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c r e a t i atv work ity an honorable m en tion

a hero in disguise

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meet the staff

Dragon’s Tale staff members for the 2012 fall issue

Carolyn Durbin Emily File Susi Acosta Ad Manager Victoria Hendricks Andrea Ratzlaff Design Editor Taylor Mitchell Pat Moore Mayra Ramirez Morgan Oriet Copy Editor Taylor Thimesch Not pictured

Darren Ramey Justin Hodge

Honors Program Victoria Hendricks

Creative Hobbies Andrea Ratzlaff

ITS Department

Susi Acosta

Elementary Education

Morgan Oriet

staff

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Emily File

College Debt Pat Moore

Fire Science Carolyn Durbin

Non-traditional Students Taylor Thimesch

Cross Country Mayra Ramirez

Volleyball Darren Ramey

Soccer

Taylor Mitchell

Football Staff

The Dragon’s Tale is published three times a year by the Magazine class of Hutchinson Community College, 1300 North Plum, Hutchinson, KS 67501. When compiled, the three issues serve as an overview of the activities and the people of HCC during the school year.

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what’s inside

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Fair Food

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H An

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Mention photos&story

Victoria Hendricks

Explore the Honors Program and find out what students can gain from it

154

Students Interested in Honors Courses

288 said yes

said no

442 students surveyed

As cool blues and warm crimson greet college freshman into the room where future potential honors students gather, a question of who joins the Honors Program dangles in the air. A recurring theme amongst honors students on that “it” factor the program delivers is evident. “I joined the Honors Program because I wanted an opportunity to take advanced classes,” Trischia Ruckert, Hutchinson, said. “I had always wanted a challenge in high school and few classes could do that for me.”

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She got her wish, for the Honors Program offers honors shells in most general education classes and electives. The Honors Program is also working on making classes more flexible, hoping to have a plan within five years. “The Honors Subcommittee has discussed looking into online, evening, and other campus classes,” Ryan Diehl, instructor of English and Honors Program Coordinator, said. One of the many things the Honors Program offers is preparation to a four year institution. “The Honors Program helps the student create a strong work ethic that will assist students when they transfer to a four year institution,” Diehl said. “The classes should also strengthen writing, study, and research skills.” It’s not all work and no play, though. The program also has an array of social and community projects to participate in as well. The Honors Student Council also has many different activities for the students. “We have partnered with The Volunteer Center of Reno County for the United Way Day of Service and sponsor the annual Food Bank of Reno County food drive. In addition to this, we also go to Third Thursday, have movie nights, explore The Kansas State Fair, and pretty much anything that honors students are interested in,” Diehl said. The atmosphere and

financial perks are another benefit with being in the Honors Program. “You get more discussion out of honors classes, which I think is really important as far as expanding your intellectual basis,” Daniel Eckhoff, Hutchinson, said. “As far as financially, we have the Honors Merit Scholar, and elsewhere at other universities there are scholarships you can get.” To be eligible, someone must either have an ACT score of 26 or higher, be an HCC Presidential Scholar, or having taken at least 12 hours of college credit with a GPA of 3.25. However, Diehl said, students who do not meet these criteria but are still interested in taking honors courses may meet with the coordinator and apply for provisional status. The Honors Program could also be called “The Caring Honors Program”, desiring constant feedback. “We have the Honors Student Council made up of executives that you can go to, and of course, there’s Ryan Diehl, the coordinator,” Eckhoff said. In a nutshell, the honors program aims to improve the overall lives of its students. “One goal the Honors Program has for its participants is to make them active participants in life,” Diehl said. “This then will assist them in both the workplace and out in the community. They will have strong critical thinking skills that will help them in every part of their lives.” With all that the Honors Program has to offer students, it is the hope that the dangling question of who will join will soon be answered.

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Honors students explored downtown Hutchinson during their annual Third Thursday event. They analyzed a billboard that promoted changing the town’s name to Smallville. Andrew Kester, Wichita, and Emma Flynn, Lindsborg, roam through a building at the Kansas State Fair. Both Kester and Flynn admired a quilt.

Andrew Kester, Wichita, stops at the petting zoo at the Kansas State Fair. Kester attended HCC’s state fair excursion during his second year as an honors student.

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photos&story

Andrea Ratzlaff

When Do-It-Yourself projects, career choices, wedding planning, or creating memories are involved, Pinterest and Tumblr spark creativity among HCC students. “I have always loved it,” Ciara VanBruggen, Buhler, said. “I remember in kindergarten, I absolutely loved coloring the letter sheets. I guess I have always been artsy.” Pinterest inspires VanBruggen to create and put her own twist on projects found on the website. “Pinterest is my hobby life. It sparks my creativity,” VanBruggen said. VanBruggen explains that her creative time helps to express herself and relax. “Sometimes I even procrastinate my homework just so I can do something else,” VanBruggen said. “It clears my mind.” DIY projects, recipes, fashion tips and tutorials are plentiful on Pinterest, which VanBruggen fully takes advantage of. “I absolutely love doing hair, so I am actually going to take a year off and go to cosmetology school,” Vanbruggen said. “I think Pinterest has helped me with that because I can take my ideas off of it.”

