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TABLE OF CONTENTS ENTRAILS OF TESTACCIO

2

SENSORY UNLOADING

16

REC-RE-ISLANDS: DUNEOLOGY

22

REC-RE-ISLANDS

29

INNER-SYLUM

34

PAPER-CYCLATION: INSIDE-OUT LINING

42

LEARNING IN MOTION

48

EX-S: EXAGGERATED SIMPLICITY

54

CASE STUDY: CROWN HALL

58

MIXED-USE MULTI-PLEX

60

TOUCH THIS EARTH LIGHTLY

66

THE HUNT

72

CASE STUDY: HILL HOUSE

76

COMPLEX FORMS

78

MERIDIAN RESIDENCE

80

DELINEATION II

82

DELINEATION I

84

M.B.S. CANCER WELLNESS CENTER

90

SACRED SPACE

92

VISION JOURNEY

94

GLENN MURCUTT RESIDENCE

96

1


EnTrails of Testaccio STUDIO 5B: PAULETTE SINGLEY TESTACCIO, ROME, ITALY

SITE PLAN

Following the language Georges Bataille adopted when studying the ritual traces of animal sacrifice found in Paris’s abbatoir at la villette, this project proposes exploring the potential of a “formless” architecture in similar response to proposing an extended museum around Rome’s ex-mattatoio. The project proposes to create a series of interventions connecting the proposed open-air museum in Testaccio. By delineating a path through the existing fabric and weaving disparate spaces into a comprehensive whole this project addresses properties of repressed urban desires through bracketing and framing the industrial ruins surrounding Monte Testaccio. Each intervention comments on the concept of the “architectural event” and the figurative curtain lifting alerting the common city-dweller to the buildings or events surrounding them. In Rome, grand gestures are standard fare, creating a sense of overexposure that seems to result in less awareness about the city they live in. My proposal will encourage Romans to explore and experience the ex-mattatoio in radically new ways, as charged itineraries are mapped and crisscrossed through “formless” shapes that resonate with the historic and haunting aspects of the site. 2

ATMOSHPERIC SITE PLAN

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MUSEO DIFFUSO The project

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500’

Proposed Museo Diffuso Itinerary

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The natural and anthropogenic area, a plain situated between the Aventine and the Tiber, has radically changed over time: from the urban district with commercial port functions and in Roman times, between the Republic and the media empire, the Testaccio became campaign in the Middle Ages until the end of the nineteenth century, the area has returned to be re-built as part of a “new functions” and economic developments.

“The meatpacking industry may no longer be directly involved with the physical killings of animals, but the specter of mass clings to the car-

casses, viewed by the public, as they are transferred from trucks into interiors that are out of bounds to the general public. Though part of everyday life, they are also shrouded from the gaze. As with hu-

man death, we are removed from the spectacle of the animal corpse in everyday life. The work of the butcher, like that of the undertaker, becomes veiled and taboo.”

Dorita Hannah, Eating Architecture, Butcher’s White: Where the Art Market Meets the Meat Market in New York City

The popular museum, centered on a didactic (pannellistica, brochures, information campaigns) structured and thorough, yet streamlined, will recount these changes, winding through the Testaccio district according to a chronological journey that involves the ancient ruins and buildings and modern places of historical interest.

“Slaughterhouses, along with the Museum, make up a system in which the ambivalence defining the sacred nucleus at work: the slaughterhouses are the negative pole, the generator of repulsion, the centrifuge ....Museums, the pole of attraction, are centripetal. But within the heart of one the other is hidden. At the heart of beauty lies a murder, a sacrifice, a killing (no beauty without blood).”

This itinerary will be structured so as to allow a natural division into subpaths (Roman: ancient urban landscape, medieval and modern rural landscape; age contemporary modern urban landscape), to make it more convenient and adaptable to the expectations and interests of users, while providing a logical, coherent and comprehensive about the appearance or the period of interest.

Denis Hollier, Against Architecture: The Writings of Georges Bataille

source: www.culturaitalia.beniculturali.it 500’

Museo Diffuso “Hot Spots”

EX-MATTATOIO In 1888 architect Gioacchino Ersoch was commissioned to design the cluster of buildings near Monte Testaccio now known as the ex-mattatoio. Engineer Philip Laccetti devised the disposal system of the carcasses into the Tiber River. The former slaughterhouse covers an area of 25000 square meters. Each pitched roof rectangular building was finished with brick and had regularly spaced arches with an exterior network of iron mechanisms to transport the carcasses. The layout of the buildings was based on principles of functionality and hygiene, with the interior buildings used for slaughter and the exterior used for stables and baths as well as butchery.

Bataille refuses to define informe: “It is not

only an adjective hav-

ing a given meaning, but a term that serves to bring things down in the world.” Yve-Alain Bois, Formless: A User’s Guide, The use value of “formless”

500’

Birds Path of Travel

Since closing in 1975, the ex-mattatoio is considered a key piece in ‘Industrial Archeology’ in Rome and houses the Social Center Global Village, the City of the Economy, University of Roma Tre Architecture complex and is the Birthplace of Muccassassina.

500’

4 Direct Linkage

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RESEARCH

RESEARCH

Offal Inspiration: Photo Analysis looking at ligaments, encasings, distribution

Offal Diagram relating function of organ to program of space OffalInspiration: Inspiration

LIVER

RESTAURANT

it has a wide range of functions, including detoxification, protein synthesis, and production of biochemicals necessary for digestion. The liver is necessary for survival; there is currently no way to compensate for the absence of liver function long term. This organ plays a major role in metabolism and has a number of functions in the body.

HEART

NIGHT CLUB

the heart is responsible for pumping blood throughout the blood vessels by repeated, rhythmic contractions.

KIDNEY_single

EXHIBITION/ PERFORMANCE SPACE

KIDNEY_multiple

CIRCULATION

LUNG

6

HOOKAH BAR

kidneys are an essential part of the urinary system and also serve homeostatic functions such as the regulation of electrolytes, maintenance of acidbase balance, and regulation of blood pressure. They serve the body as a natural filter of the blood, and remove wastes which are diverted to the urinary bladder. In producing urine, the kidneys excrete wastes such as urea and ammonium; the kidneys also are responsible for the reabsorption of water, glucose, and amino acids. The kidneys also produce hormones including calcitriol, renin, and erythropoietin.

in mammals and the more complex life forms, the two lungs are located near the backbone on either side of the heart. Their principal function is to transport oxygen from the atmosphere into the bloodstream, and to release carbon dioxide from the bloodstream into the atmosphere.

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RULES

RULES

“enforme” Shaping

“ENFORME” SHAPING

Spectacle vs. the Spectator Spectacle vs. the Spectator

SPECTACLE VS. SPECTATOR

typical space distribution: “the blob”

the existing structure creates a barrier that confines the blob, changing its size as the ground plane differs

by manipulating the ground based on the program requirements and necessities, the “blob” begins to be re-shaped

at times, the “blob” breaks through the barrier of the the existing structure, alerting its presence inside the abbatoir

when the “blob” crosses through the roof, thereframing of the “blob” becomes one of perspective with the spectacel and the spectator

Both are spectators, each focusing on their surroundings, with  Both are spectators, each focusthe exiting context hiding the  ing on their surroundings, with  other the exiting context hiding the  other

When the intervention is visible  from the ground plane of the exWhen the intervention is visible  isting fabric, the red becomes a  from the ground plane of the exspectacle for the blue.  isting fabric, the red becomes a  spectacle for the blue. 

At points of interest, the simple  framing of a detail creates a  At points of interest, the simple  focus of intention.   framing of a detail creates a  focus of intention.  

STRUCTURAL RULE-SET Structural Rule Set independent condition

the intervention is independent of the existing structure. inhabit old inhabit new

dependent condition_one-sided

the intervention is dependent on the existing structure. inhabit new

dependent condition_two-sided

the intervention and the existing structure depend on one another for structural support. inhabit new inhabit old inhabit exterior

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The relationship between the  spectacle and the spectator beThe relationship between the  comes very interesting.  While  spectacle and the spectator bethe red is in the museum for the  comes very interesting.  While  purpose of viewing the content,  the red is in the museum for the  they unintentionally (on their  purpose of viewing the content,  behalf) become the spectacle.   they unintentionally (on their  They are put into the frame of  behalf) become the spectacle.   the picture to be viewed. They are put into the frame of  the picture to be viewed. 9


DIARY OF TESTACCIO

SITE ANALYSIS OF IRON MECHANISMS

Photo analysis of the city to give a sense of the people and neighborhood

Photo analysis depicting the path of the iron mechanisms used in the transport of the animal carcasses

Protestant Cemetery

Aurelian Wall

Aurelian Wall

vehicular and pedestrian traffic pass under and through the wall on a daily basis

over time, the wall has become fully integrated into the urban fabric surrounding it

Cestia Pyramid

Gatto Haven

wrongly thought during all the Middle Ages to be the tomb of Remo, brother of the founder of Rome Romolo

part of the protestant cemetery has been closed off to public access to allow for stray cats to find shelter

testaccio architecture ranges from castle-type buildings to temples to recently completed modern buildings

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Protestant Cemetery

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Monte Testaccio

The Non-Catholic Cemetery for Foreigners in Testaccio, Rome also known as the Protestant cemetery although it contains the graves of many non-Christians

Local Labor

Protestant Church

Graffitti

locals take pride in their business and happenings in their town

church inside the protestant cemetery

the city is plastered with graffitti on most walls. however, the colorful artwork adds additional complexity to the surrounding context.

many tombstones in the cemetery are graced with a statue depicting an emotion or peron.

statues throughout the cemetery depict the sorrow and emotions symbloic of a loss.

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housing in the testaccio area near the cemetery

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gorilla artwork

typical street in testaccio

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Macro Museum

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New Testaccio Market construction of the new testaccio market is underway. the new spaee allows vendors to have a permanent space for their merchandise.

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the typical way to dry laundry in rome. clothesline can be seen all around testaccio.

Construction

Ex-Matattoio

testaccio is undergoinf major reconstruction and new construction thorughout the city.

the first sign of the former slaughterhouse

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N graffitti can be seen thoughout rome, but in testaccio the art work usually tries to have some meaning behind it

Gasometer

32’

kazahkstan cultural center

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6

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EUR Inspired large-scale cranes scimmin the syline can be seen from most parts of the city

the simple fascist-style architecture of the post office stands out compared to the historic architecture of the city

Tiber River a historic piece of a wall is now surrounded by housing and sits as a useless artifact.

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RESTAURANT

GALLERY/ EXHIBITION SPACE

o

 Want T

ow You

You Kn

Purge

SECTIONS

Always On Display 12

FLOOR PLAN

SECTIONS

FLOOR PLAN 13


HOOKAH BAR

NIGHTCLUB

SECTIONS

Anim

al Ho

use

UPPER FLOOR PLAN

LOWER FLOOR PLAN

FLOOR PLAN

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SECTION

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A

UPPER PARKING LOT B

DESIGN LASER CENTER LAB op_co

pa_ss

Plan Scale: 1”=1’-0”

v_ss

MAIN PARKING LOT

CLASSROOM

WOODYÕS

CLASSROOM CLASSROOM

OFFICE OFFICE OFFICE OFFICE OFFICE OFFICE OFFICE OFFICE OFFICE OFFICE

OFFICE

a_t

ALUMNI QUAD

PARKING LOT

c_ss

v_ss

a_t

LIBRARY v_2w

Location

Attachment

AHMANSO N MAIN SPAC E

Sense

A

BOOKSTORE

p_c

Site

B

DORMS

STUDIO

The project critiques the sensory overload aspect of autism through check points that magnify one sense more than the others by manipulating and/or impregnating interfacing to allow either smell, touch, taste, hearing, or sight to become the main focus of a person’s experience while in the space. Interfacing is a material commonly used to stiffen clothing garments and has similar properties of a previous material study model with toilet paper and acrylic gloss varnish. Through pleating and folding the interfacing and creating an operable system, the natural curvature of the material is allowed to follow the structural aluminum tubes. Different forms of attachment to the existing buildings are required depending on the location of the checkpoint, such as at a single wall or spanning between two walls.

KIRBY HALL

OFFICE

D O R MS

STUDIO 5A: JEANINE CENTUORI WOODBURY UNIVERSITY BURBANK, CALIFORNIA

SENSORY UNLOADING_Self Supported Unit_sight

v_w

c_w

WOOD SHOv_co P

Section A Scale: 1”=1’-0”

STUDIO

Sensory Unloading

STUDIO

pleasurable smell

wall unit

off-putting constant

ceiling unit

hearing variable existing site conditions

taste active touch passive color sight

light

tree unit

corner unit

2 wall unit

self supported unit

views

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Section B Scale: 1”=1’-0”

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SENSORY UNLOADING_Ceiling Unit_smell

CEILING UNIT_SMELL

Elevation Scale: 1”=1’-0”

SELF SUPPORTED UNIT_SIGHT Section Scale: 1”=1’-0”

Plan 18 Scale: 1”=1’-0”

The existing site conditions inform the sense, which informs the location of the intervention. The location of the unit informs the type of attachment required. The corner unit located on the northern exterior corner of the wood shop aims to focus the sense of hearing. A large paper cone is inserted into the interior space magnifying and focusing the sound into the unit. The ceiling unit located by the second year studio building is meant to amplify the sense of smell by interweaving specific flowers dependent on mood modifiers through a wire mesh. Perforated paper allows for a person to smell the flowers without visibly being aware of them. The self-supported unit is panelized and deals with the sense of sight. Certain apertures are located to allow specific views to be experienced, shaping the unit through the desired visual experience. 19


CORNER UNIT_HEARING

SENSORY UNLOADING_Corner Unit_hearing

Elevation Scale: 1”=1’-0”

Section Scale: 1”=1’-0”

The project is designed both for people with autism and those without. It is not focused solely on those who have autism, but instead encourages the typical student on campus to experience an intense sensory experience they would not otherwise have similar to the experiences of a person with autism. In many ways, most people in their daily lives experience the sensory overload aspect of autism. However, a person with more sever autism might have a debilitating reaction to the over-stimulating nature of their normal surroundings. The project allows them to focus on one sense, creating a comforting and relaxing environment. For someone without autism, the project encourages a new look at their surroundings and exposes them to the surprisingly jarring nature of their environment.

