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Academic Program 2019-20


Course Planning

I. Calendar Major Academic Dates 2019-20

Please check full calendar for additional dates FALL Friday, Aug. 30. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Registration/Orientation for football players Saturday, Aug. 31 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Registration/Orientation for varsity cross country, field hockey, and soccer candidates Registration for student leaders Monday, Sept. 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Registration for international students Tuesday, Sept. 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Registration/Orientation for new and returning students and families Thursday, Sept. 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Convocation Friday, Sept. 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . First day of classes Monday, Sept. 16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Last day to submit course change requests—by 4 p.m. Friday-Saturday, Oct. 4-5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Family Weekend Tuesday, Oct. 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Required varsity practices 3 p.m.; all students return 7 p.m. Monday, Oct. 14. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fall midterm check period Monday-Friday, Nov. 18-22. . . . . . . . . . . . . Term Assessments; students must stay through their final assessment; all assessments conclude Friday at noon Friday, Nov. 22. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Thanksgiving break begins at noon; all students depart by 5 p.m. WINTER Monday, Dec. 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Thanksgiving break ends; all students return by 9 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . First day of winter term classes Friday, Dec. 13. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Last day to submit trimester course change requests—by 4 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 19. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Christmas Festival for the school community (full day of classes) Friday, Dec. 20. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Winter break begins at 7 a.m. Wednesday, Jan. 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Winter break ends; students return by 9 p.m. Monday, Jan 20 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Winter midterm check period Friday-Saturday, Jan. 24- 25. . . . . . . . . Fifth Form Parents’ Weekend (classes/games on Saturday) Monday, Jan. 27. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . no classes; students return by 7 p.m. Monday, Feb. 17 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Presidents Day—no classes; students return by 7 p.m. Monday-Friday, March 2-6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Term Assessments; students must stay through their final assessment; all assessments conclude on Friday at noon Friday, March 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Spring Break begins at noon; all students depart by 5 p.m. SPRING Tuesday, March 24 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Spring break ends; students return by 9 p.m. Wednesday, March 25. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . First day of spring term classes Friday, April 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Last day to submit trimester course change requests—by 4 p.m. Monday, April 13. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Easter Weekend—no classes; students return by 7 p.m. (Mandatory classes/games on Saturday, April 11) Monday, April 27. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Spring midterm check period Monday, May 25 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Prize Day; seniors depart campus by 5 p.m. Tuesday-Friday, June 2-5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Term Assessments; students must stay through their final class assessment; all assessments conclude on Friday at noon. Friday, June 5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Summer vacation begins at 12 p.m.; students not taking SATs depart campus by 5 p.m. Saturday, June 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SATs/ SAT IIs; all remaining students depart campus by 5 p.m.


II. Diploma Requirements The requirements for a St. George’s diploma ensure broad exposure for students across the curriculum and, at the same time, enable students to pursue depth in particular areas of interest and academic passion. These represent a minimum; entrance requirements for certain colleges and universities may exceed this minimum in certain disciplines. Students may receive credit toward the St. George’s diploma for courses taken previously at the high school level when it is clear that they meet the equivalent of our own curricular requirements. Students must complete their sixth-form year at St. George’s and pass all courses during their senior year regardless of the total credits accumulated prior to the senior year. Please see The Shield for additional information about non-academic graduation requirements. Creative & Performing Arts One year, or three trimesters, of visual art, music or theater, for academic credit, in any combination, during the high school years. New fifth-formers must complete two trimesters of visual art, music, or theater for academic credit. Successful completion of a one-year ensemble course taken for credit (any version of Music 250 or 450), may count for up to one-third of the requirement. This may occur once per student. Enrollment for credit in ensemble courses constitutes a sixth course. Humanities English—Four full years. History & Social Science—two years, one of which must be U.S. History or American Studies. Theology & Religious Studies—three trimester courses for those entering in the third-form, two trimesters for those entering in the fourth-form, and one trimester for those entering in the fifthform. Entering third- and fourth-form students should enroll in Hebrew Scripture, New Testament, or World Religions as a prerequisite for theology courses in the upper forms. Completion of Civilizations course satisfies one trimester of the Theology & Religious Studies requirement. Language & Culture Study at least through the third year (Level III) in one foreign language in consecutive years. The foreign language requirement can be met with either a classical (Latin) or modern language (French, Spanish, or Chinese). Students who enter St. George’s with prior second language experience in Chinese, French, Latin or Spanish must demonstrate proficiency by successfully passing the St. George’s Level III final exam in order to satisfy the St. George’s graduation requirement for a foreign language. While students for whom English is not the native language are not required to take French, Spanish, Chinese, or Latin, as English qualifies as their foreign language, we strongly recommend that those international students who are already proficient in English do so. Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics Math—Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, and Pre-calculus. The majority of students enroll in mathematics through the senior year. Science—two year-long laboratory science courses during the high school years. The majority of St. George’s students graduate with at least three years of high school science. The Science Department also recommends that seniors enroll in science electives only to complement a program that includes biology, chemistry and physics.


III. Planning a Course of Study Students should create a balanced course of study that is appropriately rigorous; reflects their passions, gifts and challenges; takes full advantage of the array of distinctive programs at St. George’s from Geronimo to internships and study abroad; and maximizes achievement and success. New Students: if you would like help completing the Course Planning Worksheet, please call the Academic Office (401) 842-6791 to set up a telephone appointment with Dr. Christopher Shaw, Dean of Academics, or Mrs. Melanie Lewis, Assistant Dean. Placement in Honors or Advanced Courses—Courses designated Honors demand an increased commitment of time and effort from students of 20 to 25% above and beyond the already rigorous expectations of any course at St. George’s. Courses designated Advanced or Advanced demand a commitment 25 to 40% above regular expectations. Students interested in pursuing Honors or Advanced work should indicate that preference on the course request sheet. Placement in these courses is determined by department faculty and the Academic Office on the basis of all four of the following factors: 1) student interest and commitment, as expressed in the course planning worksheet, acknowledging the additional time and effort required; 2) demonstrated achievement in related courses already completed; 3) potential for success, given other requirements and demands of the student’s program (it is unusual, for example, for students to be enrolled in four or five honors-level or advanced classes at once); 4) available seats in the Honors or Advanced section requested. Students who successfully enroll in Honors or Advanced courses are expected to honor the commitment that their teachers have made to them by maintaining and completing the course; low grades or insufficient effort are not grounds for dropping any course at St. George’s School. Adding /dropping courses—The Academic Calendar lists a date approximately a week after the beginning of each trimester by which students may request to add or drop a course, with their advisor’s signature. This week is designed to allow every student to try out a course, survey the syllabus and recommit to the course in its earliest days. These procedures do not pertain to level changes (that is, from French II to French I, or from Precalculus Honors to Precalculus) which may be recommended by the department or required by the Academic Office later in the trimester. After this trial week, students who commit to a course are not permitted to drop that course except under the most extraordinary of personal circumstances. Academic credit from outside programs — While encouraging learning for enrichment over the summer, St. George’s does not award academic credit or advanced placement for summer work done in a school, on-line, or in tutorials. St. George’s will award credit for successful completion of courses taken during the fifth-form in a limited number of approved and accredited off-campus programs, such as School Year Abroad, High Mountain Institute in Colorado, and The King’s Academy in Amman, Jordan. Interested students and parents should consult the Dean of Academics for additional information. Geronimo is the off-shore marine science program on board the school’s 70- foot sloop of the same name. Interested students apply for one of four trips during the year – fall, winter, spring, or summer. Students are encouraged to consider making Geronimo part of their curriculum at St. George’s. The Geronimo program is the opportunity of a lifetime and an integral part of the


school, at no additional tuition cost for students who participate. Those sailing during the academic year receive full academic credit for the program and must be in good academic standing as they apply, and prior to their departure. Participation also requires careful advance planning because some St. George’s courses, such as a first-year language, chemistry, or Advanced Courses, can be challenging to manage successfully without the benefit of the oncampus classroom experience. Since Geronimo is a major commitment, interested students should discuss the program with their parents and advisors. Applications are available from Captain Dawson. The fall voyage is not open to new students. Independent Study — Sixth-formers who have completed the published curriculum of an academic department have the opportunity to study an area of special interest for a trimester in a graded, individual tutorial with a faculty member who shares their interest. A detailed proposal from both student and teacher outlining the goals of the project, the texts and other resources to be used, a proposed weekly syllabus, and a list of expected outcomes must be drafted by the student, signed by the faculty sponsor and student’s advisor, and submitted to the Academic Office by the midterm of the trimester prior to proposed study. Proposal forms are available in the Academic Office, and require not only the signatures of a faculty sponsor and the student’s advisor, but also approval of the Dean of Academics. Successful completion of approved proposals earn one credit and replace one of the five courses in a student’s trimester program.

IV. Sample Schedules

All students take five courses; only music ensembles may be taken as a sixth course and confer a half-credit. F, W, S denote fall, winter, spring trimester courses (which are shaded); all others are year-long. Note: After 2015-16 all AP-designated courses became “Advanced”

Sixth-form

Art, Music or Theater

English

History & Social Science

Languages

Math

Science

S: Dramatic Literature Theater 503

Adv. Lit & Composition Eng 610/A

Advanced Economics HSS 620/A

Fall: Spanish 501

Precalculus Math 410

Physics 410

Adv. American Studies Eng 450/A

Adv. American Studies Hist 450/A

Spanish III 320/H

Algebra II Math 310

Chemistry 310

English 200

Adv. European HSS 300/A

Spanish II 200

Geometry Math 210

Spanish I 100

Algebra I Math 110

Fifth-form

Fourthform Third-form

F: Theater Foundation Theater 201 F: Visual Fdn Art 201 S: Doc’ary Video Ar373

English 100

Theology & Religious Studies W: Faith & Doubt TRS 412

S: Design Science Math 213

W: World Religions TRS 322

Biology 100

W: Biblical Studies TRS 312

Here, a third-former with a strong interest in the humanities begins at the introductory level in all subjects. He is able to complete four years of math, surpass the graduation requirement in science, Spanish, art and theater, and sit for Advanced Placement exams in US History, English Language & Composition (through American Studies), European history and English Literature and Composition.


Art, Music or Theater

English

Sixth-form

Jazz Ensemb Music 460-J (½ credit)

Global Writing English 510

Fifth-form

Jazz Ensemb Music 450-J (½ credit)

English 300

Fourth-form

Jazz Ensemb Music 260-J (½ credit)

English 200

Third-form

Jazz Ensemb Music 250-J (½ credit)

English 100

History & Social Science F: WWII HSS521 S:Psychology HSS543

Math

Science

Advanced BC Calculus Math 570/A

Advanced Physics C 480/A

Advanced Latin IV Latin 400/A

Precalculus Honors Math 420/H

Advanced Chemistry 420/A

F: Visual Fdn Art 201 W: Video An Art 382

Latin III Latin 300

Algebra II Honors Math 320/H

Chem 320/H

Asian Civ History 220

Latin II Latin 200

Geometry Math 210

US History History 400

Languages

Theology & Religious Studies W: Freedm Decision & Ethics TRS 422

S: Biblical Studies TRS 313

Biology 100

Here, a particularly strong math/science student, who also plays the tenor sax, chooses to go deeply into those areas, and completes her Theology & Religious Studies requirement through Asian Civilization, Biblical Studies and Freedom, Decision & Ethics. She is able to complete Advanced Physics C as well as BC Calculus her senior year, while also completing the Arts requirement through Visual Foundation, Video Animation and a year of Jazz Ensemble for credit. All students take five courses; for-credit music ensembles, which are half-credit, may be a sixth course F, W, S denote fall, winter, spring trimester courses (which are shaded); all others are yearlong

Sixth-form

Fifth-form

Art, Music or Theater

English

Adv. Studio 2D Design Art 420/A

Currents in Maritime Lit Eng 520

F: Fine Art Photo Art 311 W: 2D Print Art 342

English 300 Spring: Geronimo

Fourth-form

Third-form

English 200 W: Vis Fdn Art 202 S: Design Sci Art 233

English 100

History & Social Science

Languages

Math

Science

F:Architecture Art 441 W: 3D Design Art 332W S: Welding Art 453

Chinese IV CHI 400

US History HSS 400

Chinese III CHI 300

Precalculus Math 400

Modern World HSS 210

Chinese II CHI 200

Algebra II Math 310

Chem 300

Chinese I CHI 100

Geometry Math 210

Biology 100

W: Environ’tal Science SCI422 S: Energy & Ethics TRS SCI443

Theology & Religious Studies F: Freedm Decision & Ethics TRS 421

S: Marine Science 333 Geronimo

F: Biblical Studies TRS 311

Here, a third-former is able to follow Visual Foundation with Design Science, using the FabLab (fabrication laboratory) in discovering 3D printing. He finds that art is his passion. After completing chemistry as a fourth-former, he is well positioned to sail on Geronimo in the spring and double up on art, enrolling in Fine Art Photography and 2D Printmaking. His senior year, instead of history, he takes AP 2D Design as well as Architecture, 3D Design (in wood) and completes the year in Welding.