In addition to career possibilities, VanBruggen uses the site to express her personal style. “I enjoy doing any paper craft. In a lot of my art work I like to incorporate Bible verses,” VanBruggen said. “I think Bible verses are very inspiring and I also think they are very beautiful.” Creativity easily defines VanBruggen’s lifestyle, seen in her career choice as well as future plans. “I cannot imagine myself ever not being crafty. I don’t see myself ever just sitting down,” VanBruggen said. Pinterest also proves to be very resourceful for Kelsey Moore, Hutchinson, who is planning her wedding through ideas on the website. “You can search a topic and artistic pictures, DIY, photography ideas fill your ‘main feed.’ A new app for my phone makes it easier and quicker to ‘repin’ different ideas,” Moore said. Moore has org anized her wedding into different “boards,” or categories such as photography, reception, ceremony and dress ideas. “It’s a lot cheaper than using a wedding planner. A lot of people have used it. Different wedding blogs are great resources,” Moore said. Moore expresses her artistic flare through DIY projects such

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as braided jersey scarves and bracelets. Her wedding will reflect her artsy style. Pinterest inspires many students but for Kyle Thompson, Hutchinson, sites like Tumblr and various media inspire him to create designs on his preferred mode of transportation, his longboard. “The first longboard that I bought was actually a blank deck,” Thompson said. “I wanted it blank just so I could draw on it. Some of the decks have designs that I don’t like. I wanted to make it personal.” Thompson attended Cederville University in Ohio last semester and needed a quick way to get around the campus, and longboards were the popular way to go. “My first board was all sharpie. Some people thought that it was just a graphic sticker,” Thompson said. “I have used paint twice, and then I’ve done a colored sharpie one. Paint has a 3D look to it. But it’s cooler to say that I did that with sharpie.” Thompson explains that there are two parts to completing the design. He first scrapes off the old design to get to the raw wood, puts finish on it, draws the design, and applies gloss to complete the work of art. The whole process takes about 12 to 15 hours.

“Make time. Always make time. People make time for the things they love to do. This was something that always interested me and I like art so I like designing them,” Thompson said. Inspiration for the designs spring from various forms such as graffiti, music, funky colors, nature, and random design including tattoos. “All the brands have the same kind of standards and logo on the bottom,” Thompson said. “It’s nice to say that mine’s the one over there, the one that is definitely not like the others.” Being unique is clearly one of Thompson’s motive for designing these longboards. Thompson also takes pride in having something unique to share with his future children, friends, or coworkers about what he did in college, riding his custom-designed longboard around campus. Pinterest and Tumblr inspire these students to express themselves and ultimately create memories that can be shared with future generations. Kyle Thompson, Hutchinson, longboards to school almost every day. Thompson designed the bottom of his board with a sharpie marker.

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Information Technology Department Assists with Technology Equipment Problems photos&story

Susi Acosta

Typing, Chris Buff, Newton, logs into his computer before he gets started at work. Buff waits patently for a student who needs his help.

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Modern day technology has the attention of everyone nowadays. People around the world have all kinds of high tech equipment. About 90% of college students own a personal laptop. Being involved with technology, a person can run into some problems. The Information Technology Services, better known as the IT De partment, is designed to help HCC staff, faculty, and students with any technology failure. They work with closed-circuit televisions, security cameras, interactive TV (ITV) systems, projectors and document cameras, and computer problems, free of cost. “We work on a long list of problems,” Glenn Acheson, technical support manager, said. “Essentially if it has to do with a computer or the network, we are likely involved in some fashion.” The department consists of a total of 18 staff members and

also employs several student workers. “It has been a great experience,” Jeff Daze, Wichita, said. “I’m getting a lot of real world experience that’s exposing me to different real world situations that could help me in the future.” Learning something new can be quite challenging at times. Some students love to experiment and engage in new challenges while others don’t think the same way. Learning systems for the first time is not an easy task when you’re a new student. There are many programs a student has to learn. Some procedures are more difficult than others. “Sitting in front of a software I haven’t had much experience on was difficult for me than you have to learn all the different procedures. Nobody really teaches you how to do it but when you’re actually doing the job,” Richard Petrie, Hutchinson, said. If a person is busy and

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How to save your battery’s life Technical Support Manager, Mo Odeh, talks on the phone while he waits for the day to get started. Odeh answers questions to an HCC member. Jeff Daze, Wichita, discusses a program with Buff. Both IT students returned as staff members.

not able to walk to the IT department to solve a technical problem, there are options. That person can call IT at 620-665-3514 and a staff member will walk them through a concern over the phone. This is not something most people have to do on a daily basis. Being able to solve a concern through the phone is not an easy task. “It took me a while to get used to working on the phone because it’s a different mentality,” Chris Buff, Newton, said. Through the year, the IT Department staff members will be given the chance to help the HCC employees as well as gain job knowledge. Technology is the fastest growing and advancing element in our economy today, it will continue to grow everyday, every month and every year. Technology in recent years has advanced quickly which means more failures. With all of this new technology, the IT Department is assured new issues and challenges.

