394 $0.758447 $0.710000 $0.462500 $1.113943 $0.349709 $0.599507

Fate $0.291100 Flower Mound $0.439000 Forest Hill $0.992873 Forney $0.621110 Fort Worth $0.785000 Frisco $0.446600 Garland $0.704600 Glenn Heights $0.879181 Granbury $0.399385 Grand Prairie $0.669998 Grapevine $0.289271 Greenville $0.652162 Haltom City $0.653000 Heath $0.389105 Hickory Creek $0.347535 Highland Park $0.220000 Highland Village $0.563020 Hurst $0.580000 Hutchins $0.682459 Irving $0.594100 Joshua $0.775270 Kaufman $0.898650 Keene $0.897823 Keller $0.413250 Kennedale $0.725714 Krum $0.647489 Lake Dallas $0.661750 Lake Worth $0.434806 Lancaster $0.867500 Lewisville $0.436086 Little Elm $0.649900 Lucas $0.303216 Mansfield $0.710000 McKinney $0.525170 Melissa $0.609541 Mesquite $0.730000 Midlothian $0.708244 Murphy $0.490000 North Richland Hills $0.585000 Parker $0.365984 Plano $0.460300 Princeton $0.688820 Prosper $0.520000

CITY

CITY RATE

OTHER RATES

TOTAL RATE

0.010 0.010 0.015 0.010

0.0100 MTA 0.0100 MTA 0.0050 CTA .005 MTA, .005 CCD

0.0825 0.0825 0.0825 0.0825

0.0625 0.0625 0.0625 0.0625

NOTES: MTA = Metropolitian Transit Authorities, CCD = Crime Control District SOURCE: Texas Comptrollers Office

Providence $0.799718 Red Oak $0.705480 Richardson $0.625160 Richland Hills $0.541880 River Oaks $0.749400 Roanoke $0.375120 Rockwall $0.402100 Rowlett $0.757173 Royse City $0.621500 Sachse $0.720000 Saginaw $0.471800 Sanger $0.679100 Sansom Park $0.787304 Seagoville $0.743800 Southlake $0.447000 Sunnyvale $0.412900 Terrell $0.764200 The Colony $0.662500 Trophy Club $0.446442 University Park $0.245379 Watauga $0.601788 Waxahachie $0.680000 Weatherford $0.489860 White Settlement $0.762186 Willow Park $0.536700 Wylie $0.725848 SCHOOLS Aledo ISD Allen ISD Alvarado ISD Alvord ISD Anna ISD Argyle ISD Arlington ISD Aubrey ISD Avalon ISD Azle ISD Birdville ISD Bland ISD Blue Ridge ISD Bluff Dale ISD Boles ISD Brock ISD

STATE RATE

PLANO DALLAS DENTON FORT WORTH

$1.595000 $1.550000 $1.461000 $1.354000 $1.670000 $1.585050 $1.368670 $1.590000 $1.230700 $1.329000 $1.453900 $1.364000 $1.571490 $1.370000 $1.542940 $1.620000

Burleson ISD $1.670000 Caddo Mills ISD $1.455000 Campbell ISD $1.040000 Carroll ISD $1.380000 Carrollton Farmers Branch ISD $1.370000 Castleberry ISD$1.392200 Cedar Hill ISD $1.376000 Celeste ISD $1.430600 Celina ISD $1.640000 Cleburne ISD $1.630000 Collin College (CCD) $0.081222 Commerce ISD $1.539300 Community ISD $1.670000 Coppell ISD $1.460500 Crandall ISD $1.540000 Crowley ISD $1.670000 Cumby ISD $1.300000 Dallas County Community College (CCD) $0.124000 Dallas ISD $1.412035 Denton ISD $1.540000 DeSoto ISD $1.490000 Duncanville ISD $1.520000 Eagle MountainSaginaw ISD $1.540000 Ennis ISD $1.540000 Era ISD $1.210000 Everman ISD $1.495000 Farmersville ISD $1.320000 Ferris ISD $1.517300 Forney ISD $1.540000 Fort Worth ISD $1.352000 Frisco ISD $1.440000 Frost ISD $1.592500 Garland ISD $1.460000 Glen Rose ISD $0.999000 Godley ISD $1.540000 Granbury ISD $1.195000 Grand Prairie ISD $1.595000 Grandview ISD $1.266100 Grapevine-Colleyville ISD $1.396700

