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30th Nov 2nd Dec 2018

C O N T I N U U M S E S S I O N G U I D E

Drama Australia National Conference

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2018 Drama Australia National Conference

C O N T I N U U M proudly hosted and organised by Drama Victoria. VCA Performing Arts Building - 30 Dodds Street, Southbank, Melbourne Friday 30th November – Sunday 2nd December This year’s conference theme is CONTINUUM: Drama education past, present and future. We ask our presenters and delegates to contemplate the notion of the continuum that is drama education in Australia especially as the host organisation is celebrating its 50th birthday. A continuum can be characterised as a collection, a sequence, or a progression of values or elements that vary by the smallest degree, or theories that explain gradual transitions from one condition or moment to another, without any abrupt changes. A continuum is something that keeps on going, changing slowly over time, like the continuum of the four seasons. It can also mean a whole made up of many parts. It is synonymous with the terms perpetuity, sequence, and continuance. We ask you to join us on Boon Wurrung land and consider the thousands of years of arts practice and story-telling that has gone before. We are but a small part of the continuum. The National Conference Committee invites the broader drama and theatre education community to contemplate and respond to drama education as a continuum; what is its past, its present, and what will be its future? P R O V O C A T I O N S Transition: What has changed/is changing in terms of drama education in Australia? Progression: How has drama education innovated in the 21st Century? Perpetuity: How will drama education contribute to the lives of young people in the future? Continuance: What are the qualities and characteristics of drama education that have always been and are essential to our practice and research?

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DAY 1 F R I D AY 3 0 TH N O V E M B E R VCA Performing Arts Building (Dodds Street) From 7.30 - Registration 7.50am – 8.40 Warm-up Frenzy VCA Federation Hall – Grant Street 8.45am - Welcome to Country, Welcome to Conference , Archive Launch VCA Performing Arts Building (Dodds Street) 10am – Morning Tea (Trade Hub) 10.45am - Session One (90 min) 12.15pm Lunch & Book Launches (Trade Hub) 1.15pm Session Two (90 min) 2.45pm – Afternoon Tea (Trade Hub) VCA Federation Hall – Grant Street 3.15pm – 5.45pm Keynote - The Greatest Love of All A performed research play based on the Drama Victoria MAMA Project Written by Jane Bird, Kelly McConville and Richard Sallis (University of Melbourne).

6pm – 8.30pm OPTIONAL EXTRA – Drama Victoria 50th Birthday Event

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DAY 2 S AT U R DAY 1 S T D E C E M B E R VCA Performing Arts Building (Dodds Street) From 7.30 - Registration 7.50am – 8.40 Warm-up Frenzy VCA Federation Hall – Grant Street 8.45am - Welcome to Day 2, Keynote – Jacob Boehme VCA Performing Arts Building (Dodds Street) 10.15am – Morning Tea (Trade Hub) 11am - Session Three (90 min) 12.30pm Lunch (Trade Hub) 1.30pm Session Four (90 min) 3pm – Afternoon Tea (Trade Hub) 3.30pm Session Five (90 min) 5pm Conference Close

6pm – 8.30pm - OPTIONAL EXTRA - End of Conference Drinks (Studio 1)

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DAY O N E Fri 30th Nov, 7.40AM - 8.50am For anyone who wants to get in a bit earlier and/or avoid the traffic!

THE WA R M -UP FRE NZY ( I NCLUD ES BRE AKFA S T GOO D IES )

Featured Presenters: Sam Mackie and Brendan Carroll

About the Presenters

We love a continuum, But, while every circle is a continuum, somewhere there is a little bit of plastic that shows you where the join is. That bit is the start. And we specialise in starting. So, what better way to start your day than with a Zen-Thai-Shiatsu-PilatifiedBox-aerobic-Boot-camp-Hit-and-Run warm-up game frenzy. We’re talking games. Drama games. Games that get the mind, the body, the spirit all going. Games from the past. Games for the now. Games that will be around in the future because they have stood the test of time.

Sam and Brenny have been teaching together for the last 9 years. Sam has taught for a lot longer but Brenny has a better qualification. They like teaching Drama, fish and chips from Captain Gummy’s in Frankston, and long walks on the beach with their dogs. They thought that the warm-up frenzy would be a great way to kick-start each day of the conference.

Forget about getting up early for that run, jog, ride, swim or workout. Get up early join us for breakfast! With a bundle of likeminded dramatically buff and theatrically ripped players in our field of improvisational dreams.

NEED TRAVEL OR A C C O M O D AT I O N A S S I S TA N C E ? Amber Edwardson - 1000 Mile Travel Group Mobile: 0413 880 891 Email: amber.edwardson@1000miletravel.com.au FB: https://www.facebook.com/amberedwardson1000miletravelgroup/ For things to do & see in Melbourne please visit https://www.theurbanlist.com/melbourne

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SESSION ONE Workshops places are limited and will be allocated upon order of registration; when workshops are full your next preference will be allocated. We will NOT be able to change preferences so please choose carefully. Changes will not be able to be made on the days of the Conference, unless there is a cancellation.

Fri 30th Nov, 10.45am – 12.15pm Please decide on one preference before registering

1A.

Area of Focus: Production and Technology Provocation: Perpetuity Featured Presenter: Mark McDowell

‘PIT PERS PEC TIVE’ – MYS TERIES OF THE O RC HES TRA PIT

About the Presenters

Have you ever wondered why musical directors want what they want? Why does the band cost so much? If the band is made up of professionals why do they need so much equipment? In this session we will answer all your questions about why they want what they want, how to give them less, save budget and make it sound like more.

Mark McDowell has worked in all technical aspects of live theatre production over the past 20 years. In that time he has worked at all major theatres in Melbourne and Sydney, and on a range of major theatrical events. His Australian show credits include A Little Night Music (MTC), Phantom of The Opera (Melbourne first return season), Les Miserables (Melbourne first return season), SpaceJam Southeast Asia Promo Tour, Bombshells (MTC), Annie (GFO: Melbourne), Man From Snowy River: Arena Spectacular‚ The Producers (Melbourne Season), Wicked (Touring), Dons Party (Touring, Sydney). On these shows he has worked in various technical positions including Head Electrician which covers all lighting roles in the theatre. He has also worked as automation operator and sound designer/operator, as well as filling the role of Assistant to the Music Director. Mark spent many years working in children’s entertainment for clients such as Warner Bros and Nickelodeon, in which he has held positions including Production Manager, Stage Manager, Lighting and Sound Operator. Mark has been the Manager of the Mahon Theatre at Aquinas College for the past 10 Years. During this time he has been involved in the School’s musical in the roles of both Technical Director and Music Director. He is now the full time Director of YourShow.

We will discuss - sound baffles, foldback, personal mixers, sound patches, microphones, di’s, orchestral layout, location, balance, stands, sconces, chairs, risers, computers, digital, analogue, control, vision foldback, amps and personnel.

1B.

WORK ING WITH A ND PRO D UC ING CO NTEMPORARY I N D IG ENO US THEAT R E I N THE C L AS S ROO M

Ideal for: Senior Theatre Studies, Production of Plays, Directing or Stagecraft Provocation: Perpetuity Featured Presenters: Andrew Byrne, Lyndy Clarke and Kate Phillips About the Presenters

Lyndy, Kate and Andrew have been collaborating with their respective year 11 VCE Theatre Studies students, exploring how to engage with and produce Contemporary indigenous Theatre. In 2018 both schools produced and performed “Black Medea” by Wesley Enoch.

Andrew was fortunate enough to undertake teaching rounds at Caulfield Grammar with Lyndy as his mentor. They served together on the board of Drama Victoria before Lyndy made the move to Drama Australia. in 2017 they began a collaboration to explore how to produce Contemporary Indigenous Theatre within VCE Theatre Studies.

This presentation workshop will demonstrate the processes Lyndy, Kate and Andrew undertook with their students to produce the play, including the application of acting and stagecraft. The workshop will feature students from Braybrook College and Caulfield Grammar presenting scenes from their productions.

Kate Phillips has been a teacher of Drama , Humanities & English since 2006, teaching in a number of public secondary schools in Melbourne. She currently teaches part-time at Braybrook College. Kate completed a honours degree in Indigenous Theatre at La Trobe University and is interested in including the work of Indigenous writers across the curriculum.

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SESSION ONE

1C.

S TEPPING INTO/ O UT O F HIS TO RY: S TO RYING D RAMA AUS TRAL IA TH RO UGH ITS JO URNAL S

Organisation: Western Sydney University Provocation: Continuance Area(s) of focus: Primary/Early Years, Middle Years, Senior Drama, Senior Theatre Studies, Tertiary. Featured Presenters: Mary Mooney & Christine Carlton

Discover historical Australian drama wisdom that continues to enrich our drama practice today. Storytelling will frame this research-based workshop to capture the 42-year potted history of Drama Australia with reference to NJ publications. We will playfully step into and out of history to keep our story alive by exploring the remarkable article curation by NJ editors from Gordon Goulding, John Holmes, Megan Schaffner, John Carroll, Wendy Michaels, Philip Taylor, Christine Comans, Christine Sinclair, Madonna Stinson, Robyn Ewing and more to provide the primary source material for mapping the development of drama education. Participants’ drama education experience and wisdom will be called on as we travel along the stepping stones of time that embrace the themes, concepts and good practices of drama teaching. In this engaging, creative and fun session we will acknowledge the key moments in our history and discover for ourselves how our past and present practices and theories lay the stepping stones for emerging processes into the future so that drama education remains vibrant, relevant and meaningful.

1D.

About the Presenters Associate Professor Mary Mooney (WSU) is co-editor of Drama Journeys: Inside Drama Learning, which received the best Drama Publication Award by Drama Victoria (2004). She is a recipient of the Drama Australia President’s Excellence Award for Drama in Education (2015). Her work includes drama curriculum, creative pedagogy, artists-in-residence, screen drama and gender in Australian playscripts. Christine Carlton works throughout Australia and overseas as a freelance Educator and Consultant in Storytelling, Drama and the Creative Arts in Education and Community Development. An experienced educator in Tertiary, Secondary and Primary schools she works with children and adults encouraging them to explore possibilities for their own creative expression.

Organisation: University of Melbourne Provocation: Transition, Progression, Perpetuity, Continuance: Area(s) of focus: Primary/Early Years, Middle Years, Senior Drama, Production of Plays, Directing or Stagecraft Featured Presenter: John O’Toole

THE S EVEN AG ES O F PROC ES S D RAMA

The development of Process Drama is among Drama education’s most original and valuable contributions - to the art form of drama, to contemporary pedagogy, and to applied theatre. Starting as a ragbag of classroom activities, games, rehearsal techniques and acting exercises, inspired educators have morphed it into a clearly defined genre. Process drama is a dramatic form that can now be found in communities’ world-wide and schools at all age levels, and it continues to evolve. John O’Toole, who has been involved in the movement virtually throughout its continually changing history, will give participants an illustrated, active tour through its dynamic growth: chronicling, analysing, demonstrating and sharing some of the genre’s most significant discoveries, characteristics and achievements. This presentation will directly address three of the conference themes: transition, progression, and continuance. Perpetuity is a step too grand and too far, but this presentation will give a base of practical understanding to allow us to begin to explore what possibilities process drama might offer young people in the future.