Hibernate DON’T standby. Hibernating saves more energy because it saves your work to a hard drive then it automatically shuts your laptop down almost all the way. Take care of your battery. Don’t leave your battery charger plugged in all day, this actually harms your laptop. DON’T pack your laptop in a backpack or other enclosed space. It causes the battery to get hot and damages it.

Information Technology Department Hours Monday-Friday 7:30am-9:00pm Saturday 8:00am-Noon Sunday 1:00-5:00pm

Avoid multitasking! Try cutting down programs running in the background.

Located in Lockman Hall Room 108

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Dim your screen. Your laptop battery requires a lot of energy. Keep it dim but still capable to read your screen.

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Changing Lives with an Elementary Education Degree story

Morgan Oriet

From Superman and Wonder Woman to Batman and Robin, the world has been captured by heroic acts in movies and comic books. These are the big names that everyone knows, but there are some names that go

unnoticed. A cape and a mask are not necessary elements of an everyday hero. Some children view their mom or dad as a hero. Sometimes an aunt or uncle can be eligible for the title, but more often than not, a child can find a hero in their teacher. “That would be my pre-

school teacher, Mrs. Richmond, because she was really caring and she made people feel like they were important and she was just good around kids,” Lacie Story, Hutchinson, said. Gabby Fischer, Olathe, also remembers her teacher from middle school, Mr. Haines. “I was never a person who was into school, actually, but he got me motivated and he was just so much fun, so I will never forget him and I still keep in touch with him till this day,” Fischer said. Alexis Johnson, Macksville, and Cody Zenger, Belleville, listen to group discussions about Trunk or Treat. Johnson and Zenger were nominated for officer positions and gave short speeches stating why they would be good candidates. Photo by Morgan Oriet

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Hutchinson Community College offers multiple education degrees that can create this career. The Elementary Education degree sends students through a four-year program, two years at HCC and two more years at a four-year institution. With a bachelor’s degree, the new graduate will find a teaching job with a classroom full of students. “Enjoy each child, because everyone has something special and unique to offer,” Jennifer Forker, early childhood education coordinator, said. The HCC Child Care Center provides students in the elementary education field with the opportunity to spend time with young children before they choose this major. It is a way to find out if it is really what they want. However, HCC is not the first start. There are many options through the years, before college, to discover whether or not this is the appropriate career. Story has explored several. “I have been a cadet teacher in high school, I was in Youth Friends, and pretty soon I will be doing an internship project where I am going to have to teach or mentor students, so I think those are some good activities that I’ve been involved in,” Story said. The internship will be completed through the Leadership Class. Another option for elementary education majors is Nutrition, Health and Safety, which is taught online by Instructor Starla Wells. “This course helps students gain an understanding of the roles that nutrition, health and safety plays in the lives of young children and families,”

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Wells said. The class offers a variety of activities for a student to gain a strong knowledge base of the subject. Some projects include day care center regulation assignment, a fetal alcohol syndrome poster, or parent checklists. “We also conduct online discussions about TV viewing for kids, day care regulations, nutrition guidelines, child abuse and neglect, ADHD and other diagnosis of young children, childhood obesity, and meal planning and parent involvement,” Wells said. The main courses for elementary education majors are Introduction to Education and Introduction to Education Practicum, also taught by Wells.

“Students will work on class projects that expose them to opportunities that give them a chance to explore why they want to be a teacher, what teachers today can expect in the classroom of themselves and of their students, and to gain an overview of what makes a teacher effective,” Wells said. The Introduction to Education course is more learning about a teaching career and the Practicum offers more of a hands-on experience. After finding the treasure chest, Michael Potter, Kingman, helps his reading buddy with the bandana and other costume items. The students played out the theme of pirates for the day. Photo by Emily File

Tye’ Richardson, Kennesaw, Ga., and his partner match the playing cards in their game. The reading comprehension students met with their partners once a month. Photo by Taylor Mitchell

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Dillon Cotter, Hutchinson, reads aloud to his buddy. KNEA and the reading comprehension students participated in a Reading Buddy Day at the HCC Child Care Center. Photo by Emily File

“The Introduction to Education Practicum does have a background check for the students because they will be working in the classroom setting in various elementary buildings,” Forker said. The first task the student needs to take care of in their practicum is finalizing their preferred choice of grade level. “I then work with them to find a placement that is convenient for them and work with the administration to find a

cooperating teacher that will allow them to spend at least 40 hours in their classroom working hands on with the students,” Wells said. Once the student is placed in a classroom, the practice of being a real teacher begins. “They are asked to experience the classroom from a teacher’s perspective, to examine the motives for entering the teaching profession, and to decide whether or not to continue preparing for a teaching