Section Scale: 1”=1’-0”

SENSORY UNLOADING_attachment details Existing Beam Structure

Interfacing Beyond Existing Plaster Exterior Existing Plywood

Interfacing

Aluminum Plate

Hook Aluminum Pipe

Adhesive

Aluminum Pipes

2” Aluminum Pipes

Sheathing

Custom Cardboard Attachment

Custom Aluminum Sleeves Custom Cardboard Attachment

Interfacing

Aluminum Pipes 1/4” Aluminum Screws Interfacing

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Ceiling Unit @ Existing structure Scale: 6”=1’-0”

Self Supporting Unit Scale: 6”=1’-0”

Self Supporting Unit Scale: 6”=1’-0”

Corner Unit @ Plaster Scale: 1’-0”=1’-0”

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Tujunga Valley. The project is multi-functional and multi-purpose as not only a flood control center but also a recreational park and lake created by a silt-collection system. The concepts was based on Hydro-development, by creating a contained body of water for recreational purposes, educating the community about the Dam and the park area as well as create multiple sports venues able to house a variety of sports to appeal to the community.

REC-re-isands: DUNEology

Program Diagram

The aim of the DUNEology project is to create a levee system surrounding the proposed Hansen Dam Lake through collecting a dispersing silt and sediment naturally delivered to the site on a yearly basis. The levee system and silt collection system allow Theofsite is divided intowhile 50 xcreating 50 square grid. Each square alongalong the certain lake areas. Silt is confor parts the park to be preserved new possibilities for habitat and wildlife stantly spilling the site viadune the Bigis and Little Tujunga washes. In theor past, the silt has ruined the possibility of recreation and theinto dredged either further divided addedd together to due to its natural tendency erosion properties. With the recent Station Fire even more silt will be entering the site, further destroying any habitat cultivation, let alone community recreation areas. The solution for this sediment and silt is to dredge the current lake, which is full of sediment to create a levee to further protect it from future damage. Also, a column system along the outside of the levee helps to concentrate the silt in certain areas with silt curtains and stepping sides. Eventually, the colcamping spaces, hiking destinations ad general leisure atmospheres. umns will likely be completely covered with sand, creating a dune-like surface. Until that time comes, the nets and columns can be used to climb, train or even play volleyball. As the sediment and water erode the column surface, new habitat will start to form, Alluvial Fan Sage Scrub is the likely habitat due to the location on the Big Tujunga Wash.

STUDIO 4B: DAVID FREELAND HANSEN DAM

a 3-d honeycomb structure that forms a composite system. 50’

Dune Creation

is activated and stabilizes and reinforces soft soils. Perforations 50’ along the web allow for vegetation to be cultivated as well to reintroduce a variety of habitat to whatever mound or slope created over time.

1,560,378 cu-yds to create dune 420,000 cu-yds silt and sediment enter the site each year

Roughly take 4 years to capture sediment and re-purpose in the dune area 2,179,323 cu-yds dredged to create lake 1, 795, 625 cu-yds to create levee around lake

Water

24.4 cu-ft per second enter the site annually 256, 492, 800 cu-yds water per year due to floods, rain and water management anywhere above the Hansen Dam in the watershed

mo se

und

s_g rad u

_in ten

al

ds un mo

Silt Station Fire 160,000 acres burned in San Gabriel Mountains Sediment Causing more sediment and silt travel to the Hansen Dam area during next heavy rain, resulting in the ability to create dunes faster Sand Gravel

n

io collect

Silt Curtains

divert

Neoweb Cellular Confinement System Water

a 3-d honeycomb structure that forms a composite system. When this system is filled with sand, sediment or silt, the system is activated and stabilizes and reinforces soft soils. Perforations along the web allow for vegetation to be cultivated as well to reintroduce a variety of habitat to whatever mound or slope created over time.

DUNES

Tapered Columns

FORMS

Watershed (Dams) Floods

ex ca va tio

n

Bulldozers Station Fire dredging_major

The goal of the overall REC-re-island project is to make Hansen Dam a more important part of San Fernando Valley and Tujunga Valley. The project is multi-functional and multi-purpose as not only a flood control center butProgram also a recreational park and lake created by a silt-collection system. The concepts was based on Hydro-deDiagram The site is divided into 50 x 50 square grid. Each square along the lake velopment, adivided contained bodyto of water for recreational purposes, educating the community about and the dredgedby dunecreating is either further or added together Program Diagram the Dam and the park area as well as create multiple sports venues able to house a variety of sports to appeal camping spaces, hiking destinations ad general leisure atmospheres. to the community. The site is divided into 50 x 50 square grid. Each square along the lake and the dredged dune is either further divided or addedd together to camping spaces, hiking destinations ad general leisure atmospheres.

50’

22

50’

0’

32’

64’

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Lake Levee surrounding lake Proposed 100-year flood level 2,179,323 cu-yds dredged to expand lake 1,795, 625 cu-yds to create levee around lake

3 years 325,000 cu-yds for dune 980,000 cu-yds for Levee

5 years 620,000 cu-yds for dune 1,490,000 cu-yds for Levee

10 years 1,240,000 cu-yds for dune 2,870,000 cu-yds for Levee

Levee System triangulated grid system based on original program grid 24

Column System angled, stepping system to allow recreation

8 years 980,000 cu-yds for dune 2,130,000 cu-yds for Levee

12 years 1,560,378 cu-yds for dune 3,580,000 cu-yds for Levee

Circulation System combined ramp and stair system trails for hiking, leisure, running 25


26

The aim of the DUNEology project is to create a levee system surrounding the proposed Hansen Dam Lake through collecting a dispersing silt and sediment naturally delivered to the site on a yearly basis. The levee system and silt collection system allow for parts of the park to be preserved while creating new possibilities for habitat and wildlife along certain areas. Silt is constantly spilling into the site via the Big and Little Tujunga washes. In the past, the silt has ruined the possibility of recreation due to its natural tendency erosion properties. With the recent Station Fire even more silt will be entering the site, further destroying any habitat cultivation, let alone community recreation areas. The solution for this sediment and silt is to dredge the current lake, which is full of sediment to create a levee to further protect it from future damage. Also, a column system along the outside of the levee helps to concentrate the silt in certain areas with silt curtains and stepping sides. Eventually, the columns will likely be completely covered with sand, creating a dune-like surface. Until that time comes, the nets and columns can be used to climb, train or even play volleyball. As the sediment and water erode the column surface, new habitat will start to form, Alluvial Fan Sage Scrub is the likely habitat due to the location on the Big Tujunga Wash. 27


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AR 489: Public Work(s) Drake Fay-Paget, Heidi (WIng-Yan) Li, Emanuel Rodriguez

REC-re-islands

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1. Hansen Dam Natural Resource Learning Center 2. LA Library 3. Playground area 4. Hansen Dam State Aquatic Center 5. Skatepark 6. Archery Lanes 7. Basketball Courts 8. Playground area 9. Baseball/ Softball/ t-ball Field 10. Recreation Fields 11. Equestrian Center 12. Rockclimbing area 13. Playground area


as well as Native plants do. This causes a reduction in the amount of water that is able to be collected in the water table due to runoff into the surrounding rivers and ultimately into the ocean. Also, the non-native plants that are currently inhabiting in the Big Tujunga wash are obstructing the natural direction of the flow of water due to gravity. The plants, mostly shrubs and trees of the Mixed Chaparral habitat, have grown naturally in the wash area and have created artificial-like miniature dams becaue the water is unable to traverse through that wash.

Non-native plants are typically found in the Little Tujunga wash and the Big Tujunga wash in the Hansen Dam area. These plants typically have a more shallow rootsystem than Native plants, which doesn’t allow water to penetrate the ground

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NATIVE PLANTS

NATIVE PLANTS

IMPACT ON WATER SUPPLY

% WATER RETENTION

FIRE INTENSITY AND LIKELYIHOOD

NON-NATIVE PLANTS

NON-NATIVE PLANTS

REMOVE EXISTING HABITAT TO IMPROVE FLOW OF WASH

NON-NATIVE PLANT HABITAT

NATIVE PLANTS

WATER FLOW

GRASS

SAND

GROUNDCOVER

PACKED DIRT

ASPHALT


97 FT. VERTICAL LIFT GATES 8 - 5’ W X 8’ H

2,455 AC-FT

GATE SILL.

DEBRIS POOL (CURRENT WATER) 2,455 AC-FT

UNGATED OUTLET 2 - 8’ W X 6’ H

FLOOD CONTROL 28,390 AC-FT

SPILLWAY SURCHARGE 20,193 AC-FT 30,845 AC-FT

51,038 AC-FT

FLOOD CONTROL AND SPIILWAY

HANSEN DAM ANALYZATION

EL. 990 FT.

EL. 1,011 FT.

EL. 1,060 FT.

EL. 1,081 FT.

EL. 1,087 FT.

Grass and +15% Slope:

Dirt and Lowest: archery camping soccer polo

Wetland and Lowest:

Asphalt and Lowest: rollerblading skateboarding

Dirt and Lowest: archery camping soccer polo equestrian show

Grass and Highest: archery baseball softball t-ball camping football soccer lacrosse toddler play polo

Asphalt and Highest: rollerblading skateboarding

Dirt and +15% slope:

Dirt and Highest: archery camping soccer polo

Water: fishing kayaking canoeing

Water and Highest: lap swimming leisure swimming water polo competitive swimming tanning bird watching exercise

Turf and -15% Slope: archery baseball softball t-ball horseback riding show riding football soccer lacrosse toddler play polo

Dirt and -15% slope: archery camping soccer polo equestrian show

Sand and -15% Slope: tanning volleyball camping

Groundcover and Lowest:

Asphalt and -15% Slope: rollerblading skateboarding

Concrete and -15% Slope: roller blading skateboarding

Peak Inflow: 53, 000 cfs Peak Outflow: 20,800 cfs

Sand - Lowest tanning volleyball camping

Groundcover and -15% Slope:

Grass and -15% Slope: archery baseball softball t-ball camping football soccer lacrosse toddler play polo

The Dam was not initially designed to hold a reservoir. Depending on the size and depth of the proposed lake, the Dam may be operated more than usual due to inceases or decreases in the amount of water from the Big and Little Tujunga washes.

LANDTYPE-TOPOGRAPHY MATRIX

32 33

Groundcover and Highest:

Dirt and -15% Slope: archery camping soccer polo equestrian show

Dirt and Highest archery camping soccer polo

Dirt and -15% Slope: archery camping soccer polo

-15% SLOPE

+15% SLOPE

LOWEST TOPO

HIGHEST TOPO

BOULDERS

WATER

TURF

CONCRETE

SILT

WETLAND

GRASS

SAND

GROUNDCOVER

DIRT

ASPHALT

Current capacity of the Hansen Dam holding area is 70,000 ac-ft. If create a recreational lake, the amount of water exisitng in the Dam area would increase and the capacity of flood water would decrease.

1969 - 15,993 cfs with Peak Inflow of 26,012 cfs 1978 - 13,541 cfs with Peak Inflow of 35,048 cfs 1988 - 18,104 cfs with Peak Inflow of 27,901 cfs

Peak Outflow From Hansen Dam


INNER-SYLUM

STUDIO 4A: LINDA TAALMAN ARI BHOD CAMPUS, TEHACHAPI MOUNTAINS, TEHACHAPI, CA 33

The Ari Bhod campus cabins are typically used by people who wish to meditate and become one with nature or reconnect and reevaluate their lives. The idea of man and his relationship with nature comes into play when analyzing the site and its presence. The site is extremely nature driven, surrounded by trees and literally nestled in a valley of a Tehachapi mountainside. When designing the new cabin skin system and interior skin, the concept of weaving was very permeable in the solution. The weave throughout the different aspects of the cabin changes from pattern to literal weaving depending on application and purpose. The interior skin of the cabin is meant to allow a total internal focus to develop by the camper. The floor plan is open, allowing every camper to create their own space and use the cabin to reap the most out of the area for whatever he or she deems as a necessity. The view out from the cabin is guarded in a way by weaving across the windows that also allow for privacy from the outside. Crevices of light permeate the weave and diffuse into the cabin. A cloth and wood room divider can be placed anywhere in the cabin to create a small space separate from the main area. This space can be used for meditation or to separate the room for two separate camp go-ers. The proposal uses the idea of the existing incorporated structure with new layers of structure and material to create a new, fully insulated SupraCabin. The layering concept of weaving, which is a literal interlacing of two or more materials, can be seen in more figurative ways.