About the Presenters John O’Toole has taught drama to all ages, on all continents, for half a century. Lead writer for Arts in the National Curriculum, John has written many standard research and school text-books, including – relevant to this workshop – The Process of Drama, Pretending to Learn and Dramawise Reimagined. A founder-member of Drama Queensland, Drama Australia and IDEA, he received the Order of Australia for drama in 2014.

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SESSION ONE

1E.

AN INTRODUCTION TO AESTHETIC EDUCATION – STRATEGIES FOR HELPING YOUNG PEOPLE ENGAGE DEEPLY WITH LIVE THEATRE.

Provocation: Perpetuity Area of Focus: Primary/Early Years, Middle Years, Senior Drama, Senior Theatre Studies Featured Presenters: Krystalla Pearce & Vanessa O’Neill About the Presenters

Join us for a hands-on workshop exploring the use of inquiry-based learning in your teaching practise. What happens when you think like an artist? What happens when you fully notice what there is to be noticed? How can we encourage this noticing and questioning in our students? How can students apply these skills to their engagement with theatre? Inspired by Maxine Greene’s philosophy and Lincoln Center Education’s Aesthetic Education teachings, the session will be split into two sections punctuated by watching a performance, which will provide stimulus for both the pre and post workshop. We will explore the benefits of encouraging students to go deeper in their observations, ask questions, and make connections. How can we foster these skills as habits of mind in our students so that they engage more deeply in their own work as artists and audiences?

1F.

Krystalla Pearce is an Australian theatre maker and teaching artist. She has been trained in teaching artistry and aesthetic education at Lincoln Center Education in New York City. Her teaching work includes: devised theatre workshops in New Delhi, India; community building workshops with Indigenous Australian communities; and artist residencies across New York City and greater Melbourne. She currently works as a lead teaching artist for Western Edge Youth Arts. Vanessa O’Neill is a writer, performer and teaching artist. She trained at Ecole Philippe Gaulier and Drama Centre in London and is an International Fellow of Shakespeare’s Globe. For the last four years she has been the Youth and Education Manager at Malthouse Theatre. Her show ‘In Search of Owen Roe’ was on the 2016 VCE Drama Playlist. This year, Vanessa received an Australia Council Career Development Grant to undertake advanced training as a Teaching Artist at Lincoln Center Education in New York.

Provocation: Continuance Area(s) of focus: Middle Years, Senior Drama, Senior Theatre Studies, Acting/Performance Training, Entertainment/Arts Industry Featured Presenter: Emily Goddard

GET YO UR B O UFF- ON ! A MAS TERC L AS S IN T HE WIL D & L IB ERATING A R T OF G ROTES QUE S AT I R E

About the Presenters

Bouffon is an ancient performance tradition, which has been used across cultures for centuries. In short, a style of ‘grotesque satire’ in which outcasts mock their oppressors. The parody is clever, designed to charm the audience and then ruthlessly target what is imbalanced in the culture at large. Exploring Bouffon is a fun and liberating way for Drama students to increase their spontaneity and push themselves to discover new possibilities. As a training tool, it is used as a method of encouraging students to release their childlike pleasure, break free of their inhibitions, take risks and achieve a deeper and bolder connection with themselves and their work. In this 90 minute masterclass participants will be taken through a series of performance games and activities examining the basic techniques of Bouffon and how they can be used to ignite and challenge students in both performance, ensemble building and devising. This masterclass will be an exploration of an ancient performance method for the contemporary stage, and allow participants to discover new possibilities for fostering a greater sense of courage and freedom in their students.

Actor & Theatre maker Emily Goddard graduated from Ecole Philippe Gaulier, Paris in 2010. She is the creator and performer of the recent critically acclaimed Bouffon anti-bonnet drama This is Eden (VCE Drama Playlist 2018). Theatre credits include Noises Off, The Boy at The Edge of Everything & Elling (MTC), Angels in America & The Lonely Wolf (Dirty Pretty Theatre), You Got Older & Glory Dazed (Red Stitch), Mess (London/UK tour, Caroline Horton & Co), The Unspoken Word is Joe (Brisbane Festival/MKA), Moth (Arena), The Walls (Attic/Erratic) and Os Pequenos Nadas (Ultimo Comboio Teatro, Barcelona). She has been nominated for three Green Room Awards for Best Performer, most recently for This is Eden. Emily has taught Bouffon masterclasses to VCE Drama classes, teachers, tertiary acting students and professional performers.


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SESSION ONE

1G.

AN ENS EMB L E THAT PL AYS TOG ETH ER, S TAYS TOG ETH ER; US ING TH E IMPROVIS ATION TOO L K IT TO D EVE LOP A S TRONG ENS EMB LE

Organisation: Melbourne Playback Theatre Company Provocation: Continuance Area(s) of focus: Middle Years, Senior Drama, Senior Theatre Studies, Acting/Performance Training Featured Presenter: Melbourne Playback Theatre Company About the Presenters

Developing a successful ensemble requires trust, commitment and teamwork from each of its members. In this workshop we will share our Melbourne Playback training toolkit for developing ensemble compicité and performance skills. Participants will experience exercises that develop ensemble relationships in performance, based on the principles of improvisation. Training in improvisation techniques equip performers to hone their listening skills, work with existing offers, work with ‘mistakes’, stay present, support each other and act as a cohesive team in performance. This training is crucial in developing the skills for both ensemble performance and devising. These fundamental principles continue but their iteration is constantly developing and growing. This workshop will also explore exercises in ensemble devising from stimulus material, developing character and narrative, and non-naturalistic ensemble performance styles.

1H.

Melbourne Playback Theatre Company is a leading improvisation and storytelling company specialising in improvised performances that bring the stories of our audience to life. With an ensemble of 11 actors and 2 musicians we work strongly with non-naturalistic theatrical forms as well as genre, metaphor, physical theatre, music and song.

Organisation: Melbourne Theatre Company Provocation: Perpetuity Area(s) of focus: Middle Years, Senior Drama, Senior Theatre Studies, Production of Plays, Directing or Stagecraft, Entertainment/Arts Industry Featured Presenter: Nick Tranter

MEL B OURNE THEATRE CO MPANY HQ TOUR

About the Presenters

Melbourne Theatre Company’s Southbank headquarters is the engine room of the Company, where plays are rehearsed, sets are built, costumes are sewn, and wigs are created one strand of hair at a time. This tour will provide you with unique insight into the Company’s rich history, an overview of the design process, and a chance to meet MTC staff while exploring our production departments, including wardrobe, wigs and makeup, millinery, props, scenic art and set construction. Learn about a variety of career paths in the creative industries, and inspire your students with behind-the-scenes information about how a professional theatre company operates.

Nick Tranter is the Education Coordinator at Melbourne Theatre Company. MTC’s Education Program reaches thousands of young Victorians every year. We present world-class productions and tour to some of the most remote schools in Victoria. MTC also supports the study of VCE Drama and Theatre Studies through workshops, talks and resources.

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SESSION ONE

1I.

PR E S ENTATIONS & RES EARC H PAPERS S ES S IO N

Organisation: #1 University of Newcastle and University of Melbourne #2 Temple Christian College #3 Tasmanian Department of Education Provocation: Perpetuity Featured Presenters: #1 Dr Carol Carter & Dr Richard Sallis #2 Susan Sprason #3 Jane Polley

1. Investigating the role of drama in the continuum of enabling, supportive, dialogical spaces for learning in different teaching and geographical locations This paper will be presented by Carol and Richard in the form of a research-based performance. There have been research contributions identifying the efficacy of drama as a method of teaching and learning and for the creation of dialogical spaces. However, these contributions have not been within the field of Enabling Education or widening university participation. The specific focus of the paper is to share findings that identify drama techniques and strategies that could be used to support students in Open Foundation (bridging or similar) courses. The broader focus is the collective and comparative investigation of three researchers, within different geographical and teaching contexts to examine the role drama can play in the creation of enabling, supportive dialogical spaces for learning in inclusive higher education contexts. The qualitative research, within a constructivist paradigm, is framed by practitioner research, pedagogical methodology (PM) and arts-based methodological approaches.

About the Presenters Dr Carol Carter lectures and coordinates Foundation of Education in the Foundations of English Language and Foundation Studies Centre (ELFSC) at the University of Newcastle. She has extensive experience as a teacher educator and researcher at universities in Australia and South Africa. Her PhD examined the role of oral art forms in supporting drama pedagogy and intercultural understanding within teacher education. Dr Richard Sallis is a senior lecturer in arts education in the Melbourne Graduate School of Education at the University of Melbourne, where he is also the is the Assistant Dean, Diversity and Inclusion. His Masters (2004) and PhD (2010) studies looked issues of masculinities, gender identity, and drama education and ethnographic performance.

2. How engagement in Drama enhances confidence, self-esteem, and mental health, impacting student learning and engagement in other subject areas such as English, Maths, and Science. This presentation addresses the needs of students in 2018 and beyond, and how what we do in Drama can assist students to develop confidence, self-esteem, and impact their well-being and sense of self (identity), for now and into the future (Perpetuity). The evidence-based research presented, addresses Continuance through research conducted in Australia, the UK, Canada and the USA, and looks at the current research available on how engagement in Drama can impact learning across the curriculum, including English, Maths, Science. ‘Performance - Essentials of the Drama Classroom’ will also form a part of this presentation.

Susan’s teaching experience (UK, Queensland, Adelaide), includes National Curriculum (UK), GCSE/’A’ level, Australian Curriculum, and QCAA/SACE Curriculum. She has been a QCAA panel and Curriculum writing team member. Susan holds a BA (hons) Music, P.G.C.E., MArts Drama (theatre major). Susan is a teacher and an author of children’s books. She performs on stage, and directs and music directs productions. Susan presented her evidence-based research at CSA Conference (2017).

3. The Imagination Pioneers: How drama education activates and enables young people to be cultural change makers and to navigate a time of flux

Jane Polley is the Curriculum Teacher Leader for The Arts in the Tasmanian Department of Education and is responsible for high level pedagogical leadership and the development of state-wide strategies to implement the Australian Curriculum. To this role she brings her experience as a professional actor, deviser and voice artist and over twenty five years in educational and artistic leadership. She is on the national boards of Drama Australia and AustralianPlays. org, has a Bachelor of Education with a double major of Dance and Drama from Rusden, Victoria College and a Master of Drama Education with Honours from Griffith University. She recently presented at the International Drama In Education Research Institute in New Zealand.

In a drama class room young people are given permission to ‘try on’ other realities, and in doing so, they crystallise their self-actualisation. As they leave school and enter the wider cultural space their experience of drama impacts on the way they collaborate, handle conflict and create cultural content. How do our current theatre, film, and television makers draw on their own drama education experiences and can they articulate a correlation between their adolescent selves and their contemporaneous experience as early career artists? Do young cultural creatives use their knowledge of dramatic form, the theatrical canon and their own burgeoning confidence to maintain a creative career and effect cultural change? Interviewing some of Australia’s next generation of cultural change makers, this paper looks to articulate why drama education is so important to current curriculums in our Australian schools and for our wider cultural landscape.

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SESSION TWO Fri 30th Nov, 1.15pm – 2.45pm Please decide on one preference before registering

2A.

NOWH ERE EL S E B UT H ERE : RES TORIN G C OUNTRY THROUG H RES TORYING.