SAMPLE TAX INFORMATION FOR DFW COMMUNITIES CITY

COUNTY

$0.460300

COLLIN

$0.180785

PLANO ISD

$1.439000

DALLAS

$0.782500

DALLAS

$0.243100

DALLAS ISD

$1.412035

DENTON

$0.620477

DENTON

$0.225574

DENTON ISD

$1.540000

$0.785000

TARRANT

$0.234000

FORT WORTH ISD

$1.322000

Richardson ISD $1.520000 Rio Vista ISD $1.600000 Rockwall ISD $1.430000 Royse City ISD $1.670000 Sanger ISD $1.372067 Scurry-Rosser ISD $1.330000 Slidell ISD $1.127500 Springtown ISD$1.359000 Sunnyvale ISD $1.520000 Tarrant County College (CCD) $0.136070 Terrell ISD $1.599700 Tolar ISD $1.390000 Trenton ISD $1.420000 Van Alstyne ISD$1.620000 Venus ISD $1.589500 Waxahachie ISD $1.553900 Weatherford ISD $1.449000 White Settlement ISD $1.520000 Whitewright ISD $1.320000 Wolfe City ISD $1.344000 Wylie ISD $1.640000 OTHER Dallas County Parkland Hospital (HD) $0.279400 Dallas County School Equalization (SET) $0.010000 Tarrant County Water District (WD) $0.019400 Tarrant County Hospital (HD) $0.224429 SOURCES: Collin, Dallas, Denton, Ellis, Hood, Hunt, Johnson, Kaufman, Parker, Rockwall, Somervell, Tarrant, and Wise County Appraisal Districts

2018 RATE PER $100 OF TAXABLE VALUATION

SCHOOL DISTRICT

PLANO

FORT WORTH

Greenville ISD $1.298481 Gunter ISD $1.620000 Highland Park ISD $1.235500 Hurst-EulessBedford ISD $1.273000 Irving ISD $1.401100 Italy ISD $1.519000 Joshua ISD $1.520000 Kaufman ISD $1.550000 Keene ISD $1.401100 Keller ISD $1.510000 Kennedale ISD $1.451694 Krum ISD $1.540000 Lake Dallas ISD $1.670000 Lake Worth ISD $1.670000 Lancaster ISD $1.530000 Leonard ISD $1.170000 Lewisville ISD $1.407500 Lipan ISD $1.480000 Little Elm ISD $1.640000 Lone Oak ISD $1.310000 Lovejoy ISD $1.670000 Mansfield ISD $1.540000 Maypearl ISD $1.289000 McKinney ISD $1.590000 Melissa ISD $1.670000 Mesquite ISD $1.520000 Midlothian ISD $1.540000 Milford ISD $1.170000 Millsap ISD $1.592200 Mineral Wells ISD $1.430000 Northwest ISD $1.490000 Palmer ISD $1.435000 Peaster ISD $1.440000 Perrin Whitt ISD $1.248000 Pilot Point ISD $1.370000 Plano ISD $1.439000 Ponder ISD $1.467790 Poolville ISD $1.345000 Princeton ISD $1.620000 Prosper ISD $1.670000 Quinlan ISD $1.240000 Red Oak ISD $1.540000

OTHER CCD SET HD CCD

$0.081222 $0.010000 $0.279400 $0.124000

WD HD

$0.019400 $0.224429

CCD

$0.136070

TOTAL $2.161307 $2.851035

$2.386051 $2.750899

SET = School Equalization Tax; HD = Hospital District; WD = Water District; CCD = Community College District 166

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SPRING 2019


MUST-HAVE CONTACT INFO Addison, Town of

972-450-7001

addisontx.gov

Haslet, City of

817-439-5931

haslet.org

Allen Economic Development Corporation

972-727-0250

allentx.com

HEB Economic Development Foundation

817-540-1053

heb.org

Arlington, City of

817-459-6777

arlingtontx.gov

Hickory Creek, Town of

940-497-2528

hickorycreek-tx.gov

Highland Village, City of

972-899-5131

highlandvillage.org

Hurst, City of

817-788-7044

ci.hurst.tx.us

Hutchins, City of

972-225-4449

hutchinsedc.org

Irvingâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Las Colinas Economic Development Commission

214-507-5091

irvingchamber.com

Johnson County Economic Development Corporation Justin Economic Development Corporation Kaufman Economic Development Corporation