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FLOOR PLAN

SITE PLAN

SNOW

WINTER

RAIN

SUMMER

4.60

55.5

2.90

52.9

Typical Condition

2.29

32.5

0.32 0.28

0.60

59.3

52.5

0.25

67.6

36.8

2.10

48.9

47

59

.2

42.9

0.82

65.5

5.10

.3

39.2

.3

33

1.40

30

52.0

.1

41

2.

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35

49

34.5

30.4

1

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2.48 44.2

2.17 39.2

3.2

49.1

.4

54

82.1

77

.8 64 .2

.1

.3

49 70

49.9

59.0

63.6

84

.0

74.6

75.0

87.3

TEMPERATURE-SNOW-RAIN DIAGRAM

EXTERIOR VIEW 34

Sun Diagram

Tehachapi Site

Through much research, many diagrams were formed based on the average monthly temperature of the Tehachapi site, as well as the prevailing wind, and average monthly rain and snow fall. In addition to the typical conditions for the site, one unique aspect is that it is located in a valley surrounded by steep slopes. This lessens the amount of sun exposure and direct sunlight on the campsite, making it often cooler than expected. 35


METAL

ROOF

2X8 WOOD PLANKS_EXISTING

2X4 ROOF MEMBERS_EXISTING RIGID INSULATION_EXTRUDED POLYSTYRENE

1/2” PLYWOOD

1/2” & 1” PLYWOOD GRID

1/4” COPPER TILES

HEARTH

FIREPLACE METAL SCREEN

3FORM VARIA ECORESIN_BEAR GRASS

FENCE SECONDARY

1/2” & 1” PLYWOOD GRID SHELVING BOOKCASE

INTERIOR VIEW

1/2” PLYWOOD

FENCE PRIMARY

GLAZING

EXTRUDED POLYSTYRENE INSULATION 2X4 WALL MEMBERS_EXISTING

INSULATING FURRING STRIPS 2X8 WALL MEMBERS

6” CONCRETE WALL_EXISTING 2X4 FLOOR JOISTS

MOUND

EXTRUDED POLYSTYRENE INSULATION 1/2” PLYWOOD FLOORING

SECTIONAL PERSPECTIVE 36

EXPLODED AXONOMETRIC 37


INTERIOR VIEW

PHYSICAL MODEL: SECTION MODEL

EXPLODED AXONOMETRIC

INTERIOR VIEW

38

PHYSCIAL MODEL: INTERIOR VIEW

39


existing 2x6 roof joist existing 1x8 roof planks

rainscreen clips

existing metal deck roof

roof furring strip

existing 2x6 roof rafters

6x9 existing framing 1/2” & 1” plywood grid 1/2” plywood 2x10 header 1/8” plywood window cover

air space 3form rainscreen

1/2” & 1” plywood grid 1/8” plywood window cover

1/2” plywood existing 2x4 2x8 header

metal clips glazing

3form window covers

exterior 1/8” 3form window covers

DETAIL @ DOOR

1” & 1/2” Plywood grid 2x4 furring wall 2x2 blocking existing 2x4 framing

PHYSICAL MODEL: EXTERIOR VIEW

Programmatic areas are created out of the overlapping of materials and with one materials extruding from the existing plane to create shelving or storage. As for the interior experience, the propasal for the design is meant to be an inner sanctum for the inhabitant, where there is simple accents and materials to allow for focus and concentration.

rigid insulation 1/2” plywood 1/2” plywood metal clip and railing air space 3form varia rainscreen existing concrete wall

WALL SECTION 40

DETAIL @ WALL TYP.

PHYSICAL MODEL: ROOF DETAIL

41


STUDIO 4A: LINDA TAALMAN ARI BHOD CAMPUS, TEHACHAPI MOUNTAINS, TEHACHAPI, CA

Property Line Creek Dry Creek Road Fire Hydrant Septic Tank Propane Tank Collector Tank Natural Spring

33

31 19

11

13 14

Site Plan

Ari Bhod Campus Tehachapi Ca Ari BhodMountains, Campus Tehachapi Mountains, Ca

JAN JAN

FEB FEB

MAR MAR

APR APR

MAY MAY

80 F 8074FF

78 78

74 68 F F 68 F

60 F 60 F 40 F 40 F

JUN JUN

49 49 37 37

51 51

53 53

38 38

38 38

67 67

59 59

48 48

42 42

56 56

JUL JUL

AUG AUG

85 85

84 84

63 63

63 63

SEP SEP

OCT OCT

NOV NOV

DEC DEC

November

December January

February

79 79 68 68 60 60

51 51

56 56 42 42

49 49

March April

October September

36 36

20 F 20 F

August

55.5

JUN JUN

JUL JUL

AUG AUG

SEP SEP

OCT OCT

NOV NOV

DEC DEC

44.2

49

.1

39.2 34.5

30.4

.3

35

41

.3 52.9

33

0.60 0.60

Average Precipitation Average Precipitation Average SnowFall Average SnowFall

2.1 2.1 0.2 0.07 0.28 0.2 0.07 0.28

0.02 0.02

0.09 0.09

0.25 0.25

0.32 0.32

2.9 2.17 2.9 1.4 2.17 0.82 1.4 0.82

48.9

.3

49

.8

2.3 2.29 2.3 2.29

64

3.21 3.21

.4 54

2.48

2 IN. 2.48 2 IN.

36.8

5.1 5.1

4.6 4.6

4 IN. 4 IN.

59.3

52.5

6 IN. 6 IN.

32.5

65.5

42.9

52.0

39.2

.3

8 IN. 8 IN.

70

.2

77 .1

MAY MAY

.7

APR APR

49.1

47 .2

MAR MAR

May

INSULATION DIAGRAM

59

FEB FEB

July June

82.1

42

JAN JAN

Interior Comfort Level 30-45%Comfort HumidityLevel when Temperature is above 20 F outside Interior 30-45% Humidity when Temperature is above 20 F outside

67.6

Ari BhĂśd is the American Foundation for Tibetan Cultural Preservation, a non-profit organization dedicated to preserving the sacred cultural heritage of Tibet. The foundation is in the process of repairing and renovating a 475-acre mountain property in the mountains of Tehachapi, CA. The site has multiple cabins, many of which are in the process of being renovated. The Woodbury University cabin was started in the summer of 2009, where the foundation, structure and exterior siding was designed and built. Our project focuses on the interior lining of the cabin. The inside-out lining design aims to repurpose the notion of the wall and what a wall could be. The typical function of a wall is to hold up a roof and create a space interior, separate from the exterior. However, the focus of the design highlights the idea that the wall can be more than a 4-inch air space. The design for the wall is integrated into the existing framing structure. The main additional function of the wall is insulation that can be removed depending on the season. The existing wall framing is both vertical and horizontal, creating a consistent grid. This grid is taken and used to create a modular system of cardboard cubes. Each cardboard cube is constant in length and width, with the depth varying to allow more insulating properties.

Average High Temp Average High Temp Average Low Temp Average Low Temp

49.9

59.0

63.6

84

.0

74.6

75.0

87.3

AVERAGE MONTHLY TEMPERATURE

The diagram above depicts the building envelope of the existing cabin and the need for additional as well as less insulation during different months throughout the year. In the winter months, when the temperature drops below 20 degrees, the cabin needs to be insulated more so than when the temperature outside is in the 70’s. By allowing for more insulation to be added to the building envelope during the winter months, the heat that is created in the cabin (from the fireplace) will be retained longer and better. In the summer months, the option of 43 removing the insulation allows for more of the internal and external air to mingle and create a balance.


The rendering at left depicts the interior of the cabin with the proposed cardboard insulating cubes. The cubes are set into the existing framing and attached with brackets. The boxes vary in depth to allow for more insulation per inch as well as to create a space that can be used as shelving or bookcases. Some cubes protrude farther out past the framing, which allow for shelf space. The cubes that are not quite passed the framing can be used as a cubby space.

Roof

Metal Frame Windows

Cardboard

INTERIOR VIEW: BOXES IN

PaperStone Insulation Furring Strips

INTERIOR VIEW: BOXES OUT

SKETCHES

EXPLODED AXON

As temperatures in the Ari Bhod campus rise during the summer months, there is the option to remove some of the cardboard cubes to allow less insulation (less insulation means more of the interior and outside atmospheres to intermingle) as well as more sunlight through the exisitng polygal exterior siding. The cubes that are removed can either be placed in the roof (to help decrease the heat absorbtion into the interior space during the summer months) or can be stored under beds or can even be combined together into furniture.

Another main aspect of the design is the recycled or recyclable nature of the products. The impact of materials on the environment is very important. The materials throughout the design are either recycled (such as blue jeans, cardboard) or can be recycled at a later time. The important part of the design is trying to use everyday things or non-traditional materials for another purpose. For example, cardboard is not traditionally used as insulation even though its has a rather high insulating R-value. Also, radiant barrier insulation is normally used to wrap water heaters to keep heat out, but if tripled in layers and reverse the foil inward, then the heat is reflected back into the space instead of escaping during the winter months

ELEVATION UNFOLDED 44

45


Details Bracket Screw Existing Polygal Existing 2x4 Framing New 2x4 Framing Metal Window Frame Glazing

Existing 4x10 Sill Existing CMU

PHYSICAL MODEL: ITERATION 1 WINDOW DETAIL

Existing Polygal Existing 4x10 Sill PaperStone Interior Finish Adhesive Existing CMU

Existing 2x4

PAPERSTONE AND ULTRATOUCH INSULATION @ POLYGAL AND CMU

Screw 3M 4905 VHB Tape 4” Bracket Existing 4x10 Sill

CARDBOARD BLOCK ATTACHMENT Wood Door Frame

PHYSICAL MODEL: ITERATION 3 PaperStone Interior Finish

UltraTouch Radiant Barrier Insulation

1x1 Furring Strips

46

WALL SECTION @ DOOR (PLAN)

PHYSICAL MODEL: ITERATION 2

PHYSICAL MODEL: ITERATION 3

47


utilized. A large playground A large playground takes thetakes entirethe roof, entire allowing roof, allowing studentsstudents to be entertained to be entertained by not only by not the only jungle-gyms the jungle-gyms but also the but ability also the toability to des eir elementary of their elementary school toschool get places. to get Nets places. thatNets shade that the shade smaller, lower smaller, playgrounds lower can be climbed can from be climbed on to access on to access roof or thewhich just roofwill or just The new the elementary school willplaygrounds be serving students kindergarten tothe sixth grade, decrease the teacher -student ratio of the area in most of the ge hrough void through the center theofcenter the school of thecreates schoolacreates sense of a sense opengrades. and of open clarity. The clarity. solidThe andsolid voidratio and areisvoid clear in presence clear presence and use purpose. purpose. Each Eachsince there are more students per teacher. In order for Theand current student-teacher 23:1. are This is notin a prime ofand teacher with students children progress and learn, thebe student-teacher ratio should be less, around 12:1. The future expansion and contraction of the school not only allows for and escape cool and air to cool come air to in, come furtherin,reducing further reducing the heat the in the heat building. in thetobuilding. The students The students will staying will beat staying school atfrom school morning from morning to evening, to evening, more children to attend, but also lowers the student-teacher ratio to either 15:1 or 12:1 depending on the grade. take rentsadvantage to take advantage of the free of time the free since time childcare since childcare will be provided. will be provided.

LEARNING IN MOTION

Since the design is heavily concerned about students’ health and safety, convenient circulation, large playground space, and good natural lighting in the interior spaces are utilized. A large playground takes the entire roof, allowing students to be entertained by not only the jungle-gyms but also the ability to literally scale the sides of their elementary school2019 to get places. Nets that shade the smaller, lower playgrounds can be climbed on to access the roof or just 2019 2029 2029 for fun. Also, a large void through the center of the school creates a sense of open and clarity. The solid and void are clear in presence and purpose. Each 15,000 15,000 15,000 15,000 void allows heat to escape and cool air to come in, further reducing the heat in the building. The students will be staying at school from morning to evening, which will allow parents to take advantage of the free time since childcare will be provided.