Storytelling has always been, and continues to be, essential to our creative practice and research. This workshop offers decolonising processes to prepare ourselves as non-Indigenous teacher-artists for dramatizing intercultural stories from Country alongside Indigenous co-creators. As makers of intercultural on-Country theatre, we need to grapple with the ontology of stories from Country as ‘living Entities’, which have rights and need custodians. The workshop aims to counter notions of the binary, embrace ‘Entanglement’, and provoke questions around individual identity and relationship to the Entities. In light of our Government’s rejection of the Uluru Statement of the Heart, the presenters regard the work of telling the real stories from the Countries on which we live, work and play as urgent strategies for healing, cultural survival, self-determination and social justice.

2B.

Workshops places are limited and will be allocated upon order of registration; when workshops are full your next preference will be allocated. We will NOT be able to change preferences so please choose carefully. Changes will not be able to be made on the days of the Conference, unless there is a cancellation.

Organisation: Nambucca High School & Coffs Harbour High School Provocation: Continuance Area(s) of focus: Middle Years, Senior Theatre Studies, Tertiary, Production of Plays, Directing or Stagecraft Featured Presenters: Catherine McSkimming & Madge Hair About the Presenters Catherine McSkimming and Madge Hair are teacher-artists working at Nambucca High School and Coffs Harbour High School respectively. Their creative practice of on-Country co-created intercultural theatre aims to shift the audience gaze toward a view of Country where shared history is acknowledged alongside foregrounded Indigenous knowledge and experiences.

CONNECTING THROUGH THE LANGUAGE OF IMAGINATION: TEACHING LANGUAGE AND LITERACY SKILLS TO REFUGEE ADULTS USING PROCESS DRAMA APPROACHES

Organisation: Western Sydney University Provocation: Perpetuity: How will drama education contribute to the lives of young people in the future? Area(s) of focus: EAL/D, Primary, Secondary, Tertiary Featured Presenter: Rachael Jacobs About the Presenters

The benefits of using drama to develop literacy have been well established, but adults with disadvantage face several barriers to engaging in drama learning processes. These barriers were particularly evident in the ‘Connected’ program, piloted by Sydney Theatre Company, Western Sydney University and the University of Sydney. The program was conducted at six sites in Sydney, with classes mostly comprising of newly arrived refugees learning English as an additional language. This workshop explores techniques used to overcome barriers to learning, using process drama approaches. Folk tales were collaboratively developed with participants to facilitate a humanising curriculum based in the imaginative realm. This workshop provides an example of the approach, engaging participants in learning strategies that were found to be particularly effective. The political and social dimensions that led to the success of various strategies and the limitations of others will be discussed. The Connected project fostered creative ways of being and bridged racial and cultural distances in the learning environment. This workshop also explores the challenges encountered by adults with disadvantage in creative spaces, and possibilities for imaginative pedagogies in their learning environments.

Rachael Jacobs is a lecturer in Creative Arts Education at Western Sydney University. She is a former secondary teacher (Dance, Drama and Music) and primary Arts specialist. Her research interests include assessment in the arts, pre-service teacher education and embodied learning. Rachael conducts research projects situated in refugee communities in Sydney in partnership with the Sydney theatre Company. She has been engaged by the OECD to assist in the development of the Sustainable Development Goals for 2030. In 2013 Rachael released her first textbook, addressing arts education in the Australian Curriculum. She is the current Director of Research for Drama Australia. Rachael is a community activist, a freelance writer, practicing dancer and choreographer. She is the convenor of the community group, Teachers for Refugees and runs her own intercultural dance company.

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SESSION TWO

2C.

TH E NATIONA L L ITERAC Y L EARNING PROG RES S IO N AND D RAMA : INVES TIG ATIN G TH E C ONTINUUM

Success in any learning area depends on being able to use the significant, identifiable and distinctive literacy that is important for learning and representative of the content of that learning area (ACARA 2016). Literacy (and numeracy) and the knowledge of key disciplines are identified as fundamental cornerstones of education for all young Australians. Literacy is the business of all teachers and has a place in every classroom. What might that look like as students learn in Drama? The National Literacy Progression was developed in response to the Council of Australian Government Education Council’s 2015 call for national action to extend the national literacy and numeracy continuums to: … better assist teachers to identify and address individual student needs according to the expected skills and growth in student learning at key progress points from the early years through high school, given the evidence of the spread of student achievement within any classroom. (Education Council 2015, National STEM School Education Strategy, p. 9) This workshop focuses on the national literacy progression and drama, and aims to provide some frameworks and experiences to assist teachers to understand and report on the contributions of drama to the progression students are making in literacy skills. We begin the workshop with a shared drama experience, which we will then investigate together, unravelling the literacy outcomes from the drama work. In our leadership of the analysis, we will focus on the construction of the literacy progressions in the curriculum, rather than specific year levels, so the workshop is relevant to teachers from K-10. The workshop does not position drama as a “handmaiden” for literacy, rather, focuses on what is typically already happening in drama classrooms that contributes to literacy development.

2D.

Organisation: ACARA Provocation: Continuance Area(s) of focus: Middle Years Featured Presenters: Joanne O’Mara & Helen Champion About the Presenters Joanne O’Mara is an Associate Professor in Language and Literature Education in the Faculty of Arts and Education, Deakin University, Melbourne, Australia. An experienced secondary English and Drama teacher, she has continued to work with young people and schools through her university research. Her research and scholarship focuses on drama pedagogy; emergent literacies and new textual practices; digital games; and the spatial, social and temporal dimensions of teachers’ work. Helen Champion is the Arts Curriculum Specialist at the Australian Curriculum Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA). A former classroom music teacher, Helen’s work now focuses on monitoring and supporting implementation of Australian Curriculum: The Arts.

DEVISING COLLAGE DRAMA – ENCOURAGING STUDENT OWNERSHIP

Organisation: St. Michael’s College, SA Provocation: Continuance Area(s) of focus: Middle Years, Senior Drama, Production of Plays, Directing or Stagecraft Featured Presenter: Giselle Becker

Young people are ready to articulate the issues that concern them when we lean in close enough to listen. This workshop will explore how teachers and students can use the thematic approach of Collage Drama to devise an engaging and meaningful performance, around an issue of global, local and personal importance to students. Participants will recognise the continued importance of young people constructing their own stories to share within their communities. Using the processes traversed with many Year 11 classes but could be applied to middle school or Year 12, this workshop will explore idea or theme generation. Participants will investigate brainstorming methods and stimulus materials as well as how to utilise all the skills of the group you are working with to make theatre that stretches across art forms and styles. Delegates will workshop ideas in groups exploring their own ideas as well as view examples from student performances. They will consider ideas for non-literal staging and how theatrical elements can be used economically. This workshop is for teachers who would like to activate student voice and ownership in all aspects of their production work.

About the Presenters As Drama Subject Coordinator at St. Michael’s College, Henley Beach, Giselle manages a vibrant team, an array of productions and an in school mini arts festival during Adelaide Festival and Fringe time. She utilises her experiences as an Education Officer for Windmill Theatre Co and the Adelaide Fringe to connect artists with her students to inspire their work.

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SESSION TWO

2E.

IN-YER- FAC E TH EATRE ON AUS TRAL IAN S H ORES : L EG AC IE S, L ATENC IES AND WRITERS NOT B EG INNING WIT H TH E L ETTER ‘L’

The influence of In-Yer-Face on national theatres outside of Britain has been keenly felt in Australian theatres. A number of Australian playwrights working at the time of the rise of In-Yer-Face in the United Kingdom and in the years beyond demonstrate the need to use theatre to interrogate and confront societal violence, victims of history or the media, and a re-authoring of the other. Critical commentary around the reception of In-Yer-Face theatre note that these are rare works of theatre that can at once interrogate, entertain and horrify. This practical workshop will focus on two works Oedipus Doesn’t Live Here Anymore (2015) by Australian writer and director Daniel Evans and The Tragedy of King Richard III (2016) by writers Marcel Dorney and Daniel Evans to trace the impact and influence of the In-Yer-Face movement in the contemporary Australian theatre landscape. The workshop will draw on interviews with the playwrights, critical reviews and the play texts to show how playwrights have embraced this theatre form to create a more dynamic, raw and visceral experience for Australian audiences to investigate what it means to be human and living in uncertain times.

2F.

Organisation: Queensland University of Technology Provocation: Progression Area(s) of focus: Senior Theatre Studies, Production of Plays, Directing or Stagecraft Featured Presenter: Sandra Gattenhof About the Presenters Associate Professor Sandra Gattenhof is Director of Research Training in Creative Industries Faculty, QUT. Sandra is leader of the Creative Education and Creative Workforce theme in the Creative Lab at QUT and has been Discipline Leader - Dance, Drama, Music (2017) and Head of Drama (2010-2016). Sandra specializes in postdramatic theatre, theatre for young audiences, and arts evaluation.

Organisation: Griffith University Provocation: Progression Area(s) of focus: Senior Drama Senior Theatre Studies Promotion or Product Launch Featured Presenter: Bruce Burton

TEACHING SENIOR DRAMA IN 2019 – LIVING DRAMA

About the Presenters

This Masterclass will first investigate the major developments that have occurred in senior drama curriculum around Australia and in particular the new and revised syllabi being introduced in 2019. The progression towards a unified national curriculum is explored, and significant examples of outstanding practice from the various state drama units that are relevant to drama teaching nationwide are identified. The major part of the Masterclass involves workshop activities and discussion on the structuring and teaching of each unit to maximise student learning and assessment outcomes. The new edition of Living Drama, Edition.5, published this year, provides the information, knowledge and practice for all the teaching outlined in this Masterclass. Specifically, major progressions in drama teaching are explored in theory and in practice. These include Verbatim Theatre, Mono Drama, Multi-disciplinary Theatre and Contemporary Approaches to Performance and Transformational Drama. The fundamental aim of this Masterclass is to support teachers in progressing Senior Drama in 2019 and beyond.

Bruce is an Emeritus Professor at Griffith University and the author of 12 books in Drama Education and Applied Theatre including Living Drama, which has been the standard senior drama text in schools for three decades. He has taught drama in three countries and trained thousands of drama teachers in Australia.

12.


SESSION TWO

2G.

As we grow in recognition of the need for authentic learning and representation of a more transnational classroom, our approach to learning through theatre must also adapt. This session encourages teachers to broaden the secondary classroom experience through an exploration of a diverse range of performance styles to celebrate different world cultures. The session hopes to respond thoughtfully and dynamically to the growing momentum and changes to HSC, VCE, IB and other Australian curricula. This practical workshop is particularly suited to teachers looking to explore alternative performance styles and drama theorists and will include various resources targeted for the middle school and senior classrooms. The workshop aims to address intended outcomes and potential learning experiences and assessments for the IB, VCE and HSC syllabi that encourage in a variety of ways:

2H.

Organisation: St Peter’s College, Cranbourne & Foundation Studies, Trinity College, The University of Melbourne Provocation: Transition Area(s) of focus: Senior Drama & Theatre Studies Featured Presenters: Samantha Kosky and Christina Burton

DRAMA WITHOUT WALLS: EXPLORING WORLD PERFORMANCE STYLES

About the Presenters Samantha and Christina met while teaching drama, including the IB Theatre programme, in the international school system in Singapore and Paris. Both came to the IB MYP Arts and IB Diploma Theatre Programmes with extensive knowledge and experience of the NSW HSC Drama course and VCE Drama and Theatre Studies course. The IB Theatre course requires an exploration of theatre styles from around the world to meet the needs of an international classroom. Having returned to Melbourne, both teachers recognise the opportunities and value in teaching more diverse Performance Styles in Australia’s Drama curriculum.

