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GUIDEBOOK FOR INFILL LOT IMPROVEMENT STRATEGIES

SCATTERED SITES

KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI UPDATED 12/18/12


CITY OF KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI 414 E. 12th St. Kansas City, Missouri 64106 (816) 513-3001 Stuart Bullington, Assistant Director/Senior Planner Housing and Community Development Division John A. Wood, Director Neighborhoods and Housing Services Department

DRAW ARCHITECTURE + URBAN DESIGN LLC formerly DAVISON ARCHITECTURE + URBAN DESIGN 405 Southwest Boulevard Suite 200 Kansas City, Missouri 64108 (816) 531-8303

VIREO, KANSAS CITY 929 Walnut Suite 700 Kansas City, Missouri 64106 (816) 756-5690

Funding for design and development of this guidebook was provided by Community Development Block Grant Recovery Funds from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (H.U.D.).


Table of Contents: pg. 2-3

Introduction

pg. 4-5

SITE ANALYSIS - METHODS

STRATEGY 1: RESTORING THE SITE

pg. 6-7 pg. 8-9 pg. 10-13

Analyzing the Existing Lot Strategy 1a: Cleanup & Maintenance of the Site Strategy 1b: Infrastructure Improvements, Tree Planting & Xeriscaping

pg. 14-15 pg. 16-17 pg. 18-19 pg. 20-21

Strategy 2a: Community Garden Strategy 2b: Nature Playground & Rain Garden Strategy 2c: Block Green Solution Strategy 2d: Community Plaza & Farmer’s Market

pg. 22-25 pg. 26-27

APPENDIX: COMMUNITY RESOURCES

Site Location & Analysis - Should the Site be Developed or Preserved as Open Space?

STRATEGY 2: PROGRAM OPPORTUNITIES

Steps to Create a Community Infill Improvement Project Resource List for Community Organizers and Citizens


Site Analysis

Introduction: Welcome to the Scattered Sites Guidebook for Kansas City! Imagine for a moment that we stop thinking about the various vacant lots scattered throughout our urban neighborhoods as areas of burden and begin to consider them lots of opportunity. Today they may sit empty, covered in weeds and collecting debris, but what if tomorrow they became a neighborhood park, community garden or beautiful plaza? What if these depressed areas of neglect could actually ease the stormwater burden on our City’s infrastructure while becoming alluring spaces of inspiration and prosperity?

pg. 2

KC Scattered Sites Guidebook

The City estimates that there are approximately 5,000 vacant lots within the Kansas City limits, with an estimated 13,000 vacant singlefamily homes. Many of these properties are poorly maintained and diminish the property value of the surrounding buildings and neighborhoods, resulting in decreased property taxes. The economic impact of having 13,000 vacant homes with no water, gas or electric revenues along with what the city estimates as 3,000 of these properties having delinquent taxes is estimated at $33.6 million annually. City maintenance costs also increase with an abundance of vacant lots, along with the expense of police and code enforcement activities. While restoration and adaptive re-use practices are the most sustainable option for historic homes within blighted neighborhoods, it can be expensive. The city demolishes about 300 vacant houses per year, while private demolitions and fire raze many more - the following Scattered Sites Guidebook for Infill Lot Improvement intends to provide resources to help turn this blight into development opportunities. The purpose of the Scattered Sites Guidebook for Infill Lot Improvement Strategies is to outline strategies and cost considerations to turn vacant sites into productive properties that complement the City’s long-term development objectives. The following examples offer both short-term holding strategies and long-term design options with associated preliminary pricing for the various outlined improvement strategies. The sections outlined herein include:

Should the Site be Developed or Preserved as Open Space? Basic Cleanup and Maintenance

Infrastructure Improvements, Tree Planting and Xeriscaping

Community Garden, Nature’s Playground, Rain Garden, Green Block, Community Plaza & Farmer’s Market Resources & Steps to Create a Community Infill Improvement Project Capitalizing on this opportunity to offer new places for play, growth and design, along with other non-traditional land uses, will help to benefit existing neighbors and encourage new residents to invest and grow roots. Demonstrating how community grassroots efforts can utilize vacant land within their neighborhoods helps promote entrepreneurship and offers numerous engagement opportunities. These vacant land use strategies focus on empowering Kansas Citians to improve their quality of life and restore the interactive functions of the City’s urban core.


Introduction, Continued Site Analysis

Kansas City,

We, the people of must work together with the City to provide the stewardship to guide the continued revitalization of the City. Together, we will build on its strengths to make it the most exciting place to live, work and play in the region, creating a viable and charismatic alternative to the suburbs. Home to our most venerable neighborhoods, active commercial centers, significant cultural institutions and the majority of our historical assets, the urban core is the real and symbolic heart of our City. Enhancing its health and vibrancy is critical to the long-term success of our entire Metropolitan Area. FOCUS Kansas City – Strategic and Comprehensive Plan Vision Statement

A significant reality facing Kansas City is the decreasing level of federal and local public funding to address an increasing number of housing, community and special needs issues, along with continuing population loss in the central core. How do you make a neighborhood appealing to new inhabitants? When considering infill lot improvements, it is important to take into account pertinent external factors. What is the goal of the neighborhood? The block? Are the surrounding neighbors open to the idea of a neighborhood park? Would they use it? Will they participate in a Farmer’s Market or keep up a Community Plaza? Who can afford to make the initial investments? Getting to know a block and the people who call it home is the most important consideration for sustainable infill developments.

