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ALLISON C. KLUTE Selected Architecture Projects 2006-2011

allison.klute@gmail.com


Projects completed at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona: LMU SCIENCE BLDG

Frank R. Seaver College of Science and Engineering* Modeled in: Rhino Rendered in: V-Ray for Rhino Drawn in: AutoCAD Additional programs used: Illustrator Photoshop

MT. BALDY TOWER Personal Residence

Modeled in: Rhino Rendered in: n/a Drawn in: AutoCAD Additional programs used: Illustrator Physical model pictures

WESTERN PRIMARY

Cahuenga Elementary School Modeled in: ArchiCad Rendered in: ArchiCad Drawn in: ArchiCad/AutoCAD Additional programs used: Illustrator Photoshop

POMONA TRAIN STATION A Pollinating Skeletal Skin*

Modeled in: Rhino Rendered in: V-Ray for Rhino Drawn in: AutoCAD Additional programs used: Illustrator Photoshop

I.D.E.A.

International District of Emerging Applications* Modeled in: Rhino Rendered in: V-Ray for Rhino Drawn in: AutoCAD Additional programs used: Illustrator Photoshop

SCRAP

Satellite Capturing, Remediation and Processor Modeled in: Rhino Rendered in: V-Ray for Rhino Drawn in: AutoCAD Additional programs used: Illustrator Photoshop

* Portions of projects completed with partner(s)


LMU SCIENCE BLDG Frank R. Seaver College of Science and Engineering Loyola Marymount University 1 Loyola Marymount University Drive Los Angeles, CA Showcased at Interim Design Exhibit

The LMU Science Building is a proposal for existing renovations for the campus. Science is usually hidden behind closed doors, privy only to those in the profession. Today science is expanding into other disciplines, connecting with a broader range of people. To help facilitate this, science should make itself visible to the public.


The concept is to invite the student body to explore science and introduce a space for intellectual exchanges. A technique used to start revealing science to the public was through carving pieces of the usually imposing block building to expose the inside of the labs. With the remainder of the tower exposing the labs inside the building, the supporting labs, storage, MEP, offices and circulation are pushed to an interior core. The main structure of the tower is centered around the core that runs the length and height of the building, housing the MEP, storage and support labs.


IGNATIUS CIRCLE

IGNATIUS CIRCLE

Site Plan

THE MALL 0’

40’

80’

STUDENT INVOLVEMENT

INVITE the public to OBSERVE science Programmatic elements are being carved from the tower and brought down to the public and distributed on the field.

WALKING ALLEY

RESIDENTIAL HALL

RESIDENTIAL HALL LIBERAL ARTS CENTER

ATHLETIC CENTER

LIBERAL ARTS CENTER


PROGRAM CONFIGURATION

INTERSTITIAL FLOORS AND DOUBLE HEIGHT CEILINGS Offsetting the labs enhances interconnectivity between the different science disciplines. It also provides the labs with ample amounts of natural lighting.