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career,” Wells said. “They will do this by selecting activities where they are observing, tutoring, paper grading, preparing materials, creating bulletin boards, developing teaching projects and teaching in small groups.” Aside from the classes, students have the opportunity to join the Kansas National Education Association as an extra curricular activity. This year Sara Vytlacil, KNEA president from Belleville, works with

Rachel Santine, KNEA advisor and speech instructor, and Teri Eckhoff, assistant advisor and reading specialist, and a team of future education students. “Last year, I was the PR officer, so I did the public relations, but this year, my roommate/ best friend is the president so I am just really working with her and helping her with activities,” Fischer said. A variety of classes, along with the HCC Child Care Center, and the KNEA all pro-

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KNEA advisor, Rachel Santine, sits with Teri Eckhoff, assistant advisor, and Tammy Davis, South Hutchinson. During the meeting, KNEA members discussed Trunk or Treat, the 50/50 rally, and their elections. Photo by Morgan Oriet

LEARNING OUR

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vide the skills needed to become a teacher. With everything in life, there will always be room for complications. “One of the cons for the educational field is the seemingly never-ending governmental changes,” Forker said. “Kansas has recently adopted the Common Core Curriculum, which puts more emphasis on career and college readiness, in the hopes of making our students more competitive in the world market. It will also engage our students in more critical analysis and application; so in the long run, this governmental change may turn out to be a pro.” It is always important to accept the good and learn how to manage or make the best of the bad of any job or situation. “The biggest pro is the opportunity to change a child’s life,” Forker said. “I have always felt that teaching is the most important job anyone can have, with the exception of being a parent.” The light bulb moment is another positive aspect of being

a teacher and may have the power to determine whether or not the difficult tasks and obstacles are worth the rewards of the field. “It’s a really good feeling because you get to see that you’re doing something right, that you’ve accomplished something so it’s a good feeling knowing you taught a kid something,” Fischer said. The light bulb moment is not the only experience that will bring joy into a classroom. “I like that stage where they’re learning how to read and the funny words that they say when they’re doing it, when they’re starting to pronounce stuff,” Fischer said. A young child is there to grow, play and learn. A teacher is there to educate and to make a difference in that child’s life, but by the end of the year each one of the students that walk through the door will change that teacher’s life in ways that are unexplainable. As students leave for summer break, a realization hits that it went by way too fast. One thing to do, other

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Ask for the different letters until someone shouts out BINGO. Review the letters they have selected and offer a prize if they were able to recognize all letters correctly.

The traditional way to learn the alphabet is to sing the alphabet song.

With the color of choice, have the students paint the capital and lowercase letter of each letter in the alphabet.

Scatter letters throughout the room and have the students hunt for them. than completing the curriculum, is to appreciate that time. “Enjoy the homemade gifts and drawings they give you, for they are truly given from the heart,” Forker said. “Enjoy the stress of the classroom, because it means learning is taking place. Enjoy the student’s wonderment, because even old souls need to be reminded of simple pleasures.”

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Taste Bud Treates

Students explore the foods at the Kansas State Fair

The KSF is a once a year, ten day opportunity that Hutchinson gets to take part it. This annual event has come to Hutchinson for years, but this year is even more special than the rest. It is the 100th year anniversy. One of the most defining aspects of this event is all the wonderful foods it brings that everyone can try. These foods aren’t your daily foods, they’re taste bud treats. Waiting for their chocolatedipped banana, Samuel Potter, Abilene, and Parker Erickson, Herrington, discuss what other foods: they would like to try. They decided to trya pronto pup.

Lindsay Turner, Hutchinson, purchases her first stuffed cucumber at the Kansas State Fair. Turner also tried the fried cheese curds at the KSF.

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It’s back! This year was the 100th year of the KSF. Every new year of the KSF brings new experiences, bringing a wide variety of food. The ten days out of the year that the KSF is in Hutchinson it always brings a broad range of rides, vendor boothes, and letting taste buds experience new treats. In an attempt to change the common assumption about all fair food being fried, some venders offer a healthier option. “I’m not a fan of fried food so the stuffed cucumbers were a healthier choice that I enjoyed,” Mariah Childs, Hutchinson, said. Even people who indulge in the various fried foods chose to try the healthier vendors as well.