2009 2009

10,000 10,000 STUDIO 3B: MARK OWEN 2009 7,500 PARTNER: HEIDI LI 7,500 7,500 5,000 PACOIMA 5,000 5,000 15-21 15-21 22-34 22-34 15-21 15-21 22-34 UNDER30,000SF 15 UNDER 15 UNDER 15 UNDER 15

000 10,000

15,000

10,000

10,000

7,500

7,500

22-34

7,500 7,500

20:1

25:1

25:1

20:1 2029

15,000

15:1

15:1

10:1

10:1

20:1

20:1

15:1

10,000

5,000 5,000

7,500

15-21 15-21 22-34 22-34 UNDER 15 UNDER 15

25:1 20:1

12:1 Ideal ratio

15:1

2009 450 2009 2019 2019 2029 2029 students 400 students 400 students 600 students 600 students

450 students

10:1 5,000 5,000 Ideal ratio raph Theabove graphshows abovethat shows the that under the15under and 22-34 15 andyear 22-34 yearIn 2019 the In 5,000 2019 underthe 15under age group 15 age willgroup now be willinnow thebe 15-21 in thegroup. 15-21 group. By 2029,Bythe 2029, 22-34 thegroup 22-34from group 2009 fromwill 2009 havewill hadhave children had children Through Through the use of theexpanding use of expanding classrooms classrooms that can that can groups ageare groups the largest are the inlargest the Pacoima in the Pacoima area. The area. current The current Therefore, Therefore, the elementary the elementary willschool experience will 22-34 experience a decrease a decrease in in which will which increase will increase the number the of number students of students attending attending elementary elementary 15-21 22-34 22-34 UNDER 15school 15-21 UNDER 15 UNDER 15 be15-21 2009 2019 2029 divided be divided further into further 2 classrooms, into 2 classrooms, the number the of number of 450 students 600 students 400 students entary elementary schools are schools at maximum are at maximum capacitycapacity due to this duefact. to this fact. enrollment. enrollment. school. Also, school. the Also, 2009 the under 2009 15 under group 15 will group now will be in now the be 22-34 in the 22-34 The graph above shows that the under 15 and 22-34 year In 2019 the under 15 age group will now be in the 15-21 group. By 2029, the 22-34 group from 2009 have children students students canwill increase canhad increase and the and student the Through to student teacher touse teacher the of expanding classrooms that can next In the ten next yearstentheyears 22-34 theyear 22-34 ageyear group agewill group soonwill start soon start age groups are the largest in the Pacoima area. The current group and group having andchildren having children of their own, of their further own,continuing further continuing the cycle. thenumber cycle. Therefore, the elementary school will experience a decrease in which will increase the students attending elementary ratio of can ratio decrease. can decrease. Research Research shows that shows the that number the number be divided further into 2 classrooms, the number of elementary schools are at maximum capacity due to this fact. es families and haveand children have children of their own. of their own. enrollment. school. Also, the 2009 under 15 group will now be in the 22-34 students can increase and the student to teacher of students of students will likelywill decrease likely decrease by 2019. byThe 2019. design The design

In the next ten years the 22-34 year age group will soon start families and have children of their own.

OL BREEZE

SECONDARY SKIN: GLAZING AND FABRIC ROOF RO O OOF

CONTRACTED SCHOOL

12:1

LOUVERLOUVER AT M AT SYSTEM MSYSTEM ROOF AND ROOF CLASSROOMS AND CLASSROOMS CLA ASSROOMS CLA ASSROOMS

PRIMARY PRIMARY STRUCTUR STRUCTURE: STRUCTUR STRUCTURE: RE: RE: STEEL FRAMING STEEL FRAMING

LOUVER SYSTEM M AT ROOF AND CLASSROOMS CLA ASSROOMS

group and having children of their own, further continuing the cycle.

ratio can decrease.that Research shows that the number accommodates accommodates this decrease this decrease with classrooms with classrooms that of students will likely decrease by 2019. The design can alsocan compress also compress and shrink andin shrink size. accommodates in size. this decrease with classrooms that

PRIMARY PRIMARY SKIN: ELASTOMERIC SKIN: ELASTOMERIC ELASTOME ELASTOME ERIC ERIC GRAILCOAT GRAILCOAT

PRIMARY STRUCTUR STRUCTURE: RE: STEEL FRAMING

EXPAN

PRIMARY SKIN: ELASTOMERIC ELASTOMEERIC GRAILCOAT

EXPANDED SCHOOL

A A

A

can also compress and shrink in size.

First Floor

B

B

B

B

B

A

SECOND LEVEL

A

A

SECONDSECOND LEVEL LEVEL

B

B

B

B

B

A

FIRST LEVEL

A

A

FIRST LEVEL FIRST LEVEL

B

B

According to the research on the San Fernando Valley and its surrounding areas, the number of elementary school students will decrease in ten years, but will N increase to a larger number than the current 450 students within 20 years. Due to the change in demand, based on the increase and decrease of the youth population, the expansion and contraction of the space in the school responds the life cycle GROUNDtoPARKING LEVELof the community. 0

40’

The new elementary school will be serving students from kindergarten to sixth grade, which will decrease the teacher -student ratio of the area in most of the grades.B The current student-teacher ratio is 23:1. This is not a prime use of teacher with students since there are more students per teacher. In order for children to progress and learn, the student-teacher ratio should be less, around 12:1. The future expansion and contraction of the school not only allows for more children to attend, but also lowers the student-teacher ratio to either 15:1 or 12:1 depending on the grade.

NW PREVAILING WIND

Second Floor B

B

2009

2400 S.F2. 400 S.F. 200 S.F.200 S.F. 520 S.F. 520 S.F. 180 S.F. 180 S.F. 800 S.F. 800 S.F. 700 S.F. 700 S.F. 470 S.F. 470 S.F. 470 S.F. 470 S.F. 740 S.F. 740 S.F. 370 S.F. 370 S.F. 370 S.F. 370 S.F. 3780 S.F.3780 S.F. 940 S.F. 940 S.F. 2840 S.F.2840 S.F. 2750 S.F.2750 S.F. 350 S.F. 350 S.F. 800 S.F. 800 S.F. 1600 S.F.1600 S.F. 3500 S.F.3500 S.F. 1400 S.F.1400 S.F. 585 S.F. 585 S.F. 300 S.F. 300 S.F. 1215 S.F.1215 S.F. 780 S.F. 780 S.F. 780 S.F. 780 S.F.

back stage back stage circulation circulation

Classrooms 8688 S.F. Art roomArt room kindergarten (2) 912 S.F. rocioem nce room 1296 S.F. first grade (3)Science S second grade (3) 1296 S.F. third grade(3) 1296 S.F. SecondSecond Floor Floor fourth grade(3) 1296 S.F. Classrooms Classrooms fifth grade(3) 1296 S.F. kindergarten kindergarten (2) (2) sixth grade(3) 1296 S.F. first grade first(3)grade (3) 780 S.F. Restrooms girl’s restroom second grade 390 S.F. second(3)grade (3) boy’s restroom third grade(3) third grade(3) 390 S.F. Hallway fourth grade(3) fourth grade(3)7700 S.F. elevator & stairway 350 S.F. fifth grade(3) fifth grade(3) 500 S.F. lockers sixth grade(3) sixth grade(3) 6880S.F. circulation Basketball court/ gym Restrooms 7900 S.F. Restrooms

8688 S.F.8688 S.F. 912 S.F. 912 S.F. 1296 S.F.1296 S.F. 1296 S.F.1296 S.F. 1296 S.F.1296 S.F. 1296 S.F.1296 S.F. 1296 S.F.1296 S.F. 1296 S.F.1296 S.F. 780 S.F. 780 S.F. 390 S.F. 390 S.F. girl’s restroom girl’sThe restroom The elementary school, twenty years the future large central void space covered by in glazing and a boy’sbamboo restroom boy’slouver restroom 390 S.F. 390 S.F. expanded provide maximum capacity, houses system to allows for extra ventilation and natural 600 students from kindergarten to sixth grade. Hallway Hallway 7700 S.F. 7700 S.F. lighting. This void will save 60% of energy for lighting use. elevatorelevator & stairway & stairway 350 S.F. 350 S.F. lockers lockers 500 S.F. 500 S.F. circulation circulation 6880S.F.6880S.F. Basketball Basketball court/ gym court/ gym 7900 S.F.7900 S.F.

B

Since the design is heavily concerned about students’ health and safety, convenient circulation, large playground space, and good natural lighting in the N N the entire roof, allowing students to be entertained by not only the jungle-gyms but also the ability to interior spaces are utilized. A large playground takes literally scale the sides of their elementary school to get places. Nets that shade the smaller, lower playgrounds can be climbed on to access the roof or just GROUND GROUND PARKING LEVEL LEVEL for fun. Also, a large void through the center of the school creates a sensePARKING of open and clarity. The solid and void are clear in presence and purpose. Each 0 0 40’ in the 40’ void allows heat to escape and cool air to come in, further reducing the heat building. The students will be staying at school from morning to evening, which will allow parents to take advantage of the free time since childcare will be provided.

A

After school and during recess, children from all grades interact with one another on the large roof playground, equipped with slides, swings, nets to climb on and recycled rubber as a ground cover.

First Floor First Floor

Library Library Library 2400 S.F. PTA meeting PTA meeting room room PTA meeting room 200 S.F. seating/readingseating/reading 520 S.F. seating/reading office & front desk 180 S.F. office & office front desk & front desk collection spaces 800 S.F. collection collection spaces spaces circulation 700 S.F. circulation 470 S.F. Teacher’s lounge circulation ocuhnegre’s lounge470 S.F. Admin/ nurse oTffe icaecher’Tsela Admin/ A nu drm seino/fnfiu cerse of740 ficeS.F. BPublic restrooms female Public restrooms Public restrooms370 S.F. male 370 S.F. female female Café & kitchen 3780 S.F. male male kitchen 940 S.F. Café & kitchen 2840 S.F. dining area Café & kitchen Hallway 2750 S.F. kitchen kitchen elevator & stairway dining area dining area 350 S.F. lobby 800 S.F. circulation Hallway Hallway 1600 S.F. & stairway & stairway Aud/ Music/ Mediaelevator room elevator 3500 S.F. seating 1400 S.F. lobby lobby stage circulation circulation 585 S.F. back stage 300 S.F. Aud/ Music/ Aud/Media Music/room Media room circulation 1215 S.F. seating seating Art room 780 S.F. stage stage Science room 780 S.F.

Th inv pla

A

B

recess, duringchildren recess, children from all from grades allinteract grades interact with onewith another one another on the large on the roof large playground, roof playground, equipped equipped with slides, with slides, and imb recycled on and recycled rubber as rubber a ground as a ground cover. cover.

W PREVAILING WIND

CONT

30, 000 SQ. FT.

20:1

12:1 Ideal ratio

SECONDARY STRUCTURE: STRUCTTURE: STEEL CABLES

ACCESS: STAIRS, STAIRSS, S ELEVATOR AND D RAMP

25:1

15:1

SECONDARY SECONDARY SKIN: SKIN: GLAZING GLAZING AND FABRIC AND ROOF FABRIC ROOF RO O OOF RO OOF

LEARNING IN MOTION SAN FERNANDO VALLEY

STUDENT : TEACHER RATIO 15:1

SECONDARY SECONDARY STRUCTURE: STRUCTTSTRUCTURE: STRUCT URE: TURE: STEEL CABLES STEEL CABLES

ACCESS:ACCESS: STAIRS, STAIRSS, S STAIRS, STAIRSS, S ELEVATOR ELEVATOR AND AND D RAMP D RAMP

25:1

A

000

25:1

10,000 10,000 2019

15,000

invigorating colors, interactive apparatuses, and the possibility for expansion as seenabove. Also, the fabric roof-canopy creates a light and playful atmosphere.

STUDENTSTUDENT : TEACHER : TEACHER RATIO RATIO

EXAGGERATED SIMPLICITY

000 15,000

500

expanded provide maximum capacity, bamboo louver system to allows for extra ventilation andhouses natural 600void students from kindergarten to lighting sixth grade. lighting. This will save 60% of energy for use.

CURRENT

2019

2029

10 YEARS FUTURE

CLASSROOM TRACK SYSTEM STUDENT : TEACHER RATIO DETAIL

15,000

15,000

15,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

20:1

7,500

7,500

7,500

15:1

25:1

25:1

NATURAL COOL BREEZE

ACCORDING TO THE RESEARCH ON THE SAN FERNANDO VALLEY AND ITS SURROUNDING AREAS, THE NUMBER OF ELEMENTARY SCHOOL STUDENTS WILL DECREASE IN THE NEXT TEN YEARS BUT WILL INCREASE TO A LARGER NUMBER THAN THE CURRENT 450 STUDENTS WITHIN 20 YEARS. DUE TO THE CAHNGE IN DEMAND, BASED ON THE INCREASE AND DECREASE OF THE YOUTH POPULATION, THE EXPANSION AND CONTRACTION OF THE SPACE IN THE SCHOOL RESPONDS TO THE LIFECYCLE OF THE COMMUNITY.

20:1

15:1

HOT AIR ESCAPING FROM BUILDING

N

0

160’

THE NEW ELEMENTARY SCHOOL WILL BE SERVING STUDENTS FROM KINDERGARTEN TO SIXTH GRADE, WHICH WILL DECREASE THE TEACHER-STUDENT RATIO OF THE AREA IN MOST OF THE GRADES. THE CURRENT STUDENT-TEACHER RATIO IS 23:1. THIS IS NOT A PRIME USE OF TEACHERS WITH STUDENTS SINCE THERE ARE MORE STUDETNS PER TEACHER. IN ORDER FOR CHILDREN TO PROGRESS AND LEARN, THE STUDENT-TEACHER RATIO SHOULD BE LESS, AROUND 12:1. THE FUTURE EXPANSION AND CONTRACTION OF THE SCHOOL NOT ONLY ALLOWS FOR MORE CHILDREN TO ATTEND, BUT ALSO LOWERS THE STUDENT-TEACHER RATIO TO EITHER 15:1 OR 12:1 DEPENDING ON THE GRADE.

NATURAL COOL BREEZE

5,000

5,000 UNDER 15

15-21

22-34

The graph above shows that the under 15 and 22-34 year age groups are the largest in the Pacoima area. The current elementary schools are at maximum capacity due to this fact. In the next ten years the 22-34 year ageDIAGRAM group will soon start PLAYGROUND families and have children of their own.

10:1

5,000 UNDER 15

15-21

22-34

In 2019 the under 15 age group will now be in the 15-21 group. Therefore, the elementary school will experience a decrease in enrollment.