CLOSED OFFICES

LAB

CONFERENCE ROOM

LAB

OUTDOOR SPACE

OPEN OFFICES

LAB

LAB STUDENTS

LAB

PUBLIC SPACE

LAB

CLOSED OFFICES TEACHING LABS CLOSED OFFICES TEACHING LABS CLOSED OFFICES TEACHING LABS

SUPPORT LABS SUPPORT LABS SUPPORT LABS SUPPORT LABS SUPPORT LABS SUPPORT LABS

CLOSED OFFICES TEACHING LABS CLOSED OFFICES TEACHING LABS

TEACHING LABS

LAB CLOSED OFFICES TEACHING LABS CLOSED OFFICES TEACHING LABS

SUPPORT LABS SUPPORT LABS SUPPORT LABS SUPPORT LABS SUPPORT LABS

CLOSED OFFICES

CONFERENCE CLOSED OFFICE

TEACHING LABS

LAB

TEACHING LABS

SUPPORT LAB

CLASSROOMS

CLOSED OFFICE

CONFERENCE

CLOSED OFFICES

CLOSED OFFICES

LAB

SUPPORT LAB

CONTAINED FLOOR

SUPPORT LABS

OPEN OFFICE

MEP

CLOSED OFFICES

LAB

OPEN OFFICE

SUPPORT LAB

LAB

TEACHING LABS

INTERSTITIAL FLOOR

CLASSROOMS

PUBLIC SPACE

SUPPORT LAB

LAB


OPEN TO BELOW

TYPICAL NORTH FACING LAB FLOORS 5TH FLOOR SHOWN ABOVE

OPEN TO BELOW

TYPICAL SOUTH FACING LAB FLOORS 4TH FLOOR SHOWN ABOVE

OPEN TO BELOW

Programmatic Floorplans LAB SUPPORT LAB CLOSED OFFICE OPEN OFFICE CONFERENCE PUBLIC SPACE MEP CLASSROOMS CLEAN CIRCULATION DIRTY CIRCULATION

11’

TYPICAL FLOOR PLAN


Taking the idea of creating connections between science and the public, we enhanced interconnectivity by offsetting the two-story labs. By offsetting the labs and giving them double height ceilings, interstitial floors are created. On the mezzanine floors, offices, conference rooms, study, and lounging areas are provided with views and visual connections to the labs below. The relationship between the lab and its interstitial floor reveal science and provides the labs with ample amounts of natural light. When the fractured pieces are removed from the tower and placed onto the field, terraces are formed from the voids left. The terraces provides outdoor spaces for people working in the tower and views into the labs as well as the field below.


MT. BALDY TOWER Personal Residence Mt. Baldy, CA Showcased at Interim Design Exhibit

A private single person 600 sq. ft. residence on a secluded hillside facing a valley on Mt. Baldy. The residence consists of three floors with almost no interior walls. The floors separate the different functions and are connected by an interior spiral staircase along the outer edges. The floors are detached from the exterior shell, creating a circular opening between the floors and the exterior shell that is used for the stair circulation. The basic shape is a spiraling oval that twists and turns giving a 360 degree view, showcasing the beautiful nature surrounding the tower.


^ Elevations

< Sections 10’-0”

10’-0”

36’-6”

16’-9”


21 ft.

2 A4.1 O

166 O

68

1

O

1 A4.1

1 A4.1

0 UP

17

144

O

157

O

O

2

Birch flooring

15

17 ft.

Open to below Bedroom

Bathroom

2 A4.1

3rd floor

23 ft

2 A4.1 O

167

O

167 O

2

UP

16 1 A4.1

1 A4.1

O

151

157

O

13

8

O

19 ft

Open to below

Birch flooring Kitchen/ Dining

2 A4.1

2nd floor

21 ft 2 A4.1

137

15

6

ft. .5 11

O

1 A4.1

O

r=

156

1435

1435

O

23’-0”

16

7

O

Front door (glass hatch)

O

24’-0”

157

O

140 1 A4.1

1440

0’-6”

1445

Birch flooring

1445

1435

0’-6”

17 ft

Glass

1440

Living Room

1435

1430

1430

UP

2’-0”

2 A4.1

1st floor

23’-0”

23’-0”

48’-0”


45’-0” Steel Frame Glass Triangular Plate Waterproof Rubber Flashing 4” Diameter Circular Steel Tube Stainless Steel Panel

Bolt Steel Plates Waterproof Rubber 30’-0”

Steel Channel Beam Steel Wide Flange

4 A9.1 Metal Floor Cap Birch Flooring 2

Oriented Strand Board (OSB)

A9.1

Rigid Insulation 20’-0”

Gypsum Board

Glass Plate Waterproofing Rubber Weld 2x4 Wood Beam (for hanging lighting)

10’-0”

3 A9.1 Weld Embed 1 ft. Diameter Caisson Rebar #8

0’=0”

Wall Section

SCALE 1”=1’-0”

1


Roof Connection

Floor Connection

Foundation Connection

Wall Section 3D Reference

SCALE 1”=1’-0”

2


Galvanized Steel Round Tubes 4 in. Diameter 6 in. cuts in side for steel plates Steel Plates 5 in. x 6 in. Steel Embed 11in. diameter Concrete Caisson 1 ft. diameter/ 35ft. depth

Foundation Connection

1

SCALE 1”=1’-0”

Galvanized Steel Round Tubes 4 in. Diameter Steel Plate Weld Steel Channel Beam 1 ft. depth Birch Flooring Panels Oriented Strand Board

Steel Wide Flange 1 ft. depth Rigid Insulation

2 in.