“After all the fried food I consumed, I felt better about myself for eating something somewhat healthy,” Lindsay Turner, Hutchinson, said. The KSF is one activity that HCC students can take part in because it is located close to campus and is in walking distance. It also provides activites the students might not get to take part in on a daily basis along with a food spread different from the cafeteria. After 9 o’clock it is free for anyone to get in which is another bonus for the students. Celebrating its 100th year, some foods could best represent the KSF. There are long-lasting favorites such as, the pronto pup, turkey leg, roasted corn, funnel cakes, dippin’ dots, fried

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After waiting, Potter grabs the chocolate banana from a food vendor. Potter explored other food options as well.

d pickles, and fried snickers. “A lump of cow of some sort, something really country,” Ben Cotton, Oxon, England, said. Food is such an expression of the KSF that the food chosen to best identify the 100th year could be from a broad range. Each year brings a popular “must try” food as well as old favorites. “Fried Milky Way. It’s phenomenal,” Mason Varner, Midland, Texas, said. “I enjoyed the Turkey leg. They are alwasys quite good,” Trey Hayden, Augusta, said. The fair food is a change from the regular food people are used to eating daily. For most people the food at the fair can’t be bought on any given day . A down side to the tastey treats is the price. It tends to be more expensive than most options. With the change of pace provided by the fair and the change of food, also comes the

expense. Fair food can give consumers tastey treats but they come at a price. This can be a challanege for many students who must stick to a budget. “There was a stand where things were only a dollar, so I spent $4 on 4 hambugers instead of $4 on one thing,” Samuel Potter, Abilene, said. That food stand made it possible for people who weren’t wanting to spend a lot of money for food. The KSF is an anual ten-day event in Hutchinson. When the fair comes, it brings a little extra excitement and a different opportunity to the community of Hutchinson. Despite the fact that there are a lot of different activities happening at the fair, the food is always one of the most defining and popular aspects of this grand event.

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Taking his first bite of stuffed cucumber, Austin Boley, Meade, goes onto finish his meal. When done with his meal, Boley, went on to coninue having other fair fun with friends.

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photos&story

Pat Moore

In the rush of taking that next step toward discovering an area of interest and the hope of a promising career, some students forget about the impact of the financial obligations. Many students look past the well-intentioned thoughts of caring parents, college staff, financial aid experts and trusted colleagues, focused on ideas and maybe a mindset toward minimizing college debt. In a perfect world, there would be no college debt, but many students are not able to achieve that level of college funding. Evan Rothwell, Peoria, Ill., is currently one of those loan-free students. “I had no intention of stumbling down the route that I have,” Rothwell said. “I have some savings, I have two parttime jobs, and I don’t have a credit card. I’m 28 years old and I’ve never had a credit card.” The value of this expression and the freedom it represents quickly gets lost in the issue of increasing college costs and expanding debt.

Rothwell looked at going to school in Illinois, but the amount he could save helped make the decision to move to Kansas. “Community college in Kansas is very cost effective,” Rothwell said. Research and even feedback from experts in financial aid confess that the solution to minimizing college debt requires sacrifice and hard work from the student. Finding the right-fit college that matches financial resources is a place to start. For some like Rothwell, a worthwhile sacrifice may relocate them to the Land of Oz or other states with cost effective college options. For others, the sacrifice may simply mean a strategic delay. “Don’t go to college to find out what you want to do,” Tim Shaw, anatomy and physiology instructor, said. “Take time to figure that out and save some money while you’re at it.” The point is well thoughtout plans and strategies along

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with the discipline to carry them out are critical to success of any kind, including finances and debt management. “If they can get their college degree without debt, they would be ten times further along than someone who graduates owing money,” Shaw said. A list of facts, along with the pros and cons of each fact or issue of concern can provide a basis for sound decision-making as demonstrated by Ashley Stagner, Newton. “I did a lot of research about health care and what would be a field I wanted to do before

I actually applied in college, so, I’m hoping that when I get out of school, I’ll be able to get right into dental hygiene,” Stagner said. Jean Kibbe, acting director of financial aid, has been involved in financial aid for 30 Story continued on page 28.

Willa Luetters, business office clerk, hands a financial aid refund check to a student. Over $17 million dollars in government-provided student aid was processed by Hutchinson Community College in the 2011-1012 school year.

Phillip Henshaw, Sterling, researches the cost of textbooks as he takes advantage of the convenience offered at the college bookstore. Many textbooks bought and sold on the internet provide savings to the student.

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Examine the gear that keeps firefighters safe Fire science students use the Jaws of Life and axe to cut into a car. Students practiced using this equipment during a Fire Science Field Day.

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Walking into many hazardous conditions such as heat, flames, smoke and falling debris, a firefighter’s gear is sometimes their only safety net. From head to toe, the gear that firefighters wear helps protect them from the many dangerous conditions relating to their job. The Fire Science Program at Hutchinson Community College shows students how to use the gear and why the gear is required. The firefighters’ gear is crucial to their survival. “Every piece is just as important as the next,” Jordan Crose, Sydney, Australia, said. “If one fails it can be the difference between life and death.” The different kind of gear that firefighters must have to keep them safe include a helmet, coat, pants, boots, protective hood, gloves, selfcontained breathing apparatus, also known as SCBA, and a personal alert safety system also known as PASS. The total cost of the gear with the SCBA is $7,005. The weight of the gear can be up to 90 lbs. “Some of our equipment used in everyday situations can weigh up to 100 lbs.,” Crose said.