15-21 UNDER 15 CURRENT CURRENT 22-34

12:1 Ideal ratio

2009 2019 10 YEARS 10FUTURE YEARS FUTURE 400 450 students students

By 2029, the 22-34 group from 2009 will have had children which will increase the number of students attending elementary school. Also, the 2009 under 15 group will now be in the 22-34 group and having children of their own, further the cycle. 20continuing YEARS FUTURE CURRENT

2029 CLASSROOM CLASSROOM TRACK SYSTEM TRACK SYSTEM DETAIL DE 600 students

Through the use of expanding classrooms that can be divided further into 2 classrooms, the number of students can increase and the student to teacher ROOF-COLUMN CONNECTION ratio can decrease. Research shows thatDETAIL the number of students will likely decrease by 2019. The design accommodates decrease with classrooms that PRE-MODIFIED TRUSS this WITH 4’ CAMBER can also compress and shrink in size.

HOT AIR ESCAPING FROM BUILDING HOT AIR ESCAPING FROM BUILDING

0

0

N

N

160’

160’

SECTION A THE DESIGN IS HEAVILY CONCERNED ABOUT STUDENTS’ HEALTHSECTION ANDB SAFETY, CONVENIENT CIRCULATION, LARGE PLAYGROUND SPACE AND GOOD NATURAL LIGHTING IN THE INTERIOR SPACES ARE UTILIZED. A LARGE PLAYGROUND TAKES THE ENTIRE ROOF, ALLOWING STUDENTS TO BE ENTERTAINED BY NOT ONLY THE JUNGLE-GYMS BUT ALSO THE ABILITY TO LITERALLY SCALE THE SIDES OF THEIR ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TO GET PLACES. NETS THAT SHADE THE SMALLER, LOWER PLAYGROUNDS CAN BE CLIMBED TO ACCESS THE ROOF OR JUST FOR FUN. ALSO, A LARGE VOID THROUGH THE CENTER OF THE SCHOOL CREATES A SENSE OF OPEN AND CLARITY. THE SOLIDS AND VOIDS ARE CLEAR IN PRESENCE AND PURPOSE. EACH VOID ALLOWS HEAT TO ESCAPE AND COOL AIR TO COME IN, FURTHER REDUCING THE HEAT IN THE BUILDING.

48

SECTIONSECTION A A

SECTIONSECTION B B

AS THE LOAD FROM THE BUILDING TRANSFERS DOWN TO THE TRUSS IT WILL START TO FLATTEN OUT

PLAYGROUND PLAYGROUND DIAGRAM DIAGRAM

WEST ELEVATION

CURRENT CURRENT

EVENTUALLY, THE TRUSS WILL BE LEVELLED OUT AND ROOF-COLUMN CONNECTION CONNECTION DETAIL DE 20 YEARS 20FUTURE YEARS THE CAMBER WILL AIDFUTURE THE STEEL IN BENDING OVER ROOF-COLUMN THE SPAN OF THE CHANNEL

PRE-MODIFIED PRE-MODIFIED TRUSS WITH TRUSS 4’ WITH CAMBER 4’ CAMBER

AS THE LOAD AS THEFROM LOADTHE FROM BUILDING THE BUILDING TRANSFERS TRANSFERS DOWN TO DOWN THE TO TH TRUSS ITTRUSS WILL START IT WILLTO START FLATTEN TO FLATTEN OUT OUT

PRELIMINARY MODEL

PRELIMINARY MODEL

PRELIMINARY MODEL WEST ELEVATION WEST ELEVATION

49

EVENTUALLY, EVENTUALLY, THE TRUSS THEWILL TRUSS BEWILL LEVELLED BE LEVELLED OUT AND OUT AND THE CAMBER THE CAMBER WILL AID WILL THEAID STEEL THEINSTEEL BENDING IN BENDING OVER OVER THE SPAN THE OFSPAN THE CHANNEL OF THE CHANNEL


THE GYM, LOCATED AT THE TOP OF THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL, HAS A FABRIC ROOF THAT SPANS THE ENTIRE LENGTH OF THE BUILDING. THE FABRIC ALLOWS LIGHT TO ENTER THE GYM AND PERMEATE THE TRUSS SYSTEM OF THE ROOF, CREATING INTRICATE SHADOW DETAILS THROUGHOUT THE GYM.

THE SMALLER INDIVIDUAL PLAYGROUNDS ARE SHARED BY TWO CLASSROOMS. EACH PLAYGROUND HAS EITHER A CAVE, CIRCULAR SLIDE OR STAIR WHICH CAN BE USED TO ACCESS THE LARGER ROOF PLAYGROUND. NETS LOCATED ALONG THE PLAYGROUNDS AID IN HEAT REDUCTION AND CAN BE CLIMBED ON.

HOT AIR ESCAPING FROM BUILDING

SECTION A

50

SOUTH ELEVATION

PLAYGROUND DIAGRAM DEPICTS THE TRANSFER FROM THE ROOF PLAYGROUND TO THE SMALLER LOWER PLAYGROUND

51


Basketball court/ gym

A

elevator & stairway 350 S.F. 2400 S.FN. lobby 800 S.F. ng room 200 S.F. circulation 1600 S.F. GROUND PARKING LEVEL 3500 S.F. ading 520 S.F. STUDENT : TEACHER RATIO Aud/ Music/ Media room SECONDARY STRUCTURE: STRUCTTURE: SECONDARY SKIN: ACCESS: STAIRS, STAIRSS, S nt desk 180 S.F. 0 AND 40’ seating 1400 S.F. STEEL CABLES ROOF GLAZING AND FABRIC RO O OOF ELEVATOR D RAMP spaces 800 S.F. stage 585 S.F. 700 S.F. back stage 300 S.F. unge 470 S.F. B circulation 1215 S.F. e office 470 S.F. Art room 780 S.F. oms 740 S.F. Science room 780 S.F. 2019 2029 370 S.F. use of expanding classrooms that can further into 2 classrooms, the number of 370 S.F. Second Floor increase and the student to teacher LOUVER SYSTEM M AT PRIMARY STRUCTUR STRUCTURE: RE: n 3780 S.F. crease. Research shows that the number PRIMARY SKIN: ELASTOME ELASTOMERIC ERIC ROOF AND CLASSROOMS CLA ASSROOMS Classrooms 8688 S.F. STEEL FRAMING will likely decrease by 2019. The design GRAILCOAT 940 S.F. kindergarten (2) 912 S.F. tes this decrease with classrooms that ampress and shrink in size. 2840 S.F. first grade (3) 1296 S.F. 2750 S.F. second grade (3) 1296 S.F. stairway 350 S.F. third grade(3) 1296 S.F. First Floor Library 800 S.F. fourth grade(3) 1296 S.F. PTA meeting room 1600 S.F. seating/reading fifth grade(3) 1296 S.F. office & front desk Media room 3500 S.F. sixth grade(3) 1296 S.F. collection spaces circulation 1400 S.F. Restrooms 780 S.F. Teacher’s lounge A d min/ nurse office 585 S.F. B girl’s restroom B 390 S.F. Public restrooms 300 S.F. female boy’s restroom 390 S.F. male 1215 S.F. Hallway 7700 S.F. Café & kitchen B kitchen 780 S.F. elevator & stairway 350 S.F. dining area m 780 S.F. Hallway lockers 500 S.F. SECOND LEVEL elevator & stairway lobby circulation 6880S.F. circulation Basketball court/ gym 7900 S.F. Aud/ Music/ Media room seating 8688 S.F. stage en (2) 912 S.F. back stage B B circulation (3) 1296 S.F. Art room Science room de (3) 1296 S.F. Second Floor e(3) 1296 S.F. Classrooms de(3) 1296 S.F. kindergarten (2) FIRST LEVEL first grade (3) (3) 1296 S.F. second grade (3) third grade(3) e(3) 1296 S.F. fourth grade(3) 780 S.F. fifth grade(3) sixth grade(3) oom 390 S.F. Restrooms girl’s restroom oom 390 S.F. boy’s restroom Hallway 7700 S.F. B B elevator & stairway stairway 350 S.F. lockers circulation S.F. AFTER SCHOOL AND500 DURING RECESS, CHILDREN FROM ALL GRADES INTERACT WITH ONE ANOTHER ON THE LARGE ROOF PLAYBasketball court/ gym N PLAYGROUND DIAGRAM GROUND PARKING LEVEL GROUND, EQUIPPED6880S.F. WITH SLIDES, SWINGS, NETS TO CLIMB ON AND RECYCLED RUBBER AS A GROUND COVER. urt/CURRENT gym 7900 S.F. FUTURE 10 YEARS CLASSROOM TRACK SYSTEM DETAIL

7900 S.F.

CONTRACTED SCHOOL

20:1

15:1

12:1 Ideal ratio

600 students

EXPANDED SCHOOL

0

40’

2400 S.F. 200 S.F. 520 S.F. 180 S.F. 800 S.F. 700 S.F. 470 S.F. 470 S.F. 740 S.F. 370 S.F. 370 S.F. 3780 S.F. 940 S.F. 2840 S.F. 2750 S.F. 350 S.F. 800 S.F. 1600 S.F. 3500 S.F. 1400 S.F. 585 S.F. 300 S.F. 1215 S.F. 780 S.F. 780 S.F.

CURRENT

8688 S.F. 912 S.F. 1296 S.F. 1296 S.F. 1296 S.F. 1296 S.F. 1296 S.F. 1296 S.F. 780 S.F. 390 S.F. 390 S.F. 7700 S.F. 350 S.F. 500 S.F. 6880S.F. 7900 S.F.

A

A

A

A

400 students

10 YEARS FUTURE

CLASSROOM TRACK SYSTEM DETAIL

THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL, TWENTY YEARS IN THE FUTURE EXPANDED TO PROVIDE MAXIMUM CAPACITY, HOUSES 600 STUDENTS ROOF-COLUMN CONNECTION DETAIL 20 YEARS FUTURE CURRENT FROM KINDERGARTEN TO SIXTH GRADE.

PRE-MODIFIED TRUSS WITH 4’ CAMBER

CURRENT

CURRENT

CLASSROOM TRACK SYSTEM DETAIL 20 YEARS FUTURE

ROOF-COLUMN CONNECTION DETAIL

CURRENT

PLAYGROUND DIAGRAM

10 YEARS FUTURE

20 YEARS FUTURE

ROOF-COLUMN CONNECTION DETAIL PRE-MODIFIED TRUSS WITH 4’ CAMBER

SUMMER SUN

PRE-MODIFIED TRUSS WITH 4’ CAMBER

CLASSROOM TRACK SYSTEM DETAIL

WEST ELEVATION

AS THE LOAD FROM THE BUILDING TRANSFERS DOWN TO THE TRUSS IT WILL START TO FLATTEN OUT

EVENTUALLY, THE TRUSS WILL BE LEVELLED OUT AND THE CAMBER WILL AID THE STEEL IN BENDING OVER THE SPAN OF THE CHANNEL

AS THE LOAD FROM THE BUILDING TRANSFERS DOWN TO THE TRUSS IT WILL START TO FLATTEN OUT

WINTER SUN

AS THE LOAD FROM THE BUILDING TRANSFERS DOWN TO THE TRUSS IT WILL START TO FLATTEN OUT WEST ELEVATION

EVENTUALLY, THE TRUSS WILL BE LEVELLED OUT AND THE CAMBER WILL AID THE STEEL IN BENDING OVER THE SPAN OF THE CHANNEL

EVENTUALLY, THE TRUSS WILL BE LEVELLED OUT AND ROOF-COLUMN CONNECTION DETAIL THE CAMBER WILL AID THE STEEL IN BENDING OVER THE SPAN OF THE CHANNEL

ION

RE-MODIFIED TRUSS WITH 4’ CAMBER 52

SECTION B

WEST ELEVATION

53


EX-S

EXAGGERATED SIMPLICITY

STUDIO 3B: MARK OWEN ARLETA PUMPING STATION, DEVONSHIRE AVENUE @ I-5 3000SF

THE EXAGGERATED SIMPLICITY OF THE PROJECT WAS INSPIRED BY THE CROWN HALL BUILDING DESIGNED BY MIES VAN DER ROHE. THE PERFECT 90 DEGREE ANGLES, CRISP LINES AND EXAGGERATED STRUCTURE OF THE CROWN HALL INFLUENCED THE PROJECT BUT DO NOT RULE.

N

0 16 8 FIFTH FLOOR PLAN DEPICTS THE LOUNGE, KITCHENETTE AND BUNK AR

THE DESIGN, INFLUENCED BY THE RIGID STRUCTURE OF THE CROWN HALL JUXTAPOSES THE CURVING GEOMETRY OF THE FREEWAY SYSTEM THAT SERVES AS A BACKDROP FOR THE SITE. THE DESIGN ATTEMPTS TO LIMIT THE PHYSICAL FOOTPRINT OF THE BUILDING BY SIMPLIFYING THE STRUCTURE AS MUCH AS POSSIBLE. NO EXCESS. EVERY PIECE OF STEEL IS NECESSARY AND HAS ITS PLACE. WHILE THE AMOUNT OF STEEL IS MINIMAL THE SIZE OF THE STEEL IS EXAGGERATED. THE SHAPE AND FORM OF THE PROJECT RELATES TO THE CONVERGING WATER CHANNEL LOCATED DIRECTLY BENEATH THE BUILDING. THE LOWEST FLOOR OF THE BUILDING IS SHAPED AGAINST THE FORM OF THE CHANNEL, FURTHER JUXTAPOSING THE RIGID STRUCTURE WITH THE NATURAL FORM OF THE SITE.