THEATRE, INDUSTRY AND EDUCATION: WHERE ARE WE NOW? WHERE COULD WE BE?

Organisation: Hosted by Melbourne Theatre Company Education and Families – Qatar lounge @ Southbank Theatre Provocation: Perpetuity Area of focus: Primary, Secondary and Tertiary Drama/Theatre educators, theatre industry Featured Presenters: Meg Upton, Lecturer in Drama Education (Deakin University), Researcher and Teaching Artist Jeremy Rice, Melbourne Theatre Company, Head of Education and Families Invited education managers and artistic directors from a range of Melbourne based and interstate theatre and arts organisations

What is the current relationship between drama and theatre education and contemporary arts practice? Is it a happy one? Why can it sometimes be so difficult to have a conversation or to speak the same languages? What is current best practice in education programs in arts organisations? What roles do and could teachers play in helping shape education programs? Join the education managers and artistic directors of key theatre and arts organisations from around Australia in a critical think tank and workshop that considers the intersection between industry and education in the arts. This is a unique opportunity to work together and consider the future of arts organisation education programs and theatre experiences for students and teachers.

13.


SESSION TWO

2I.

PRES ENTATIONS & RES EARC H PAPERS S ES S ION

Organisation: #1 University of Southern Queensland #2 Duval High School, NSW #3 The Impending Room Provocation: Progression Featured Presenters: #1 Genevieve Duncan #2 Katy Walsh #3 Cathy Hunt & Helena Stratakos

#1 The Teacher Artist as a continuum of aesthetic engagement in the classroom A teacher artist convenes a creative space, navigates the challenges of this space and directly enters the art making process as an agent and co-contributor of the art. Whether the art is intended for public consumption or not, the process of collaborative practice is transformative and ignites the aesthetic experience for teacher and students alike. Teacher artists have an innate ability to tap into their student’s creativity while also exploring and extending their own practice and artistry. This presentation will interest drama practitioners who are interested in the latest research on contemporary arts practice while understanding and developing a shared language of their aesthetic experiences as they navigate their artistry into the future of drama education. #2 High School Drama and the Good Life: A reflection on how teaching Drama shapes young lives. Drama education has the intrinsic capacity to develop creative inspired and innovative students who enter the post-school life with outstanding skills in a range of vital areas, including collaboration, creativity and diplomacy. The current NSW syllabus demands proficiency in these areas articulated in the Key competencies. In this paper I reflect on 20 years teaching the subject of Drama and consider what are the key elements of that curriculum that should be maintained and developed and those that should be changed if we are to ensure that high school drama continues to play a substantive role in the flourishing of our students and the future citizens they will become.

About the Presenters Genevieve Duncan is an experienced drama practitioner who is passionate about teaching and learning within creative arts. She has written, directed and produced original work for secondary students for many years. Genevieve has since made the leap to tertiary education and is enjoying studying her MA while working at USQ. Katy Walsh has extensive experience in theatre performance and has taught secondary Drama in regional NSW for over 20 years. She has taught Drama Methods to Teacher Education Students at the University of New England over many years. She recently enrolled in a PhD in Drama Education at the University of Newcastle. Helena Stratakos is an experienced drama teacher of senior students at both VCE and HSC level. She has been teaching at Bacchus Marsh Grammar since 2009 and has directed numerous large scale productions including Beauty and the Beast, The Wizard of Oz and Hairspray. Cathy Hunt is a director and dramaturg, a VCA graduate. Through La Mama she has devised work with young people from migrant and refugee backgrounds. Cathy is a 2018 Associate Artist on Dybbuks. Directing includes Her Father’s Daughter, a version of Hedda Gabler, and Les Mamelles de Tiresias for Lyric.

#3 Diverse Ways of Devising: Ensemble Performance & Collaborative Development This workshop draws on Helena Stratakos’ expertise in guiding students to create devised ensemble pieces and her hard won experience in the context of directing large-scale school productions allowing her to understand what works to help them connect proactively. With Cathy Hunt – director, dramaturg and theatremaker, this workshop outlines how current drama education can draw on techniques and processes used in the artistic practices of theatre-makers in the contemporary independent theatre scene to engage and empower students for whom performance making from scratch is daunting or unfamiliar. Participants will try out a range of techniques to devising work drawn from workshop leaders’ own practices, able to be taken directly into the classroom. Approaches will be suitable for dealing with people unfamiliar with drama, students from CALD backgrounds and those who identify with having a disability. We will focus on Progression through innovation in drama education. Teachers guiding students creating devised ensemble work for VCE or HSC can absorb techniques and approaches of contemporary theatre makers. Helena Stratakos will share insights gleaned across her teaching career for working with groups of students creating work and Cathy Hunt will share experiences of collaborating with young people from migrant and refugee backgrounds.

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DAY T W O Sat 1st Dec, 7.40AM - 8.50am For anyone who wants to get in a bit earlier and/or avoid the traffic!

THE WA R M -UP FRE NZY ( I NCLUD ES BRE AKFA S T GOO D IES ) We love a continuum, But, while every circle is a continuum, somewhere there is a little bit of plastic that shows you where the join is. That bit is the start. And we specialise in starting. So, what better way to start your day than with a Zen-Thai-Shiatsu-PilatifiedBox-aerobic-Boot-camp-Hit-and-Run warm-up game frenzy. We’re talking games. Drama games. Games that get the mind, the body, the spirit all going. Games from the past. Games for the now. Games that will be around in the future because they have stood the test of time.

Featured Presenters: Sam Mackie and Brendan Carroll

About the Presenters Sam and Brenny have been teaching together for the last 9 years. Sam has taught for a lot longer but Brenny has a better qualification. They like teaching Drama, fish and chips from Captain Gummy’s in Frankston, and long walks on the beach with their dogs. They thought that the warm-up frenzy would be a great way to kick-start each day of the conference.

Forget about getting up early for that run, jog, ride, swim or workout. Get up early join us for breakfast! With a bundle of likeminded dramatically buff and theatrically ripped players in our field of improvisational dreams.

Sat 1st Dec, 8.45am – 10.15am VCA Federation Hall – Grant Street

KEYNOT E SPEA K ER JAC OB BO E H ME Jacob Boehme is Melbourne born and raised artist of the Narangga and Kaurna Nations, South Australia. Jacob is the Creative Director of YIRRAMBOI Festival, Melbourne’s premier biennial First Nations arts festival presenting innovation in contemporary and experimental First Nations arts practice from around the world. YIRRAMBOI is the recipient of the 2018 Green Room Award for Curatorial Contribution to Contemporary and Experimental Arts. Jacob is a multi-disciplinary theatre maker and choreographer, creating work for stage, screen, large-scale public events and festivals. Alumni of the Victorian College of the Arts, Jacob’s solo work Blood on the Dance Floor premiered at Arts House North Melbourne in 2016 to critical acclaim with a subsequent season at Sydney Festival 2017. Blood on the Dance Floor will be touring nationally and internationally from 2019. Jacob currently sits on the Board of Directors for the Blackfulla Performing Arts Alliance, is a member of the International Advisory Panel for the Calouste Gulbenkian UK Enquiry into the Civic Role of Arts Organisations and the Australian Centre for Contemporary Art Yalingwa Advisory Committee.

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SESSION THREE Sat 1st Dec, 11am – 12.30pm (90mins) Please decide on one preference before registering

3A.

Organisation: YourShow Area of Focus: Production, Technology Featured Presenter: Mark McDowell

‘MUS IC AL S AND PL AYS ’ ADVIC E

This is a discussion based workshop with Mark McDowell sharing his view of how ‘Musicals and Plays’ in schools should be run. ‘Mark’s view’ is from the point of view of a contractor coming in to assist you in getting the best results and outcomes for your productions, based on a 30 year career in Directing, Designing, Lighting, Sound, Front of House, Ticketing, and Building in both professional and school theatres. Mark believes that you can learn as much from a bad production as from a good one. It’s all about how you assess what can be done differently to achieve a better result and or what you can take on board from something that amazed you.

3B.

Workshops places are limited and will be allocated upon order of registration; when workshops are full your next preference will be allocated. We will NOT be able to change preferences so please choose carefully. Changes will not be able to be made on the days of the Conference, unless there is a cancellation.

About the Presenters Mark McDowell has worked in all technical aspects of live theatre production for 20 years. He has worked at all major theatres in Melbourne and Sydney, and on a range of major theatrical events. His Australian show credits include A Little Night Music (MTC), Phantom of The Opera, Les Miserables, SpaceJam Southeast Asia Promo Tour, Bombshells (MTC), Annie (GFO: Melbourne), Man From Snowy River: Arena Spectacular‚ The Producers (Melbourne Season), Wicked (Touring), Dons Party (Touring, Sydney). On these shows he has worked in various technical positions including Head Electrician, which covers all lighting roles in the theatre. He has also worked as automation operator and sound designer/operator, as well as filling the role of Assistant to the Music Director. Mark spent many years working in children’s entertainment for clients such as Warner Bros and Nickelodeon, in which he has held positions including Production Manager, Stage Manager, Lighting and Sound Operator. Mark has been the Manager of the Mahon Theatre at Aquinas College for the past 10 Years. During this time he has been involved in the Schools musical in the roles of both Technical Director and Music Director. He is now the full time Director of YourShow.

Organisation: Make A Scene Provocation: Continuance Area(s) of focus: Middle Years, Senior Drama, Senior Theatre Studies, Production of Plays, Directing or Stagecraft, Acting/Performance Training Ideal For: Experienced Teachers Featured Presenter: Rosa Campagnaro

IN S C ENA – C OMMED IA D EL L’ARTE IN PRAC TIC E FO R THE EX PERIENC E D TEAC HER

About the Presenters

180 MINUTE MASTERCLASS (SESSIONS 3 + 4 COMBINED)

Rosa is the director of Make A Scene and studied Commedia dell’Arte with Venezia InScena (Italy) and Jacques Lecoq Technique. She has a teaching degree from Deakin University and has trained with Patsy Rodenburg and in Uta Hagen technique (in New York). In 2016 she translated and directed ‘The Servant of Two Masters’ for the VCE Playlist. She has devised several original shows for Make A Scene including our latest offering, ‘Pinocchio’. Rosa has taught teachers, students and actors through: Drama Victoria, Deakin University, Fairfax Youth Initiative and MTC. She is a proud member of the Drama Victoria Committee of Management.

his workshop is for teachers needing to feed the actor within! Participants with some knowledge of commedia are encouraged to sign up. This is essential PL for the actor behind theDrama teacher: build on your physical theatre, improvisation and playmaking skills. Have an opportunity to explore traditional leather masks, stock characters and scenarios. Explore the commedia process by developing a scenario and workshopping it with Make A Scene Director and commedia specialist, Rosa Campagnaro. Identify and discover commedia skills and techniques that can be transferred to other performance styles and playmaking tasks. Great for Senior Drama and Theatre Studies.