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The gear alone can cause stress on a firefighter’s shoulders, which means they must be physically fit. “All of it is needed to keep us safe and to complete the job,” Courtney Siemers, Clay Center, said. The teamwork of all the firefighters is just as important as their gear. There is a policy that all firefighters go by, called “two-in, two-out.” The policy states that if two firefighters go in at the same time, the same two must come out of the situation or building. Mariah Shultz, Burlingame, said the second most important part is the other firefighters on the scene. The SCBA helps supply clean air to the firefighters, so that they are not breathing in the smoke. A SCBA typically has three main components: a high-pressure tank, a pressure regulator, and an inhalation connection (mouthpiece, mouth mask or face mask), connected together and mounted to a carrying frame. The cost of the SCBA is approximately $5,600. PASS is a personal safety device used primarily by firefighters in a hazardous environment such as a burning

building. It sounds a loud alert to notify others in the area when a firefighter is in need of help. A PASS device will automatically activate if the device does not detect motion for a certain period of time, typically 15-30 seconds. This alert will signal the other firefighters that their teammate is either seriously injured or otherwise incapacitated. Some devices use a ball bearing on a track to sense firefighter movement and others utilize an infrared beam mounted on a spring. The idea of a person risking their life in a burning building may sound scary or extreme, but there are many tools that keep them safe. The challenge, the love of the fire prevention, and safety of the citizen’s inspired Chrissy Terronez, Winfield, to become a firefighter. Firefighting equipment and clothing continues to change as technology and experience present new and better ways to control fires. Students work together to spray water to put out a tree fire. Instructors timed each student during this test; this was clocked at two minutes. A small group of students work to eliminate a car fire. The program pushed to educate its students on how to handle the various forms of fire. Jordan Crose, Sydney, Australia, deliberately ignites a hay fire with a blow torch. Students practiced using a water fire extinguisher to put out the fire.

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DIFFERENCES in HCC students photos&story

VS

Ta y l o r T h i m e s c h

of 2423 male students

of 3350 female students

26.7

average age

24.2

15

minimum age

15

84

maximum age

77

statistics supplied by the HCC Information Technology Department

Spending extra time on a project in AutoCAD, Andrew Green, Hutchinson, creates a layout of a house. Green returned to school for computer drafting.

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While watching a film based off of Dante’s Inferno, Jamie Parish, Hutchinson, takes notes. Parish created an outline that compared the film with the text read in class. Studying in the lower level of the library sits Sean Smith, Hutchinson. Smith prepared for a criminal justice exam.

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back to school

Non-tradtional students share valuable lessons they have learned about school and the workforce.

Some believe going to school is difficult, but what about having to come back? Duane Morris, Minneapolis, is in this situation after his job of thirty-eight years at Hawker Beechcraft was outsourced to another country. “I had never been on a college campus as a college student before. I was pretty content with my job. I was looking at retirement. My job went away so I was forced into reeducation

focused too.” Jamie Smith,Kingman, also compared school to work and has advice for all traditional students. “Go to class, do your work, don’t go to school just to go to school,” Smith said. “If you don’t know what you want to do, get a job, figure out what you want to do, then go back to school.”

in a new trade,” Morris said. Unlike Morris, Andrew Green, Hutchinson, returned to school on his own after being on disability with Lyme disease for eight years. “I had a lot of free time so I decided I’d be back in school, it is something I’d always wanted to do,” Green said. Adjusting back to school was fairly smooth for Green. “I took college before, I [was] just trying to get through

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it. Now that I have a plan it’s easy to get to class and it’s easy to do the homework and it’s easy to absorb the stuff because I want to learn it. [School is] definitely something I want to do rather than something I feel like I have to do,” Green said. It’s really easy because [I’m] coming from the work force and you’re there for eight hours plus, and here you’re just here for a few hours. It just seems kind of easy, a lot easier when you’re

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photos&story

Mayra Ramirez

The sound of the sun goes off in three, two, one. Then, the journey begins as each step meets the terrain. All of a sudden a rush of adrenaline pumps through each one of the runners veins. These are a few mental characteristics the HCC cross country runners go through.

Cross Country Proves to be More Than Just A Sport.....

Misconceptions are definitely an issue in the life of a cross country runner. “Cross country runners run through any terrain they give them,” Taylor Fry, Topeka, said. “Track is simpler than cross country, but cross country is a lot more complicated because of holes, sharp corners, and hills.” Some people believe that the difference in track and cross country is the environment. When running track, a person is running in an oval shape for the assigned distance. In cross country, though, a runner experiences different courses at each meet. Most runners believe cross country is more of a mental sport than a physical sport because a runner has to block

The women’s cross country pose for a picture after they ran at the Hutchison Invitational meet. The team consisted of four sophomores and four freshmen.

Cross country

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Men

Women

out all the physical pain in order to maintain motivation and never give up. “It is more of a mental sport because the entire time you are thinking, did I start off too fast or too slow, who is behind me, who is about to catch me, and do I have a kick left? If your mind gives up on you, then your body will also give up on you,” Orbelin Araujo Rojas, Phoenix, Ariz., said. Runners are definitely challenged at a mental and physical level, because they have to worry about the race ahead of them and have to block everything and anything out of their mind in order to finish a race. Cross country is so physically demanding that it proves to also be a mental sport.