Before planning and designing your Infill Lot Improvement Project, you may want to familiarize yourself with the City of Kansas City’s building and zoning codes online or in person.

dependent on the project plans and site conditions. Sample sites average a size of 45’ x 125’. Cost considerations are calculated in square feet (SF), cubic feet (CF), linear feet (LF), and cubic yards (CY). Material prices fluctuate often and depend on the quantity being purchased. When planning a budget, be sure to explore avenues for donated, recycled or shared materials. Be sure to research and include tools and architectural design or landscape services within your plan and budget where needed.

pg. 3

Additional Things to Consider... Pricing for permits, tools and optional items have not been included because they are

KC Scattered Sites Guidebook

The following Guidebook for Infill Lot Improvement Strategies aims to provide ideas and pricing for five unique development strategies. The first section includes the Basic Cleanup and Maintenance of the Site. These restoration strategies and their included pricing considerations should be taken into account when estimating each of the following advanced developments in Section 2 - Program Opportunities. As you will see in the following pages, some thought has been put into future maintenance of the site - where grass is planted it is native, requires little water, and does not grow too high. Tree height and function has been considered and a list is provided to help choose the right tree for the right place. In the City of Kansas City, the municipality regulates land use and building codes. Make sure to follow zoning codes about where parks, gardens and other greenspace can be located. Pay attention to building codes that mandate the type and location of out-buildings, fences, compost bins and signs. An appendix, including Community Resources, has been provided for help and guidance at each step.


Site Analysis

Site Location & Analysis: The first step to planning a vacant land use strategy is site location and thorough analysis. There are nearly 5,000 vacant lots scattered throughout Kansas City, about 3,000 are currently owned by the Jackson County Land Trust but are in the process of being transferred to a newly established Land Bank. The abundance of these sites, in addition to the current move to put these properties on the market creates an unprecedented opportunity to transform some of the vacant lots into much needed shared community greenspace. Once you have located a site, visit the Kansas City Missouri’s online mapping website at http://maps.kcmo.org/apps/parcelviewer/ for information on ownership and if the site is available for purchase. Contact Nate Pare’, Property Conservation Manager for the City of Kansas City at (816) 513-9018 or nate.pare@kcmo.org for more information. Website and contact info may change after the Land Bank transition.

pg. 4

KC Scattered Sites Guidebook

SITE ANALYSIS: Many of the vacant sites scattered throughout the city will require a thorough analysis of their current conditions. Because many of the lots have previously housed homes or various other structures, large foundations may be located just beneath the soil. Depending on what the sites were previously used for, there may be the potential for pollutants, debris and hard, compacted soils. The EPA has a handy two-page, citizen’s guide to phytoremediation online - download the file at http://www.epa.gov/tio/download/citizens/a_citizens_guide_to_phytoremediation.pdf Pollutants • Soils should be properly tested to determine if they may pose a health threat to you or the community. This testing should be done prior to considering the potential use, purchasing and/or leasing of the site. • Kansas City Community Gardens currently offer soil testing for $15. More information and instructions can be found on their website at http://www.kccg.org under gardeing information. In Missouri, call (816) 252-5051 or in Kansas, call (913) 715-7050. Existing Infrastructure • Hidden beneath the soil is the potential for existing foundations and debris from previously demolished houses. Call the Department of City Planning and Development for questions regarding the previous uses for target sites. • On sites where existing infrastructure and/or issues of hard, compacted soil plague a lot, considerations should address whether building up from the site is appropriate, or if a budget allows for the hiring of a professional clean-up service. The flow chart on the following page helps to address the question of whether identified, target lots should be developed or preserved as open space. Walk through the various steps to see if your target site would best serve as a space where future development and infill housing would be appropriate or another site strategy should apply.


Should the Site be Developed or Preserved as Open Space?

NO

PRESERVE AS OPEN SPACE PREREQUISITE: Basic Cleanup/Maintenance Plan, See 1a for more details.

YES

MENU OF TREATMENTS: 1. Natural Urban Greenspace 2. Storm-Water Management: Bio-retention, constructed wetland, stream daylighting 3. Soil Remediation: where soil samples prove hazardous 4. Deep Tillage and Pavement Removal

Site Analysis

DECISION FACTORS: 1. Is it a watershed site for the surrounding neighborhood? Is there any other riparian use? 2. Is it a habitat for native species? 3. Could it provide a link to a nature corridor? 4. Is the site too small for the footprints of most residential/commercial uses?

WHAT IS THE SITE’S DEVELOPMENT POTENTIAL?

COULD BE RESTORED FOR DEVELOPMENT

PREREQUISITE: Basic Cleanup & Infrastructure Plans See 1a and 1b for more details.

PREREQUISITE: Basic Cleanup/Maintenance Plan, See 1a for more details.

PREREQUISITE: Basic Cleanup/Maintenance Plan, Consider Strategies 2a-d.

1. Visit with the neighborhood association or community planning organization regarding their goals and the potential for creating a design template to unify new development plans.

1. Visit with the neighborhood association or community planning organization regarding their goals within the community. What does it have? What does it lack? Consider the best management practices for the site.

1. Community Garden 2. Nature Playground & Rain Garden 3. Block Green Solution 4. Community Plaza & Farmer’s Market

2. Follow the Native Planting Guide & Reference for planting street trees. 3. Publish advertising for the sale of the lotbe sure to check with neighboring property owners for interest in purchasing the lot.