Courses by Department 2019-20 Please note: Course IDs that end in “0” are yearlong courses; IDs that end in “1” meet in the fall trimester, IDs that end in “2” meet in the winter trimester, and IDs that end in “3” meet in the spring trimester.

Course ID

Title

Open to

Prerequisite(s)/corequisite

CONNECTED LEARNING ART/SCI 301-2

PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING

all forms

Visual Foundation & Prereq/Coreq Chemistry

SCI 331,332,333

MARINE SCIENCE

IV, V & VI

for Geronimo crews

INT 352

PHILOSOPHY & POP CULTURE

V & VI

MTH/ART 433

DESIGN SCIENCE

all forms

Visual Foundation & two TRI of Geometry

SCI/TRS 443 Physics

ENERGY & ETHICS

IV, V, VI

one TRI Bible Studies or World Religions; one TRI Chemistry or

HSS 510

GLOBAL STUDIES

VI

three history credits

CREATIVE & PERFORMING ARTS ART 201,202,203

VISUAL FOUNDATION

all forms

ART 301-2

PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING

all forms

Visual Foundation & Prereq/Coreq Chemistry

ART 311,312,313

FINE ART PHOTOGRAPHY

all forms

Visual Foundation

ART 322,323

JOURNALISTIC PHOTOGRAPHY

all forms

Visual Foundation

ART 331C

3D DESIGN CLAY

all forms

Visual Foundation

ART 332W

3D DESIGN WOOD

all forms

Visual Foundation

ART 333M

3D DESIGN METALS

all forms

Visual Foundation

ART 342

2D PRINTMAKING

all forms

Visual Foundation

ART 353

2D DRAWING

all forms

Visual Foundation

ART 363

2D PAINTING

all forms

Visual Foundation

ART 372

DOCUMENTARY VIDEO

all forms

Visual Foundation

ART 383

VIDEO ANIMATION

all forms

Visual Foundation

ART 433

DESIGN SCIENCE

all forms

Visual Foundation & two TRI of Geometry

ART 441,443

ARCHITECTURE

V & VI

Visual Foundation

ART 453/H

3D/WELDING (H)

IV, V, VI

Visual Foundation

ART 410/A

DRAWING & 2D DESIGN (A)

IV, V & VI

Visual Foundation

ART 430/A

3D DESIGN (A)

IV, V & VI

Visual Foundation

MUS 201,202,203

MUSIC FOUNDATION

all forms

MUS 222

SONGWRITING

all forms

MUS 233

AMERICAN POP

all forms

THE 201

THEATER FOUNDATION I

all forms

THE 212

THEATER FOUNDATION II

all forms

THE 401,403

THEATER COMPANY

all forms

Theater Foundation I or completion of art requirement

THE 501,502,503

DRAMATIC LITERATURE

all forms

Theater Foundation I or completion of art requirement

Music Foundation


Course ID

Title

Open to

Prerequisite(s)/corequisite

HUMANITIES ENG 100

JOURNEYS IN LITERATURE

III

ENG 200

EXPANDING HORIZONS

IV

ENG 240/H

WORLD LITERATURE (H)

IV by invitation

ENG 300

AMERICAN LITERATURE

V

ENG 450/A

ENGLISH: AMERICAN STUDIES (A) V & VI by invitation

ENG 510

GLOBAL WRITING

VI

ENG 520

MARITIME LITERATURE

VI

ENG 530

READING THE VISUAL WORLD

VI

ENG 610/A

ENGLISH LITERATURE (A)

VI by invitation

ENG 251,253

GERONIMO SEMINAR

IV, V

HSS 210

THE MODERN WORLD

III & IV

HSS 220

ASIAN CIVILIZATIONS

IV (III by invitation) Note: also one Theology credit granted

HSS 300/A

EUROPEAN HISTORY (A)

IV, V VI by invitation

HSS 400

U.S. HISTORY

V & VI

HSS 420/A

U.S. HISTORY (A)

V & VI by invitation

HSS 450/A

HISTORY: AMERICAN STUDIES (A) V & VI by invitation

HSS 510

GLOBAL STUDIES

VI

HSS 610/A

AMERICAN GOVERNMENT (A)

VI by invitation

HSS 620/A

ECONOMICS (A)

VI by invitation

HSS 521

WORLD WAR II

VI U.S. History

HSS 522

VIETNAM

VI U.S. History

HSS 523

RACE RELATIONS IN THE U.S.

V & VI

two TRI U.S. History

HSS 533

HISTORY OF MEDICINE

V & VI

two TRI U.S. History

HSS 543

PSYCHOLOGY

VI

TRS 311,312,313

BIBLE STUDIES/HEBREW SCRIPTURE III & IV

TRS 321,322,323

WORLD RELIGIONS

TRS 331,332,333

BIBLE STUDIES/NEW TESTAMENT III & IV

TRS 411,412,413

FAITH & DOUBT

IV, V, VI

one TRI Bible Studies or World Religions

TRS 421,422,423

FREEDOM, DECISION & ETHICS

IV, V, VI

one TRI Bible Studies or World Religions

TRS 511,512,513

EVIL & JUSTICE

IV, V, VI

one TRI Bible Studies or World Religions

TRS 443

ENERGY & ETHICS

IV, V, VI

one TRI Bible Studies or World Religions; one TRI Chemistry or Physics

TRS 523

WOMEN & THE BIBLE

IV, V, VI

one TRI Bible Studies or World Religions

for Geronimo crews, one-term, replacing yearlong ENG

U.S. History

III & IV

LANGUAGE & CULTURE FRE 100

FRENCH I

all forms

FRE 200

FRENCH II

all forms

FRE 220/H

FRENCH II (H)

III & IV by invitation

French I

FRE 300

FRENCH III

all forms

French II or II (H)

FRE 320/H

FRENCH III (H)

all forms by invitation

French II or II (H)


Course ID

Title

Open to

Prerequisite(s)/corequisite

FRE 510/A

FRENCH LANGUAGE (A)

IV, V & IV by invitation

French IV (H), or III (H) by invitation

FRE 401-2

FRENCH IV-1,2

IV, V & VI

French III or III (H)

FRE 421-2

FRENCH IV-1,2 (H)

IV, V & VI by invitation

French III or III (H)

FRE 403

FRENCH IV-3

IV, V & VI

French IV-1,2

FRE 423/H

FRENCH IV-3 (H)

IV, V & VI by invitation

French IV-1,2 (H)

SPA 100

SPANISH I

all forms

SPA 200

SPANISH II

all forms

Spanish I

SPA 220/H

SPANISH II (H)

all forms by invitation

Spanish I

SPA 300

SPANISH III

all forms

Spanish II

SPA 300/C

SPANISH III CONVERSATION

all forms

Spanish II

SPA 320/H

SPANISH III (H)

all forms by invitation

Spanish II or II (H)

SPA 400

SPANISH IV

IV, V, & VI

Spanish III or III (H)

SPA 420/H

SPANISH IV (H)

IV, V, & VI by invitation

Spanish III or III (H)

SPA 510/A

SPANISH LANGUAGE (A)

V & VI by invitation

Spanish IV (H), or III (H) by invitation

SPA 610/A

SPANISH LITERATURE (A)

V & VI by invitation

Spanish V or by invitation

SPA 501

SPANISH V-1

V & VI

Spanish IV, IV (H), or III (H); may be taken apart or consecutively

SPA 611/A

SPANISH V-1 (A)

VI by invitation

Spanish V-1, 2, or 3, or 510/A or 601/A

SPA 502

SPANISH V-2

V & VI

Spanish IV, IV (H), or III (H)

SPA 612/A

SPANISH VI-2 (A)

VI by invitation

Spanish V-1, 2, or 3, or 510/A or 601/A; may be taken apart or consecutively

SPA 503

SPANISH V-3

V & VI

Spanish IV, IV (H), or III (H)

SPA 613/A

SPANISH VI-3 (A)

VI by invitation

Spanish V-1, 2, or 3, or 510/A or 601/A

CHI 100

CHINESE I

all forms

CHI 120/H

CHINESE I (H)

all forms by invitation

CHI 200

CHINESE II

all forms

Chinese I

CHI 220/H

CHINESE II (H)

all forms by invitation

Chinese I

CHI 300

CHINESE III

IV, V & VI

Chinese II

CHI 320/H

CHINESE III (H)

IV, V & VI by invitation

Chinese II or II (H)

CHI 510/A

CHINESE LANGUAGE (A)

CHI 401-2

CHINESE IV-1,2

IV, V & VI

Chinese III or III (H)

CHI 421-2

CHINESE IV (H)-1,2

IV, V & VI by invitation

Chinese III or III (H)

CHI 403

CHINESE IV-3

IV, V & VI

Chinese IV-1,2

CHI 423/H

CHINESE IV (H) -3

IV, V & VI by invitation

Chinese IV (H) -1,2

LAT 100

LATIN I

all forms

LAT 200

LATIN II

all forms

Latin I

LAT 220/H

LATIN II (H)

all forms by invitation

Latin I

LAT 300

LATIN III

IV, V & VI

Latin II or II (H)

LAT 320/H

LATIN III (H)

IV, V & VI by invitation

Latin II or II (H)

LAT 400/A

LATIN (A)

IV, V & VI by invitation

Latin III (H)

Chinese IV (H), or IV by invitation

SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING & MATH BIO 210

BIOLOGY

III & IV


Course ID

Title

Open to

BIO 220/H

BIOLOGY (H)

III & IV by invitation

Prerequisite(s)/corequisite

BIO 420/A

BIOLOGY (A)

V & VI by invitation

Chemistry

CHM 300

INTRO CHEMISTRY

IV & V by invitation

pre/corequisite Algebra II

CHM 310

CHEMISTRY

IV & V

pre/corequisite Algebra II

CHM 320/H

CHEMISTRY (H)

IV & V by invitation

pre/corequisite Algebra II

CHM 420/A

CHEMISTRY (A)

V & VI by invitation

pre/corequisite Algebra II; one year of chemistry

PHY 400

INTRO PHYSICS

V & VI by invitation

Algebra II

PHY 410

PHYSICS

V & VI

Algebra II

PHY 460/A

PHYSICS 1 (A)

V & VI by invitation

pre/corequisite Algebra II (H)

PHY 470/A

PHYSICS 1 & 2 (A)

V & VI by invitation

pre/corequisite Precalculus (H)

PHY 480/A

PHYSICS C (A)

V & VI by invitation

Calculus

SCI 301-2

PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING

all forms

Visual Foundation & PreReq/Coreq Chemistry

SCI 420/A

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE(A)