N

N

N

54

0

16

8 FOURTH FLOOR PLAN DEPICTS THE OPERATION CENTER AND AUDITORIUM

0

8

16

0

8

16

SECOND FLOOR PLAN DEPICTS CLASSROOM AREA AND AUDITORIUM

FIRST FLOOR PLAN DEPICTS THE STORAGE AREA, GARAGE AND PUBLIC RESTROOMS

DETAIL

55


S SHARP

SUMMER SUN

SUMMER SUN 0

INTERSTATE 5

4

2

FLOOR SYSTEM DETAIL WIDE FLANGE BEAMS WELDED TO STEEL TUBEE COLUMNS

WINTER W TE SUN SU

STRUCTURAL SYSTEM, STEEL TUBES, STEEL GIRDERS, I-BEAMS

WINTER INT R SUN S H

N

SITE PLAN

SITE PLAN

0

16

32

SHARP

CHANNEL INTERIOR SHOT DEPICTING AN AUDITORIUM SPACE

N SITE PLAN

0

16

32

CHANNEL LOUNGE/ KITCHENETTE AREA OPERATION CENTER 4 CLASSROOMS

INTERIOR RENDERING

FINAL MODEL

STORAGE AND GARAGE AUDITORIUM SPACES BUNK AREA FOR 8 UPPER LEVEL INTERIOR SPACE WITH FULL LENGTH GLAZING ALLOWS PLENTY OF LIGHT INTO THE INERTERIOR SPACES

FINAL MODEL WINDOW DETAIL 56

SKIN SYSTEM

57


CROWN HALL BUILDING CASE STUDY

STUDIO 3B: MARK OWEN ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 3000SF

THE CROWN HALL BUILDING BY MIES VAN DER ROHE IS CONSIDERED THE “CENTERPIECE” OF A MASTER PLAN FOR THE IIT CAMPUS. THE BUILDING IS MADE UP OF STEEL GIRDERS AND BEAMS FOR STRUCTURAL SUPPORT AND A PRIMARY SKIN OF ALL GLAZING WITH DIFFERING OPACITIES. THERE ARE TWO DIFFERENT TYPES OF GLAZING TO HELP DETER HEAT GAIN DURRING SUMMER AND HEAT LOSS DURING WINTER. THE 220’ BY 120’ GLASS BOX IS COMPLETELY FREE OF INTERIOR COLUMNS.

58

59


-EACH FOIL CAN BE TREATED TO MANAGE SOLAR GAIN

mixed-use multi-plex

MIXED-USE MULTI-PLEX

SUMMER SUN

SUMMER SUN

ROOF SYSTEM- ETFE FOIL PILLOW WITH WHITE INNER SKIN

AN UM TR

DRAKE FAY-PAGET AR 383: KELLY BAIR

ST

STUDIO 3A: KELLY BAIR DOWNTOWN SAN FERNANDO 8000 SF

ROOF GARDEN

SKYLIGHTS

STAIRS- ROOF ACCESS

OOR WALLS- ONE BEDROOM RESIDENTIAL SECOND FLOOR

SECOND FLOOR SLAB- ONE BEDROOM RESIDENTIAL INTERIOR STAIR SYSTEM FIRST FLOOR RESIDENTIAL WALLS SUMMER SUN

SUMMER SUN AN UM TR

ROOF SYSTEM- ETFE FOIL PILLOW WITH WHITE INNER SKIN

ST

FIRST FLOOR SLABINTERIOR RENDERING OFRESIDENTIAL FLOWER SHOP AT FIRST LEVEL

ROOF GARDEN

WINTER SUN

MIXED-USE MULTI-PLEX DRAKE FAY-PAGET

NW PREVAILING

SKYLIGHTS

STAIRS- ROOF ACCESS

STEEL STRUCTURE

OOR WALLS- ONE BEDROOM RESIDENTIAL SECOND FLOOR

WINTER SUN

SECOND FLOOR SLAB- ONE BEDROOM RESIDENTIAL INTERIOR STAIR SYSTEM

WINDS

FIRST FLOOR RESIDENTIAL WALLS

AR 383: KELLY BAIR

N

FIRST FLOOR SLAB- RESIDENTIAL

STEEL STRUCTURE

WINTER SUN

WINTER SUN NW PREVAILING

WINDS

N

ETFE FOIL PILLOW CUSHIONS ETFE FOIL PILLOW CUSHIONS

N

SA RN

FE . RD

SA

DO

AN

CIRCULATION RETAIL FLOOR SLAB

N AN

RN

FE SITE PLAN

CIRCULATION

STAIRS- PARKING GARAGE ACCESS

RETAIL SPACE

DO . RD

UNDERGROUND WALLS- CONCRETE BLOCK

RETAIL FLOOR SLAB PARKING SLAB

SITE PLAN

STAIRS- PARKING GARAGE ACCESS

RETAIL SPACE

UNDERGROUND WALLS- CONCRETE BLOCK

INTERIOR RENDERING OF PARKING LEVEL STAIRCASE PARKING SLAB THE MIXED-USE DEVELOPMENT PROJECT IN SAN FERNANDO CITY ATTEMPTS TO REVITALIZE A HISTORIC CITY THAT HAS BEEN NEGLECTED AND UNDERVALUED IN RECENT YEARS. THERE HAS BEEN A STEADY DECLINE IN AFFORDABLE, QUALITY HOUSING AND AN INCREASE IN POPULATION, OF WHICH THE APPEAL IS A LESS EXPENSIVE COST OF LIVING WHEN COMPARED TO THE GREATER LOS ANGELES AREA. THE DESIGN FOR THE MIXED-USE DEVELOPMENT ALLOWS SUSTAINABILITY TO BE A KEY FACTOR IN THE PROCESS. THE ROOF IS ANGLED TO CORRELATE TO THE PREVAILING NORTHWEST WINDS TO CREATE POSITIVE AND NEGATIVE WIND PRESSURE TO ENCOURAGE VENTILATION THROUGH THE SKYLIGHTS. THE REAR OF THE ROOF IS ANGLED AT 55 OVER THE RESIDENTIAL SPACE TO ACCOMMODATE A SOLAR WATER HEATER FOR EACH UNIT. THE SKIN SYSTEM IS A MAJOR COMPONENT OF THE DESIGN AIDING IN SUSTAINABILTY. THE ETFE FOIL PILLOW IS A COPOLYMER SIMILAR TO PLASTIC THAT CAN BE TREATED BASED ON THE AMOUNT OF SOLAR GAIN WANTED. THE FOIL PILLOW ALSO FUNCTIONS AS AN INSULATOR WITH AIR PUMPED IN BETWEEN THE SHEETS TO REGULATE THE TEMPERATURE INSIDE AND CAN DIFFER DEPENDING ON THE WEATHER OUTSIDE. FOUR FACES OF THE L-SHAPED LOT RECEIVE SOUTHERN SUN EXPOSURE ALMOST ALL DAY. THIS ALONG WITH THE SKIN SYSTEM, ALLOWS LIGHT TO PERMEATE THE INTERIOR SPACES.

SECTION AXON

THE GEOMETRY AND MASSING OF THE EXTERIOR FACADE IS BASED ON INTERSECTIONS, MIDPOINTS AND ENDPOINT OF LINES CREATING OVERLAPPING SHAPES. THE OVERLAPPING CONCEPT IS CONTINUED ON THE INTERIOR WITH THE WALLS ANGLED BASED ON THE EXTERIOR AND THE FOCUS OF THE SPACE. THE EXCESS CIRCULATION SPACE CREATED BY THE INTERIOR WALLS ALLOW EACH INSTANCE TO BE UTILIZED IN A SPECIFIC WAY BY ALL; SUCH AS AN OFFICE SPACE, LIBRARY AREA, SITTING SPACE OR EVEN A GARDEN AREA FOR PLANTS TO GROW. THE PROGRAM OF SPACES ARE SUCH THAT THE ONE BEDROOM APARTMENTS OVERLAP AND INTERLOCK WITH ONE ANOTHER CREATING OPEN, LIGHT SPACES. THE RESIDENTIAL SPACE CAN BE ACCESSED BY THREE STAIRS AND THREE ELEVATORS. THE STAIRS ARE ACCESSIBLE ONLY FROM THE PARKING AND RESIDENTIAL FLOORS, NOT THE RETAIL. THE STAIR OVERLAPS AND PROTRUDES INTO THE RETAIL SPACE BUT DOES NOT INTERFERE OR HAVE ACCESS TO THE RETAIL. HOWEVER, RETAIL CAN BE ACCESSED FROM THE ELEVATORS. THE RETAILS SPACE IS BASED ON THE ORIGINAL PRIMARY FUNCTION OF THE ETFE FOIL PILLOW, WHICH WAS A GREEN HOUSE. THE RETAIL SPACE IS A NURSERY FOR FLOWERS, ARRANGED BASED ON THE PERFUME AND ITS IMPACT ON OUR SENSES AND EMOTIONS.

THE MIXED-USE DEVELOPMENT PROJECT IN SAN FERNANDO CITY ATTEMPTS TO REVITALIZE A HISTORIC CITY THAT HAS BEEN NEGLECTED AND UNDERVALUED IN RECENT YEARS. THE GEOMETRY AND MASSING OF THE EXTERIOR FACADE IS BASED ON INTERSECTIONS, MIDPOINTS AND ENDPOINTS OF LINES CREATING OVERLAPPING SHAPES. THE OVERLAPPING CONCEPT CONTINUES ON THE INTERIOR WITH ANGLED WALLS FOCUSING ON THE INTERIOR SPACES. THE SKIN SYSTEM IS AN INTEGRAL PART OF THE DESIGN, USING ETFE FOIL PILLOW FOR STAINABILITY AS WELL AS A UNIQUE MATERIAL TO EXPERIENCE AS AN INHABITANT OF THE SPACES. THE INTERIOR SPACES CREATED BY THE INTERACTION OF THE OVERLAPPING STEEL STRUCTURE WITH THE ETFE SKIN SYSTEM CREATES LIGHT, OPEN SPACES. THE EXCESS CIRCULATION THEOF MIXED-USE DEVELOPMENT PROJECT IN SAN FERNANDO CITY ATTEMPTS TO REVITALIZE A HISTORIC CITY THAT HAS BEEN NEGLECTED AND UNDERVALUED CREATED BY THE OVERLAPPING INTERIOR EACH IN RECENT YEARS. THERE HAS BEEN A STEADY DECLINE IN AFFORDABLE, QUALITY HOUSING AND AN INCREASE IN POPULATION, OF WHICH THE APPEAL IS A LESS EXPENSIVE COST OF LIVING WHEN COMPARED TO THE GREATER LOS ANGELES AREA. THE DESIGN FOR THE MIXED-USE DEVELOPMENT ALLOWS LEVEL CAN BE USED BY THE RESIDENTS AS LIBRARY SUSTAINABILITY TO BE A KEY FACTOR IN THE PROCESS. THE ROOF IS ANGLED TO CORRELATE TO THE PREVAILING NORTHWEST WINDS TO CREATE POSITIVE AND NEGATIVE WIND PRESSURE TO ENCOURAGE VENTILATION THROUGH THE SKYLIGHTS. THE REAR OF THE ROOF IS ANGLED AT 55 OVER THE RESIDENTIAL SPACES, SITTING AREAS OR EVEN GARDENS. SPACE TO ACCOMMODATE A SOLAR WATER HEATER FOR EACH UNIT. THE SKIN SYSTEM IS A MAJOR COMPONENT OF THE DESIGN AIDING IN SUSTAINABILTY. SUMMER SUN

SUMMER SUN

AN UM

TR

ROOF SYSTEM- ETFE FOIL PILLOW WITH WHITE INNER SKIN

ST

WINTER SUN

ROOF GARDEN

SKYLIGHTS

ETFE MEMBRANE WELDED TO NEOPRENE INTERMEDIATE LAYER

76 MM DIA. TUBULAR STEEL TENSIONING MEMBER WELDED TO 20 MM DIA. THREADED ROD

STAIRS- ROOF ACCESS AROMATIC SOOTHING COMFORT REASSURANCE

THREE LAYER ETFE-MEMBRANE CUSHION WITH WHITE INNER SKIN

OOR WALLS- ONE BEDROOM RESIDENTIAL SECOND FLOOR

35 MM DIA. STEEL TUBE STEEL T-SECTION WITH RAKING-CUT FLANGE

SECOND FLOOR SLAB- ONE BEDROOM RESIDENTIAL

CITRUSREFRESHING PICK ME UP

INTERIOR STAIR SYSTEM FIRST FLOOR RESIDENTIAL WALLS SWEET/ FLORALNOURISHING RELAXING

FIRST FLOOR SLAB- RESIDENTIAL

SPICY-

STIMULATING MASCULINE

STEEL STRUCTURE ETFE FOIL PILLOW- ETHYLENE TETRA FLUORO EHTYLENE (COPOLYMER) -STRONG, TRANSPARENT, LIGHTWEIGHT -ATTATCHED TO INTERLOCKING STEEL TUBES -3 SHEETS WELDED TOGETHER ALONG SIDES AND LAYERS OF AIR PUMPED HIN BETWEEN, CAN BE ADJUSTED BASED ON WEATHER (COLDER DAY CAN PUMP MORE AIR INBWTWEEN THE SHEETS TO BE MORE INSULATION WHEN NEEDED) -100% RECYCLABLE, NO SOLVENTS -CAN BE FABRICATED IN ANY SIZE -EACH FOIL CAN BE TREATED TO MANAGE SOLAR GAIN