2. Soil Remediation may be necessary if converting to interactive greenspace. See Site Analysis for more details on pollutants and soil testing.

WEAK DEVELOPMENT POTENTIAL (>5 years)

Refer to the Guidebook’s Appendix for a Citywide Resource list and the outlined Steps to Create a Community Land Reuse Project

pg. 5

STRONG DEVELOPMENT POTENTIAL (0-5 years)

KC Scattered Sites Guidebook

DECISION FACTORS TO CONSIDER: 1. Is the market favorable for development? 2. Does the site have a clear title? 3. Is it close to any amenities such as schools, retirement homes, grocery stores or shopping? 4. Is it nearby any development in progress? Could this increase the lot’s potential for development? 4. Is the site in a populated area? Highly visible to the street? In a walkable neighborhood? 5. Is there soil contamination? 6. Is there evidence that the foundation of a demolished home is still present? (Look for divots indicating the sunken basement) 7. Are there any plans for the lot? (Existing neighborhood intentions, potential developer interest) 8. Is there any funding committed to the project?


pg. 6

KC Scattered Sites Guidebook

Restoring the Site

Analyzing the Existing Vacant Lot Many of the vacant lots scattered throughout the city have been inundated by volunteer tree growth and invasive weeds, while degraded curbs, sidewalks and gutters can be dangerous as well as eye-sores. The first step in any effective site strategy is identification of the current conditions. • Common invasive weeds should be identified and proper techniques may be applied for their permanent removal. • To determine if any trees in a vacant lot are desirable and should be pruned and preserved, consult a landscape architect or licensed arborist. • Grass overgrowth along curbs and sidewalks is common on vacant lots. • Degraded curbs and sidewalks should be identified and depending on their location on the property may be addressed by the city or property owner.

WHAT ARE WEEDS? Weeds are essentially any plant that is in a place that it isn’t supposed to be. Nonnative, invasive plant species are plants that do not originate from the ecosystem they are in and are likely to grow quickly and aggressively, spreading and displacing native plants. They pose a threat to restored lots by crowding the desirable native plants and consuming vital nutrient and water sources. THREE DISTINCT CLASSES OF WEEDS, BASED UPON THEIR LIFESPAN: Annual: Probably the easiest to control, annual weeds germinate, flower, go to seed, and die all within the same season. Biannual: These weeds germinate, grow, and then go dormant in the first season. In the second season of growth, biannual weeds flower, go to seed, and then die. Perennial: This class of weed is the most difficult to eradicate. Perennial weeds not only flower and seed much like an annual, but a single plant can flower and go to seed over multiple years. Probably the most noxious aspect of perennial weeds is their ability to spread through vegetative means, such as rhizomes, which are fleshy underground stem structures (similar to an iris). This means that they can even spread from a small scrap of root. Resource: Identifying Grass Seedlings: http://extension.missouri.edu/p/IPM1024

Common Invasive Weeds Top left: Ailanthus altissima Common Name: Tree-of-Heaven Top right: Lonicera japonica Common Name: Japanese Honeysuckle Bottom left: Sorghum halepense Common Name: Johnson Grass Reference: North Carolina State University Cooperative Extension

Weeds Will Happen There is no doubt that weeds will invade restored lots. They inhabit the soil, and are released when the contractor exposes the dirt. Weeds are also transported by the wind and animals. When a new planting is installed, it is critical that weeds are controlled. These new plants are most vulnerable when first planted; their roots haven’t penetrated the surrounding soil, and they often suffer from shock as they are moved from the safety and care of the plant nursery. This is when weeds can interfere and steal valuable water and nutrients from the new plants and, without intervention, grow and crowd out any new, beneficial plantings.


Analyzing the Existing Vacant Lot Restoring the Site

A

F B I D E C G H

A

Weedy Hedgerow along Property Lines

B

Weeds and Uncontrolled Vegetation

C

Divots from Collapsed Foundation

D

Stumps and Large Trash

E

Good Trees with Unmaintained Branches and Sapling Growth at Base

F

Degraded Sidewalks

G

Degraded Curbs and Gutter

H

Ponding and Drainage Issues

I

If at a Corner, ADA Ramps are Degraded, Silted in and Not Accessible

J

pg. 7

J

Invasive/ Volunteer Tree Growth

KC Scattered Sites Guidebook

Issues:


Restoring the Site

Strategy 1a: Cleanup & Maintenance of the Site Cleanup and maintenance of abandoned properties helps to establish a sense of stewardship and pride within transitional neighborhoods. Upkept properties spread inspiration and the simple clean-up and landscaping of vacant lots can increase adjacent property values. The following strategy serves as a foundation approach for future developments, and much of the work can be performed by organized, able volunteers - decreasing cost considerations greatly.