817-866-0820

johnsoncountytx.org

940-648-3800

cityofjustin.com

972-932-5332

kaufmanedc.org

Keene, City of

817-641-3337 ext. 36 817-743-4000 903-498-3191 817-985-2100 940-497-2226 817-237-1211 ext. 225

keenetx.com

972-218-1300

lancaster-tx.com

972-219-3400 214-975-0406

cityoflewisville.com littleelmtx.us

817-728-3650

mansfield-texas.com

972-562-5430

mckinneyedc.com

972-288-7711

ci.mesquite.tx.us

972-775-3481

cedmidlothian.org

972-468-4118

murphytx.org

817-640-3300

nctcog.org

817-427-6060

nrhtx.com

817-617-3705

townofpantego.com

940-686-2165

cityofpilotpoint.org

972-208-8300

planotexas.org

972-941-7000 972-734-2416 972-346-3502 817-281-9376 972-617-3638

plano.gov princetontx.gov prosperedc.com netarrant.org redoaktx.org

972-792-2800

telecomcorridor.com

817-491-2411

roanoketexas.com

972-772-0025

rockwall.com

972-463-2489 972-524-4700

rowlett.com roysecity.com

972-675-0562

sachseedc.com

817-232-4640 940-458-7702

saginaw.tx.us sangertexas.org

972-287-9944

seagovilleedc.com

903-868-2566

sedco.org

Athens Economic Development Corporation

903-675-4617

athensedc.com

Azle, City of

817-444-2541

ci.azle.tx.us

Balch Springs, City of

972-286-4477

cityofbalchsprings.com

Bedford, City of

817-952-2101

ci.bedford.tx.us

Benbrook Economic Development Corporation

817-249-3000

benbrook.org

Bridgeport Economic Development Corporation

940-683-3490

cityofbridgeport.net

Burleson, City of

817-426-9600

burlesontx.com

Carrollton, City of

972-466-3000

cityofcarrollton.com

Cedar Hill Economic Development Corporation

972-291-5132

cedarhilltx.com

Celina Economic Development Corporation

972-382-8949

celinaedc.com

Cleburne, City of

817-645-0900

cleburne.net

Colleyville, City of

817-503-1000

colleyville.com

Keller, City of Kemp, City of Kennedale, City of Lake Dallas, City of

Commerce Economic Development Corporation

903-886-1121

commercetx.org

Lake Worth, City of

Coppell, City of

972-462-0022

ci.coppell.tx.us

Corinth Economic Development Corporation

940-498-3284

cityofcorinth.com

Crandall Economic Development Corporation

972-427-8300

crandalledc.com

Dallas, City of

214-670-1221

dallascityhall.com

Dallas County

214-653-7011

dallascounty.org

Dallas Regional Chamber

214-746-6600

dallaschamber.org

Decatur Economic Development Corporation

940-627-9109

decaturtx.org

Denison Development Alliance

903-464-0883

denisontx.org

Denton Chamber of Commerce

940-382-7151

dentonedp.com

DeSoto Economic Development Corporation

972-230-9611

dedc.org

Duncanville, City of

972-780-5000

ci.duncanville.tx.us

Ennis, City of

972-878-1234 ext. 2238

ennis-texas.com

Euless, City of

817-685-1422

eulesstx.gov

Everman, City of

817-293-0525

evermantx.net

Fairview Economic Development Corporation

972-562-0522

fairviewtexas.org

Farmers Branch, City of

972-919-2512

farmersbranch.info

Farmersville Economic Development Corporation

972-782-6151

farmersvilletx.com

Flower Mound, Town of

972-539-7378

flower-mound.com

Forest Hill, City of

817-568-3000

foresthilltx.org

Lancaster Economic Development Corporation Lewisville, City of Little Elm, City of Mansfield Economic Development Corporation McKinney Economic Development Corporation Mesquite, City of Midlothian Economic Development Corporation Murphy, City of North Central Texas Council of Governments North Richland Hills, City of Pantego Economic Development Corporation Pilot Point, City of Plano Economic Development Plano, City of Princeton, City of Prosper, Town of Quad Cities DFW Red Oak, City of Richardson Economic Development Corporation Roanoke, City of Rockwall Economic Development Corporation Rowlett, City of Royse City Sachse Economic Development Corporation Saginaw, City of Sanger, City of Seagoville Economic Development Corporation Sherman Economic Development Corporation