V & VI by invitation

Biology & either Chemistry or Physics

SCI 441-2

DNA SCIENCE

V & VI

Biology & Chemistry

SCI 411,413

MARINE BIOLOGY

V & VI

Biology & Chemistry

SCI 422

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

V & VI

Biology & Chemistry

SCI 443

ENERGY & ETHICS

IV, V, VI

one TRI Bible Studies or World Religions; one TRI Chemistry or Physics

SCI 453

PRE-VETERINARY SCIENCE

V & VI

Biology & Chemistry

SCI 483

BOTANY

V & VI

Biology & Chemistry

MTH 110

ALGEBRA I

III

MTH 210

GEOMETRY

III & IV

Algebra I

MTH 220/H

GEOMETRY (H)

III & IV by invitation

Algebra I

MTH 300

INTRO ALGEBRA II

IV & V by invitation

Geometry

MTH 310

ALGEBRA II

III, IV & V Geometry

MTH 320/H

ALGEBRA II (H)

III, IV & V by invitation

MTH 400

INTRO PRECALCULUS

V & VI Algebra II

MTH 410

PRECALCULUS

V & VI

Algebra II or Algebra II (H)

MTH 420/H

PRECALCULUS (H)

IV, V & VI by invitation

Algebra II (H)

MTH 500

STATISTICS

V & VI

Intro Precalculus

MTH 510/A

STATISTICS (A)

V & VI by invitation

Precalculus

MTH 600

CALCULUS

VI and by invitation to V

Precalculus

MTH 610/A

AB CALCULUS (A)

V & VI by invitation

Precalculus

MTH 620/A

BC CALCULUS (A)

V & VI by invitation

Precalculus

MTH 630/H

MULTIVARIABLE CALCULUS (H)

VI by invitation

AB or BC Calculus

MTH 433

DESIGN SCIENCE

all forms

Visual Foundation & two TRI of Geometry

COM 341,342,343

HUMANS & COMPUTERS

IV, V & VI

COM 351,352,353

ROBOTICS

IV, V & VI

COM 401,402,403

CODING: JAVA PLUS

V & VI

COM 500

COMPUTER SCIENCE COMPREHENSIVE: THE DIGITAL WORLD

V & VI

Geometry

Precalculus


Course Listings -./0--. Courses appear here by department (diploma requirements by department, equaling at least 51 credits, are noted in parentheses): CONNECTED LEARNING: Interdisciplinary and experiential courses CREATIVE & PERFORMING ARTS: Music, theater & visual arts (three terms of arts in any sub-discipline, or two for entering fifthformers) HUMANITIES: English, history & social science, theology & religious studies (four years of English; two years of history including one of U.S. history; three terms of theology & religious studies including one of Bible Studies or World Religions, or two for entering fourthformers, or one for entering fifth-formers) LANGUAGE & CULTURE: Chinese, French, Latin, Spanish (completion of at least three years of study) SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING & MATHEMATICS: (Two years of yearlong lab science; math sequence through precalculus)

CONNECTED LEARNING A R T/ S C I ] . /- - PR I N C I P L ES O F E N G I N E ER I N G Open to all forms

Prerequisites: Visual Foundation; pre-or co-requisite: Chemistry

This two-trimester course is a survey course of engineering. The course exposes students to some of the major concepts that they will encounter in a postsecondary engineering course of study including materials, proposal writing, research and fabrication. Students will have the opportunity to develop skills and understanding of concepts through problem-based learning. Used in combination with a team approach, this course challenges students to continually hone their interpersonal skills, creative abilities and problem-solving skills by using engineering concepts. It also allows students to develop strategies to enable and direct their own learning, which is the ultimate goal of education. Students will employ engineering and scientific concepts in the solution of engineering design problems. Students will develop problem-solving skills and apply their knowledge of research and design to create solutions to various challenges. Students will also learn how to document their work and communicate their solutions to their peers and faculty members.

S C I ] ] /, ] ] -, ] ] ] M A R I N E S C I EN C E Open to IV, V & VI (for Geronimo crews) This trimester course is taught on board Geronimo during the school year. It is largely experiential and unique to each voyage track incorporating elements of navigation and seamanship, marine ecology and oceanography. The core of the Geronimo experience is building the seamanship and navigation skills to serve as crew on an ocean-going sailing vessel, while learning lessons in leadership and collaboration. Topics are introduced in a class setting, and then skills are executed and built while on watch. In navigation, we will start with a foundation of basic coastal piloting and progress to celestial navigation, giving students a strong foundation in traditional navigation. Part of the course will closely relate to our geographic location and include components of ecology, marine biology, oceanography and meteorology. Sailing on board Geronimo will afford you a unique perspective for comparing different marine ecosystems. We will employ hands-on explorations of ecosystems, from estuaries and pelagic plankton communities to tropical coral reefs, whenever possible. Geronimo’s long-standing research project, a sea turtle population study in cooperation with the University of Florida, will also be a component of this course. This course is also designed to help you gain a better understanding of our interconnectedness with the marine environment and to develop an appreciation for the role of the ocean on a global scale.


I N T ] a- PH I LO S O P H Y & PO P C U LT U R E Open to V & VI An introduction to the study of both philosophy and popular culture, this course allows for the critical study of popular interests and concerns considered and analyzed through the lens of classical philosophy. At its core, philosophy focuses on essential questions connected to the human condition, i.e. what it means to be human. This course will give students the opportunity to consider the human condition through four major units: knowledge and philosophical method, conduct, governance and salvation. The course will delve into difficult contemporary issues and questions while giving students an opportunity to engage in deep discussion and critical thinking. While the course will incorporate a wide range of sources from popular culture, including film, television, comic books/graphic novels, music and literature, the foundation of the course curriculum comprises philosophical texts and the avenue of engagement is through close reading, critical thinking and class discussion.

M T H /A RT c ]] D ES I GN S C I E N C E Open to all forms

Prerequisites: Visual Foundation & two trimesters of Geometry

This one-trimester course is intended to provide students with hands-on experience in designing, creating and analyzing two- and three-dimensional geometric structures, sculptures and models using a variety of media (including paper, wood, metal, ceramics, etc.). Students successfully completing this course would receive one trimester credit in Arts and one trimester credit in Mathematics. Possible topics and projects include tessellations, polyhedra, Platonic solids, Archimedean solids and the mathematics and design of commercial packaging. Class periods for this course would include lecture/demonstration and hands-on labs. One or two field trips to local manufacturing facilities and art museums would be included. Each student will maintain a daily journal containing research assignments, design sketches, and potential ideas relating to class projects. The resources of the Arts Center, the Welding Lab, and the Fab Lab would be utilized for the hands-on part of this course. Offered spring.

S C I / T R S c c ] EN E R GY & ET H I C S Open to IV, V, VI

Prerequisites: one trimester of Bible Studies or World Religions and one trimester of Chemistry or Physics

Anthropogenic climate change is not just a scientific fact — it is a moral issue. To give context to this great moral issue of our time, “Energy and Ethics” is a trimester elective that embraces the relationship between our ethical choices and energy production and usage. The course will begin with some exploration of the language and history of ethics, including both classical and religious perspectives. We will splice this knowledge with an exploration of the physics and chemistry of energy, and how this knowledge has been used to power the infrastructure of our society and economy. This is a course in seeing these connections. This will be done through discussions, readings, lectures and experiments all drawn from the best classical and current literature. The heart of the course will then be the question: What are the impacts of those decisions and how should we act to address them as moral citizens in our local communities and in the world community? Available spring only.

H S S a / . GL O BA L S T U D I ES Open to VI As peoples and cultures are brought into closer contact in the 21st century, this seminar-style yearlong course will allow students to study how these exchanges shape the world in which they live and will hopefully lead. The course will begin with an examination of the forces of globalization, focusing on political, economic and cultural theories. After a preliminary exploration of international relations and global challenges, students will focus in greater depth on one country and the development of a research-based independent study. Students will then travel to the selected country during the spring vacation for field research before returning to campus and producing a thesis-length paper to be defended before a committee and shared with the larger St. George’s School community.

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CREATIVE & PERFORMING ARTS A RT - ./ , - .- , - .] V I S UA L FO U N D AT I O N Open to all forms Have you ever wondered what it would be like to be able to draw the things that you see? This course will help you to discover talents you never knew you possessed. Visual Foundation, a prerequisite for all other studio-based art courses, introduces students to the fundamental concepts of two-dimensional and three-dimensional art. Students develop a comprehensive visual vocabulary as they actively confront visual issues and problems in the studio. The course emphasizes the importance of drawing as a primary tool for the development of visual ideas. Media such as pencil, charcoal and ink help students investigate various solutions to visual projects as they build technical skills. A broad range of formal concerns is presented through a series of sequential two-dimensional exercises. Exercises in the use of line, perspective and value will be explored in a sequence that builds in complexity as the semester progresses. Students will observe the work of professional artists for inspiration and learn to evaluate their own solutions and those of their peers through regular group discussion. Offered fall (201), winter (202) and spring (203).

M U S - . /, - . ] M U S I C F O U N D AT I O N Open to all forms This course is designed for students who have little or no background in music, or for those with some playing experience who want to augment their overall musicianship. As an introduction to the fundamentals of music, students study music notation, theory, reading, listening, history and composition. Basic keyboard skills are introduced and incorporated into the class. Computer-based learning using “MuseScore� provides opportunities to compose music based on the styles and genres covered in class.

T H E - . /, - . ] T H EAT ER FO U N D AT I O N I Open to all forms Theater Foundation is a trimester course designed to introduce students to the basic skills required to perform onstage. By examining the foundational skills of vocal projection, active listening, diction, presence, physical awareness, and script analysis, students gain understandings and abilities within the art of performance. These serve students beyond the art form as well, with clear benefit to public speaking, leadership, and problem-solving. Students learn and experience the importance of connecting to the imagination, committing to the present moment, and engaging in a creative process. A series of performances serve as formative assessments throughout the semester, including individual monologues, an open-ended dialogue, stage combat, and a scene-study as part of the final exam. Students craft and receive constructive feedback from both peers and instructor through each project. Offered fall (201) and winter (202).

T H E - / - T H EAT ER F O U N DAT I O N I I Open to all forms Theater Foundation II is a trimester course designed to further the practical application of skills to the concepts introduced in Theater Foundation I. Building upon the fundamentals of the actor’s process and qualities of mind, body and voice, students study a modern play in depth. The trimester is devoted to bringing that play to life onstage through hands-on projects in set and costume design, based in script analysis. The culminating project is a presentation of a set model and costume renderings, which student craft using resources such as the Fab Lab. Students craft and receive constructive feedback from both peers and instructor through each project. Emphasis falls on authentic, student-directed learning, as students make all creative decisions for their final projects.

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MUS --- SONGWRITING Open to all forms

Prerequisites: Music Foundation

This intermediate course is designed for students who already have a basic foundation in music reading and writing skills. Students will delve beyond basic music theory and examine elements of songwriting: harmony, form, lyric writing and arranging. Basic keyboard skills are reinforced and computer-based composing programs used extensively. In addition to composing their own songs, students will also research and present biographical and analytical reports on famous songwriters through history. Offered winter only.

M U S - ] ] A M E R I C A N PO P Open to all forms This course examines the social, technological and economics forces that fueled the creation of carious popular music styles through the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries. Emphasis is placed on events, individuals and musical styles, comparing and contrasting the influences each had on the other through the scope of the material covered. Basic musical concepts will also be introduced (simple music theory, song form, etc.) that will provide the students the ability to understand what they are listening to and how it fits into each historical era. Offered spring only.

A R T/ S C I ] . /- - PR I N C I P L ES O F E N G I N E ER I N G Open to all forms

Prerequisites: Visual Foundation & Chemistry

This two-trimester course is a survey course of engineering. The course exposes students to some of the major concepts that they will encounter in a postsecondary engineering course of study including materials, proposal writing, research and fabrication. Students will have the opportunity to develop skills and understanding of concepts through problem-based learning. Used in combination with a team approach, this course challenges students to continually hone their interpersonal skills, creative abilities and problem-solving skills by using engineering concepts. It also allows students to develop strategies to enable and direct their own learning, which is the ultimate goal of education. Students will employ engineering and scientific concepts in the solution of engineering design problems. Students will develop problem-solving skills and apply their knowledge of research and design to create solutions to various challenges. Students will also learn how to document their work and communicate their solutions to their peers and faculty members.