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SESSION THREE Organisation: Australian Plays Provocation: Perpetuity, Continuance Area(s) of focus: Middle Years, Senior Drama, Senior Theatre Studies, Tertiary, Production of Plays, Directing or Stagecraft, Entertainment/Arts Industry, Acting/Performance Training Featured Presenters: Dr Meg Upton & John Kachoyan

TEL L ING AUS TRAL IAN S TO RIES – S TAGI N G AUS TRAL IAN PL AYS

3C.

About the Presenters

180 MINUTE MASTERCLASS (SESSIONS 3 + 4 COMBINED)

Dr Meg Upton is an experienced drama educator, researcher and youth arts worker in both arts industry and educational settings. As Education Manager at the Malthouse Theatre from 2000 to 2008 she created a range of programs and projects that connected young people with practising professional artists in professional arts settings. She has mentored emerging artists and developed industry based practice for the Theatre Arts Course at Victoria University and is a co-opted member of Platform Youth Theatre where she consults in education. Meg lectures in Drama Education at Deakin University and has presented at the University of Melbourne in the area of youth arts.

Why Australian plays? Australia is a complex country with diverse cultural identities and rich Indigenous history. Using theatre is a powerful way to tell our stories. Australian drama/theatre is part of several State based curricula and the Australian Curriculum states that students studying drama need to engage with scripts in order to explore dramatic elements, dramatic action, performance styles and make artistic and aesthetic choices. This masterclass will focus on Australian scripts from the past, the not so distant past and contemporary times. It will be a practical workshop that enables teachers to confidently and skilfully explore contemporary Australian plays with students in Years 9-12. Within the workshop participants will explore theatrical styles, dramaturgical decisions, and directorial techniques related to taking a text from page to stage. The workshop will enable teachers to discover a broad range of Australian plays that can be studied, staged and performed in schools.

3D.

John Kachoyan is a freelance director, writer and script developer who works internationally in theatre, opera and screen. John is currently on Film Victoria’s Key Talent Register, the Australian Writer’s Guild’s Pathways programme and just completed an Advanced Diploma in Script Editing & Development at AFTRS. He was most recently Co-Creative Director and CEO of multi-Green Room Award winning MKA: Theatre of New Writing and previously Director In Residence for Bell Shakespeare. John holds an MA (Advanced Theatre Practice) from the Royal Central School of Speech & Drama (RCSSD) and originally trained at the National Institute of Dramatic Art (NIDA).

Organisation: Drama New Zealand Provocation: Transition Area(s) of focus: Middle Years Featured Presenter: Emma Bishop

WH EN I G RO W UP

“When I Grow Up, I will be strong enough to carry all the heavy things you have to haul around with you when you’re a grownup” Tim Minchin’s musical Matilda explores the idea of childhood fantasies and what it means to be “Grown Up.” For many of us becoming a teacher came with fantasies of what that meant. Maybe it was working 9-3 Monday to Friday or maybe it was changing the lives of the children in front of us…. This workshop explores our fantasies of growing up to be teachers and the realities of just that - teaching in the 21st century. This idea of what teaching actually is will underpin this practical workshop looking at ways of devising and developing new works with students in the classroom. Underpinning the devising process is the investigation of the idea of we as educators.

About the Presenters Emma Bishop is currently freelancing as a producer and director, as well as teaching private singing, speech and drama lessons. As an experienced classroom teacher, she has been involved in many facets of the National external examination process for both Dance and Drama. Emma is the current Drama NZ President and has in the past four years run many workshops nationally for both teachers and students.

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SESSION THREE

3E.

S TARTING FRO M S C RATC H – H OW TO C REATE UNIT S O F WORK FOR P R E P TO YEAR 8

Are you starting from scratch or never know where to begin? Well this is the workshop for you! During this workshop, teachers will be taken through the process of creating a whole school scope and sequence, which outlines key learning areas and assessment ideas targeted to student levels and needs. The scope and sequence will include Drama, Music and Dance; however, this workshop will focus on the Drama component. They will then be provided with the step-by-step process of creating “I can” assessment checklists using Victorian Curriculum documentation, as well as generating lesson plans and classroom resources. During the workshop, teachers will go through the full process of generating and applying their own ideas to this specific model of Unit creation, that ticks all the required boxes of documentation in Government schools. By the end of the workshop, participants will leave with a whole Unit of work, documentation, outlines, report comment banks and assessment resources. Everything a teacher needs! Participants are encouraged to bring their laptops so that they can take this unit of work directly back into their classrooms.

3F.

Organisation: Mount Ridley College Provocation: Perpetuity Area(s) of focus: Primary/Early Years, Middle Years Featured Presenters: Leah Fistric and Jasinta Savage About the Presenters Leah and Jasinta began working together at Mount Ridley College in 2017 where they are re-writing the entire Prep to 12 Performing Arts Curriculum. Together they have 15 years of teaching experience that spans across various school settings (high-achieving, low socioeconomic, Indigenous Community, Primary, Secondary, EAL....) Jasinta is the Head of Performing Arts at MRC and Leah is the Performing Arts Programs Leader and Production Manager. They are currently building Performing Arts programs and have seen a significant increase in student engagement in Performing Arts programs, classroom activities and appreciation for the subject area across the college, including parents and community.

Organisation: DramaWest Provocation: Transition, Continuance Area(s) of focus: Primary/Early Years, Middle Years, Senior Drama, Senior Theatre Studies Featured Presenters: Jess Wellman & Felicity Glendinning

L EAD ING TEAC HE R S, TEAC HING L EAD E R S

About the Presenters

With recent research and publications regarding the future of education in Australia indicating a step towards more progressive models of teaching and learning, the role of the Arts at the pedagogical centre of education is being rapidly brought to the foreground. As Arts educators, we are viewing this transformation of thinking through the lens of experience. We know that Arts centred learning works. We know that it is vital to deliver the Arts as not just subjects, but also modalities. We know that what seems new and progressive to others is merely a continuance of our already well-established practices. So how do we position the Arts at the centre of the curriculum? What role do we have to play in transforming education from the ground up? What are the steps we need to take to become pedagogical leaders; to inspire in our leaders and colleagues the same growth mindset we hope to create in our students? This workshop will explore how teachers can work with, and in, their school community to inspire others through collaboration, professional learning models, sharing best practice, and creating opportunities for structured dialogue. Let’s plan the future of education, together!

Jess is the current chairperson of DramaWest, and Drama specialist at Bold Park Community School (WA). She has been teaching since 2009 in both primary and secondary contexts. Jess is passionate about the important role of Arts in education, and developing quality professional learning opportunities to support teachers in developing their practice. Felicity is the current DALO of DramaWest and a Head of Learning Community and Middle School Arts at Shenton College (WA). She has been teaching since 1993 in primary, secondary and tertiary contexts. Felicity believes that the Arts is an essential part of all robust educational environments and is passionate about facilitating opportunities for educators working across the breadth of the curriculum to embed Arts pedagogy.

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SESSION THREE

3G.

MEANING FUL M OVE ME N T: A N E A SE F UL A P P R OACH TO EMPO WERIN G E ACH ST UDE N T TO CR E AT E MOVEMENT IN T HE DR A MA CLA SSR OOM

This practical workshop will guide you through a lesson structure for developing movement material, either ‘from scratch’ or in response to a stimulus. A structure you can use immediately, or extrapolate into a larger sequence of learning. An approach that will empower each student to take ownership of their ability to create and execute movement, and of their body. A workshop that might even make you feel like a choreographer yourself. As a group, we will learn elements of the Laban Movement Analysis vocabulary, in particular those relating to the basic actions a body can do. Attention will be paid to inclusive language and practice, so that any body can participate. These elements will then be assembled into sequences, which, through a process of peer-to-peer teaching and feedback, will accumulate into a shared whole; an immediate product of our work together. As we reflect on our own process of creativity, you will gather language, activities and concepts that can be used across your Drama curriculum to develop movement skills or teach physical theatre styles. More importantly, they can be used to facilitate respectful, safe and emboldened collaboration; the kind that will serve your students for life.

3H.

Organisation: More Movement Embodied Education Provocation: Perpetuity Area(s) of focus: Middle Years, Senior Drama Featured Presenter: Lucy Angell About the Presenters Lucy Angell is a Certified Laban Movement Analyst, one of few specialists in Australia. Lucy teaches secondary drama and works as a movement director throughout Melbourne. Her physical theatre training has included Dell’Arte International (CA., USA) and Corporeal Mime with Leisa Shelton and a BFA from Webster University in Theatre Performance

Organisation: Arts Centre Melbourne Area(s) of focus: Primary students (Year 2-6) & Secondary students (year 7-10) Featured Presenters: Chris Thompson, Jane Bayly & Sally Smith About the Presenters

THE C REATIVE C L AS S RO OM

CHRIS THOMPSON is a multi-award winning writer, director, theatre maker and teacher. He has been Artistic Director of several companies including St Martins Youth Arts Centre, HotHouse Theatre, Jigsaw Theatre and Union House Theatre. His plays for young people have been nominated for five Writers’ Guild AWGIES winning three times for Shady Characters, The Bridge and The Sadness of Mister Saisson. A former secondary school teacher, he is a sessional lecturer at ACU and has been a Teaching Artist with Arts Centre Melbourne for almost twenty years.

The Creative Classroom is a new programme currently in development at Arts Centre Melbourne. The experience of young people attending arts and cultural events often comes with the educationally focused ‘add-on’ such as the Q&A or a lesson plan that aims to extend the experience through writing or discussion exercises conducted when the students return to the classroom. Whilst there is obvious value in these ‘educational add-ons’ they can easily be viewed by the student more for their educational imperatives than for the subtle intentions of promoting processes of reflection and extension in the way young people respond to the work they’ve seen, often eliciting the ‘right sort of response’ from students – responses associated with an educational experience rather than an intuitive response to a cultural interaction. The Creative Classroom aims to rethink the ‘follow up’ experience, exploring strategies that encourage young people to respond intuitively to cultural and artistic experiences, without necessarily associating the activities of the programme with attendance at a particular event. The goal here is to promote a way of creative thinking that can draw widely on cultural experiences as inspiration for the creative process rather than using the process to ‘unpack’ a particular visit. In other words, rather than commencing a classroom-based arts activity in the context of it being a ‘follow up to that recent excursion our goal is a more spontaneous moment of realisation where the student makes their own, unsolicited connections between the content of the workshop and an arts or cultural experience. In this way, we aim to deliver a programme that transforms the educational environment of the classroom into a creative environment – a creative classroom.

JANE BAYLY is as an actor, singer, songwriter, theatre maker and teaching artist. She co-created several shows with a cappella theatre company Crying in Public Places, and has performed with Hubcap Productions, Aphids, Arena Theatre, Auto Da Fe Theatre, Perilous Productions, Keene/Taylor Theatre Project, HotHouse, Malthouse and MTC. She co-created Button (La Mama) and Right Here (Mornington Peninsula community project) with Carole Patullo. As a teaching artist Jane conducts song- and performance-making workshops for Arts Centre Melbourne, VCA, MTC Education and The Song Room. SALLY SMITH is a performer, choreographer, director and teacher with extensive experience in facilitating learning in a variety of community, school-based and adult education contexts. Sally has mentored young artists participating in the Next Wave Festival, taught Improvisation and Body Awareness at Deakin University, and voice classes at VUT Sunbury. Overseas, she has run workshops in Berlin, Bristol, and in Strasbourg where she collaborates with female vocal theatre group Les Clandestines. Sally’s work as a Teaching Artist for Arts Centre Melbourne includes Small Bites!, Spinout and a number of workshop based programmes.