Forney Economic Development Corporation

972-564-5808

forneytexasedc.org

Fort Worth Chamber of Commerce

817-336-2491 ext. 228

fortworthchamber.com

Frisco Economic Development Corporation

972-668-5550

friscoedc.com

Garland Chamber of Commerce

972-272-7551

garlandchamber.com

Glenn Heights, City of

972-223-1690

glennheights.com

Grand Prairie, City of

972-237-8081

gptx.org

Grapevine, City of

817-410-3135

ci.grapevine.tx.us

Greenville Economic Development Corporation

800-295-4141

ci.greenville.tx.us

Haltom City

817-222-7723

haltomcitytx.com

SPRING 2019

cityofkeller.com kempedc.com cityofkennedale.com lakedallas.com lakeworthtx.org

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ESSENTIALS

LOCAL GOVERNMENT RESOURCES


ESSENTIALS

(CONTINUED) MUST-HAVE CONTACT INFO Southlake, City of

817-748-8400

cityofsouthlake.com

State of Texas Economic Development & Tourism

800-843-5781

governor.state.tx.us

Sunnyvale, City of

972-226-7177

townofsunnyvale.org

Terrell Chamber of Commerce

972-563-5703

The Colony Economic Development Corporation

972-624-3127

Trophy Club, Town of

Dallas Police Department / Jack Evans Police Headquarters

214-671-3001

Dallas Public Library

214-670-1400

DFW Airport

972-973-8888

terrelltexas.com

Emergency Preparedness

214-670-4275

thecolonyedc.org

Garbage Collection

214-670-8613

682-831-4600

ci.trophyclub.tx.us

Environmental & Health Services

214-670-3092

Watauga, City of

817-514-5813

cowtx.org

Love Field Airport

214-670-6073

Waxahachie, City of

469-309-4000

waxahachie.com

Mayor’s Office

214-670-4054

Weatherford ED Authority

817-594-9429 ext. 102

ci.weatherford.tx.us

Court & Detention Services

214-670-0109

Westlake, Town of

817-490-5720

westlake-tx.org

Park and Recreation

214-670-4100

Wilmer, City of

972-441-3574

Taxes

214-631-0910

Wylie, Development Corp. of

972-442-7901

Tree Trimming (for trees too close to power lines), TXU

972-791-2888

Visitor Information Center

214-571-1000

Zoning

214-948-4480

wylieedc.com

DFW AREA APPRAISAL DISTRICTS Collin County Appraisal District

469-742-9200

collincad.org

Dallas County Appraisal District

214-631-0910

dallascad.org

Delta County Appraisal District

903-395-4118

delta-cad.org

Denton County Appraisal District

940-349-3800

dentoncad.com

Ellis Central Appraisal District

972-937-3552

elliscad.com

Hunt County Appraisal District

903-408-4000

Johnson County Central Appraisal District

817-648-3000

TRANSPORTATION ASSISTANCE Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS)

800-525-5555

txdps.state.tx.us

hctax.info

Dallas Courtesy Patrol

214-653-3465

dallascounty.org/ department/sheriff/ courtesy_patrol.php

johnsoncad.com

Dallas Area Rapid Transit (DART)

214-749-2662

dart.org

North Texas Tollway Authority

214-461-2000

ntta.org

NTTA Roadside Assistance

972-444-4357

Kaufman County Appraisal District

972-932-6081

kaufman-cad.org

Parker County Appraisal District

817-596-0077

parkercad.org

Rockwall Central Appraisal District

972-771-2034

rockwallcad.com

DFW WORKFORCE BOARDS

Tarrant County Appraisal District

817-284-0024

tad.org

Workforce Solutions for North Central Texas

888-548-9675

dfwjobs.com

940-627-3081

appraisaldistrict. net/countyappraisal. asp?county=wise

Workforce Solutions for Tarrant County

817-413-4000

workforcesolutions.net

Wise County Appraisal District

DALLAS COUNTY Agricultural Extension Service

972-231-5362

County Commissioners Court

214-653-7361

County General Information

214-653-7475

County Judge

214-653-7555

County Taxes

214-653-7811

County Welfare

214-819-1800 ext. 1801

District Attorney

214-653-3600

Health Department

214-819-2000

Immunizations

214-819-2000

Justice Center (Inmate Affairs)

214-761-9025

Marriage License

214-653-7099

Vital Statistics/Records

214-670-3248

Voter Registration

214-819-6389

CITY OF DALLAS Emergency

911

Animal Control

311

Building Inspection

214-948-4480

Chamber of Commerce

214-746-6600

City Council

214-670-4050

City Manager

214-670-3296

Civil Service Board

214-670-3748

Controller

214-670-3538

Dallas City Services

311

Dallas Convention Center

214-939-2724

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D A L L A S REG I O N N E W C O M E R + R E L O C AT I O N G U I D E