WINTER SUN

NW PREVAILIN

G WINDS

N DETAIL- FOIL PILLOW WALL& ROOF SYSTEM SCALE: 1” = 1’-0”

EXOTICCLEANSE DETOXIFY MIND

ETFE FOIL PILLOW CUSHIONS

N

SA

RN

FE

DO

AN

CIRCULATION

. RD

RETAIL FLOOR SLAB

SITE PLAN

60

UNDERGROUND WALLS- CONCRETE BLOCK

THE ETFE FOIL PILLOW IS A COPOLYMER SIMILAR TO PLASTIC THAT CAN BE TREATED BASED ON THE AMOUNT OF SOLAR GAIN WANTED. THE FOIL PILLOW ALSO FUNCTIONS AS AN INSULATOR WITH AIR PUMPED IN BETWEEN THE SHEETS TO REGULATE THE TEMPERATURE INSIDE AND CAN DIFFER DEPENDING ON THE WEATHER OUTSIDE. FOUR FACES OF THE L-SHAPED LOT RECEIVE SOUTHERN SUN EXPOSURE ALMOST ALL DAY. THIS ALONG WITH THE SKIN SYSTEM, UNDERGROUND PARKING ALLOWS LIGHT TO PERMEATE THE INTERIOR SPACES. THE GEOMETRY AND MASSING OF THE EXTERIOR FACADE IS BASED ON INTERSECTIONS, MIDPOINTS AND ENDPOINT OF LINES CREATING OVERLAPPING SHAPES. THE OVERLAPPING CONCEPT IS CONTINUED ON THE INTERIOR WITH THE WALLS ANGLED BASED ON THE EXTERIOR AND

STAIRS- PARKING GARAGE ACCESS

RETAIL SPACE

0

1”

0

8’

N N

PARKING SLAB

FIRST FLOOR PLAN N

RETAIL GROUND FLOOR 0

1”

0

8’

SECOND FLOOR PLAN

THIRD FLOOR PLAN

61


ROOF SYSTEM- ETFE FOIL PILLOW WITH WHITE INNER SKIN

ROOF GARDEN

SKYLIGHTS

STAIRS- ROOF ACCESS

SECOND FLOOR OOR WALLS- ONE BEDROOM RESIDENTIAL

DIGITAL MODEL

SECOND FLOOR SLAB- ONE BEDROOM RESIDENTIAL INTERIOR STAIR SYSTEM FIRST FLOOR RESIDENTIAL WALLS

FIRST FLOOR SLAB- RESIDENTIAL

STEEL STRUTURE

PHYSICAL MODEL

PHYSICAL MODEL

PHYSICAL MODEL

ETFE FOIL PILLOW CUSHIONS

RETAIL FLOOR SLAB

STAIRS- PARKING GARAGE ACCESS

HALLWAY/ STAIR

STAIR AT SECOND LEVEL

INTERIOR OF APARTMENT

STARIWAY TO ROOF

ROOF GARDEN

CORRIDOR

UNDERGROUND WALLS- CONCRETE BLOCK

PARKING SLAB

62

63


SOUTHWEST ELEVATION

SOUTHWEST ELEVATION

64

0

1”

0

8’

0

1”

0

8’

65


TOUCH THIS EARTH LIGHTLY DUPLEX PROJECT

STUDIO 3A KELLY BAIR SAN FERNANDO CITY HILLSIDE 3000 SF

SUMMER SUN ANGLE @ 79

THE EARLY CONCEPT FOR THE DESIGN OF THE DUPLEX WAS BASED ON GLENN MURCUTT’S SAYING “TOUCH THIS EARTH LIGHTLY.” THE PROJECT AIMS TO LESSEN THE FOOTPRINT OF THE BUILDING ON THE EXISTING SITE BY DIGGING INTO IT AT CERTAIN TOPOGRAPHICAL POINTS AND EXTRUDING THE DUPLEX OUT FROM THE SLOPE. BY DIGGING INTO THE SITE AT 380’ AND 390’ FOR THE LOWER AND UPPER DUPLEXES NOT ONLY DISTURBS LESS OF THE SITE BUT ALSO AIDS IN PRIVACY FROM THE CONNECTED ADJACENT MAIN STREET AT 365’. TO MAXIMIZE SUSTAINABILITY, THE ROOFS ARE ANGLED TO CORRELATE PERPENDICULARLY TO THE HIGH SUMMER SUN. THE INTERIOR HEIGHT OF THE DUPLEXES DIFFERS DEPENDING ON THE USE AND PURPOSE OF THE SPACE. ALSO, SKYLIGHTS IN SLEEPING AREAS AND RECREATION AREAS ALLOW HEAT TO ESCAPE FROM THE INTERIOR. IN ADDITION, THE GROWTH-LIKE FEATURES PROTRUDING FROM THE DUPLEXES AID IN BOTH SHADING ON THE SOUTHERN AND WESTERN SIDES, AS WELL AS FACILITATES WIND CIRCULATION. THE GROWTHS ON THE WESTERN SIDE CREATE POSITIVE AND NEGATIVE PRESSURE TO HELP FORCE THE NATURAL WIND INTO CERTAIN AREAS OF THE DUPLEX.

WINTER SUN ANGLE @ 32

395’

388’

380’

STUDY SPACE

Height Limit 36’ when slope does not exceed 66%

Easement

SLEEPING SPACE

GARAGE

HYGIENE SPACE

Slope About 21% from corner to corner

KITCHEN SLEEPING SPACE DINING SPACE

ENVELOPE DIAGRAM

THE SKIN OF THE BUILDINGS IS CONTINUOUS AND FLUID, DIFFERING IN OPACITY BASED ON SUSTAINABILITY. THE SOUTHERN AND WESTERN SIDE OF THE DUPLEXES, WHICH RECEIVE THE MOST INTENSE SUN THROUGHOUT THE DAY, BOTH CONTAIN GLAZING. THE PROTRUDING WINDOWS ON THE WESTERN SIDE OF THE DUPLEX ARE OPAQUE AND MADE OF CHANNEL GLASS, DIFFUSING THE LATE AFTERNOON SUN. THE SKIN OF THE WINDOW STRUCTURE IS ENTIRELY MADE UP OF THIS GLAZING, WITH THE WINDOW PANE ON THE EXTERIOR; ALLOWING THE INTERIOR TO PERMEATE THE ENVELOPE OF THE DUPLEX TOWARDS THE EXTERIOR. ON THE SOUTHERN SIDE OF THE DUPLEX, THE WINDOW PROTRUSIONS ARE SOLID TO SHADE FROM SOUTHERN EXPOSURE.

Setbacks 5’ from property line

LIVING SPACE

SITTING ROOM

N

EXTERIOR COMMUNAL SPACE

KITCHEN/ DINING SPACE SLEEPING SPACE SITTING ROOM

Privacy, Noise, Northwestern wind, breeze from the valley of the slope created by the parcels and site

LIVING SPACE HYGIENE SPACE Due to Sun Exposure and hill/ slope

SLEEPING SPACE

STUDY SPACE

Breeze, Sun reflected off the oppsite hill across the main street

Due to Feeder Street (Privacy/ Noise)

Easement

Setback @ 5’

Noise, Privacy

N

ENVELOPE DIAGRAM 66

N

HYBRID DIAGRAM

67


CREPE MYRTLE BITTER CHERRY TREE ORCHID 37

4’

37

5’

37

6’

3 7’ 78’ 379’ 380’ 381’ 382’

37

38

3’

38

4’

38

5’

38

6’

38

38

7’

39

38

8’

0’

9’

37

3’

13

15

16 FEEDER STREET

F MING GRAILCOAT

14

37

2’

17 37

1’

12 WILDLIFE CORRIDOR

37

0’

11

36

9’

IT STER

E

RANIT

SED G

MPO

DECO

36

8

36

7’

BITTER CHERRY TREE

36

6’

11. LIVING ROOM/ REC ROOM 12. KITCHEN/ DINING ROOM 13. SITTING ROOM 14. BEDROOM 15. POWDER ROOM 16. MASTER BATHROOM 17. MASTER BEDROOM

36

5’

36

4’

LS MING STER

36

3’

EXISTING OAK TREE

TREE

S MAIN

T

BIG LEAF MAPLE

36

2’

NG WALL H STONE

SITE PLAN PARCEL 1

N PARCEL 1 LOWER FLOOR PLAN

OR WALLS D STEEL FRAME TIMBER INFILL NG OMERIC, GRAILCOAT

0 0

N

0

1”

0

8’

EXISTING OAK TREE

1” 8’

37

4’

37

37

5’

6’

3 7’ 78’ 379’ 380’

37

37

3’

8

7

OWS/ SHADING ES NEL GLASS

1 37

10

2’

2

9 3

37

1’

37

0’

6

4

36

9’

5 36

8

36

7’

36

6’

5’

36

4’

36

3’

36

2’

PARCEL1 SOUTH ELEVATION 0

1”

0

8’

N

1. GARAGE 2. STUDIO SPACE 3. SITTING ROOM 4. LIVING ROOM/ RECREATION ROOM 5. KITCHEN/ DINING ROOM 6. STUDY 7. BEDROOM 8. MASTER BATH 9. POWDER ROOM 10. MASTER BEDROOM

36

N PARCEL 1 LOWER FLOOR PLAN 0

1”

0

8’

PARCEL 1

0

1”

0

8’

N

PARCEL1 WEST ELEVATION 0

1”

0

8’

N

68

PARCEL 1

0 0

1” 8’

N

69


EXTERIOR ROOF PLYWOOD FRAMING ELASTOMERIC, GRAILCOAT

DRAKE FAY-PAGET SECTION STUDY WINTER SOLSTICE : SUN ANGLE @ 32

N

INTERIOR SOFFIT VENETIAN PLASTER

INTERIOR WALLS PLYWOOD FRAMING VENETIAN PLASTER

STAIR/ RETAINING WALL CONCRETE WITH STONE FACADE

EXTERIOR WALLS BRACED STEEL FRAME WITH TIMBER INFILL FRAMING ELASTOMERIC, GRAILCOAT

DRAKE FAY-PAGET AR 383 KELLY BAIR SECTION STUDY WINTER SOLSTICE : SUN ANGLE @ 32

WINDOWS/ SHADING DEVICES CHANNEL GLASS

N

EXPLODED AXONOMETRIC

70

0

1”

0

8’

71


THE HUNT

STUDIO 3A KELLY BAIR LOS ANGELES, CA

THE SILVERWOOD DUPLEX IS A HILLSIDE DESIGN THAT RELATES GREATLY TO THE ROLLING HILLS AND THE SUN EXPOSURE THROUGHOUT THE DAY. THE DESIGN INTEGRATES HEAT REDUCTION TECHNOLOGY THROUGH THE USE OF LARGE OVERHANGS WITH DUAL PURPOSES AND EXTERIOR SPACES ANCHORED TOWARD THE VIEW. THE OVERHANGS ARE ALSO UTILIZED AS BALCONIES AND JUXTAPOSES THE NATURALLY DOWN-SLOPING EXISITNG GRADE OF THE SITE.

72

73


THE HUNT

Summer Solstice June 21 sun angle = 79.4

Winter Solstice December 21 Sun Angle = 32.5 Less Reflection More Transmission

Winter Solstice December 21 Sun Angle = 32.5 Less Reflection More Transmission

Winter Solstice Decmeber 21 Sun Angle = 32.5 Less Reflection More Transmission

Winter Solstice December 21 Sun Angle = 32.5 Less Reflection More Transmission

Summer Solstice June 21 Sun Angle = 79.4 More Reflection Less Transmission

Summer Solstice June 21 Sun Angle = 79.4 More Reflection Less Transmission

Summer Solstice June 21 Sun Angle = 79.4 More Reflection Less Transmission

Summer Solstice June 21 Sun Angle = 79.4 More Reflection Less Transmission

Winter Solstice December 21 Sun Angle = 32.5 Less Reflection More Transmission Summer SOltice June 21 Sun Angle 79.4 More Reflection Less Transmission

Winter Solstice December 21 sun angle = 32.5

North Facing Window More Reflection Less Transmission 85% Of Reflection to Interior

West Facing WIndow More Transmission Less Reflection Transmission is 87%

North Facing Wall More Transmission Due to Reflection

West Facing Wall More Transmission

North Facing Window More Reflection Less Transmission 85% Of Reflection to Interior

West Facing Window More Transmission Less Reflection Transmission is 87%

North Facing Wall More Transmission Due to Reflection

Underside of Building Little to no Transmission Some Btu Due to Reflection

74

West Facing WIndows: Interior contains a greater percentage of Btu

Winter Solstice Sun Angle = 32.5 closer to perpendicular to the surface Transmission is about 87% Less Reflection

West Facing Windows

West Facing Windows: Interior contains a greater Btu

High Btu Due to 32.5 Sun Angle

Transmission about 87%

Underside of Balcony Btu resulting from reflection

Winter Solstice Sun Angle = 32.5 closer to perpendicualr Transmission is about

Small Btu Reflection limited Sun Angle relatively Perpendicular

West Facing Windows

High Btu Due to 32.5 Sun Angle

Transmission about 87%

South Facing Support Wall Transmits Most Amount of Btu During Winter Solstice Reflects Most Amount Btu During Summer Solstice

Underside of Balcony Btu resulting from reflection

UNFOLDED ELEVATION WHERE EACH SURFACE OF THE BUILDING HAS BEEN UNFOLDED SIMILAR TO UNFOLDING A BOX. SUN EXPOSURE DIAGRAM DEPICTS THE AMOUNT OF SUN ON EACH SURFACE OF THE BUILDING. ALSO, THE AMOUNT OF HEAT ABSORBED AND DEFLECTED BASED ON BASIC HEAT REDUCTION INTEGRATED DESIGN.