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SESSION THREE

3I.

PRES ENTATIONS & RES EARC H PAPER S S ES S ION

Organisation: #1 Santa Maria College #2 Queensland University of Technology / Coffs Harbour High School #3 CQUniversity Provocation: Transition Featured Presenters: #1 Mark Eckersley #2 Madge Hair & Catherine McSkimming #3 Susan Davis & Yvette Walker

#1 Signposts and Messagesticks: An ethnographic study of nonIndigenous Australian Drama teachers’ engagement with Australian Indigenous Drama texts. This is a performed ethnographic study presentation investigating how non-Indigenous Australian Secondary Drama teachers engage with an Australian Indigenous Drama text, using ‘ways of seeing’ which develop knowledge and understanding. The research privileges Indigenous Australian ‘ways of Knowing’ and uses ‘theories of visuality’ to make visible elements of the processes of engagement with Indigenous Australian cultures and ‘ways of Knowing’. #2 Co-creating Intercultural Theatre with Indigenous Communities: A Framework for Decolonising Practice This presentation responds to the Uluru Statement from the Heart, as issued at the 2017 National Constitutional Convention. As drama educators, two lines speak to us directly: ‘When we have power over our destiny our children will flourish. They will walk in two worlds and their culture will be a gift to their country’. This research project is premised on the understanding that there is a demonstrated need for a practical how-to-guide for co-creating on-Country intercultural theatre with Indigenous partners which can be applied by artists and artistteachers in order to create place–based theatre using local stories. Artist-teachers need to make place-based theatre using local stories in order to ‘combat negative narratives about Aboriginal people’, ‘… simply by bleeding into every state school’s curriculum that state’s unique history’ (Uncle Jack Charles). The presentation investigates decolonising strategies for collaborative co-creation by adapting Linda Tuhiwai Smith’s (2012, 143) ‘Twenty five Indigenous Projects’, designed to engage themes ‘such as cultural survival, self-determination, healing, restoration and social justice’, into a drama context. The Projects provide an appropriate terminology for decolonising theatre-making processes, including Testimonies, Story-telling, Celebrating Survival – survivance, Remembering, Revitalizing and regenerating, Connecting, Writing and theory making, Representing, Envisioning and Reframing. #3 Continuum of creativity – Dramatic thinking and learning with Indigenous theatre Dramatic learning processes and theatre scripts provide powerful means for enriching the understandings of non-Indigenous as well as Indigenous students. However sometimes teachers and facilitators are not sure of how to approach this work in schools. The paper reports on work piloted by JUTE Theatre company (based in Cairns) and the development of two works ‘Proppa Solid’ by Stephen Oliver and ‘Bukal’ by Andrea James and Henrietta Marrie which have been created to profile positive stories featuring First Nations peoples and creative teams. These works are also toured to schools and week-long drama and theatre-based workshops are being conducted in remote regional locations. This paper will report on research into the creative learning and impacts of an Indigenous theatre program focussing on dramatic thinking, student engagement and learning. In particular it examines possibilities for shifting perspectives through the telling of Indigenous stories, and the partnerships and protocols that need to be considered to help value and create a continuum of practice.

About the Presenters Mark Eckersley is an Drama, English and Media Studies teacher and lecturer with over twenty-two years’ experience of teaching in Australian and International schools, colleges and universities. Mark is completing his Doctorate of Education at ACU. Madge Hair is a teacher, playwright and director working at Coffs Harbour High School, NSW, and a PhD student in Creative Industries with Queensland University of Technology. She is also co-director of Garlambirla Youth Theatre (GYT). GYT translates the cross-cultural histories of Coffs Harbour, including Gumbaynggirr Creation Stories, into musical theatre. Presently teaching at Nambucca Heads, NSW, Catherine McSkimming has traversed the spectrum of the roles of the Drama/ Entertainment teacher for 30 years. Through qualitative research and process drama Catherine is re-storying her childhood country in New England, investigating intersecting family histories as a decolonising methodology for both Indigenous and non-Indigenous. Susan Davis is Deputy Dean Research at CQUniversity for the School of Education and the Arts. Her career spans extensive experience as a secondary drama teacher, Performing Arts Head of Department, Senior Policy Officer and more recently as a lecturer and researcher in teacher education, the arts and creativity. Yvette Walker is First Nations Producer with JUTE Theatre Company in Cairns. She is a descendant of the Waanyi people of the North Western Desert and committed to building opportunities for First Nations creatives as professions in her home state as well as nationally.

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SESSION FOUR Sat 1st Dec, 1.30pm – 3pm (90 mins) Please decide on one preference before registering

4A.

Organisation: YourShow Area of Focus: Production, Technology Featured Presenter: Mark McDowell

VENUE IS S UES

Bring your problems! After the architect has gone so is all the money! So how are you making your space work? Bring in your constraints and get some advice on how to work around your problems in the most cost effective manner. There are answers to all problems and although compromises are always required, outcomes can be positive and all venues can work.

4B.

Workshops places are limited and will be allocated upon order of registration; when workshops are full your next preference will be allocated. We will NOT be able to change preferences so please choose carefully. Changes will not be able to be made on the days of the Conference, unless there is a cancellation.

About the Presenters Mark McDowell has worked in all technical aspects of live theatre production for 20 years. He has worked at all major theatres in Melbourne and Sydney, and on a range of major theatrical events. His Australian show credits include A Little Night Music (MTC), Phantom of The Opera, Les Miserables, SpaceJam Southeast Asia Promo Tour, Bombshells (MTC), Annie (GFO: Melbourne), Man From Snowy River: Arena Spectacular‚ The Producers (Melbourne Season), Wicked (Touring), Dons Party (Touring, Sydney). On these shows he has worked in various technical positions including Head Electrician, which covers all lighting roles in the theatre. He has also worked as automation operator and sound designer/operator, as well as filling the role of Assistant to the Music Director. Mark spent many years working in children’s entertainment for clients such as Warner Bros and Nickelodeon, in which he has held positions including Production Manager, Stage Manager, Lighting and Sound Operator. Mark has been the Manager of the Mahon Theatre at Aquinas College for the past 10 Years. During this time he has been involved in the Schools musical in the roles of both Technical Director and Music Director. He is now the full time Director of YourShow.

Organisation: Sydney Theatre Company Provocation: Perpetuity Area(s) of focus: Primary/Early Years Featured Presenter: John Nicholas Saunders & Robyn Ewing AM

D RAMATIC INTERVENTIONS I N THE PRIMARY YE A R S

About the Presenters

This practical workshop will share the methodology of the School DramaTM program, developed by Sydney Theatre Company and The University of Sydney’s School of Education and Social Work with Professor Robyn Ewing AM. School Drama is a professional development program for primary school teachers, which demonstrates the impact of using drama-based pedagogy combined with quality children’s literature to teach a range of English and literacy skills including inferential comprehension, confidence in oracy, descriptive language and narrative writing. Research into the program has indicated increased student outcomes in both academic (English and literacy) and non-academic (engagement, motivation, confidence and empathy) areas. Teachers will leave this practical and engaging workshop with a range of practical process drama-based strategies to use when teaching literature in any primary classroom context.

John Nicholas Saunders, a former secondary school teacher and Head of Department, is currently the Education Manager at Sydney Theatre Company and President of Drama Australia. He has extensive experience in and is a strong advocate for transformative Arts Education. An Honorary Associate, Sydney School of Education and Social Work, University of Sydney, John also teaches at a number of Sydney universities and regularly presents at national and international conferences. His doctoral work concentrates on the role of Drama pedagogy in improving student academic and nonacademic outcomes. Robyn Ewing AM, is Professor of Teacher Education and the Arts, University of Sydney. Formerly a primary teacher, Robyn’s teaching, research and writing includes a focus on the role quality arts experiences and processes can and should play in creative pedagogy and transforming the curriculum at all levels of education. She has worked in partnership with Sydney Theatre Company on the teacher professional learning program ‘School Drama’ since 2009.

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SESSION FOUR

4C.

WH ERE ARE THE B OYS ?

In Drama classes across Australia, boys are rare. They account for approximately 30% of enrolments in the subject in any given year. Many teachers lament the absence of boys in the Drama, but often we dismiss the problem as something that can’t be helped, and we’ve learnt to just appreciate the boys when we get them. But Drama is a subject that seems almost tailor-made for boys. It is tactile, emotional and relies on learning through physical exploration, all things that boys naturally engage with. Unfortunately, it is a culture of masculinity that isolates young men from Drama and we may be guilty of perpetuating this culture without realising it. This workshop will explore how masculine cultures can be shaped and unshaped to impact boys’ enthusiasm for Drama, and what we, as teachers, can do to draw boys to this subject.

4D.

Organisation: Saint Stephen’s College Provocation: Transition, Perpetuity Area(s) of focus: Middle Years, Senior Drama & Theatre Studies Featured Presenter: Bradley Chapman About the Presenters Bradley Chapman - Drama teacher for 10 years, current Head of Drama, possessing a Bachelor of Drama, Bachelor of Education and a Master of Education (Leadership) specialising in Boys’ education and development. Experience in teaching within the State, Catholic and Private sectors.

Organisation: Newtown High School of the Performing Arts Provocation: ContinuanceArea(s) of focus: Middle Years Featured Presenter: Tahnae Luke

EL EMENTS O F REFL EC TIO N

About the Presenters

Transforming student writing from recount to deep and meaningful reflection is difficult and is something at the core of Drama education however this workshop will provide clear and easy-to-use scaffolds/ resources to make reflections easier. This will be practically taught using an Elements of Drama program, which will also provide you with a series of activities to teach to those students new to Drama or as an introduction to units of work. After participating in the exercise, you will be guided in how to increase sophistication in student writing using a clear scaffold, which will then be turned into an essay. This writing technique has made a dramatic difference in student writing from Year 7 all the way through to Year 12 and has increased student confidence in writing. At the conclusion of this workshop you will leave with an array of activities, scaffolds for writing, exemplar responses, vocabulary lists and an Elements of Drama program.

Tahnae Luke is a teacher at Newtown High School of the Performing Arts, HSC Marker, NIDA Creative Ambassador, Drama NSW Presenter, Drama NSW Committee Member, Masters of Educational Studies (Pedagogy/Leadership).

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SESSION FOUR

4E.

FUL L FAC E NO N VERB AL MAS K THEATRE

180 MINUTE MASTERCLASS (SESSIONS 4 + 5 COMBINED) Full Face Non-Verbal Mask Theatre conceals, gives permission to play, allows expression, liberates and reveals. Participants will be continually amazed by their own and their peers, at there transformations. This particular mask style has the capacity to instill a sense of joy, vulnerability, physical discipline and freedom of expression in the performer - connecting directly to the heart. The opportunity to play, express, be physical, relate and discover in real time and space. My approach is underpinned by the assumption that everyone has something to offer and that Mask Work is a unique and powerful engager that has the capacity to inspire participants who might otherwise hang back.

4F.