Workforce Solutions Greater Dallas 214-421-2460

wfsdallas.com

HUMAN SERVICES AND SPECIAL NEEDS American Cancer Society American Red Cross – Dallas American Red Cross – Fort Worth Arthritis Foundation Austin Street Shelter Callier Center for Communications Disorders – UT Dallas Cancer Care Services Catholic Charities Child Care Associates Dallas Life Foundation Dallas Lighthouse for the Blind Dallas Urban League Deaf Action Center

800-227-2345 214-678-4800

Down Syndrome Guild

214-267-1374

Easter Seals Greater Northwest Texas ECI of Richardson Goodwill Industries of Dallas Goodwill Industries of Fort Worth Greater Dallas Council on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse

817-332-7171

Hope Cottage Pregnancy and Adoption Center

817-335-9137 800-283-7800 214-428-4242 214-905-3000 817-921-0653 214-638-4997 817-838-0055 214-421-1380 214-821-2375 214-413-1760 214-521-0407

972-705-5291 214-638-2800 817-332-7866 214-522-8600

214-521-4673

SPRING 2019


Dallas Life Foundation

214-421-1380

dallaslife.org

Lift

214-824-2000

lift-texas.org

817-335-5405

North Dallas Shared Ministries

972-620-8696

ndsm.org

The Salvation Army

214-630-5611

salvationarmyusa.org

877-275-6233

The Stewpot

214-746-2785

thestewpot.org

North Dallas Shared Ministries

972-620-8696

United Way of Metropolitan Dallas

214-978-0000

unitedwaydallas.org

Poison Center

800-222-1222

Visiting Nurse Association

214-689-0000

vnatexas.org

Rape Crisis Center Dallas

972-641-7273

Volunteer Center

214-826-6767

volunteernorthtexas.org

Recovery Resource Council (Alcoholism & Drug Abuse)

817-332-6329

West Dallas Community Centers

214-760-8353

westdallas.org

The Salvation Army

214-424-7200

Suicide & Crisis Center of North Texas

214-828-1000

African Chamber of Commerce

214-628-2569

The ARC of Dallas

214-634-9810

972-241-6450

The ARC of Greater Tarrant County

American Indian Chamber of Commerce of Texas

817-877-1474

Asian-American Chamber of Commerce, Greater Dallas

972-241-8250

The Bridge Emergency Youth Services

817-335-4673

British-American Business Council of North Texas

214-229-8801

The Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Center of Tarrant County

817-924-9572 214-637-6117

Dallas Black Chamber of Commerce

214-421-5200

Union Gospel Mission United Cerebral Palsy of Metropolitan Dallas

800-999-1898

East African Chamber of Commerce

214-267-9189

United Way of Metropolitan Dallas

214-978-0000

French-American Chamber of Commerce, DFW

972-241-0111

Youth Crisis and Runaway Hotline

800-621-4000 (24 hours)