Wood 2x4 Painted Gypsum Board Steel Plate

1 ft.

1 ft. 2 in.

Weld

Floor to Wall Connection

SCALE 3”=1’-0”

3


Steel Channel Beam 1ft. depth Birch Board 1 ft. width 1/2 in height 1 ft.

Steel Plate 1 ft. width 2 in. height Bolt 1 1/2in. diameter

1/2 in.

Welded

2 in.

Steel Embed 1 ft. 6in. x 9 in. Concrete Footing 1 ft. x 1 ft. 5 ft. depth

5

13

5 ft.

Rebar #8

1 ft.

CAL POLY POMONA

Client AXEL PRICHARD-SCHMITZBERGER

Stair Connection

2

SCALE 1 1/2”=1’-0”

Stainless Steel Panels with aluminum frame Silicone Waterproofing Rigid Insulation

Galvanized Steel Round Tube 4 in. Diameter Steel Plates 5 in. x 6 in. Galvanized Steel Round Tubes 4 in. Diameter 6 in. cuts in side for steel plates

Title

DETAILS

Drawn By

Date

Size

24" x 36" Drawing #

Outside Wall Connection

SCALE 3/4”=1’-0”

4

A9.1

Allison Klute


WESTERN PRIMARY Cahuenga Elementary School Korea Town Western and Second Los Angeles, CA


Cahuenga Elementary School is located in Korea Town in Los Angeles along a major urban street, Western Ave. The learning philosophy lead the design of the school, allowing the children have the opportunity to learn at their own pace and style instead of being restricted to this strict guideline of material and standardized testing. The site is laid out on a grid, while the classrooms break free of the grid and wrap around the site with flexibility. This creates a safe environment for the children to learn and make it easier for faculty to watch over them. Courtyards are created in the voids of the grid and the curves. This creates the play areas for the children without having to use fences.


Second

Western

8

12 7

13 6

14 5

15 4

16 3

17 2

18 1

1 18 2 17 3 16 4 15 5 14 6 13 7 12 8 11 9 10

1 18 2 17 3 16 4 15 5 14 6 13 7 12 8 11 9

12

11

14

13

18

17

16

10

9

11

4

2

3

5

6

8

9

7

1

10

15

Sections

10


G1.2

ramp down

G1.3

G1.1 roof below

P.M.

S..T.

10

13

12

11

14

15

18

17

16

G1.4 4

2

3

5

6

8

9

7

1

C.T.

W.R.

K.C.

L.B.

M.M. K.3 K.4

10 9

11 8

12 7

13 6

14 5

15 4

G1.5

16 3

17 2

18 1

K.2

sand box O.1 G.B. roof below K.1

B.B.

sand box T.B. 1 18

S.T.

P.T.

C.S.

A.P.

C.O.

A.P.

P.O.

2 17 3 16 4 15 5 14 6 13 7 12 8 11 9

G.L.

10

C.F. S.T. 1 18 2 3 4 5 6 13 7

C.S.

17 16

15

14

N.O.

F.W.

C.R.

12 8 11 9 10

N.W. N.T.

M.R.

F.O.

C.T.

B.L. E.R.

W.A. GYM

1 LIBRARY 2 STORAGE 3 MULTIMEDIA ROOM 4 WORKROOM 5 KITCHEN 6 CAFETERIA 7 PLANT MANAGER 8 MULTIPURPOSE ROOM 9 PHYSICAL THERAPY 10 CUSTODIAN CLOSET 11 FOYER 12 COORDINATORS OFFICE 13 ASSISSANT PRINCIPAL OFFICE 14 PRINCIPAL OFFICE 15 CLERICAL FRONT OFFICE

16 WAITING ROOM 17 NURSES OFFICE 18 NURSES WAITING ROOM 19 NURSES TOILET 20 CHANGING TABLE 21 EXAM ROOM 22 FACULTY WORK ROOM 23 CONFERENCE ROOM 24 GIRLS LOCKER 25 BOYS LOCKER 26 GYM 27 LAN SYSTEM 28 TEACHING MATERIALS 29 SUPPLY ROOM 30 TEACHER BREAK ROOM

Ground Floor


Upper Floorplans

Second Floor open to below

B.B.

roof below

G.B. G2.1

DN UP

G2.2

roof G3.2 SG.1

G3.1

SG.2 SG.3 UP G2.3 10 9

11 8

12 7

13 6

14 5

15 4

16 3

17 2

18 1

roof below

DN

G2.4 G2.5 G.B.