Organisation: Homunculus Theatre Company Provocations: Transition, Progression, Perpetuity, Continuance Featured Presenter: Clint Bolster About the Presenters Clint Bolster - Prominent Actor, Clown, Commedia Dell’Arte & Mask Theatre Specialist, Stilt Performer & Trainer and Teaching Artist from Brisbane, Australia. With over 15 years’ committed to developing new works and training extensively, Clint regularly performs in Australia and internationally in the United Kingdom, Europe, Singapore, Hong Kong and Japan. Recently accepted into the Cirque du Soleil team of Clowns for future productions.

Organisation: Lab Kelpie Provocation: Transition Area(s) of focus: Middle Years, Senior Drama, Production of Plays, Directing or Stagecraft, Acting/ performance Training Featured Presenter: Lyall Brooks

A PRUD ENT MAN: PL AYING THE VIL L AIN

About the Presenters

From Shakespeare to Disney, we’re all familiar with the more classic “baddies”. But how do you create a contemporary villain for today’s Netflix generation? In this 90-minute workshop, Lyall Brooks will take participants through games, discussions, practical exercises, and both group and solo performance examples to ask: What makes a modern villain/? Where does the line between villain and antihero blur? What are the new archetypes? Prepare to think. Prepare to be silly. Prepare to be challenged. This workshop has been delivered to drama students from years 9 to 12 across several states, prompting vigorous discussion and igniting ideas back in the classroom. This version for educators aims to put participants in the place of the students, while still leaving space for questions and conversation - and ultimately providing rich stimulus and nourishing teachers’ own learning. Session 4F “A PRUDENT MAN: Playing The Villain” and Session 5E “A PRUDENT MAN: Performance and Q&A” may be attended separately, but are also designed so that they both complement each other, add to the attendees understanding of the work and the practices used to create and perform it, and inform senior drama educators’ own practice working with students on their devised solo assessments.

Lyall Brooks is an award-winning performer, director, workshop facilitator, and the founding artistic director of Lab Kelpie. As a new Australian writing theatre company, Lab Kelpie seeks to explore the continuance of our storytelling traditions while exploring the transition involved in responding to current climates and speaking to the now. labkelpie.com

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SESSION FOUR

4G.

Organisation: #1 Braybrook College #2 Murdoch University #3 Australian Catholic University, NSW Continuance: what are the qualities and characteristics of drama education that are essential to our practice and research? Featured Presenters: #1 Andrew Byrne #2 Robin Pascoe #3 Dr. Joanna Winchester

PRES ENTATIO N S & RES EARC H PAP E R S S ES S IO N

#1 Case Study - Effective teaching strategies to encourage and support engagement and participation in Theatre Studies Unit 3, Outcome 1, Play Production Unit 3, Outcome 1 of the Theatre Studies Study Design requires students to develop an interpretation of a script through the stages of the theatrical production process: planning, development and presentation. Students specialise in two areas of stagecraft, working collaboratively in order to realise the production of a script. The magnitude of this outcome requires Theatre Studies teachers to wear multiple hats. They are the classroom teacher responsible for overseeing the delivery of the curriculum. They are a theatre practitioner: acting coach, director, designer and producer. They need to have a broad understanding of the entire production process to successfully navigate their students through their creative academic journey. This case study aims to understand what effective teaching strategies experienced Theatre Studies teachers apply to support student participation and engagement in interpreting a script for production in VCE Unit 3, Outcome 1, Theatre Studies. Andrew has conducted semi-structured interviews with two experienced Theatre Studies teachers and analysed their responses to gain insight into their effectual pedagogical techniques. #2 Twice Told Tales: Using Case Stories in learning to teach drama Twice Told Tales: Using Case Stories in learning to teach drama. This presentation will showcase an approach to drama teacher education using case stories. The most powerful change agent for a teacher is another teacher. Madeleine Grumet (2004) reminded us that “no one learns alone”. We learn with and through others. We learn through the shared experiences of others. Belonging actively to a community of drama educators (a university class or a professional association such as DramaWest) is one on-going way of learning to teach drama. Sharing case stories is another. In the context of my drama education units at Murdoch University I have been using case story writing as one way of building knowledge and reflection about the challenges of drama teaching. The inspiration for using case stories springs from the book by Norris, McCammon and Miller (2000) Learning to Teach Drama, A Case Narrative Approach. I began by using the case stories they included but I have moved on to asking my students to write their own. In 2018 I also encouraged students to consider making their case stories video presentations. While we may learn through others, there is caution needed: good practice can lead good practice while poor or troubling practice can exacerbate what happens in schools.

About the Presenters Andrew Byrne is the Drama Faculty and Production Coordinator at Braybrook College. He is on the Committee of Management of Drama Victoria as Treasurer and Co-conference Convener. He is currently undertaking a Masters of Education in Research at the University of Melbourne. Robin Pascoe is Senior Lecturer in Arts and Drama Education, School of Education, Murdoch University, Perth, Western Australia. Robin is President of IDEA International Drama/Theatre and Education Association 2013-2020. He is a former President of Drama Australia and DramaWest. Dr Winchester is a Drama Education Lecturer at ACU and teaches within Primary and Secondary education courses. Joanna’s doctoral research investigated the artistic and social practices that community arts organizations employ within communities. Dr Winchester uses a multidisciplinary approach to her research, involving education, performance and cultural studies. Joanna has recently been involved in providing intensive drama programs in primary schools particularly using the principles of playbuilding as well as Shakespeare.

#3 The Gift of the ensemble: transporting the drama ensemble into a whole of schooling approach The drama classroom is a unique learning environment, in the drama classroom our aim is to provide a space where the group is primary above the individual. Far from a place of individualised learning and competition, the drama classroom through the concepts of ensemble and group process manages to provide a place where students work collaboratively to produce works of excellence in both individualised and group projects. In an increased school environment where individual success and individualised learning programs are king, drama teachers and educators can show schools that true group work can produce process and product that reaches all of our diverse learners. This paper will critique the relationship between the drama teacher and the drama student and their peers within the classroom using the metaphor of gift exchange derived from anthropological theory and show that we have more to offer the school environment then embodied learning. This paper will also examine the paradox of being a ‘teacher’ within a school structure with the dynamics of a facilitator or co-creator within the drama classroom and what that can teach other KLAs about group work..

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SESSION FIVE Sat 1st Dec, 3.30pm – 5pm (90 mins) Please decide on one preference before registering

5A.

D RAMA AS AN E MB ODI E D A N D A R T I ST I C WAY OF TEAC HING AND LE A R N I N G ; I N VE ST I GAT I N G T HE PRINC IPL ES O F T HE CON T I N UI N G A N D E VOLVI N G PRAC TIC E OF L E A R N I N G T HR OUGH T HE B ODY.

When undertaking drama teaching as embodied pedagogy, the teacher understands the body as a site of risk and possibility as well as a site of knowing - of self, of others [empathy], and the world. This workshop will focus on the presenters’ continuing and evolving understanding, innovative practice and research findings of teaching in and through embodied and creative drama processes. Through the presentation of a piece of performed research accompanied by a paper and supporting activities this workshop/ paper identifies and illustrates a set of core principles fundamental to the creation of an embodied and aesthetic learning experience. The research project central to this presentation closely examined a practical drama workshop based on Shaun Tan’s Stick Figures, through observation; video capture; participant and researcher reflection. The researchers investigated the impact of embodied, aesthetic learning experiences and identified key teaching practices which contributed to participants’ engagement and learning. They found that through the application of embodied and artistic teaching principles a transformational space is established. For participants, understanding is felt first, then expressed through the body and aesthetic elements, and ultimately, upon reflection, new understandings are achieved and expressed through word and thought (the cognitive domain).

5B.

Workshops places are limited and will be allocated upon order of registration; when workshops are full your next preference will be allocated. We will NOT be able to change preferences so please choose carefully. Changes will not be able to be made on the days of the Conference, unless there is a cancellation.

Organisation: MGSE, The University of Melbourne Provocation: ContinuanceArea(s) of focus: This Session is a performance piece, Middle Years, Tertiary Featured Presenters: Dr. Jane Bird & Dr. Christine Sinclair About the Presenters Dr. Jane Bird is a lecturer in secondary and primary drama education at the University of Melbourne. She specialises in the artistic, embodied and collaborative qualities of teaching and learning in and through drama and theatre. She is a co-author of the Acting Smart series for VCE Drama and Theatre Studies. Dr. Christine Sinclair lectures in drama and arts education at the University of Melbourne. Her research draws extensively on artsbased and performative research methodologies. She is co-editor and contributing author to Education in the Arts (OUP), and coauthor (with Anne Harris) of Critical Plays (Sense), which examines embodied practices in research.

Organisation: Mashed Theatre, QLD Provocation: Transition Area(s) of focus: Senior Drama & Theatre Studies Featured Presenters: Nicole Reilly & Matthew Caffoe

TRANS FORMIN G EL IZAB ETHAN TH EATRE

About the Presenters

A highly practical workshop, with resources provided so you don’t have to worry about note-taking! Aimed at teachers of senior drama, we will transform Marlowe’s Dr Faustus using cuttingedge contemporary practice and syllabus-focused questions (with emphasis on embedding 21st century skills): • How can drama be used to reframe purpose, context and meaning through contemporising texts? • How can you manipulate and shape dramatic languages to communicate to 21st century audiences? • How can drama reshape and transform meaning of inherited texts through skills of drama, including devising, directing and acting?

Nicole, co-artistic director of Mashed Theatre, was a drama teacher in Central Queensland (and has presented at DQ state and regional conferences) until she retrained as a teaching artist under Zen Zen Zo’s artistic director, Dr. Lynne Bradley as part of USC’s inaugural Master of Professional Practice (Performing Arts). Matthew, founder and co-artistic director of Mashed Theatre, graduated USQ with a Bachelor of Theatre Arts: Major Acting in 2009, performing lead roles in “Our Country’s Good”, “The Rimers of Eldritch”, “The Tempest”, and “Threepenny Opera”. He also worked internationally developing one-man shows before touring Australia as Mashed Theatre.

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SESSION FIVE

5C.

Organisation: Geelong Grammar School Provocation: Perpetuity Area(s) of focus: Middle Years Featured Presenter: Nicholas Mawson

WH AT IF THIS H APPENED TO YOU?

About the Presenters

A process drama exploring John Marsden and Matt Ottley’s picture book ‘Home and Away’. The book follows the story of a 15-year old teenager and their family in a country that resembles Australia in a number of ways. However, this families world is turned upside down when a war begins they must choose what to do in order to survive. The process drama places the participants in role as the family and uses the events of the book to explore the family and the situation they find themselves. Developed for Year 8 students, it aims to teach them a range of dramatic conventions and asks them to think about how governments deal with asylum seekers. It places them at the centre of this discussion by asking them ‘what if this happened to you?’ The process drama would be appropriate for other secondary level school students.

5D.

Nicholas is a Drama and Theatre teacher at Geelong Grammar School. He works with students from Year 5 to Year 12 and has taught IB Theatre for the past 10 years.