Greater Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, Greater Dallas

214-521-6007

Greater Southwest Black Chamber of Commerce

972-230-0501

214-828-4192

ETHNIC CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE

HEALTH CARE SERVICES Dallas County Dental Society

972-386-5741

Israel Chamber of Commerce

214-272-4817

Dallas County Medical Society

214-948-3622

713-960-0845

DFW Hospital Council

972-719-4900

Texas Turkish American Chamber of Commerce

Health Industry Council of DFW

972-256-2291

U.S. China Chamber of Commerce

312-368-9911

Tarrant County Medical Society

817-732-2825

United Way of Metropolitan Dallas

214-978-0000

U.S.-India Chamber of Commerce

214-346-9559

United Way of Tarrant County

817-258-8000

U.S.-Mexico Chamber of Commerce

214-651-4300

Visiting Nurse Association

214-905-6053

HELPFUL WEBSITES

CHILD CARE LICENSING OFFICES Dallas

214-951-7902 / 800-582-6036

Denton

940-381-3447

Fort Worth

800-582-8286 / 817-321-8604

Plano

469-229-6900 ext. 6901

DALLAS ISD Administration Building

972-925-3700

Athletics

972-749-2450

Attendance and Truancy

214-932-5030

Child Abuse/Domestic Violence

888-572-2873

Communications

972-925-3900

Counseling Services

972-925-3505

Customer Service Center

Dallas Convention & Visitors Bureau

visitdallas.com

Dallas Morning News

dallasnews.com

Dallas Police Department

dallaspolice.net

Fort Worth Convention & Visitors Bureau

fortworth.com

Fort Worth Police Department

fortworthpd.com

Fort Worth Star-Telegram

star-telegram.com

DFW CONSULATES Canada

214-922-9806

France

214-953-0100 ext. 105

Germany

214-748-4915 / 214-752-3684

Iceland

214-272-2363

Japan

972-713-8683

972-925-5555

Mexico

214-932-8670

Early Childhood Education

972-925-8930

Republic of Korea

972-701-0108

Health Services

972-925-3386

Romania

214-522-3799

Physical Education

972-925-6790

Slovak Republic

214-251-8020

Safe and Drug-Free Schools

972-925-8040

South Africa

214-943-1068

Special Education

972-581-4100

Spain

214-373-1200

Sweden

972-991-8013

Switzerland

214-965-1025

Taiwan

972-436-4242

VOLUNTEER ORGANIZATIONS American Red Cross

214-678-4800

redcross.org/tx/dallasfort-worth/locations

Austin Street Shelter

214-428-4242

austinstreet.org

Thailand

214-934-0022 ext. 2204

Big Brothers/Big Sisters

214-871-0876

bbbs.org

Tunisia

972-267-4191

ccgd.org

Uganda

972-387-7860 ext. 13

United Kingdom

214-978-8930

Community Council of Greater Dallas

SPRING 2019

214-379-4357

D A L L A S REG I O N N E W C O M E R + R E L O C AT I O N G U I D E

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ESSENTIALS

Mental Health America of Greater Dallas Mental Health Association of Tarrant County Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD)


ESSENTIALS

GETTING THE LAY OF THE LAND

Bowie

CLAY

Start talking to people about Dallas, and you’ll quickly realize there’s more here than just the city of Dallas. The official North Texas metropolitan area comprises 13 counties and more than 9,300 square miles, making it the largest land-locked metropolitan area in the United States. With more than 200 cities in the Dallas-Fort Worth region, there is the perfect community for everyone. Each community has its own personality, places of worship, schools, entertainment options, and more. Finding the part of town that makes the most sense for you just takes a little time. With a bit of guidance and patience, you’ll find a place that works for you, whether you are looking for an urban apartment as a single person with a pet or a spacious address in the suburbs for your family of five. The Communities section, in the front of this magazine, breaks down Dallas neighborhoods, Graford the suburbs, and outlying areas.

COOKE

MONTAGUE

JACK

WISE

DENTON

Alvord

Chico

Decatur Lake Bridgeport

Bridgeport Ponder

Runaway Bay Paradise

DISH

New Fairview

Justin

Boyd Aurora

Reno Sanctuary

Rhome

R

Newark

Briar CDP

Springtown

North

FORT WORTH ALLIANCE AIRPORT

Pecan Acres CDP Pelican Bay Eagle Mountain CDP Azle Eagle Mountain Lake

Haslet

Wat

Saginaw Blue Mound

Lakeside

Mineral Wells

Cool

PALO PINTO

Weatherford

Millsap

Haltom City

FORT WORTH MEACHAM INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

Lake Worth NAS FORT WORTH JOINT RESERVE River BASE

Oaks White SettlementWestover Hills

Willow Park Hudson ‘Oaks

FORT WORTH

Annetta North Aledo Annetta

Benbrook

Annetta South

Forest

Edgecliff Village

Everman

PARKER TARRANT HOOD JOHNSON

Gordon

Crowley

FORT WORTH SPINKS AIRPORT

Burleson

Cresson

Lipan

ERATH

Briaroaks

Oak Trail Shores CDP

Cross Timb

Granbury

Godley

Joshua

De Cordova Bend Keene Tolar

170

Pecan Plantation CDP

SPRING 2019 Cleburne


Whitesboro

Sherman

Gainesville Bonham

ESSENTIALS

GRAYSON

N

Pilot Point

FANNIN

COLLIN

Sanger

Anna

HUNT

Weston

Celina

Wolfe City

Blue Ridge

Aubrey

Celeste

Melissa

Krugerville Krum Denton

Prosper

Cross Roads

DENTON MUNICIPAL AIRPORT

Shady Shores

New Hope McKinney

Oak Point

Little Elm Frisco

Corinth Lake Dallas Hickory Creek Lewisville Argyle Lake Copper Canyon Highland Village Bartonville