75


hill house CASE STUDY

AR 211: MARK OWEN PACIFIC PALISADES, CA

INTERIOR RENDERING

3-D MODEL SECTION

EXPLODED AXON

A

A

A

A 0

4

8

16

SECTION AA

0

4

8

16

FIRST FLOOR PLAN

3RD FLOOR LIVING SPACE 76

KITCHEN SPACE

0

4

8

16

SECOND FLOOR PLAN

GARAGE

0

4

8

ELEVATION

16

2ND FLOOR LIVING SPACE

MASTER BEDROOM

MASTER BATHROOM 77


COMPLEX FORMS RHINO MODEL

AR 211: MARK OWEN

INTERIOR VIEW

EXTERIOR- FRONT VIEW THIS PROJECT WAS BASED ON THE PHOTOCONSTRUCTS TO THE RIGHT. EACH CONSTRCUT REPRESENTS A DIFFERENT FORM AND COMPLEXITY OF THE MODEL, FROM STRUCTURE TO SKIN. THE COMPLEX FORM IS SITUATED OUTSIDE WHERE IT CAN BE SEEN AS A FUNCTIONAL SCULPTURE. THE MAIN STRUCTURAL SYSTEM IS STEEL TRUSSES. THE SKIN IS STEEL PANELS AND GLAZING, WHICH IN SOME INSTANCES IS RAISED ABOVE THE PRIMARY STRCUTRE WITH A SECONDARY STRUCTURAL SYSTEM OF STEEL TUBES.

PHOTOCONSTRUCT

EXTERIOR- BACK VIEW

PHOTOCONSTRUCT

FLOOR PLAN

INTERIOR ROOF VIEW 78

PHOTOCONSTRUCT

3-D MODEL SECTION

EXPLODED AXON

79


MERIDIAN RESIDENCE PRO PRACTICE

AR 250: ROBERT KERR LOS ANGELES, CA 1000 SF

ROOF-WINDOW CONNECTION DETAIL

FLOOR PLAN

FOUNDATION DETAIL

80

STEEL PANEL DETAIL

WALL SECTION

NORTH FRAMING ELEVATION

EAST FRAMING ELEVATION

SOUTH FRAMING ELEVATION

WEST FRAMING ELEVATION

81


COMPUTER MODEL

DELINEATION II

SKETCHUP BASICS

SAN DIEGO MESA COLLEGE ARCH 221: NORMAN BERNETT ARCHITECTURAL DELINEATION

SHADED SKETCH

FREE HAND SKETCHES WITH SHADOWS PEN AND INK

FREE HAND SKETCHES PEN AND INK INTERIOR PERSPECTIVE

FREE HAND SKETCHES PEN AND INK

82

FREE HAND SKETCHES WITH SHADOWS PEN AND INK 83


DELINEATION I

DELINEATION I

SAN DIEGO MESA COLLEGE ARCH 220: TODD RINEHART ARCHITECTURAL DELINEATION

SAN DIEGO MESA COLLEGE ARCH 220: TODD RINEHART ARCHITECTURAL DELINEATION THE CONCEPT OF SOLID AND VOID IS A BASIC PART OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN. THE BLOCKS ARE ARRANGED RANDOMLY TO RELATE TO EACH OTHER. THE AXON DRAWINGS WERE DONE IN GRAPHITE AND BLACK PRISMACOLOR. THEY ARE AXONS OF THE BLOCK CONFIGURATION. THE ONES ON THE RIGHT ARE AXONS AS IF THEY WERE COVERED BY A BLOCK AND SUBTRACTED FROM IT THE ORIGINAL. THE LOWER DRAWINGS ARE SHADED, SHOWING DIFFERENT LEVELS OF LHGT AND DARK ON THE DIFFERENT SIDES OF THE BLOCKS.

ISOMETRIC

ISOMETRIC

PERSPECTIVE INK AND GRAPHITE WITH TRACE PAPER OVERLAY

SHADING FORMS 84

PERSPECTIVE

PERSPECTIVE

PERSPECTIVE

SHADING FORMS 85


DELINEATION I

DELINEATION I

SAN DIEGO MESA COLLEGE ARCH 220: TODD RINEHART ARCHITECTURAL DELINEATION

SAN DIEGO MESA COLLEGE ARCH 220: TODD RINEHART ARCHITECTURAL DELINEATION

UNFOLDED ELEVATION

FORM AND SHAPE DECONSTRUCTION BLACK PRISMACOLOR MAP

SOLIDIFYING NEGATIVE VOLUMES

CREATING SKETCHES FROM PHOTOGRAPHS EACH SKETCH WAS CREATED WITH BLACK PRISMA COLOR, CREATING LIGHTS AND DARKS THRU SHADING AND HIGHLIGHTING. THE MAP NAVIGATES THE PICTURES THROUGH THE BUILDING. SECTION AND UNFOLDED ELEVATION WITH PEN AND INK ALLOW DASHES, DOTS, VOIDS AND SOLIDS TO BE EXPLORED.

UNFOLDED ELEVATION

SECTION 86

87


88

89


m.b.s. cancer wellness center LUMBERMAN COMPETITION SAN DIEGO MESA COLLEGE STUDIO 180 (2B): IAN KAY SAN DIEGO, MISSION VALLEY 4000 SF

EAST ELEVATION

SECTION A

SOUTH ELEVATION

SECTION B

UPPER FLOOR PLAN

THE DESIGN FOR THE MIND BODY AND SOUL CANCER WELLNESS CENTER IS MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY TO FIT INTO THE SURROUNDING AREA WHILE STILL EVOKING FEELINGS OF WELCOME AND INVITING. TO OFFSET THE COLD, STERILE ASPECT OF THE EXISTING CONCRETE BUILDINGS, THE EXTERIOR MATERIAL OF THE BUILDING WOULD BE REDWOOD SHEATHING AND LIMESTONE TILE. THE FORM OF THE BUILDING COMES FROM A PLAY ON FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT’S FALLING WATER AND ZAHA HADID’S CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER. TWO MAIN STRUCTURES CLAD IN LIMESTONE TILE SUPPORT THE MULTIPLE CUBES HOVERING OVER ONE ANOTHER, JUTTING OUT AT DIFFERENT DIRECTIONS AND HEIGHTS. WHILE THE EXTERIOR DESIGN IS MODERN, THE INTERIOR IS MORE WELCOMING AND COZY WHILE STILL PROFESSIONAL. THE FLOOR PLAN IS THAT OF AN OPEN DESIGN TO ALLOW FOR A MORE FAMILIAR CIRCULATION LIKE THAT OF A HOUSE. THE PLAN IS DIVIDED BY CATEGORY OF USE WITHIN EACH LEVEL. THE FIRST LEVEL IS MORE OF THE “BODY” AND “MIND” PART OF THE DESIGN, HOUSING THE BUSINESS AND RECREATIONAL AREAS OF USE. THE UPPER LEVEL IS MAINLY THE “SOUL” ASPECT OF THE DESIGN. 90

SITE PLAN

LOWER FLOOR PLAN

PARTI DIAGRAM

FINAL MODEL

DETAIL 91


SACRED SPACE CHAPEL ADDITION

SAN DIEGO MESA COLLEGE: STUDIO 175 (2A): IAN KAY HILLCREST 2200 SF

THE NON-DENOMINATIONAL CHAPEL ADDITION IS MEANT TO INSPIRE AS MUCH AS POSSIBLE AND PROMOTE REFLECTIVE, MEDITATIVE, AND SPIRITUAL THOUGHT. THE DESIGN REFLECTS THE PROGRESSIVE AND DIGNIFIED NATURE OF THE SOPHISTICATED CONGREGATION IN HILLCREST. THE DESIGN AIMS TO CREATE A WELCOMING AND OPEN ATMOSPHERE FOR ALL MEMBERS AS WELL AS THE SURROUNDING NEIGHBORHOOD. THE BEAUTIFUL TOWN OF HILLCREST, KNOWN FOR ITS GAY COMMUNITY PRIDE, SERVES AS INSPIRATION FOR THE FORM AND SHAPE OF THE BUILDING. THE ORGANIC AND FREE-FORM DESIGN OF THE CHAPEL COMMUNICATES A SENSE OF OPENNESS, SINCE NO AREA OF THE DESIGN IS TRULY CLOSED OFF FROM ANOTHER. THE EXTERIOR WALLS CONTINUE FLUIDLY INTO THE INTERIOR CREATING MORE PRIVATE SPACES THAN THOSE OF THE CONGREGATION.

CONCEPT MODEL

SKETCH DETAIL

CONCEPT MODEL

FINAL MODEL

SECTION MODEL

SITE PLAN 92

SECTION MODEL

FINAL MODEL

FLOOR PLAN 93


VISION JOURNEY SENSE PAVILION

SAN DIEGO MESA COLLEGE STUDIO 172 (1B): VALERIE ABA SAN DIEGO 1800 SF

SECTION

SECTION PERSPECTIVE

STUDY MODEL

94

STUDY MODEL

STUDY MODEL

THE SENSE PAVILION OF VISION IS A STUDY OF THE FUNCTIONS OF THE EYE AND THE REACTIONS THE EYE HAS TO DIFFERENT INSTANCES. THE ENTRANCE TO THE PAVILION IS A “CLEANSING” SPACE FOR THE EYE TO READJUST TO NORMAL. THIS SPACE HAS A SEATING AREA TO SIT WHILE THE EYES READJUST TO NORMAL, WHATEVER THAT MAY BE. THE SPACES ARE MEANT TO BE ENTERED IN ORDER FROM LEFT TO RIGHT. THE FIRST SPACE PLAYS WITH LIGHT AND MIRRORS TO MIMIC THE OPENING OF THE PUPIL. THE SECOND SPACE FUNCTIONS SIMILARLY TO A DILATED EYE, WITH PLASTIC BUBBLED WINDOWS TO SIMULATE A BLURRED VISION. THE THIRD AND FINAL SPACE IS SIMILAR TO THE WAY AN EYE FIRST SEES SOMETHING: UPSIDE DOWN AND THE BRAIN INTERPRETS IT AS RIGHT-SIDE UP. ALL THE FURNITURE IN THIS SPACE IS ON THE CEILING WITH THE ROOF INVERTED.

FLOOR PLAN

95


GLENN MURCUTT RESIDENCE CHEF RESIDENCE AND STUDIO SAN DIEGO MESA COLLEGE STUDIO 172 (1B): VALERIE ABE SAN DIEGO 3000 SF

THE DESIGN FOR THE CHEF RESIDENCE IS MODELED AFTER GLENN MURCUTTS DESIGN PRINCIPLES. AS A CHEF, THE OWNER NEEDED A SEPARATE SPACE AWAY FROM THE MAIN HOUSE TO TEACH STUDENTS WITH A FULLY-LOADED KITCHEN SPACE FOR 6. THE FORM FOR THE HOUSE IS SIMILAR TO THAT OF THE MARIKA-ALDERTON DESIGN. THE SPACES ARE ARRANGED ALONG A LONG SLENDER CORRIDOR WITH THE ROOF ANGLED BASED ON THE NATURAL SUN EXPOSURE OF THE SITE. THE PARTI OF THE DESIGN CAN BE SEEN AS A COMPILATION OF SMALLER RECTANGLES TO MAKE ONE LARGER RECTANGULAR FORM. EACH SMALLER RECTANGLE CAN BE USED AS ITS OWN FUNCTION OR COMPRISED TOGETHER TO CREATE A LARGER SPACE. TALL, NARROW WINDOWS LINE THE NORTHERN FACADE TO INCORPORATE NATURAL LIGHT WITHOUT DIRECT SUN CONTACT. DIRECT SUN IS SHADED DUE TO LARGE OVERHANGS AS WELL.

MARIKA ALDERTON HOUSE

MARIKA ALDERTON HOUSE

MARIKA ALDERTON HOUSE

UNIT TO WHOLE DIAGRAM

CIRCULATION DIAGRAM

96

SIMPSON LEE HOUSE

SUN DIAGRAM

RESEARCH: GLENN MURCUTT USES CONTRASTING MATERIALS SUCH AS GLASS, STEEL, STONE, BRICK AND WOOD. HE EXPLORES THE SITE TO UNDERSTANDS ITS LIGHT, THE MOVEMENT OF THE SUN AND MOON, RIVER FLOOD AND EBB CYCLES, WINDS, TOPOGRAPHY AND CLIMATE, AS WELL AS VIEWS AND GEOLOGICAL PATTERNS. DEPENDING ON THESE VARIABLES, MURCUTT DESIGNS ACCORDINGLY. IN BOTH THE MARIKA-ALDERTON HOUSE AND THE SIMPSON-LEE HOUSE, MURCUTT UTILIZES THE NATURAL WIND AND SUN EXPOSURE THROUGH ANGLED ROOFS AND POP-OUT OR MOVEABLE WALLS AND WINDOWS. 97


GARAGE AND CULINARY STUDIO MODEL WITH ROOF OFF

HOUSE MODEL WITHOUT ROOF

SECTION MODEL- CULINARY STUDIO 98

99


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