REQUIREMENTS: • Remove litter and other debris • Remove invasive plants and volunteer tree growth • Trim and prune the remaining desirable trees • Where lawn conditions are poor, seed or resod with native, low maintenance seed mix • Edge overgrowth along the sidewalk and curb while excavating soil

Resources: Establishment and Care of Buffalograss Lawns http://extension.missouri.edu/p/G6730 Protecting Water Quality During Lawn Establishment and Renovation http://extension.missouri.edu/p/EQ500 Home Lawn Watering Guide http://extension.missouri.edu/p/G6720

pg. 8

KC Scattered Sites Guidebook

APPLICABILITY TO VACANT LOTS: • This strategy serves as a baseline for development and represents the minimum steps needed to make vacant sites safe and appealing. The following cost considerations should be applied to all the following development strategies. COST CONSIDERATIONS: Clear and Grub Invasive/ Volunteer Tree Growth

$800 EA

x

(total trees on site to remove)

= $

Clear and Treat Weedy Hedgerow along Property Line

$4 SF

x

(total area of invasive shrubs)

= $

Eradicate Existing Weeds and Vegetation and Replant with Native /Low Mow Lawn Mix Eradicate Vegetation $4 SF

x

(total area of lot)

= $

Add 2” of Compost and Till Soils

$1 SF

x

(total area of lot)

= $

Install Native Buffalo Grass/Blue Grama Seed Mix

$0.5 SF

x

(total area of lot)

= $

x

(total area of lot)

= $

x

(1.5 x total area of approx. foundation)

= $

$1 CF

x

(1.5 x total area of approx. foundation)

= $

$200 EA

x

(total number of stumps to be removed)

=$

Establish Watering

$0.5 SF Excavate and Remove Soil to a Depth of 18” at Approximate Location of Foundation Excavation $0.75 CF Topsoil Placement and Compaction Remove Stumps and Large Trash

Stump Removal

Trash Removal Varies Prune Good Trees and Remove Vegetation and Saplings at Base

$500 EA x

(total trees on site to be pruned)

= $


Strategy 1a: Cleanup & Maintenance of the Site Restoring the Site

A

F

B

E C

Strategy Solutions: A

Clear and Treat Weedy Hedgerow along Property Line

B

Eradicate Existing Weeds and Vegetation and Replant with Native /Low Mow Lawn Mix

C

Excavate and Remove Soil to a Depth of 18� at Approximate Location of Foundation

D

Remove Stumps and Large Trash

E

Prune Good Trees and Remove Vegetation and Saplings at Base

F

pg. 9

Clear and Grub Invasive/ Volunteer Tree Growth

KC Scattered Sites Guidebook

D


Restoring the Site

Strategy 1b: Infrastructure & Tree Planting Street edge improvements and thoughtful tree placement can offer vacant lots unique curb appeal. With some coordination, multiple lots along one street could be developed with the same design template - creating a unified feel within the neighborhood. A community group or neighborhood association may decide to draft an idea for what future developments might look like, and address whether current or historic styles should be incorporated. Creating a holding strategy with maintained spaces can help to discourage illegal activities such as debris dumping while offering an appealing location for potential infill and development. Resources:

pg. 10

KC Scattered Sites Guidebook

REQUIREMENTS: • Depending on the condition of existing site infrastructure, replacing sidewalks, curbs and gutters may require the assistance of a landscape architect or civil engineer. Installing trees and perimeter fencing may be addressed by volunteers or experienced members within the community. • If developments are planned or anticipated in the future, it is important to consider tree placement and spacing for this infill to occur.

KCMO APWA Construction Standards and Specifications KCMO Preferred Street Tree List Heartland Tree Alliance; http://www.heartlandtreealliance.org Recommended Trees for Kansas City Metro Area: https://www.bridgingthegap. org/tree-selection/

APPLICABILITY TO VACANT LOTS: • Holding strategies serve best in areas where there is a strong potential for future developments within the next five years. • Sites where property owners or community partners have the capacity to maintain upkeep is ideal. COST CONSIDERATIONS:

Costs may vary depending on additional development plans. Remove and Replace Sidewalk

$12.5 SF

x (total area of replacement)

= $

Remove and Replace Curb and Gutter

$35 LF

x (total length of replacement)

= $

Restore Tree Lawn (includes 2” compost tilled and reseeding with City Standard turf mix) $1.5 SF

x (total area of tree lawn)

= $

Install Street Trees

$450 EA

x (total trees to be installed)

= $

Install Perimeter Fence

$35 LF

x (total length of perimeter)

= $

Restore Curb Ramps (should include detectable warning pavers)

$50 SF

x (total area of curb ramp)

= $

Crosswalk Striping

$10 LF

x (total length of striping)

= $


Strategy 1b: Infrastructure & Tree Planting Restoring the Site

E

C

Strategy Solutions: A

A

Remove and Replace Curb and Gutter

B

Restore Tree Lawn

C

Install Street Trees

D

Add Perimeter Fence

E

For Corner Lots, Rebuild ADA Curb Ramps and Add Crosswalk Stripes

F

pg. 11

F

Remove and Replace Sidewalks

B

KC Scattered Sites Guidebook

D


Restoring the Site

Strategy 1b: Infrastructure & Tree Planting, Continued THINGS TO CONSIDER WHEN CHOOSING TREES AND LANDSCAPING: • It is important to consider what purpose the trees will serve prior to their purchase and planting. Some varieties may offer shade and privacy while maintaining a manageable height; other varieties provide fruits or berries for consumption. The following reference can help determine the right tree for the right place. • Xeriscape landscaping is the use of plants that require no additional watering after they are established. On average, the United States applies over fifty percent of their residential water use to landscapes and lawns. Strategic xeriscaping can reduce landscape water use by 60% or more. See the following page for more information.