A RT ] // , ] /- , ] /] F I N E A R T PH OTO G R A P H Y Open to all forms

Prerequisite: Visual Foundation

Anyone can take a photograph. You may have already taken hundreds of photographs during your lifetime. But what makes a photographic image truly captivating? Astonishing? Evocative? Memorable? It takes far more than pointing and shooting a camera. We engage in an ongoing discussion of the breadth of possibilities in the visual art of photography as students become comfortable using their cameras and the most current photographic software. This trimester-long course explores the techniques and applications of acquiring, manipulating and outputting digitized photographic images utilizing Adobe Photoshop. The technical skills for digital photography are covered including reďŹ nement of exposure, post-image capture processing and print manipulation. Assignments range from specific exercises with depth of ďŹ eld, portraiture, landscape and abstraction. Students are expected to engage fully in critiques and classroom discussions. Students must provide their own DSLR camera and tripod. Offered fall (311) and spring (313).

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A RT ] -- , ] -] J O U R N A LI S T I C PH OTO G R A P H Y Open to all forms

Prerequisite: Visual Foundation

This course will explore the way images are used in contemporary art, media and culture. Students will be introduced to the key issues surrounding photography now, led through these questions by lectures, readings, group discussion and project-based work. This trimester-long course explores the techniques and applications of acquiring, manipulating and outputting digitized photographic images utilizing Adobe Photoshop. A series of photo assignments challenge the students to integrate critical thought, exploring a range of formal strategies and thematic frameworks that affect the meaning of their images. Students should have a strong interest in the history, influence and technical aspects of photography. They should be motivated to work independently and experiment creatively. Students must provide their own DSLR camera and tripod. Offered winter (322) and spring 323).

A RT ] ]/ C ] D D ES I G N C L AY A RT ] ]- W ] D D ES I G N W O O D A RT ] ]] M ] D D ES I G N M ETA L S Open to all forms

Prerequisite: Visual Foundation

Learn how to weld, make pottery, shape wood and protect an egg from a 150-foot fall — all in the series of three, single-trimester courses. 3D: Clay, 3D: Wood and 3D: Metal focus on specific materials and the use of both additive and subtractive methods of construction. Three-Dimensional Design, a studio art elective, offers students an opportunity to explore a wide range of threedimensional form with emphasis on formal vocabulary and the development of an idea. Design problems evolve through the three phases of the creative process: discussion of criteria and development of preliminary ideas, translation of ideas into two-dimensional drawings and execution of plans into three-dimensional objects. Students learn to balance practical issues of function with the formal issues relating to aesthetics. Hand-building ceramic techniques are used in the production of functional ceramics. Students continue to use clay as a medium as they experiment by making scale models for projects, which will be made by using a variety of materials and methods. Formal exercises in wood, paper and welded steel emphasize the structural capabilities of line, plane and volume. Students learn to operate hand and power tools safely in the three-dimensional design studio. The text employed is Block and Leisure’s “Understanding Three Dimension.” Offered fall (331C Clay or 331M Metals) winter (332W Wood) and spring (333M Metals or 333W Wood). On the Course Planning Worksheet, please note which materials are offered in which trimesters, and specify a preference, using Alternate to name a second choice.

A RT ] c- -D PR I N T M A K I N G Open to all forms

Prerequisite: Visual Foundation

Learn how to weld, make pottery, shape wood and protect an egg from a 150-foot fall — all in the series of three, single-trimester courses. 3D: Clay, 3D: Wood and 3D: Metal focus on specific materials and the use of both additive and subtractive methods of construction. Three-Dimensional Design, a studio art elective, offers students an opportunity to explore a wide range of threedimensional form with emphasis on formal vocabulary and the development of an idea. Design problems evolve through the three phases of the creative process: discussion of criteria and development of preliminary ideas, translation of ideas into two-dimensional drawings and execution of plans into three-dimensional objects. Students learn to balance practical issues of function with the formal issues relating to aesthetics. Hand-building ceramic techniques are used in the production of functional ceramics. Students continue to use clay as a medium as they experiment by making scale models for projects, which will be made by using a variety of materials and methods. Formal exercises in wood, paper and welded steel emphasize the structural capabilities of line, plane and volume. Students learn to operate hand and power tools safely in the three-dimensional design studio. The text employed is Block and Leisure’s “Understanding Three Dimension.” Offered fall (331C Clay or 331M Metals) winter (332W Wood) and spring (333M Metals or 333W Wood). On the Course Planning Worksheet, please note which materials are offered in which trimesters, and specify a preference, using Alternate to name a second choice.

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A RT ] a] -D D R AW I N G Open to all forms

Prerequisite: Visual Foundation

2D Drawing offers further exploration of the drawing concepts and skills introduced in Visual Foundation. Composition, line, perspective, value, spatial relationships and the portrait are reviewed and applied to more complex situations. In addition, a color drawing is introduced as well as several projects based on personal ideas and self-expression. This course can serve as a preparation for the Advanced Portfolio courses and students may use artwork created in this class to supplement their portfolio.

A RT ] o] -D PA I N T I N G Open to all forms

Prerequisite: Visual Foundation

This course is an excellent opportunity to use color, learn a variety of painting techniques and become familiar with master painters both past and present. Through the use of acrylic paint and other water-based media, a series of painting projects will be pursued in an effort to develop a variety of skills, techniques and aesthetic concepts. Students will first be introduced to the rudiments of color theory, focusing on the interaction of hue, value and intensity. The elements of art will be introduced and used to guide students to develop thoughtful compositions. Subjects of study include still life, landscape and self-portrait. Master painters from the Renaissance, to contemporary will be introduced through images within the context of specific assignments. Each project will culminate in a formal critique in which class participation is crucial. Painting is open to all forms although Visual Foundation is a prerequisite. Work executed in this course can be used to supplement the Advanced Studio Art Portfolio. Offered spring only (363).

A RT ] q- D O C U M E N TA R Y V I D EO Open to all forms

Prerequisite: Visual Foundation

We live in a world in which we have access to powerful computer tools and emergent technologies. In this studio course, we explore the creation of complex digital images and the many ways in which video can support creative expression. Students develop projects and occupy the roles of creator, subject and audience. As such, this course is lab-based and hands-on. The goal is to craft documentary videos that can be analyzed both in terms of their intended impact and their ability to elicit an empathetic experience. Classroom activities and projects focus on the use of Adobe Premiere editing software. Student assessment is based on the quality of and ability to present a cohesive narrative, and on acquired technical competence. Students must supply their own tripod and DSLR camera. Offered fall (371), and spring (373) depending on enrollment.

A RT ] s] V I D EO A N I M AT I O N Open to all forms

Prerequisite: Visual Foundation

This one-trimester elective will focus specifically on the use of video cameras and editing software for producing animated films. Students will increase their knowledge of the process of animation from initial concept and storyboarding through final rendering by using animation software and studying both traditional and digital animation techniques. Animation refers to the creation of a sequence of images, drawn, painted or produced by other artistic methods that change over time to portray the illusion of motion. Beginning with the technique known as “stop motion,� the class will implement the Mac Lab to experiment using computer generated imagery (CGI). Student assessment is based on the quality of and ability to use animation to artistically express themselves and effectively tell a concise story through animation. Students must supply their own tripod and DSLR camera. Offered winter (382) and spring (383).

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T H E c . /, c . ] T H EAT ER CO M PA N Y Open to all forms

Prerequisite: Theater Foundation I or completion of art requirement

Modeled after a small professional theatre company, the course provides cohesive and experiential study of theatrical production for students interested in any area of theatre: performance, design, and/or technology. Through student-driven, faculty-supported production of a short play, students will take on all necessary responsibilities and leadership as they acquire and practice both practical and critical skills in acting, directing, management, construction, and theatrical design. The course is tailored according to the specific interests and goals of students in each class cohort. While the course culminates in a single live production to be presented for the community, performing in the production is only required for students who enter the class as declared actors; likewise, actors are not required to contribute the design or technical aspects of the production. Collaboration amongst these areas, however, will be strongly encouraged and supported. Productions will range from classical to contemporary and student-written pieces. Each production process will, through the theatrical lens, explore a timely and thoughtful social question pertaining to the school community and wider world.

A RT c /. /A D R AW I N G & - D D ES I G N ( A ) Open to IV, V & VI

Prerequisite: Visual Foundation

This full-year portfolio course is designed to address a very broad interpretation of drawing and two-dimensional design issues. Light and shade, line quality, rendering of form, composition, surface manipulation and illusion of depth are drawing issues that will be addressed during the first half of the year. The elements of design (line, shape, illusion of space and motion, pattern, texture, value and color) and ordering principles (proportion/scale, rhythm, hierarchy, symmetry/balance and unity) help guide students in making coherent and meaningful decisions relating to composition. The elements are explored and used as a means of artistic expression. The principles help guide students in making decisions about how to organize the elements.

A RT c ]. /A ] D D ES I GN (A ) Open to IV, V & VI

Prerequisite: Visual Foundation

Three-Dimensional Design Portfolio, a full-year elective, explores a wide range of three-dimensional concepts. Concepts, such as space, plane, volume, form, light and texture are explored through a series of three-dimensional exercises. Additive, subtractive and fabricated processes are utilized to articulate design ideas into coherent three-dimensional solutions. Students are expected to demonstrate a variety of skills, which include traditional sculpture, architectural models, ceramics, wood and metal work as well as industrial design prototypes. Students explore the work of professional artists, designers and architects for ideas and inspiration. Students learn to evaluate their own solutions and those of their peers through regular critiques. Sixteen finished sculptures will be produced (8 breadth, 8 concentration) in accordance with the guidelines suggested by the College Board. Students will have the option of submitting their completed portfolio to the College Board to receive an Advanced Placement score.

M T H /A RT c ]] D ES I GN S C I E N C E Open to all forms

Prerequisites: Visual Foundation and two trimesters of Geometry

This one-trimester course is intended to provide students with hands-on experience in designing, creating and analyzing two- and three-dimensional geometric structures, sculptures and models using a variety of media (including paper, wood, metal, ceramics, etc.). Students successfully completing this course would receive one trimester credit in Arts and one trimester credit in Mathematics. Possible topics and projects include tessellations, polyhedra, Platonic solids, Archimedean solids and the mathematics and design of commercial packaging. Class periods for this course would include lecture/demonstration and hands-on labs. One or two field trips to local manufacturing facilities and art museums would be included. Each student will maintain a daily journal containing research assignments, design sketches, and potential ideas relating to class projects. The resources of the Arts Center, the Welding Lab, and the Fab Lab would be utilized for the hands-on part of this course. Offered spring.

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A RT c c/ , c c] A RC H I T EC T U R E Open to V & VI

Prerequisite: Visual Foundation

Architecture may be taken as a one- or two-trimester course. Students may participate in only the first term if they choose, or, stay for deeper project work and analysis in the spring. In this course, students embark on a journey of investigation, creativity and discovery. Focusing on design thinking and a wide range of 2D and 3D techniques, students are asked to solve a problem related to architectural and interior design. Through a series of hands on exercises, students explore formal concepts, design elements and principles, and history common to architecture, interior architecture, landscape architecture and industrial design. Alternative building techniques, sustainability, and “green building” are also investigated. Analytical skills and understanding are reinforced through critique, written assignments and field trips. Maintaining a notebook of design ideas, sketches, notes and research is a key part of the course. The course culminates with a final project, where students are asked to create a tangible presentation that effectively and creatively communicates their design intentions. Students utilize the Fab Lab and Mac Lab to create their final presentations. The project theme will change from winter to spring trimester. Here are a few hypothetical projects that may differentiate the terms: •

Earthship Design: According to architect Michael Reynolds, “the Earthship is the epitome of sustainable design and construction.” Students are introduced to the principles of Earthship design and sustainable building and are asked to design an “Earthship” or earth sheltered home. Students create scale drawings and a model for their final presentation.