B.B. T.B.R.

1 18 2 17

S.R.

3 16 4 15 5 14 6 13 7 12 8 11 9 10

T.M.

open to below

L.S. open to below

Third Floor

Fourth Floor roof below

DN

open to below

roof below

roof below

DN

roof below

G4.1

O.2

DN DN roof below

G4.2

UP

roof below UP

G5.1

O.3

G3.3

G4.3

roof below

1 18 2 17 3 16 4 15 5 14 6 13 7 12 8 11 9 10

G5.2

planter

G5.5

planter

G3.4

G4.4 Terrace

roof below

G5.3 G5.4

Terrace

roof below

G3.5 G4.5

open to below


Top of Roof

Painted Infrared Reflective Pigments (White) Metal Standing Seam Roof Metal Clip Insulation Air Plenum Metal Screen Metal Decking 45’-0” Insulation 2X4 Wood Sleepers Metal Sheet Steel Channel Beam Steel Wide Flange

1/2” Pine Wood Flooring 1” Plywood Subflooring Insulation 2x4 Pressure Treated wood sleepers @ 24” O.C. Waterproof Membrane Metal Decking with Concrete HVAC System Lighting Fixture Steel Wide Flange Fourth Floor

Third Floor

30’-0”

20’-0”

Aluminum Perforated Metal Double Glaze Glass Metal Plate End Cap Steel Channel Beam Steel Wide Flange Metal Sheet

Down Lighting Light Fixture HVAC System

Sealed Concrete Floor Structural Steel Reinforcement Waterproof Membrane 2” Sand 4” Gravel Up Lighting Light Fixture

Drainage Mat Gravel Drain Tile Filter Fabric Ground Level

0’-0”

Top of Footing - 6’-0” Bottom of Footing - 8’-0”


IN

1 2

A Pollinating Skeletal Skin

Temple Avenue Pomona, CA Awarded First Place by Coreslab Inc. Exhibited at 2X8 AIALA 2010 Showcased at Interim Design Exhibit Sponsored by Coreslab Inc.


The Pomona Precast Train Station is a proposed Metro stop along the existing Riverside Metrolink Line. This station would be used by the local residents as well as the thousands of students that are enrolled in Cal Poly Pomona, Mt. SAC, and Devry Universities. The use of precast concrete pieces throughout the station helps keep the cost of construction down along with creating a permanent, long lasting structure. The station is designed using eleven precast concrete pieces to construct the walls and floor, including a beam designed to support the structure. The precast pieces and the construction were consulted on by engineers of Coreslab Structures leading to the design being constructible as well as redesigning the conventional ideas of what precast concrete pieces can be.


A

A.2

D.2

B.1

C.2

25’-0”

12’-0”12’-0” 12’-0” 12’-0”

25’-0”

B

25’-0”

C

D 12’-0”

B.2

C.1

The Modules

A

A.1

D.1

The concrete panels are constructed of two layers that combine structure and an organic skin into one. The panels can be rearranged to make numerous combinations to construct the walls with.

BC.1

A.2

BC.2

A.3

BC.3

< Floor construction

B A.4

C

A.1

^ Wall structure and design

BC.4

A.5

BC.5

A.6

The floor panels related to the wall panels in form of the design. The non-structural part of the wall panels are then flattened and turned into the structural support for the floor panels.


Construction Assembly

6’-6”

75’-0”

Detail A-A

Train station

Parking

12’-5”

M odule A A n c h or B olt ( 1’ ) C on c r e te S l a b

Mo d u le B

P re -C a s t C on c r e te Double Tee

M odul e H a un c h

Section Detail A-A

^ Bus Stop and Bench Design The bus and train stop are constructed of the same panels that make up the wall structure. This shows the versatile ability of the panels to be rearranged to construct various forms and functions.