Street Tree Placement Diagram

10’

30’

m s fro 30’ g tree stin exi

40’

pg. 12

30’

KC Scattered Sites Guidebook

If tree falls within 10’ of alley, driveway, or utility, skip tree, but maintain spacing

30’ 40’


Native Planting: Guide & Reference drought-resistant plantings. Great xeriscape plants include many of our native prairie plants such as:

• • • • •

Prairie Dropseed Little Bluestem Side Oats Grama Blue Grama Buffalo Grass

Restoring the Site

Xeriscaping is a type of creative landscape design that reduces the need for supplemental irrigation through the use of

These plants have deep roots and can survive Kansas City’s weather fluctuations, even during extreme conditions. The most important consideration is to water them very well the first month after planting and to control weeds until after the grasses have filled in.

Great Trees for the Kansas City Region Robert Whitman, landscape architect at Gould Evans, has created a

list of the highest rated trees for various desired landscape categories. Listed below are the top three trees in order of preference. For the complete downloadable list visit http://www.ci.liberty.mo.us/DocumentView.aspx?DID=2246

Large Trees for the Landscape - White Oak, Swamp White Oak, Caddo Sugar Maple Large Street Trees - Swamp White Oak, Sterling Silver Linden, Legend American Linden Most Culturally Adaptable Trees for KC - New Harmony Elm, Bur Oak, Triumph Elm Longest Lived Trees - Bur Oak, Chinkapin Oak, White Oak Small Trees for the Landscape - Paperbark Maple, Shantung Maple, Kousa Dogwood Small Street Trees - Shantung Maple, Wireless Zelkova, Trident Maple

Just because trees are commonly used, does not mean that they are ideal. Included within the list is a lowest-rated category. The ten lowest-rated, commonly used trees include: Bradford Pear, Silver Maple, Newport Plum, Cottonwood, Green & White Ash, Amur Maple, Green Hawthorn, Black Locust, Sweetgum and Red Maple.

pg. 13

The Heartland Tree Alliance through Bridging the Gap is another great resource for all of your tree questions and needs. They organize planting events, pruning events and tree care workdays to get people involved. • Visit http://www.righttreerightplace.com for more information as well as a list of community events.

KC Scattered Sites Guidebook

• • • • • •


Program Opportunities

Strategy 2a: Community Garden People living in inner-city food deserts would greatly benefit from an increase in the availability of affordable, healthy, fresh food. With an increasing number of our citizens becoming affected by food insecurity, community gardens provide one solution through on-site production. Gardens serve as a great source of nutritional education while helping to reinforce neighborhood relationships, and many communities have already embarked on providing garden space to interested citizens. Ideally, every Kansas City resident should have access to a community or market garden within a quarter mile radius.

pg. 14

KC Scattered Sites Guidebook

REQUIREMENTS: • Soil testing is an important first step, and for lots with buried debris or poor soil, infrastructure for raised beds should be installed. • High southern sun exposure is a necessity. • Work with city utilities to establish watering spigots for irrigation. • Committed individuals who are available to spend approximately 5 hours per week tending to the garden throughout the height of the growing season. • A basic educational program for residents in starting and maintaining their garden should be organized. Plot fees may recover initial investment costs. APPLICABILITY TO VACANT LOTS: • This strategy should apply to vacant lots large enough for the number of community members interested in participating. It could include multiple adjacent lots to serve several adjacent neighbors. • Consideration may be taken as to the proximity to senior living accommodations and apartment buildings offering only small yards.

Resource: How to Build a Raised Planting Bed http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/how-to/overview/0,,1615067,00.html

COST CONSIDERATIONS: 4’x 8’ Raised Planter (includes wood, soil, liner, drainage gravel, installation)

$500 EA x

(total planter beds desired)

= $

4” Thick Concrete Pavement (follow APWA standard concrete specification)

$8.5 SF

x (total area of pavement)

= $

Mulch (4” thick)

$0.25 SF

x (total area to be mulched)

= $

Fruit Trees (15 gallon containerized tree)

$75 EA

x (total trees to be planted)

= $

Watering Spigot

Cost varies with site specific conditions

3’ Benches

$200 EA

= $

x (total number of benches)


Strategy 2a: Community Garden Program Opportunities

E

C B A F

Strategy Solutions: A

15’ Min. Diameter Concrete Gathering Space with Benches (3’ long to discourage sleeping)

B

Watering Spigot or Cistern in a Convenient Location

C

4’x 8’ Raised Planter Beds Filled with 50/50 Compost and Topsoil Mix

D

Install Fruit Orchard, Neighborhood Tree Farm, or “Food Forest”

E

Mulch In and Around Planter Beds to Ease Maintenance

F

pg. 15

4” Thick Concrete Path

KC Scattered Sites Guidebook

D


Program Opportunities

Strategy 2b: Nature Playground & Rain Garden Pocket parks serve as playful gathering spaces for neighborhood children while educating on the basics of a healthy environment. Well-maintained, accessible parks play a role in increasing real estate values while providing a place for families and children to enjoy the outdoors together. Parks offer environmental benefits and provide valuable ecosystem services as trees and vegetation absorb runoff and reduce the costs for treating stormwater; they also absorb air pollutants. Access to clean, natural space is a vital component in building interactive, urban communities.

pg. 16

KC Scattered Sites Guidebook

REQUIREMENTS: • The park’s design should be based on the number of people willing to keep up the facility. Maintenance will include regular litter pick-up and depending on the landscaping, seasonal mowing, pruning and mulching may be required. • Depending on site purpose, level of access and the surround area, fencing should be considered. Fencing costs vary according to site conditions, length and style. APPLICABILITY TO VACANT LOTS: • This strategy may apply to vacant lots in neighborhoods surrounding schools and community centers where noise concerns have been taken into account. • Attention should be paid to the number of young children residing in the surrounding area, and their current access to parks and other forms of interactive green space.