Tiny House Design: Students will focus on house design, sustainability and green building techniques as they develop ideas for a small but efficient home. Students create scale drawings and a model for their final presentation.

Tree House Design: Students will focus on house design, structure and building techniques as they develop ideas for a small but efficiency home. Students create scale drawings and a model for their final presentation.

A RT c a] / H ] D / W E LD I N G ( H ) Open to IV, V, VI

Prerequisite: Visual Foundation

This course provides an introduction to welded steel sculpture. Technical and analytical skills are developed as students employ the concepts, vocabulary and techniques practiced in the Three-Dimensional Design Course. Students learn to operate safely the power tools and welding equipment associated with the fabrication of steel sculpture, including oxyacetylene and MIG methods. The course begins with research and discussion related to the history of 20th century sculpture, with a written paper presented to the class in a seminar format. Students build intermediary models prior to executing full-scale designs. A journal of drawings, research and personal observations is maintained as a method for organizing and developing potential plans. The semester culminates in a large-scale steel sculpture of each student’s individual design. The text used is Nathan Cabot Hale’s “Creating Welded Sculpture.” Offered spring only.

T H E a . ] D R A M AT I C L I T ER AT U R E Open to all forms

Prerequisite: Theater Foundation I or completion of art requirement

The course is devoted to American playwrights and their audiences; the basis of the course is in-class readings and discussion, culminating in a playwriting project. Modern plays include those that explore topics of class, race, gender and war, and vary from term to term. Students will conduct in- and out-of-class writing exercises and workshops while discussing each other’s works-in-progress. Playwriting topics include examination of the “status quo,” various dramatic structures, the protagonist’s journey and how dialogue reveals character.

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HUMANITIES E N G / . . J O U R N E Y S I N L I T ER AT U R E Open to III An introductory course to the study of literature, English 100: Journeys through Literature equips students with the skills necessary to engage thoughtfully and critically with a variety of texts — written and visual, ancient and contemporary — and thus with the world around them. Through the conceptual framework of the journey, students explore both the internal and external aspects of identity, and practice fundamental literary analysis skills through a variety of core texts. Students develop essential writing skills of creative thought, critical reflection and skillful revision through processed-based writing assignments. On their journey into the nature of identity, students make connections across texts and experiences, both academic and personal, striving to make the texts and skills their own and, like the characters they encounter, to find their way to a new understanding of themselves and their world.

E N G - . . E X PA N D I N G H O R I Z O N S Open to IV English 200: Expanding Horizons develops the student’s maturing skills in critical reading and expository writing through the exploration of new worlds in literature. Students will read novels, plays, short stories and poetry by international writers who address universal human themes: love and loyalty; coming-of-age; and societies and individuals in conflict. Works may include Ibsen’s “A Doll’s House;” Fugard’s “Master Harold ... and the Boys;” Lahiri’s “The Interpreter of Maladies;” and Shakespeare’s “Macbeth.” In addition to developing formal essay-writing skills, students learn how to approach texts from multiple perspectives through varying exercises: critical response discussion and debate; staging dramatic readings; creative writing that mimics the author’s style; and journal entries. In this way students earn a respect for the craft of writing, understand the responses literature evokes from its readers, and appreciate the impact of literature on society.

H S S - / . T H E M O D ER N W O R L D Open to III & IV This yearlong course takes a comparative, interdisciplinary approach to modern world history and is designed to inspire an understanding and appreciation of the fundamental forces that have shaped the globe since the 15th century. Students will examine the beginnings of industrialization, the emergence of the nation-state system, the rise of global inequality and the changing nature of the interrelationship between humankind and the environment. Further, students will explore the ways historians utilize and produce information in the ever-contested past. Course materials will emphasize the diverse nature of texts, all while calling on students to apply historical thinking and knowledge to comprehend the contemporary world. Modern World History is the department’s foundational course. As such, it seeks to empower students with the ability to build historical knowledge, develop sophisticated historical methodologies, craft substantive historical arguments, analyze nuanced historical narratives and use historical perspective to engage in active citizenship.

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H S S - - . A S I A N C I V I L I Z AT I O N S Open to IV (III by invitation) Note: grants 3 history credits and 1 theology credit Asia is home to great civilizations that at one time were the most powerful in the world. In the late 20th and early 21st century, this region has been returning to global power. Students of history are compelled to ask, what circumstances, experiences and values gave rise to these societies? In this class, students study the underpinnings of Asian civilizations through an interdisciplinary approach that includes history, religion, philosophy and the arts. Students study the history of China, Korea, Japan and India to understand how these regions developed from the ancient era until the “Arrival of the West” in the 19th century. Special focus is on the evolution of politics and culture in India and China over the 20th century. The main text for the course is Rhoads Murphey’s “A History of Asia” (Sixth Edition). Supplemental texts include Benjamin Hoff’s “The Tao of Pooh,” Richard Kim’s “Lost Names,” website readings, films, and multiple articles and book chapter excerpts. Assessments will include reading and geography quizzes, short papers, oral presentations, tests, a mid-term exam, a final exam and a research paper in the second trimester. Completion of Asian Civilizations fulfills one semester or one trimester of the graduation requirement in Theology & Religious Studies.

E N G - c . / H W O R L D L I T E R AT U R E (H ) Open to IV by invitation Students who are able readers, independent thinkers and curious about the world may apply for this honors course, covering a range of great works of Western and non-Western world literature, from “The Epic of Gilgamesh” to Majmudar’s “Partitions.” Each trimester focuses on a theme: the quest; the tension between individual and society; and the pursuit of knowledge. Discussion and close reading encourage identification of the human constants and cultural differences reflected in these works. Assignments provide students with opportunities to hone their skills as analytical readers and persuasive writers. Among works recently studied: “Faust,” “Emma,” “The Assault,” “The Reluctant Fundamentalist,” “Siddhartha,” “The Guide,” “The Wild Duck,” “Frankenstein,” “Twelfth Night,” short stories, and poems from “A Book of Luminous Things.”

E N G - a / , -a ] GE R O N I M O S E M I N A R Open to IV, V (for Geronimo crews, one-term, replacing yearlong English in the term of voyage) The Geronimo Seminar replaces English class for the trimester in which students are sailing on Geronimo. The course augments the on-ship experience from a literary, theoretical and philosophical perspective. Students read essays and stories and poetry about adventure, coastal ecosystems, island cultures, and the water. They dive deep into the concept of the Hero's Journey, and explore the nuances of team dynamics and development. Through this course students maintain an intensive journal that allows for individual self-reflection and discovery related to their experiences on Geronimo as an adventurer, crew mate, ecologist and more. For the other two trimesters, students enroll in standard or honors English classes along with their form peers.

E N G ] . . A M ER I C A N L I T ER AT U R E Open to V A full-year course that focuses upon American literature, the class presents texts from both traditional and contemporary sources. Coursework frequently intersects with the U.S. History curriculum. By addressing the texts themselves and their intellectual, cultural and historical contexts, students gain a better understanding of the nature of the nation as a whole. The skills of textual analysis come to the forefront as students build upon the lessons introduced in the third- and fourth-forms and gain familiarity with the exercise of close reading, argument formulation and persuasive writing. Students who show a particular affinity and aptitude for language analysis may be invited to sit for the AP Language and Composition exam in May. The final project for the year is a literary research paper on a novel of the students’ own choice, an essay that requires they put into practice the skills gained during the year and models the kind of independently driven scholarship that they will be asked to perform during the sixth-form year and beyond in college.

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H S S ] . ./A EU RO P EA N H I S TO RY ( A ) Open to IV, V VI by invitation This course examines European history in-depth from the Renaissance to the present and is designed for students who possess an intense interest in the study of history as well as strong reading and writing skills. Students study the critical events, trends and people that shaped European history. An important element of the course is analyzing and interpreting primary source documents, such as Machiavelli’s “The Prince;” Locke’s “Second Treatise on Government;” Voltaire’s “Candide;” and Hitler’s “Mein Kampf.” Students prepare in-class oral presentations, computer-generated presentations and write a major research paper. This course prepares students for the Advanced Placement Examination in May. Texts for the course may include McKay, Hill and Buckler’s “A History of Western Society;” Tierney’s “Great Issues in Western Civilization;” Bolt’s “A Man for All Seasons” and Koestler’s: Darkness at Noon.” Manchester’s “A World Lit Only by Fire: The Medieval Mind and the Renaissance” is assigned as the summer reading selection in preparation for this course.

T R S ] / /, ] / -, ] / ] B I B L E S T U D I ES / H E B R E W S C R I P T U R E Open to III & IV This course will provide an overview of the major books of the Hebrew Bible, known to Christians as the Old Testament. Students will become familiar with the Pentateuch (the first five books of the Bible), the major historical and poetical books (1 and 2 Samuel, 1 and 2 Kings, Psalms, Song of Solomon, Job, etc.) and the prophets (Isaiah, Jeremiah etc.). They will learn to think critically about biblical texts and to interpret the Bible in a modern context, including consideration of how the biblical stories relate to current conflicts in Israel-Palestine. Among other topics, we will discuss questions that the Hebrew Bible raises about the nature of God, the existence of evil, and the meaning of history.

T R S ] - /, ] - -, ] - ] W O R L D R E L I G I O N S Open to III & IV This course examines five of the major religions of the world: Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam and Judaism. Readings from the sacred scriptures of each religion are studied (the Pali Canon, the Old Testament and the New Testament, the Vedas, the Qur’an and the Tanakh). Students investigate an area of personal interest by undertaking a project that examines a particular religion in closer detail. Students in this course will develop religious literacy, comfort in interfaith settings, and the sensitivities needed to engage in meaningful interreligious and cross-cultural relationships.

T R S ] ] /, ] ] -, ] ] ] B I B L E S T U D I ES / N E W T ES TA M E N T Open to III & IV Whether you would describe yourself as an atheist, an agnostic, or a devout believer, you are probably familiar with at least some of the stories about Jesus that appear in the Christian Bible. No matter what your religious background – or lack thereof – this course will introduce you to the basic stories of what Christians call the New Testament. Students will read and compare the four Gospels, each of which tells the story of Jesus’s life in different and sometimes conflicting ways. They will also discuss, among other readings, selections from the letters of Paul, who is widely considered the founder of the Christian Church. We will study the historical context of the New Testament writings and the ways in which they were shaped by social, cultural, and political events, and we will try to understand the meaning of the New Testament teachings and stories in the context of modern events.

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H S S c . . U . S . H I S TO RY Open to V & VI This yearlong course provides a survey of American history from the pre-contact era through the modern world. Specific themes include political and economic factors that have influenced the major events in America’s past, the history of America’s expansion into world affairs and the role of women, African-, Native- and Hispanic-Americans in the development of the United States. More generally, this course seeks to give students broad exposure to the survey of American History, while teaching them to think from a variety of perspectives and connect historical patterns over time. Students complete nightly assigned reading from the main textbook “The Americans” (Littell) while supplementing their knowledge through primary and secondary sources. Additional assignments will consist of tests and quizzes on content, short writing assignments, in-class debates, research essays and collaborative projects. Significant attention is given to note-taking, research skills, historiography and critical analysis. Each student writes a final essay on a topic of their choosing which will highlight their mastery of the aforementioned skills.