hlake

Double Oak

Farmersville

The Colony

Hebron

Lewisville

Lucas

Plano

Caddo Mills

Josephine

Parker

St. Paul

Murphy

Nevada Lavon

Wylie

Royse City

Westlake

Grapevine Lake Southlake

Addison

Grapevine

Garland

Farmers Branch

DALLAS University LOVE Park FIELD

Irving

Euless

Bedford

Lake ROCKWALL MUNICIPAL Ray AIRPORT Hubbard Rockwall

Rowlett

DFW INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

Colleyville

ROCKWALL

Sachse

Richardson

ADDISON AIRPORT

Carrollton

Coppell

Keller

Richland Hills

Princeton

Lowry Crossing

Greenville Allen

Roanoke Trophy Club

m

Neylandvill

Fairview

Flower Mound

tauga North Richland Hills

McKINNEY NATIONAL AIRPORT

Highland Park

Hurst

White Rock Lake

Union Valley

Fate

Quinlan Hawk Cove McLendonChisholm

Heath

KAUFMAN

Sunnyvale

Pantego Grand Prairie

Dalworthington Gardens Arlington

t Hill

Mountain Creek Lake

Terrell

Talty

Seagoville

Mansfield

Hutchins

LancasterLANCASTERWilmer

DeSoto

REGIONAL AIRPORT

Glenn Heights

DALLAS

Combine

Oak Ridge

Kaufman

Oak Grove

ELLIS

Red Oak Oak Leaf

Post Oak Bend City

Crandall

Ferris

Ovilla

Scurry

Pecan Hill

Midlothian

ber

Forney

Balch Springs

Duncanville

Joe Pool Lake

Cedar Hill Rendon CDP

MESQUITE METRO AIRPORT

DALLAS EXECUTIVE AIRPORT

ARLINGTON MUNICIPAL AIRPORT

Kennedale

Mesquite

DALLAS

Cockrell Hill

West Tawakoni

Rosser

Cottonwood Grays Prairie

Kemp

Palmer

Venus Waxahachie

Alvarado

Garrett SPRING 2019

Mabank D A L L A S REG I O N N E W C O M E R + R E L O C AT I O N G U I D E

Ennis

171


ESSENTIALS

IT’S THE LAW Laws vary from state to state, city to city. Here are a few important laws that may be different in Texas and/or the area you plan to live in.

DRIVING LAWS DRIVER’S LICENSE You have 90 days to obtain a Texas driver’s license after moving to the state. If you are over 18 and already have a valid, unexpired license from another state, you won’t have to take the driving or knowledge test. To obtain your new Texas license you must: > Submit an application to your local Department of Public Safety > Provide proof of Texas residency > Submit a valid form of ID, such as a passport, unexpired military ID card, or U.S. Citizen Identification Card > Pay a $25 fee VEHICLE INSURANCE In Texas, you are required to have liability car insurance. It’s OK if your auto insurance was issued by another state, but it will have to meet the minimum coverage requirement. In Texas, all drivers must have at least $25,000 in coverage for property damage, $30,000 for each injured person, and $60,000 for injuries per incident. VEHICLE INSPECTION Vehicle inspections are still a part of the registration process and are performed at Official Vehicle Inspection Stations licensed by the Texas Department of Public Safety. Inspections must be done with 90 days of registering your vehicle. Emission testing is required in 17 Texas counties which must comply with federally mandated clear air requirements. VEHICLE REGISTRATION In 2013, the State of Texas changed the vehicle inspection and registration requirements, eliminating the inspection sticker. Residents must have their vehicle inspected within 90 days of renewing the state vehicle registration sticker. Under the one-sticker system, It now serves as both the inspection and registration sticker. You can register your vehicle online, by mail, or in person. HELMETS Texas does not require drivers or passengers of motorcycles to wear helmets. The state also does not require helmets for bicyclists. However, city regulations vary on the latter, and the city of Dallas requires helmets for bicyclists ages 17 and younger. For more on driving laws, go to dmv.org/tx-texas/safety-laws.php

GUN LAWS LEGALITY There are no legal restrictions to purchasing a gun in Texas. You do not need to obtain a license

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to own a firearm or register a firearm that you own. It is legal to carry a shotgun or a rifle without having a handler’s license. Handguns can be carried in some places without a Texas Concealed Handgun License (CHL). LICENSING You may carry a concealed handgun in most places in Texas if you have a CHL, but you must carry the CHL with you. Texas has reciprocity agreements with 30 states. However, there are some places and circumstances you cannot carry a handgun legally even with a CHL. Owners of any establishment can prohibit handguns on their properties if they post a legal notice. For more on Texas gun laws, go to txdps.state.tx.us/rsd/chl