Resources: http://www.childrenandnature.org http://childreninnature.mo.gov/ and the Anita B. Gorman Discovery Center

COST CONSIDERATIONS: Mulch Play Surface

$12 SF

x (total area to be mulched)

= $

Play Logs (6’ x 24” diameter)

$200 EA

x (total number of logs)

= $

Boulders (3’ x 3’ x 3’)

$350 EA

x (total number of boulders)

= $

Native Plantings (1 Quart Container, 12” on-center)

$9 SF

x (total area to be planted)

= $

Concrete Pathway

$9 SF

x (total area of placement)

Benches (5’-6’)

$1500 EA

x (total number of benches)

Add 2” of Compost and Till Soils

$1 SF

Install Native Buffalo Grass/Blue Grama Seed Mix Plant Trees

= $

= $

x (total area of lot)

= $

$0.5 SF

x (total area of lot)

= $

$450 EA

x (total trees to be installed)

= $


Strategy 2b: Nature Playground & Rain Garden Program Opportunities

H E G

D

Strategy Solutions:

B A

C

A

Reclaimed Logs, Stumps and Climbing Stones

B

Mulched Play Surface (12� thick)

C

Concrete Path

D

Small Gathering Area with Benches

E

Optional Community Garden Plots

F

Stormwater Stream

G

Educational Rain Garden

H

pg. 17

Integrate Short Native Plantings

KC Scattered Sites Guidebook

F


pg. 18

KC Scattered Sites Guidebook

Program Opportunities

Strategy 2c: Block Green Solution Green Block Solutions use various construction techniques to help address regional stormwater, combined sewer and flooding issues in the urban core. Techniques may involve the use of a retaining wall or permeable pavers to allow stormwater to seep down into the stone sub-base where it is naturally cleaned, while saving money in diverting water from expensive City treatment facilities.

REQUIREMENTS: • Diverting stormwater runoff offers many benefits, but it is very important to consult a landscape architect and/or civil engineer. Incorrectly connected water sources may result in yard flooding and wet foundations. • Contact the sewer department to learn more about permits and incentives for decreased utility fees.

References: KC APWA 5600, as modified by Kansas City Missouri KC APWA Stormwater BMP Manual

APPLICABILITY TO VACANT LOTS: • This strategy may apply to vacant lots along a drainage path within a watershed in the combined sewer system. Proper drainage from the streets and from the underground sewer system is a requirement. The size and volume of the green solution should be calculated by an engineer to capture the water quality storm event for the drainage area. COST CONSIDERATIONS: Earthwork

$25 CY

x (total area to be mulched)

= $

Stormwater Pipe Retrofit

$5,000 - $25,000+ EA

Native Plantings (1 Quart Container, 12” on-center)

$9 SF

x (total area to be planted)

Boardwalk (6’ wide)

$800 LF

x (total area of placement)

Curb Cuts

$1,000 EA

x (total number of cuts)

= $

Biosoil

$65 CY

x (total area of lot)

= $

Install Perimeter Fence

$35 LF

x (total length of perimeter)

= $

= $

= $ = $


Strategy 2c: Block Green Solution Program Opportunities

F A

C E B

Strategy Solutions: A

Split Rail Fence

B

Fescue Lawn Edge

C

Boardwalk and Maintenance Access

D

Extended Detention Outlet Structure Connected to City System

E

Concrete Maintenance Path

F

pg. 19

Extended Dry Detention Basin, Planted with Native Grasses and Wildflowers

KC Scattered Sites Guidebook

D


pg. 20

KC Scattered Sites Guidebook

Program Opportunities

Strategy 2d: Community Plaza & Farmer’s Market Community plazas serve as urban green space that is open and available to all community members for their use and enjoyment. Plazas can be as simple as walking paths with low maintenance greenery or shaded gathering spaces with fountains or bird baths. Installing park benches or picnic tables can provide a place for community interaction and encourage involvement.

Resources: Top photo taken from redevelopment on 18th & Vine. Bottom left picture taken from Dalai Luna Kansas City farmers market guide.

REQUIREMENTS: • This strategy requires infrastructure that will serve for the various intended purposes of the plaza. Consideration should be given to the amount of space and volunteers within the community that are willing to participate. • Ideally, the plaza should offer fencing, solid walkways and infrastructure for displaying art or supporting tents for a potential farmer’s market. • Any seating, activity space and landscaping should be designed using Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design Principles (CPTED). APPLICABILITY TO VACANT LOTS: • This application is ideal for highly visible lots close to public transit. • A neighborhood-run organization could establish covenants near community or market gardens for neighborhoods to share and sell produce. COST CONSIDERATIONS:

Should be associated with final design requirements. However, a cost-effective estimate can be figured as below. Native Plantings (1 Quart Container, 12” on-center) $9 SF

x (total area to be planted)

= $

Concrete Pathway $9 SF

x (total area of placement)

= $

Brick Paving $15 SF

x (total area of pavement)

= $

Benches (5’-6’) and Installation $1500 EA

x (total number of benches)

= $

Add 2” of Compost and Till Soils $1 SF

x (total area of vegetation)