T R S c / /, c / -, c / ] FA I T H & D O U B T Open to IV, V, VI

Prerequisite: one trimester of Bible Studies or World Religions

Spiritual memoirs are among the most engaging and thought-provoking forms of literature because they are personal stories that deal with enduring questions about human mortality, the meaning of life, and the existence of the Divine. Although the authors studied in this course come from different time periods and faith traditions, they share a desire to connect with a power greater than themselves. They write honestly about their struggles with doubt and failure, as well as hope and joy, in their paths toward a deeper relationship with the Divine. Authors may include Teresa of Avila, St. Augustine, N. Scott Momaday, Maxine Hong Kingston, Anne Lamott, Andrew Krivak, Immaculée Ilibagiza, Gretel Ehrlich, Simon Weil, and Karen Armstrong. Offered winter (412) and spring (413).

H S S c - ./A U . S . H I S TO RY ( A ) Open to V & VI by invitation Like HSS400, Advanced U.S. History provides a survey of American history from the pre-contact era through the modern world. In contrast to HSS400, as an Advanced course HSS420 challenges students to take the extra steps necessary to read deeply, think critically, and write analytically along lines similar to what students will encounter in a college seminar. The course explores themes that include the political and economic factors that have influenced major events in America’s development, physical expansion, foreign policy and relationships, experiences in war, and issues of race, gender, ethnicity, language, culture and historiography – accounting for the historian’s point of view. Students will engage with primary sources, document-based questions, debate, analysis, and other essential preparations for the Advanced Placement exam in U.S, history.

T R S c - /, c - -, c - ] F R E E D O M , D EC I S I O N & ET H I C S Open to IV, V, VI

Prerequisite: one trimester of Bible Studies or World Religions

An introduction to the study of ethics, this course identifies from the outset two dominant ways of approaching moral questions. The first asks, “What should we do in difficult situations?” The second, following a more ancient tradition, asks, “What kind of people should we be?” In this course, we engage the study of ethics from both perspectives as we examine various accounts of the nature and purpose of humanity (biblical, Greek, enlightenment and post-modern). The course also engages difficult contemporary moral issues and dilemmas including energy and the environment, economic and social inequality and the tensions of freedom and responsibility in the information age. Students become familiar with key terms used in ethical philosophy and learn though engagement with primary texts and biographical histories of moral courage. This course demands a great amount of critical reading and thinking and also aims to be an encouraging catalyst for living lives of service to the world.

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S C I / T R S c c ] EN E R GY & ET H I C S Open to IV, V, VI

Prerequisites: : one trimester of Bible Studies or World Religions and one trimester of Chemistry or Physics

Anthropogenic climate change is not just a scientific fact — it is a moral issue. To give context to this great moral issue of our time, “Energy and Ethics” is a trimester elective that embraces the relationship between our ethical choices and energy production and usage. The course will begin with some exploration of the language and history of ethics, including both classical and religious perspectives. We will splice this knowledge with an exploration of the physics and chemistry of energy, and how this knowledge has been used to power the infrastructure of our society and economy. This is a course in seeing these connections. This will be done through discussions, readings, lectures and experiments all drawn from the best classical and current literature. The heart of the course will then be the question: What are the impacts of those decisions and how should we act to address them as moral citizens in our local communities and in the world community? Available spring only.

E N G c a . /A E N GL I S H : A M E R I C A N S T U D I ES (A ) Open to V & VI by invitation Students who enroll in English 450 also enroll in History 450/A: Advanced Placement United States History/American Studies, offered by the history department. A chronological survey of American literature and culture, the course will cover the full sweep of American literary/cultural history from the Puritans to the present. Readings will be designed to complement and enrich topics being covered in history. English and history teachers will collaborate in developing assignments, and the final assessment of the year will be completed for both classes. Texts will be chosen based on interdisciplinary interest and intrinsic literary merit. Students will learn how to be critical readers of texts both written and visual in order to be thoughtful analysts and consumers of American culture, ideology, and history. The reading pace will be brisk. There will be, on average, a test or essay once a week. On many days, students will be asked to offer a 10-minute analysis of a selected theme or quotation from the daily reading or a full-period essay on the topic under discussion. Works will include, fiction and poetry, as well as speeches, memoirs, and literary non-fiction by a range of authors including Arthur Miller, Henry David Thoreau, James Baldwin and Ta-Nehisi Coates. Students will also be prepared to sit for the Advanced Placement English Language and Composition exam.

H S S c a ./A H I S TO R Y: A M ER I C A N S T U D I ES (A ) Open to V & VI by invitation Students who enroll in History 450 also enroll in English 450/A: Advanced Placement United States History/American Studies, offered by the history department. A chronological survey of American history and culture, the course will cover the full sweep of American literary/cultural history from the Puritans to the present. Readings will be designed to complement and enrich topics being covered in English. English and history teachers will collaborate in developing assignments, and the final assessment of the year will be completed for both classes. Texts will be chosen based on interdisciplinary interest and intrinsic literary merit. Students will learn how to be critical readers of texts both written and visual in order to be thoughtful analysts and consumers of American culture, ideology, and history. The reading pace will be brisk. There will be, on average, a test or essay once a week. On many days, students will be asked to offer a 10-minute analysis of a selected theme or quotation from the daily reading or a full-period essay on the topic under discussion. Works will include, primary source documents from the Articles of Confederation through the Pentagon Papers, as well as key texts from John Locke, Adam Smith, Ida B. Wells, W.E.B. DuBois, Margaret Sanger and Martin Luther King, Jr.. Students will also be prepared to sit for the Advanced Placement U.S. History exam.

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E N G a / . G LO BA L W R I T I N G Open to VI A yearlong course for seniors that, within the context of global contemporary writing, emphasizes multi-staged, processed-based writing assignments that cultivate independence, critical thinking, collaboration, and research. The readings are selected for their relevance to issues current in the 21st century, especially those related to global culture. Such subjects may include technology, economic globalization, environmental issues, and cultural hybridization. Readings will include fiction, creative nonfiction, and longform journalism — printed and digital — all written since 2000. A portion of the readings will be selected by each student using concepts and skills designed to develop cultural literacy and literary culture. These “choice reading” units will require independent reading and research, as well as writing and oral presentation. As a final project for the course, each student will develop, research, refine, write, and submit a final project on which they work for a significant portion of the final third of the year.

H S S a / . GL O BA L S T U D I ES Open to VI As peoples and cultures are brought into closer contact in the 21st century, this seminar-style yearlong course will allow students to study how these exchanges shape the world in which they live and will hopefully lead. The course will begin with an examination of the forces of globalization, focusing on political, economic and cultural theories. After a preliminary exploration of international relations and global challenges, students will focus in greater depth on one country and the development of a research-based independent study. Students will then travel to the selected country during the spring vacation for field research before returning to campus and producing a thesis-length paper to be defended before a committee and shared with the larger St. George’s School community.

T R S a / /, a / -, a / ] E V I L & J U S T I C E Open to IV, V, VI

Prerequisite: one trimester of Bible Studies or World Religions

Are humans innately good, or are we born with a propensity toward sin? Why does evil exist, and how should we respond when we encounter it? What does true justice look like, and what are the strengths and weaknesses of the criminal justice system in the United States? These are some of the questions that we will address in this course. We will begin by looking at scriptural and secular writings that reflect on the human capacity for violence and compassion. The rest of the trimester will be dedicated to examining real-life examples of crime and punishment. We will read an account of the trial of the notorious Nazi, Adolph Eichmann; selections from a memoir by a death row lawyer; a book by a Jesuit priest who works with gang members; and a collection of essays by prominent contemporary writers on matters of race, equality, and justice.

E N G a - . M A R I T I M E L I T E R AT U R E Open to VI A yearlong course for seniors that, within the context of mari-time issues, literature and culture, draws on St. George’s unique setting and history through multistaged, processed-based writing assignments that cultivate independence, critical thinking, collaboration and research. In addition to classic readings in the literature of the sea, texts are selected for their relevance to issues current in maritime studies. Such subjects may include: the meaning and consequences of adventure and discovery; climate change and weather patterns; the sea as a creator, connector and a divider of cultures; the sea as an agent of change; human interaction with the sea; and the sea as refuge. Readings will include fiction, creative nonfiction and long-form journalism — printed and digital. A portion of the course will focus on fieldwork as inspiration for student writing, drawing on St. George’s place in the Atlantic world. As a final project, each student will develop, research, refine, write and submit a final project on which they work for a significant portion of the final third of the year.

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H S S a - / W O R L D WA R I I Open to VI

Prerequisite: U.S. History

This trimester course will focus on World War II specifically, the rise and fall of Nazi Germany. The required text is “The Nazi Seizure of Power” by William Sheridan Allen. This book focuses on the Nazi seizure of power in one German town, Northeim. In addition, Allen explores the nature of Nazi rule in Northeim during WW II. Students will choose another title to complement the required reading. Assignments will include: reading quizzes, document analysis and essay writing with a research piece. Offered fall only.

HSS a-- VIETNAM Open to VI

Prerequisite: U.S. History

This trimester course follows on History 521, World War II, to focus on the American experience in Vietnam, 1954-1975. The required text is “America’s Longest War” by George Herring. This book is a thorough discussion of these themes: Why America got involved in a major land war in Asia? Why did the American effort not meet with success? What was the impact of the war on the United States — at home? Students will choose another title to complement the required reading. Assignments will include: reading quizzes, document analysis and essay writing with a research piece. Offered winter only.

H S S a - ] R A C E R E L AT I O N S I N U . S . Open to V & VI

Prerequisite: two trimesters of U.S. History

This course focuses on the historical framework that has helped create much of today’s racial discord in the country. After a brief refresher on the Reconstruction Era and the Plessy v. Ferguson case, we will move forward to discuss topics such as racial passing during the Gilded Age and the black migration during the World Wars. With that framework, students will then explore the Brown v. Board decision of 1954 and how its legacy plays out in current racial segregation in American cities and neighborhoods. Other topics will include the widespread use of racial covenants in real estate, the geography of urban poverty and politics and how the war on drugs of the 1980s/1990s has impacted African-Americans. The course will rely on primary and secondary source readings as well as films. Students will be expected to complete a short research paper on a topic of their choosing. Offered spring only.

T R S a - ] W O M EN & T H E B I B L E Open to IV, V, VI

Prerequisite: one trimester of Bible Studies or World Religions

This trimester course will combine elements of historical research, feminist/womanist theology, and exegetical writing. Students will examine the depiction of named and unnamed women in the stories of the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament. Students will also consider the historical status of women in the ancient Near East and first-century Palestine, and will discuss various methods of interpreting scripture in light of that history. In the discussion of interpretative methods, students will read the work of groundbreaking feminist and womanist theologians including Phyllis Trible, Mary Daly, Rosemary Radford Reuther and Delores Williams. The course will culminate in a final exegetical papers as well as a presentation.

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E N G a ] . R EA D I N G T H E V I S U A L WO R L D Open to VI A yearlong course for seniors that prepares students to encounter critically the visual world in which they live through multi-staged, processed-based writing assignments that cultivate independence, critical thinking, collaboration, and research. Course readings will include critical, historical, and theoretical readings about visual language and culture, and the meaning of media. Students will be introduced to the language of visual analysis and interpretation and have the opportunity to apply those new skills to works that interest them, which may include painting, photography, moving images, graphic novels, hybrid texts, and social media forms. The course will include thematic units such as The Self Portrait, historical units such as The Birth of Cinema, and theoretical units, such as Social Media & Meaning. As a final project, each student will develop, research, refine, write, and submit a final project on which they work for a significant portion of the final third of the year.

H S S a ] ] H I S TO R Y O F M ED I C I N E Open to V & VI

Prerequisite: two trimesters of U.S. History

This course will be led as a college-level survey of the history and politics of medicine in post-Civil War America. The course will move through such topics as the othering of groups using disease during America’s forays into imperialism at the turn of the 20th century to grassroots health organization during the New Deal era to the political maneuvering of the HIV/AIDS crisis during the 1980s and 1990s. Students will learn more about the powers of the Supreme Court through close readings of monumental cases such as Roe v. Wade and National Federation of Independent Business v. Sebelius and will engage in the long standing political debates around the government’s role in health care in America.