SCRAP

Satellite Capturing, Remediation and Processor Lower Earth Orbit (LEO) Earth, Solar System, Milky Way Showcased at Interim Design Exhibit

As space junk orbiting Earth grows exponentially, it is only a matter of time before catastrophes arise. SCRAP offers one solution to assist with beginning to clean Lower Earth Orbit. SCRAP is in itself an orbiting satellite that captures debris and defunct satellites that cross its path. The space junk is then broken down for raw materials and then used to grow SCRAP


into a larger satellite. The larger SCRAP grows, the larger junk it is capable of collecting and the more visitors it can hold. To make SCRAP even more economically viable, hotel rooms and labs will be available for rent to the public and countries of the world that do not currently have a space station.


Space Junk Orbital debris experts explain that even with an immediate halt of launch activities, nations will be dealing with an unstable low-Earth orbit environment. In 2007, a New Zealand Airline plane narrowly missed flaming space junk falling into Earth's atmosphere. Not only is the junk a problem here on Earth, but some altitudes and bands already have critical mass concentrations that will trigger "collisional cascading". Without removal, the experts are looking at 20 catastrophic collisions within the next 200 years. All of these collisions lead to an exponential growth in debris, only worsening the problem. It is believed that if no action is taken it could get so bad that the LEO will become so dense that it will become impassable- rendering space exploration and the use of satellites unfeasible for generations. Around 20,000 trackable items (3in and larger) Millions possibly billions of untraceable items less than 3 inches in size Defunct satellites total over 6,000 tons

Space junk includes: -Defunct satellites -Aluminum -Rocket bodies-boosters -Titanium -Steel -Paint chips -Screws Garbage-few lost tools, a camera, and even a glove meteroids-dust, ice, etc


Countries/companies could pay to have their defunct satellites removed from orbit

Ship raw materials instead of fabricated parts

Space tourists

Recycle materials from satellites and debris to add onto the station

Rentable lab/office space

Economic Viability

Power supplies >

The recycling program will help boost the station economically by recycling thousands of pounds of materials in space; this material can be used for free to add on to the station. Other space stations and rockets could pay a fee to have their flight path cleaned before they enter it, to ensure there will be no collision with space debris. Countries could pay for the station to remove their defunct satellites so they do not cause damage to any other property. In a section of Space Laws, enforced by the United Nations, every country is responsible for the damage that their satellites causes to any other countries property, even if they no longer have control over it.

Algae/waste plant Solar panels


< Junk Remediation Process 1 2 3 4 5 6

5 6

Junk enters Debris is disassembled Materials are sorted Materials are broken down to raw form Storage of raw materials 3d printers build new additions to the station Offices Long-term residences Conference Labs Dining Lobby/Lounge Hotel rooms Garden Algae/Waste plant Recreation rooms Mechanical

Ring Phasing >

1 4

2 3


1

5

entrance/HALL

2

gardens

3

algae/WASTE

4

lab

5

hotel ROOM

11

RENTABLE LAB/OFFICE SPACE

6

dining

12

CLEANSING SPACE

7

food dispensary

13

Storage CLOSET

8

storage

14

LOUNGE

9

office

15

LONG-TERM ROOMS

10

Conference ROOM

16

KITCHEN

17

RECLAIMING CENTER

5 5 3

14

10

13 7

9 5

11

5 5

6

5 3

7 12

2 4

8

1

16 9 15

9

15

15 15

9 5

5

5 17

1

Entrance/hall

6

Dining

12

Cleansing Space

2

Gardens

7

Food Dispensary

13

Storage Closet

3

Algae/waste

8

Storage

14

Lounge

4

Lab

9

Office

15

Long-term Rooms

5

Hotel Room

10

Conference Room

16

Kitchen

11

Rentable Lab/office Space

17

Reclaiming Center

Circulation Junk circulation

Levels of Permanence Visitor circulation

Variable rentable offices Short-term hotel rooms

Long-term rooms


Hotel Public Space 1

Hotel Room

2

Common Restroom

3

Storage

4

Recreational Passages

5

Main Corridor

6

Food Dispensary

11 2

2

1 1 1

1

2

4

2

1 1

5

1

3

2

2

6 1

1

1 1

1 1


Allison Klute Architecture Portfolio  

Portfolio of Selected Works Between 2006-2011

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