Date

Mario Perez, Pratt, runs down a hill at the Hutchinson Invitational meet. Perez placed 31st out of 46 runners.

Event

Team Results

Sept. 1

Wichita State/ J.K. Golden Classic

9

Sept. 15

Hutchinson

1

Cecilia Lane- 5 Ashlynn Lambert- 7

Sept. 22

Tabor College

3

Cecilia Lane- 4 Ashlynn Lambert- 5

Oct. 13

McPherson College

1

Ashlynn Lambert- 4 Cecilia Lane- 7

Oct. 27

Region VI Championship

6

Date

Event

Team Results

Sept. 1

Wichita State/ J.K. Golden Classic

6

Sept. 15

Hutchinson

1

Individual Results

Individual Results

Oberlin Rojas- 2 John Murphy III- 3 Isaac Williams- 5 Kevin Marks- 8

Sept. 28

Emporia State/ Jock’s Niche Classic

9

Oberlin Rojas- 2

Oct. 13

McPherson College Invitational

2

Oberlin Rojas- 3 John Murphy III- 5

Oct. 27

Region VI Championship

6

Oberlin Rojas, 9

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The men’s cross country team pose for a team photo. The team consisted of three sophomores and six freshmen.

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Taylor Fry, Topeka, begins to pick up speed towards the end of the course at the Hutchinson Invitational meet. Fry placed 33rd out of 46 runners .

Dragon’s Tale

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photos&story

Darren Ramey

Under New Coach, Team Seeks Top Spot With the 2012 Hutchinson Community College volleyball season coming into its final stretch, the team is in a favorable position, boasting a (0-0) overall record, and a 13-1 conference record. The team entered the season with high expectations. “Our team is focused on winning both the conference and the region. These are very realistic goals for us, but given our position atop the conference we have to be prepared for a very motivated opponent every time we take the court,” Head Coach Patrick Hall said. Leading the conference, as Hall points out, is a tough but empowering position to be in. On one hand, the team goes in with the confidence of being the number one team in the conference. While on the other

Freshman Samantha Lackey, San Antonio, Texas, prepares to serve the ball during a 3-0 sweep of Cloud County on Oct. 16.

Colby

Pratt

W 3-0

W 3-0

Conference Play

Seward County

W 3-1

Cloud County

Ramey Volleyball DPS.indd 22

Garden City

Barton

Dodge City

Colby

Pratt

W 3-0

W 3-0

W 3-0

W 3-2

W 3-1

W 3-0

volleyball

hand, opponents come into the game putting extra effort into pulling off a win to unseat the top seed or get a meaningful win for themselves. This is Hall’s first season coaching HCC volleyball, but definitely not his first coaching job or volleyball experience. He comes to the team bringing along his years of experience at different colleges in many levels of the sport, as well as several coach-of-the-year honors. Hall’s experience puts him in a position to compare this year’s Lady Dragons with teams he has been a part of in the past. “Every team has its own unique identity, “ Hall said. “This team has been particularly fun to coach because they are so easy to work with every day in the gym. They are eager to advance their technical training, and they like to have fun. There have also been very few problems off the court.” Hall has made a big impact on the players of this year’s volleyball team. “It is quite a different experience this year with having a new coach. Hall is a very experienced coach, and has taught us so much. He is really helping us grow not only as athletes, but as students and young adults also,” Emily Oberlin, Ada, Mich., said. Each new season for any sports team brings new players joining the team. Athletes must attempt to balance a brand new academic environment as well as being a part of a col-

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Dod

3-1

lege sports team. For the Lady Dragons, this year’s batch of new players has shown they can adjust well. “Our new players appear to be adjusting easily both on and off the court. With our automatic substitutions we start 10 players, 5 of whom are freshmen,” Hall said. Keeping up with school, sports, and sometimes a job also can prove to be a tough task for all college athletes. HCC volleyball, as well as other sports are given the opportunity to handle such a large workload. “Balancing school and volleyball, and even a job too for me, can be stressful sometimes but it’s just important to stay organized,” Ashlyn Westerman, Liberal, said. “Coach is very supportive of us and helps us a lot with keeping our school work in check through study hall and planners, that support system is great to have when trying to balance so much.” One factor that may help new players feel more at home, and at the same time be motivating for the entire team, is the crowd at each of the games. Whether it is a big home game crowd, or those following the team at away games, the fans bring constant support to the players. “The crowd plays a big role for us. We hate letting down a home crowd so when we play at home we be sure to do the best we can to impress the crowd. We love when we play at away games and have a rowdy crowd

The team celebrates a scoring against Cloud County Oct. 16. Cloud County faced the Lady Dragons in regional play on Oct. 31.

too. It adds fuel to our fire when the crowd is obnoxious. I love playing in that atmosphere,” Shayne Haley, Katy, Texas, said. The team also does different things in Hutchinson to promote both the team and the sport, as well as new fans of HCC volleyball. “We’ve tried to get out in the community with some clinics for younger kids and some promo materials, but we hope to build upon that community support in the future,” Hall said. This is an opportunity to mold young players that may

one day represent HCC volleyball. With the season nearing its end, the Lady Dragons eye their 6th conference championship in 9 years, and 5th regional championship in 9 years. With the support of the college and community the team strives to make it a reality.