H S S a c ] PS YC H O LO GY Open to VI This trimester course provides an introduction to one of the most popular college courses. Its unique design promotes skill development in the areas of collaboration, communication, analysis and discovery. After establishing the foundational knowledge of the field, key concepts in psychology will be explored based on student interest and choice. Individual and small group investigations lead to student presentations as units of instruction to their peers in the form of Wikis, video presentations, lectures, discussions and facilitated discussion panels. In addition to the prominent theorists and diagnostic categories, students often choose to explore their interests in the areas of social, abnormal, forensic and sport psychology. An electronic textbook is used for this class along with significant journal articles, other scholarly work and information from contemporary media. Although there is no academic prerequisite, this course requires strong organizational and time management skills, as students will be expected to work independently inside and outside of the classroom. Offered spring only.

E N G o / . /A E N GL I S H L I T ER AT U R E (A ) Open to VI by invitation Exploring rich and challenging literary works can increase students’ skill and pleasure as readers. This college-level course requires participants to examine the ways that writers construct meaning in various genres (novel, drama, story, poetry). In discussion and in written analysis, students improve their ability to deploy the vocabulary and analytical tools that unlock theme, style, tone, imagery and other literary devices. Students requesting this course should be enthusiastic about reading poetry, and prepared to write frequently and participate energetically in discussion. They are also required to take the AP exam. Among longer works studied in recent years: Barker, “Regeneration;” Russo, “Straight Man;” McEwan, “Atonement;” Shakespeare, “Hamlet,” “King Lear;” Wilde, “The Importance of Being Earnest;” Stoppard, “Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead;” Austen, “Pride and Prejudice;” Bronte, “Jane Eyre;” Woolf, “Mrs. Dalloway;” Cunningham, “The Hours.”

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H S S o / ./A A M E R I C A N G OV ER N M E N T (A ) Open to VI by invitation

Prerequisite: U.S. History

This course, a college-level introduction to American government and political science, prepares students for successful completion of the Advanced Placement American Government and Politics exam offered each May. Students develop an understanding of the history and workings of the American political system, including an in-depth examination of the institutions and policy processes of the U.S. Congress, the president, the bureaucracy and the federal courts. Likewise, elections, political parties, interest groups and civil liberties and civil rights issues are studied. Students examine the constitutional underpinnings and critical historical events that have helped to shape the American system of government in order to attain a better understanding of the current workings of the government. Students analyze primary source documents, including decisions from Supreme Court cases and acts of the legislature. Students prepare a significant research paper each semester. The basic text is Lineberry’s “Government in America.” Current events are studied through subscriptions to The Week. This course prepares students for the AP exam. However, students may choose an alternative research project in lieu of the AP exam.

H S S o - ./A EC O N O M I C S (A ) Open to VI by invitation This yearlong course offers a broad examination of the principles of microeconomic theory and macroeconomic analysis. After introducing basic economic history and concepts like opportunity cost, scarcity and choice, the course focuses on marginal utility analysis; the laws of supply and demand; the law of diminishing returns; the costs of production; profit maximization; the theories of the firm in perfect and imperfect competition; and factor markets. Beginning in the second trimester, students focus on macroeconomics. Primary emphasis is placed upon developing an understanding of aggregate demand and supply; monetary and fiscal policy; money and banking; unemployment; Gross Domestic Product; the role of government; currency markets; international trade and current global issues. The course culminates in a substantial research paper that requires each student to use theory from the literature in the analysis of an issue or region of the world of the student’s own choice. Students will be prepared to take the Advanced Placement exams in micro and macroeconomics. The course also examines economics in the larger context of politics, history and public policy and focuses on developing skills applicable to careers in global development, corporate and business law and finance. Texts include Greg Mankiw’s “Principles of Economics,” The Wall Street Journal, and Wheelan’s “Naked Economics.”

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LANGUAGE & CULTURE C H I / .. C H I N ES E I Open to all forms The first year of Chinese introduces the student to radicals, tones and characters. These aspects of Mandarin Chinese make the language unique in the world. In addition, the course provides an introduction to basic Chinese grammar and sentence structure. The primary text used is “Ni Hao,” which is supplemented by short stories and traditional poetry. Students are expected to work on their pronunciation with the use of multimedia to perfect Chinese speech. Progress is monitored closely by means of quizzes and exams to gauge the pace of the class. Upon completion of first-year Chinese, students should be able to carry out basic conversations with residents while traveling in China. A yearlong course.

F R E /. . F R EN C H I Open to all forms We believe that students should study French as it is used in real-life situations and authentic cultural contexts. In French I, therefore, we use a multimedia series to give students a solid foundation in both the language and the culture of contemporary France and the broader francophone world. A wide range of technology further enhances the classroom experience and provides additional language resources. Students create projects using video and PowerPoint to enhance their cultural knowledge and build communication and presentation skills.

L AT / . . L AT I N I Open to all forms Students in Latin I acquire a basic understanding of the structure of this ancient language and develop a working Latin vocabulary. Because Latin is an inflected language, students must wrestle with a radically different linguistic structure. They learn how to be intellectually flexible and verbally precise as they carefully reason their way through a Latin sentence. Readings in Jenney’s “First Year Latin” are supplemented by engaging mythological and cultural readings, and a specific goal is for students to enhance their English vocabulary by learning Latin roots and English derivations.

S PA / . . S PA N I S H I Open to all forms Spanish I is an introductory level yearlong course offered to students with limited or no prior experience with the Spanish language. Spanish I is also designed for students who may benefit from a thorough review of the concepts they acquired during their middle school Spanish study. In this class, students learn vocabulary related to greetings, expressions of courtesy, academic life, family, pastimes, vacations and shopping. Grammar concepts introduced include regular and irregular verbs in the present tense, descriptive and possessive adjectives, direct and indirect objects and pronouns, the present progressive and the preterite tense. In Spanish I, students develop reading, writing and conversational skills through the use of texts, selected readings, workbooks and audiovisual materials. Students practice and demonstrate their language proficiency through individual and partner work, group discussions, journals, voice recordings, projects and formal presentations. Students are required to use the target language at all times in order to provide and partake in an immersion experience in the classroom.

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C H I - .. C H I N ES E I I Open to all forms

Prerequisite: Chinese I

The second year of Chinese continues to build upon the foundation laid in Chinese I. Tones, stroke order and pronunciation are repeatedly stressed to reinforce good habits developed in the first year of study. Increasingly, however, students are encouraged to create sentences and dialogue on their own. The basic text used is “Ni Hao.” Students continue to use various forms of multimedia, but these are supplemented with Chinese software and Chinese-language movies to help students perfect pronunciation and tone. Upon completion of second-year Chinese, students should be able to write 200- to 250-character essays as well as to give oral presentations based on memory. A yearlong course.

F R E -. . F R EN C H I I Open to all forms As in French I, French II uses a broad range of media, from text to film, to encourage students to deepen their knowledge of language and culture. In addition to textbooks, a technology is incorporated into our curriculum in order to create an immersion environment and to expose students to the diversity of the francophone world. This approach helps students develop and strengthen their verbal, listening and writing skills and also supports a variety of learning styles. Students regularly use online resources, thereby gaining immediate access to a wide variety of francophone resources, from magazines and news-papers to cultural and grammar sites.

L AT - . . L AT I N I I Open to all forms

Prerequisite: Latin I

The opening weeks of this course are dedicated to a fast-paced review of the first-year material in the context of reading continuous Latin narratives on Rome’s legendary history. The remainder of first semester focuses on a mastery of advanced topics of grammar, including participles, gerunds, conditions and the subjunctive mood. In the second semester, students translate Caesar’s famous “Commentarii De Bello Gallico” and in so doing, they grapple with the power and nuance of words in both languages.

S PA - . . S PA N I S H I I Open to all forms

Prerequisite: Spanish I

This yearlong course is a continuation of the program and materials presented in Spanish I or its equivalent. It continues to build on the established foundation as it further develops the students’ reading, writing and conversational skills. The class not only reviews the material from Spanish I but also introduces students to more complex sentence structures as well as the use of commands, the future and the present subjunctive tenses. The new vocabulary presented relates to cultural events, celebrations, daily routines, shopping, food, technology, the home, etc. As in Spanish I, communication is a critical component of the Spanish II classroom. Students are required to use Spanish at all times in order to communicate with each other as well as with the teacher in an effort to provide an immersion experience in the classroom. In addition to our study of grammar and vocabulary, we will also explore various cultures and the history of the Spanish-speaking world through selected readings, films and the Internet. A Spanish II Honors section is also offered.

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C H I - -. / H C H I N ES E I I (H ) Open to all forms by invitation

Prerequisite: Chinese I

Designed for students who are particularly motivated to build command of the language, and are willing to devote additional time and effort on a regular basis, Chinese II Honors builds upon the foundation laid in Chinese I, at a faster and deeper pace than Chinese 200. Classes are conducted largely in Chinese; students are expected to create sentences and dialogue on their own, and will cover grammar and vocabulary at a deeper level than Chinese II. The basic text used is “Ni Hao.” Students continue to use various forms of multimedia, but these are supplemented with Chinese software and Chinese-language movies to help students perfect pronunciation and tone. Upon completion of second-year Chinese, students should be able to write 250- to 300-character essays as well as to give oral presentations based on memory. A yearlong course.

F R E -- . / H F R EN C H I I (H ) Open to III & IV by invitation

Prerequisite: French I

As in French I, French II uses a broad range of media from text to film in order to deepen students’ knowledge of language and culture. Designed for students who are particularly motivated to build command of the language, and are willing to devote additional time and effort on a regular basis, French II Honors requires communication as a critical component of the classroom, and will cover grammar and vocabulary at a deeper level than French II. Classes are conducted entirely in French. Students regularly use online resources, thereby gaining immediate access to a wide variety of francophone resources from magazines and newspapers to cultural and grammar sites.

L AT - - ./ H L AT I N I I ( H ) Open to all forms by invitation

Prerequisite: Latin I

Latin 220/H is designed for motivated students who have a genuine interest in Latin, a strong record of achievement in the discipline and a willingness to devote the additional time and effort required of this course. Students in this class tackle the same foundational material as in Latin 200 but at an accelerated pace and with more challenging Latin readings, in-class work, and assessments. They also read more selections from “Commentarii De Bello Gallico” and begin to build their skills of close textual analysis.

S PA - - . / H S PA N I S H I I ( H ) Open to all forms by invitation

Prerequisite: Spanish I

This yearlong course continues to build on the foundation of Spanish I, introducing students to more complex sentence structures as well as the use of commands, the future and the present subjunctive tenses. Designed for students who are particularly motivated to build command of the language, and are willing to devote additional time and effort on a regular basis, Spanish II Honors requires communication as a critical component of the classroom and will cover grammar and vocabulary at a deeper level than Spanish II. Students are required to use Spanish at all times in order to communicate with each other as well as with the teacher in an effort to provide an immersion experience in the classroom. In addition to our study of grammar and vocabulary, we will also explore various cultures and the history of the Spanish-speaking world through selected readings, films and the Internet.

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C H I ] .. C H I N ES E I I I Open to IV, V & VI

Prerequisite: Chinese II

The third year of Chinese focuses on the foundations of the language; however, increasing emphasis is placed on improving reading and writing skills. Students begin to analyze and creatively comment on stories and essays. In spoken Chinese, students make presentations and create skits that are simultaneously sophisticated and practical in nature. The basic text used for this course is “Ni Hao.” Software and other forms of multimedia complement the oral and written materials. Students use PowerPoint presentations to give oral reports. Upon completion of the third year of Chinese, students should be able to achieve a high level of proficiency in the target language, which can be evident in the following areas: reading Chinese newspapers, writing rudimentary research papers, engaging in more complex conversations and spontaneously speaking for minutes at a time. A yearlong course.