LABOR LAWS RIGHT TO WORK Texas is a right-to-work state. That means you cannot be denied employment for participation or nonparticipation in a labor union/organization. Your employer cannot discriminate against you for choosing to join or not join a union. Texas is also an employment-at-will state, which means the employer or employee can terminate employment at any time, for any reason, with few exceptions. For more information on labor laws, go to texasattorneygeneral.gov/agency/ righttowork.shtml

SMOKING AND DRINKING LAWS USE/PURCHASE OF TOBACCO You must be older than 18 years of age to purchase tobacco products in Texas. SMOKING RESTRICTIONS Smoking is not allowed in public places in Dallas, including city parks, libraries, buses, or within 15 feet of any pedestrian entrance. The city of Dallas has also banned smoking in bars and restaurants. However, many of the surrounding communities do allow smoking in bars. DRINKING RESTRICTIONS The legal age to purchase and consume alcohol in Texas is 21. In Texas, driving with a blood alcohol content (BAC) of .08 percent or higher is considered driving while intoxicated (DWI). It is illegal in Texas to have open containers of alcohol in the passenger area of your vehicle while you are driving or parked on a public highway. DRY VERSUS WET AREAS A wet area is one in which sales of all alcoholic beverages are permitted at all times. A dry area is one in which some or all alcoholic beverage sales are restricted some or all the time. There are also partially wet areas in which beer and wine sales are legal, but the sale of liquor is not. DFW is a complicated patchwork of all of the above.

MARRIAGE AND DIVORCE LAWS MARRIAGE/DIVORCE REQUIREMENTS To get married in Texas, you need to be at least 18

D A L L A S REG I O N N E W C O M E R + R E L O C AT I O N G U I D E

years old. Apply in person at a Texas County Clerk’s Office to receive your marriage license. Texas is a no-fault divorce state, meaning you do not have to prove wrongdoing to be granted a divorce. Texas does not stipulate that a couple must be separated for any period of time prior to getting a divorce. COMMON LAW MARRIAGE Texas recognizes common-law marriage. You and your partner simply need to either file a Declaration of Informal Marriage or agree that you are married, live together in Texas, and represent to other people that you are married to each other. DOMESTIC PARTNERSHIPS As of the summer of 2015, the State of Texas recognizes marriage, civil unions, and domestic partnerships between individuals of the same gender, per the U.S. Supreme Court ruling. For more on marriage and divorce, go to dshs. state.tx.us/Vital_Statistics/Verification_of_a_ Marriage_or_Divorce.aspx

EDUCATION LAWS KINDERGARTEN Texas does not require kindergarten. However, children ages 6 and over must attend school. TESTING Texas requires students to take standardized tests in grades 3-8 and high school end-ofcourse (EOC) exams. The tests are called the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) system. The number of EOC tests a student is required to take depends on what that student plans to do after graduation. For more on public education in Texas, go to tasb.org/legislative/documents/fullguide.pdf and see the Education section of this guide (beginning on page 130).

REAL ESTATE HOMESTEAD LAW The Texas Homestead Exemption reduces taxes by lowering a home’s taxable value. All school districts offer a $15,000 homestead exemption, and some taxing units offer a separate exemption based on a percentage of a home’s assessed value. The homestead exemption applies only if the property is the owner’s primary residence. There are additional exemptions for people over 65. Also under the Texas Homestead Exemption your residence is protected from the forced sale by creditors, with the exception of the lender, the IRS, or a contractor who works on your house and increases its value. When you buy a house, call the county appraisal district and ask for the forms for declaring your homestead. For more on the homestead exemption, go to comptroller.texas.gov/taxinfo/proptax/exemptions. html

SPRING 2019


T E X A S ARLINGTONTX

WHERE DEALS GET DONE Globe Life Field (2020)

Esports Stadium

Arlington Automotive Logistics Center

Texas Live

OFFICE OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT arlingtontx.gov/business I ecodev@arlingtontx.gov I 817.459.6155


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Profile for Dallas Regional Chamber Publications

Dallas Region Newcomer & Relocation Guide  

The Dallas Region's guide to jobs, communities, culture, schools, outdoors, and more

Dallas Region Newcomer & Relocation Guide  

The Dallas Region's guide to jobs, communities, culture, schools, outdoors, and more