= $

Install Native Buffalo Grass/Blue Grama Seed Mix $0.5 SF

x (total area of lot)

= $

Plant Trees $450 EA

x (total trees to be installed)

= $

Pedestrian Lighting $15,000 EA

= $

Shade Structure $12,000 - $25,000 EA

= $

Trash Receptacle $800 EA

x (total number to be installed)

Signage $1,200 - $5,000+

= $ = $


Strategy 2d: Community Plaza & Farmer’s Market Program Opportunities

A E

D C

Strategy Solutions: A

Garden Path

B

Concrete Plaza

C

Opportunity for Volunteer-Maintained Flower Garden

D

Space for Vendors or Tents

E

pg. 21

Opportunity to Create and Show Local Art

KC Scattered Sites Guidebook

B


Appendix: Resources

Appendix There are a number of public resources available to help perform the necessary steps required for Scattered Sites Infill Improvement Projects. This guidebook details only a few potential infill ideas. Collaborate with family members, neighbors, coworkers and community organizations to determine how you can build upon the needs and strengths within your community. The opportunities are endless. The following outline, Steps to Create a Community Infill Improvement Project, may help you initiate a strategy of your own. Reference for the five steps came from Re-Imagining Cleveland’s Ideas to Action Resource Book.

“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.”

pg. 22

KC Scattered Sites Guidebook

- Margaret Mead


Steps to Create a Community Infill Improvement Project

PLAN A VISIONING SESSION

pg. 23

• Choose a date and time that you can schedule a meeting with the community to come up with ideas about how you want your final project to turn out. Early evening is usually a good time to hold such an event. • Invite a representative from your CDC, your councilperson, and your neighborhood’s city planner. • Create a flyer or handout for the meeting and use it to invite as many members of the neighborhood as possible. Be sure to invite immediate neighbors to the site and those people the site is designed to benefit directly. Consider distributing your flyer at local merchants, schools, churches and community centers. • Gather things you may need for the meeting, such as a sign-in sheet for contact information, writing utensils, poster board for brainstorming notes and any ideas, pictures or information you may have regarding the current condition of the abandoned site and proposed reuse ideas. The more visual the better to help communicate the end goal.

KC Scattered Sites Guidebook

2

• As the Kansas City Land Bank commission is formed new websites and resources may become available. Contact Nate Pare’, Property Conservation Manager with questions prior to this transition - (816) 513-9018 Email: nate.pare@kcmo.org. • You can view dynamic maps of Kansas City, Mo. neighborhoods, down to the level of individual homes - and get lots of visual information about them by visiting the kcmo.org website at http://maps.kcmo.org/apps/parcelviewer/. The site software allows you to zoom in or out, and view street names, bodies of water, parcel boundaries, the outline of buildings, ownership information, driveways, and water shutoffs. • Kansas City Community Gardens offers affordable soil testing, visit http://www.kccg.org for more information. • Take time to walk around the site several times at many different times of the day. Pay attention to the neighborhood, the surrounding parcels, trees, fences and debris. Take note of sun exposure and after heavy rains check for the drainage of stormwater. • Think critically about what the surrounding community lacks, and what reuse project could provide the most benefit to the largest majority of neighbors. Begin considering the best management practice for reusing the land. • Find a time to set up a meeting with a representative from your local community development corporation (CDC). Visit http://stage2.lisc.org/kansascity/cdclisting.htm for a listing of Kansas City CDCs. Ask the CDC about whether or not they have a long-term vision for the site or neighborhood and request help in setting up a visioning session. This may help create a list of steps that are required to complete a planned project.

Appendix: Resources

1

IDENTIFY VACANT LAND IN YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD


pg. 24

KC Scattered Sites Guidebook

Appendix: Resources

Steps to Create a Community Infill Improvement Project, Continued

3 4

HOST THE VISIONING MEETING • • • • • • • •

Make sure that everyone in attendance signs in. Go around the room and briefly introduce those in attendance and have neighbors tell where they live in the community. Approach the potential of the vacant land in a way that will be beneficial to all residents. Take time to present your various findings about the site and neighborhood, while highlighting the opportunity for growth. Give ideas for reuse implementation, and carefully listen for feedback from the community members. Have a volunteer record the discussion. Lead the discussion with questions like: What challenges do we currently face in the neighborhood? How might improving this land help with these challenges? Who can benefit from this space? How can we get more people involved? What do we want to see in this space? How do we want it to look? Decide on what type of project the group wants and what elements to include. Then continue the discussion: What resources do we already have in place? What resources are required to make this project happen? How and who will maintain the project once it is build? Be sure to record all volunteers and the roles needed to complete the project, organize them into an action committee. Include writing grant applications, recruiting volunteers, organizing the work and short/long term maintenance tasks.

HOLD A FOLLOW-UP MEETING • Get help from the resource organizations that work with your type of project. • Consider project ideas from this book as well as other current projects throughout the city and the nation. You can also sketch out your own plan using the ideas from the community visioning session. Be creative and true to the community. • Estimate a project budget. Be sure to double-check costs from suppliers as prices change over time. Keep in mind that most land re-use grants ask applicants to match what they’re asking for with either in-kind donation or a financial match. Decide how to raise money and solicit donations for the project. • Set a timeline for your project. • Create an implementation and maintenance plan as well as a schedule for completing your project. Plan out details: What needs to be done? What permits will be needed? Who will install the project? Who will maintain the project, and how often will it be necessary? How will the maintenance schedule change with the seasons? • Identify a non-profit organization to be your fiscal agent for project grants you may receive. Often neighborhood CDCs take on this role. Ask your CDC contact if they would be willing to do this, and discuss what is expected by both parties.