Overall:

23-8 Conference:

Dodge City

Seward County

Cloud County

Garden City

Barton

W 3-0

L 2-3

W 3-0

W 3-2

W 3-1

volleyball

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Melissa Hetherington, Burnley, England, wards off defenders while dribbling the ball downfield. Hetherington led the team with eight goals this year. Photo Illustration

While leading the ball downfield, Danielle Sheehy, Limerick, Ireland, battles a Coffeyville defender. Sheehy scored four of the seven goals for the Dragons win over the Red Ravens on October 10.

Sammy Lane, soccer coach, calls out a play from the sidelines. Lane started as head coach for the Lady Dragons six years ago.

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Refuse to

Lose

After the early morning workouts and countless hours of running, it’s down to the 90 minutes on the field where all the records are set and the Dragon soccer team leads the nation. photos

Ta y l o r M i t c h e l l

Soccer Schedule/Results Date

Opponent

Time/Results Record

Aug. 28 Neosho County W, 7-0 1-0 Aug. 31 Kansas City W, 15-0 2-0 Sept. 5 Cloud County W, 7-0 3-0 Sept. 7 Independence W, 13-0 4-0 Sept. 10 at Hesston College W, 5-0 5-0 Sept. 12 at Pratt W, 6-0 6-0 Sept. 15 Johnson County W, 3-2 7-0 Sept. 18 at Barton W, 2-0 8-0 Sept. 22 at Allen W, 5-0 9-0 Sept. 26 at Garden City W, 8-0 10-0

Date

Opponent

Time/Results Record

Oct. 3 Oct. 5 Oct. 10 Oct. 14 Oct. 17

Cowley Northern Okla. Coffeyville Butler Dodge City

W, 2-1 11-0 W, 2-0 12-0 W, 7-0 13-0 L, 3-1 13-1 W, 7-0 14-1

Region VI Tournament Oct. 22 Cloud County Oct. 27 Barton Oct. 28 Butler

W, 11-5 15-1 W, 3-1 16-1 L, 2-1 16-2 Results as of October 30, 2012

Isa Whitley, Wichita, hustles to attempt the back tackle move against a Coffeyville Community College offensive player. The Dragons won against the Red Ravens 7-0.

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The defensive line prepares to stop Butler from scoring. Defensive linemen Toby Johnson, College Park, Ga., and Ben Bradley, Norcross, Ga., led the way as the best defensive linemen in the nation. Photo by Staff

59 Players Make Up the Official HCC Football Roster football

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Hutchinson Community College Quarterback Luke Barnes, Fort Walton Beach, Fla., drops back to complete a pass. Barnes completed 23 of 41 for 202 yards and three interceptions and set a single season record with 215 completions previously set by PJ Peters in 1995. Photo by Saff Wide Reciver, Miguel Johns, Newton, catches a pass for a short Blue Dragon first down. Johns returned for his second year on the team. Photo by Staff

Football Schedule Blue Dragon Aug. 25 Sept. 1 Sept. 8 Sept. 15 Sept. 29

Coffeyville Navarro College Garden City Dodge City Highland

58-25 54-34 63-49 45-10 49-12

W L W W W

football

026-027 football-REV.indd 27

Oct. 6 Oct. 13 Oct. 20 Oct. 27

Air Force Prep Independence Fort Scott Butler

66-7

W

75-0

W

37-14 W 40-7 L

Results as of October 30, 2012

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Story continued from page 15. years and agreed that the roadto being debt-free at the end of college is very difficult. “It is becoming harder,” Kibbe said. Most college financial aid offices are sensitive to the potentially destructive impact of college debt, and they work with students to help minimize what they borrow.

Student loans are one piece of the overall financial aid package. “We actually make each student take the extra step of doing a loan request worksheet,” Kibbe said. “That way at least we feel that they know they are taking out this loan, and they are requesting us to process a loan.” There are creative ways to help reduce education costs

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but each student has to discover them and make them work in their favor. Angela Glascock, instructional designer, is the mother of a former college student who addressed a creative solution to the high cost of books. “Some of those books are one hundred to two hundred dollars a piece and I’m serious, we paid a total of five hundred dollars for all four years worth

of books because we were able to buy them and sell them online,” Glascock said. College costs and the associated debt will always remain the student’s responsibility. Financial freedom is still attainable but it does require searching out the things that can save dollars and reduce debt along with diligence in expense and debt management.

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Dragon's Tale - Fall 2012 Issue