Organisation: Lab Kelpie Provocation: Transition Area(s) of focus: Middle Years, Senior Drama, Production of Plays, Directing or Stagecraft, Acting/ performance Training Featured Presenters: Lyall Brooks

A PRUD ENT MA N: PERFO RMANC E AND Q&A

What makes the Trumps, the Abbotts and the Hanson’s of this world tick? What if their world started to shift ever so slightly? What would happen if they came face-toface with the consequences of their hardline stances? A speculative piece inspired by real life events and people, A PRUDENT MAN taps into the social and political zeitgeist to create a superb portrayal of a contemporary villain archetype. For educators, this darkly comedic political thriller presents a strippedback work and a provocative new perspective on how truly necessary complex production areas (set, costumes, lighting, sound) are in creating gripping drama. Written by AWGIE-winning playwright Katy Warner and performed by multiple Green Room Award nominee Lyall Brooks, A PRUDENT MAN takes an unapologetic look at a man both in control… and on the edge. Session 4F“A PRUDENT MAN: Playing The Villain” and Session 5E“A PRUDENT MAN: Performance and Q&A” may be attended separately, but are designed so that they both complement each other, add to the attendees understanding of the work and the practices used to create and perform it, and inform senior drama educators’ own practice working with students on their devised solo assessments.

About the Presenter Lyall Brooks is an award-winning performer, director, workshop facilitator, and the founding artistic director of Lab Kelpie. As a new Australian writing theatre company, Lab Kelpie seeks to explore the continuance of our storytelling traditions while exploring the transition involved in responding to current climates and speaking to the now.labkelpie.com

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SESSION FIVE

5E.

PRES ENTATIONS & RES EARC H PAP E R S S ES S ION C ONTINUUM

Organisation: #1 Charles Sturt University #2 Director of Research and Monographs for Drama Australia #3 The Aside Podcast Provocation: Continuance Featured Presenters: #1 Gerard Boland #2 Rachael Jacobs with teacher-researchers #3 Nicholas Waxman

#1 How ‘The Gifts of the Theatre’ informed Dorothy Heathcote’s approach to Process Drama - and what it means for us Dorothy Heathcote trained as an actor. What she learned through that experience she called ‘the gifts of the theatre’; these she applied to the development of her unique approach to drama in education. Yet what she meant by this was more often left implicit rather than explicitly explained in her writing and teaching. I will show how classic dramatic structure is embedded within Heathcote’s approach to planning drama lessons and demonstrate how Heathcote’s innovations are directly connected to both Paulo Freire’s ‘conscientisation process’ as well as to what Baz Kershaw latterly came to identify as the ‘points of process’, which define ‘the radical in performance’. This discussion introduces and develops concepts that can aid us in our own planning processes we wish to design Heathcote-inspired drama lessons. #2 Is Research for me? : Exploring the benefits and challenges of being a teacher-researcher The concept of a teacher-researcher has emerged, highly encouraged by schools, administrators and higher education institutions. Many teachers are encouraged to do post-graduate study, participate in research projects or conduct their own investigations in Drama Education. But embarking on a research journey can be daunting. Many teachers wonder ‘Is research for me?’. This symposium, led by Drama Australia’s Director of Research, begins with a panel discussion of three classroom teachers who are currently doing research or post-graduate study. The teachers will provide a snapshot of their research projects, then engage in discussion on their approaches, then benefits of engaging in research and the challenges of being a teacher-researcher. Those who attend will be encouraged to ask questions about time management, the research process or any other aspect of the research journey. The session concludes with a speed-dating style session where participants have the opportunity to ask questions or discuss their ideas with experienced researchers. #3 The Aside Podcast LIVE with special guests International comedy sensations ‘Aunty Donna’

About the Presenters Gerard Boland, PhD (Newcastle, Australia) is Senior Lecturer in Theatre/Media in the School of Communication & Creative Industries, Charles Sturt University – Bathurst. A recipient of an Australian Learning & Teaching Council (ALTC) citations for teaching excellence in 2007 and 2010; he studied with Dorothy Heathcote at the University of Newcastle upon Tyne in 1982-83. Rachael Jacobs is a lecturer in Creative Arts Education at Western Sydney University. She is a former secondary teacher (Dance, Drama and Music) and primary Arts specialist. Her research interests include assessment in the arts, pre-service teacher education and embodied learning. Rachael conducts research projects situated in refugee communities in Sydney in partnership with the Sydney theatre Company. She has been engaged by the OECD to assist in the development of the Sustainable Development Goals for 2030. In 2013 Rachael released her first textbook, addressing arts education in the Australian Curriculum. She is the current Director of Research for Drama Australia. Rachael is a community activist, a freelance writer, practicing dancer and choreographer. She is the convenor of the community group, Teachers for Refugees and runs her own intercultural dance company. Nick is a contributing writer for Australian Teachers Magazine, Head of Faculty at ELTHAM College, the host of drama teacher podcast The Aside, an award winning teacher and director, and member of Drama Victoria Committee of Management. He has been running Performing Arts workshops for 7 years.

A podcast for drama students and teachers! Join Nick Waxman and Eli Erez for a special LIVE recording of the podcast with special guests International comedy sensations ‘Aunty Donna’ to discuss how Victorian drama teachers changed their lives and how they are uniquely inspiring a generation of future actors and comedians through their bold theatrical shows and workshops.

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ADDITIONAL EVENTS Thursday 29 November, 8pm Arts Centre Melbourne, Fairfax Studio

1.

Melbourne Theatre Company presents

Travel back to the 80s with this heart-warming story of teenage trials and tribulations played out in a video arcade, directed by Sarah Goodes (A Doll’s House, Part 2), starring Elaine Crombie (Black Comedy) and Kamil Ellis (Macbeth). Astroman contains coarse language, strong violence and sexual references.

ASTROMAN by Albert Belz

Cost $46 - Exclusive offer for Drama Australia National Conference delegates at the time of registration. Limit one A-Reserve ticket per delegate, subject to availability. Offer closes 19 October 2018. By selecting this offer, you agree to receive communications from Melbourne Theatre Company. Your data will be handled securely in accordance with our privacy policy, and you may opt-out of communications at any time.

2.

Friday 1 December, 6.00pm - 8.30pm Victorian College of the Arts.

D R A M A V I C T O R I A’ S 5 0 T H B I R T H DAY C E L E B R AT I O N S

In 1968...

In 2018...

Indigenous people were now Australian citizens. Carlton won it’s first VFL flag in 21 years. John Gorton replaced the missing Harold Holt as our PM. Australians were fighting in Vietnam. School playgrounds were metal and uniforms were grey. La Mama was one year old, the Pram Factory was a glint in the eye of Melbourne’s playwrights. Within this political, social, cultural and historical timeline education was changing Dorothy Heathcote’s ‘Mantel of the Expert’ was a thing and...

We invite you celebrate 50 years since the establishment of VADIE - now Drama Victoria - with a red carpet event. Our birthday party will have all the usual ingredients; food, drinks, dancing, cake, speeches and gifts. All we need is you! Friday 1 December, 6.00pm - 8.30pm, Victorian College of the Arts.

Cost: $60.00

Drama education was beginning to have impact in Australia In 1968, the Victorian Association of Drama in Education was born VADIE

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ADDITIONAL EVENTS Sat 1st Dec, 5.30am-7.30pm Victorian College of the Arts

3.DRINKS! After two days of engaging, absorbing, learning, networking, listening and playing, it’s time for imbibing. We invite you to join your old and new found friends to continue the conversations. $15 drinks and snacks


Sun 2nd Dec, 10am-1pm Victorian College of the Arts

4.

M A S TERC L AS S ‘ PU LSE’ AS A STR ATEGY FO R BU I LDING ENS EMB L E PE R FORMANC E

Featured Presenter: Tanya Gerstle from Optic Nerve Performance Group About the Presenter Tanya is an actor, director, performance maker and teaching artist. She has worked inmany performance and training contexts in Australia, Europe and USA over the past 35 years. Tanya is the founding Artistic Director of OpticNerve Performance Group atraining/performance company she started in 2008. www.opticnervepg.com Tanya is currently an Honorary Senior Fellow with the University of Melbourne. She was formally a Senior Lecturer in Theatre (Acting) at The Victorian College of the Arts (VCA). Tanya received an award for Teaching Excellence in 2002 from the VCA and has a Masters Degree in Direction (Research) from the University of Melbourne. Tanya has been an acting trainer and director at The Oxford School of Drama, England, Studio Wolkalno Actorskie, Poland, The Actors Studio and The Artists Institute, Amsterdam, was Co-Artistic Director of Actors Centre Australia, Sydney from 1996 to 1998 and a Con-Joint Fellow of Newcastle University. Most recently Tanya has been a Visiting Teaching Artist at Penn State University, USA, the University of York, UK and the University of Caen, France.

Drama Victoria is excited to be able to offer this special masterclass by acclaimed theatre teacher and maker, Tanya Gerstle. Participants will be introduced to Pulse physical performance and theatre-making principles, a methodology Tanya has developed over many years. Working through the fundamental and then more complex layers of the work, participants will embody a shared language enabling them to collaborate and create. Each participant will be challenged to move beyond their habitual performance modes and to extend their physical, vocal and imaginative fluency and clarity within an improvised structure. This workshop will appeal specifically to actors and to teachers with an interest in physical acting – both body and text – and to those seeking to challenge their own theatre-making processes. Optic Nerve Performance Group: https://www.opticnervepg.com/tanya-gerstle Cost $100 29.


PRICING Early bird pricing only available when booking both days on or before 24/9/2018 Member rates apply to members of Australian state associations and other countries (proof required). Concession rates apply to unwaged members and pre-service teachers only (proof required).

R E G I S T R AT I O N E A R LY B I R D

T W O DAY

O N E DAY

MEMBERSHIP TYPE Member (2 days)

$410

Non-Member (2 days)

$520

Member

$480

Non-Member

$620

Member Concession

$310

Presenter

$230

Member

$300

Non-Member

$395

Member Concession

$195

Presenter

$115

EVENT

OPTIONAL EXTRAS

COST

DAT E

COST

Astroman - MTC

Thursday 29th November

$46

Birthday Party

Friday 30th November

$60

Saturday drinks

Saturday 1st December

$15

Masterclass

Sunday 2nd December

$100

MADE YOUR CHOICES? R E G I S T E R N O W AT W W W. D R A M A V I C T O R I A . V I C . E D U . A U

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C O N T I N U U M C O N F E R E N C E P U B L I C AT I O N S A N D A R T I C L E S NJ: THE DRAMA AUSTRALIA JOURNAL NJ is an internationally respected peer-reviewed journal, providing the drama education community of teachers, arts practitioners and researchers with reflection, discussion and research into innovative drama praxis, across the many fields of drama practice in Australia and internationally.  A DA national conference themed NJ edition is planned for 2019 and a call for submissions will be publicized prior to the national conference in November, 2018 We encourage our research and practice presenters to submit articles. There will be other publication options made available through ADEM and state and territory based organisation publications such as MASK (Victoria).  Publishing papers and articles on innovative drama praxis ensures that the national and international drama education community is aware of the powerful impact of our work.  Link to the submission guidelines and how to subscribe to our national journal:  http://dramaaustralia.org.au/national-journal-2/

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Drama Australia National Conference hosted by Drama Victoria EGUIDE 2018  

Continuum: Drama Education Past, Present, Future Friday, 30th November - Sunday, 2nd December, VCA Registrations Open!

Drama Australia National Conference hosted by Drama Victoria EGUIDE 2018  

Continuum: Drama Education Past, Present, Future Friday, 30th November - Sunday, 2nd December, VCA Registrations Open!