Steps to Create a Community Infill Improvement Project, Continued • Distribute copies of a flyer or newsletter with the design plan and important meetings and work days. Ask for volunteers and donations. Remember that many people would prefer to do volunteer work over sitting through a meeting while others may prefer to donate. • Be sure to promote the work day through every available avenue - create publicity and excitement for the event. • Hosting smaller, mini-events prior to the project’s completion may help to get people excited and willing to volunteer. Events such as picnics, trash pick-up days or even a mini-fundraiser might help get the neighborhood involved in the project. • If you are receiving grant funding, work with your CDC representative or a technical assistance organization to purchase supplies. Or if you are working with all donated materials, create a system for picking them up or having them delivered. Have clear communications with all volunteers so they can be available and ready for work days. • Be sure to provide refreshments and food after volunteer work day(s) to celebrate everyone’s participation. • A follow-up meeting may be necessary to discuss how the work day went and how site maintenance is going. Re-evaluate your maintenance plan and make any changes that may be required.

Appendix: Resources

5

START WORK ON YOUR PROJECT

KC Scattered Sites Guidebook pg. 25


pg. 26

KC Scattered Sites Guidebook

Appendix: Resources

Community Resources Included here is a list of various resources intended to serve as information, elaboration and advice. Consider contacting overarching neighborhood associations where available. If you are interested in organizing a community center or neighborhood-lead Infill Lot Improvement Project, see the previous section entitled Steps to Create a Community Infill Improvement Project for guidelines and basics to help facilitate the organization and development of ideas and implementation. The following is not an endorsement for the businesses listed and no discrimination is intended toward businesses not listed.

MAPPING TOOLS/VACANT LAND INFORMATION: • • • • •

City of Kansas City, MO Online GIS Mapping - http://maps.kcmo.org/apps/parcelviewer/ Jackson Co. Prop. Search - https://ascendweb.jacksongov.org/ascend/(ii53x0fxvmhmwh55uee35f45)/search.aspx Jackson County, MO Recorder of Deeds - http://records.jacksongov.org/localization/menu.asp Phone: (816) 881-3191 Email: Records@Jacksongov.org University of Missouri KC - Center for Economic Information http://cei.haag.umkc.edu United States Environmental Protection Agency - soil testing and remediation http://www.epa.gov/tio/download/citizens/a_citizens_guide_to_phytoremediation.pdf

ADVICE ON APPROPRIATE LAND USE STRATEGIES IN YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD: • City of Kansas City Planning and Development Commission - http://kcmo.org Phone: (816) 513-1500 Email: Planning@kcmo.org • Zoning and Development Codes - http://kcmo.org Find extensive information online through the Zoning & Development Code Guide. The website also provides updated online application forms for development projects. Phone: 816-513-1500 URBAN AGRICULTURE TRAINING AND ADVICE • Cultivate Kansas City & The Center for Urban Agriculture - provides agricultural training & grant information http://www.cultivatekc.org/farms/get-growing-kc.html • Municipal Farm - area-wide brownfield sustainable reuse plan in Kansas City http://www.municipalfarmkc.com/about/ • Bad Seed - Urbavore Urban Farm & Training Facility - http://www.badseedkc.com/


Community Resources, Continued

• • • • • • •

Kansas City Community Gardens - information, events, workshops, training & soil testing http://www.kccg.org Greater Kansas City Food Policy Coalition - resources & aid advocating for local food systems http://www.kcfoodpolicy.org KC Healthy Kids - initiatives, resources & actions for reducing childhood obesity http://www.kchealthykids.org - see their extensive resource list by registering your email address Specifically, the Action Plan for Starting a Farmer’s Market/Community Garden Download EPA Brownfields & Urban Agriculture - interim guidelines for safe gardening practice http://www.epa.gov/brownfields/urbanag/pdf/bf_urban_ag.pdf EPA Urban Farm Business Plan Handbook http://www.epa.gov/brownfields/urbanag/pdf/urban_farm_business_plan.pdf

Appendix: Resources

URBAN AGRICULTURE TRAINING AND ADVICE CONTINUED...

INFRASTRUCTURE & TREE PLANTING RESOURCES:

FUNDING RESOURCES:

pg. 27

• Kauffman Foundation - information, education & entrepreneurship funding & grant opportunities http://www.kauffman.org • Neighborhood & Housing Services Department Kansas City, MO - grants and incentives to applicable reBUILD proposals Check the website regularly for updates: http://www.kcmo.org • Kansas City Local Initiatives Support Corp. (LISC) - offers an array of funding and technical assistance to community development corporations (CDCs) in the form of grants, loans, and lines of credit. http://www.lisc.org/kansas_city/ 3535 Broadway, Suite 200 Kansas City, MO 64111 Phone: (816) 753-0055

KC Scattered Sites Guidebook

• Heartland Tree Alliance - reference & volunteers through Bridging the Gap http://www.heartlandtreealliance.org • Great Trees for the Kansas City Region - Reference Study & List by Robert Whitman, ASLA View the PDF Document via: http://extra.gouldevans.com/greattreesforkc.pdf


Guidebook for Infill Lot Improvement Strategies