F R E ]. . F R EN C H I I I Open to all forms

Prerequisite: French II or II (H)

The goals of French III are to complete the formal study of grammar and to introduce students to serious French literature. “Le Petit Prince” and a variety of short stories are studied, both as a means of enhancing language skills and building analytical skills. Classes are conducted almost entirely in French. Through the use of online resources and films, aspects of modern France and francophone culture are examined. Students are asked to do presentations on French figures, events and/or places.

L AT ] . . L AT I N I I I Open to IV, V & VI

Prerequisite: Latin II or II (H)

Beginning with an intensive grammar review, the third-year course focuses reading extended passages of unedited Latin from a variety of authors. Students learn how to explicate Latin poetry and prose and to write essays analyzing a Latin text. By reading excerpts from authors such as Virgil, Cicero, Catullus and Ovid, students read Latin in different genres and interpret famous primary sources that illuminate the unchanging nature of the human condition.

S PA ] . . / C S PA N I S H I I I C O N V E RS AT I O N Open to all forms

Prerequisite: Spanish II

Spanish III is the continuation of the program and materials presented in Spanish II or its equivalent. In this course, students build on their grammar foundation as they practice the use of previously acquired structures and learn advanced concepts such as the imperfect subjunctive, reciprocal pronouns, the perfect and “if” clauses. Students are required to participate actively and use Spanish at all times in order to provide and partake in an immersion experience in the classroom. To develop and build upon their cultural awareness of the different Spanish speaking countries, students in Spanish III will study short stories and poems from Spanish and Latin American authors, including an adapted version of “El ingenioso hidalgo don Quijote de la Mancha.” This course is divided into two sections: Spanish III and Spanish III Conversation (with an emphasis on oral communication).

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C H I ] -. / H C H I N ES E I I I ( H ) Open to IV, V & VI by invitation

Prerequisite: Chinese II or II (H)

Designed for students who are particularly motivated to build command of the language, and are willing to devote additional time and effort on a regular basis, Chinese III Honors builds upon the foundation laid in Chinese II, at a faster and deeper pace than Chinese 300. Classes are conducted primarily in Chinese; software and other forms of multimedia complement the oral and written materials. Students use PowerPoint presentations to give oral reports, and will cover grammar and vocabulary at a deeper level than Chinese III. Upon completion of the third year of Chinese, students should be able to achieve a high level of proficiency in the target language, which can be evident in the following areas: reading Chinese newspapers, writing rudimentary research papers, engaging in more complex conversations and spontaneously speaking for minutes at a time. A yearlong course.

F R E ]- . / H F R EN C H I I I ( H ) Open to all forms by invitation

Prerequisite: French II or II (H)

As in French 300, the goals of French 320/H are to complete the formal study of grammar and to introduce students to serious French literature. “Le Petit Prince” and a variety of short stories are studied, both as a means of enhancing language skills and building analytical skills. Designed for students who are particularly motived to build command of the language, and are willing to devote additional time and effort on a regular basis, French III Honors requires communication as a critical component of the classroom, and will cover grammar and vocabulary at a deeper level than French III. Classes are conducted entirely in French. Through the use of online resources and films, aspects of modern France and francophone culture are examined. Students are asked to do presentations on French figures, events and/or places.

L AT ] - ./ H L AT I N I I I (H ) Open to IV, V & VI by invitation

Prerequisite: Latin II or II (H)

As an Honors course, Latin 320/H is an appropriate choice for those students who have a strong record of achievement in Latin, welldeveloped study skills and a sincere interest in the subject. The grammar review at the beginning of this course is brief so that students can jump into “real” Latin as soon as possible. A specific curricular goal is to prepare students for further study and particularly for success in the AP Latin course. Among the authors studied, Vergil and Caesar therefore receive particular attention. Throughout the course, students are stretched to improve their fluency and deepen their comprehension of a Latin text. They also relate the material to its various contexts and focus on crafting well-argued and appropriately substantiated interpretive essays.

S PA ] - . / H S PA N I S H I I I (H ) Open to all forms by invitation

Prerequisite: Spanish II or II (H)

This yearlong course continues to build on the foundation of Spanish II, as students learn advanced grammatical concepts such as the imperfect subjunctive, reciprocal pronouns, the perfect and conditional constructions. Designed for students who are particularly motivated to build command of the language and are willing to devote additional time and effort on a regular basis, Spanish III Honors requires active participation and use of Spanish at all times for an immersion experience in the classroom. The Honors section will cover grammar and vocabulary at a deeper level than Spanish III. To develop and build upon their cultural awareness of the different Spanish speaking countries, students in Spanish III Honors will study short stories and poems from Spanish and Latin American authors, including among others an adapted version of “El ingenioso hidalgo don Quijote de la Mancha.”

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S PA c . . S PA N I S H I V Open to IV, V, & VI

Prerequisite: Spanish III or III (H)

This yearlong course takes a communicative approach to teaching intermediate Spanish students. We review and expand upon grammar concepts previously studied while focusing more on application of those skills to listening, speaking, reading and writing. We will also continue to expand and reinforce each student’s vocabulary. Daily discussion topics, role-plays, presentations and interviews provide students with opportunities to express their opinions and to synthesize both grammar and vocabulary. Students will write responses to and summaries of audio, video and readings as well as compositions relating to topics studied in the text. The use of films by Hispanic filmmakers strengthens students’ listening comprehension skills, expands students’ cultural knowledge and provides the opportunity to make comparisons and connections between cultures as well as a platform for analysis and discussion. Students’ cultural competency and communicative skills are also strengthened through the study of art, literature, current events, country profiles and cultural readings. Students are required to participate actively using the target language at all times in order to provide and partake in an immersion experience in the classroom. The goal of this course is for students to feel confident in their use of the Spanish language and to spark an interest in further study at or beyond St. George’s.

L AT c . ./A L AT I N (A ) Open to IV, V & VI by invitation

Prerequisite: Latin III (H)

What causes wars? How does a leader inspire? Is vengeance ever just? These and other seminal questions form the core of this fastpaced, challenging course. Students begin their study with Vergil’s “Aeneid,” an epic poem of refugees and survivor guilt, deception and the madness of love, capricious if not malevolent gods, and even a journey to Hell. The course then shifts Caesar’s “Commentarii De Bello Gallico” to focus on historical prose and issues of war and peace, the cost of empire and the demands of leadership. Throughout this advanced course, students enhance their fluency in Latin, their sight-reading skills and their ability to analyze a Latin text in class and on assessments. They also become acquainted with the mythological, legendary and historical figures of Rome’s history and discuss the troubling yet timeless questions raised by Rome’s rise to power. Students who take this course will take the national AP Latin exam in May.

C H I c ./ - - C H I N ES E I V- /, Open to IV, V & VI

Prerequisite: Chinese III or III (H)

C H I c .] C H I N ES E I V- ] Open to IV, V & VI

Prerequisites: Chinese IV-1,2

This course is designed to help students gain greater fluency in the target language in the areas of listening, speaking, reading and writing. Students continue to use the “Ni Hao” series and begin to use an increasingly large number of supplemental materials, including excerpts from books on Chinese history, philosophy and literature, and Chinese websites on news and current affairs. In addition to accumulating vocabulary, perfecting pronunciation and working with grammar, students begin to read authentic Chinese articles and write essays with Chinese word-processing programs to advance fluency and competency. Student interest also dictates materials used and direction of the specific class discussions. Opportunity for individual research in the Chinese language is provided. This course requires a minimum commitment of two trimesters (401-2, fall and winter) for those students who will not continue to the Advanced level. Students who aspire to complete the Advanced level must commit to 401-2 & 403 (spring) as a yearlong course.

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F R E c. /- - F R EN C H I V- /, Open to IV, V & VI

Prerequisite: French III or III (H)

F R E c. ] F R EN C H I V- ] Open to IV, V & VI

Prerequisites: French IV-1,2

French IV includes an intensive grammar review, further exploration of the broader francophone culture through literature and film, and an overview of French history. This course is designed to enable students to achieve a high level of proficiency in the language and to give solid preparation for the SAT II French subject test. This course requires a minimum commitment of two trimesters (401-2, fall and winter) for those students who will not continue to the Advanced level. Students who aspire to complete the Advanced level must commit to 401-2 & 403 (spring) as a yearlong course.

S PA c - . / H S PA N I S H I V ( H ) Open to IV, V, & VI by invitation

Prerequisite: Spanish III or III (H)

The goal of Spanish Honors IV is for students to leave the course well prepared for further study of Spanish at the Advanced and/or college level. Like Spanish IV, this yearlong course takes a communicative approach to teaching intermediate Spanish students. We continue to expand and reinforce each student’s vocabulary. Daily discussion topics, role-plays, presentations and interviews provide students with opportunities to express their opinions and to synthesize both grammar and vocabulary. Students will write responses to and summaries of audio, video, readings and film as well as compositions relating to topics studied in the text. Designed for students who are particularly motivated to build command of the language and are willing to devote additional time and effort on a regular basis, Spanish Honors IV requires active participation and use of Spanish at all times for an immersion experience in the classroom. The Honors section will cover grammar and vocabulary at a deeper level than Spanish IV. Students’ cultural competency and communicative skills are also strengthened through the study of art, literature, current events, country profiles and cultural readings.

C H I c -/ - - C H I N ES E I V ( H )- / , Open to IV, V & VI by invitation

Prerequisite: Chinese III or III (H)

C H I c -] / H C H I N ES E I V (H ) - ] Open to IV, V & VI by invitation

Prerequisites: Chinese IV (H) -1,2

Designed for students who are particularly motivated to build command of the language, and are willing to devote additional time and effort on a regular basis, Chinese IV Honors builds upon the foundation laid in Chinese III at a faster and deeper pace than Chinese 400. In addition to accumulating vocabulary, perfecting pronunciation and working with grammar at a deeper level than Chinese IV, students read Chinese newspapers and magazines and write essays with Chinese word-processing programs to advance fluency and competency. Student interest also dictates materials used and direction of the specific class discussions. Opportunity for individual research in the Chinese language is provided. This course requires a minimum commitment of two trimesters (421-2/H, fall and winter) for those students who will not continue to the Advanced level. Students who aspire to complete the Advanced Level must commit to 421-2 & 423 (spring) as a yearlong course.

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F R E c- /- - F R EN C H I V- /, - ( H ) Open to IV, V & VI by invitation

Prerequisite: French III or III (H)

F R E c- ] / H F R EN C H I V- ] (H ) Open to IV, V & VI by invitation

Prerequisite: French IV-1,2 (H)

French IV Honors includes an intensive grammar review, further exploration of the broader francophone culture through literature and film, and an overview of French history, at a more rapid pace and a deeper level than French IV. This course is designed to enable particularly motivated students to invest the time and effort required for proficiency in the language. The course also provides a solid preparation for the SAT II French subject test. This course requires a minimum commitment of two trimesters (421-2, fall and winter) for those students who will not continue to the Advanced level. Students who aspire to complete the Advanced level must commit to 421-2 & 423 (spring) as a yearlong course.

S PA a . / , a. - , a. ] S PA N I S H V- / Open to V & VI

Prerequisites: Spanish IV, IV (H), or III (H); may be taken apart or consecutively

Spanish V is an intermediate course offered in successive trimesters to students in their final year of Spanish study at St. George’s and to students who would benefit from further practice prior to enrolling in an advanced course. In this class, students review previously acquired language structures as they discuss the geography, history, culture and current events of the countries in the Spanishspeaking world. Other topics of study include the Hispanic identity, immigration, biculturalism and the diversity among the customs and beliefs of the peoples of Hispanic descent. In Spanish V, students develop reading and writing proficiency through the use of texts and authentic materials. They refine their conversational skills through interviews and interactions with native Spanish speakers, as well as through continuous participation in discussions, debates, research projects, and formal presentations. Students are required to participate actively using the target language at all times in order to provide and partake in an immersion experience in the classroom. Offered fall (501), winter (502) and spring (503) and may be taken singly or in any combination. Note: Spanish students who aspire to the Advanced level must complete at least two consecutive trimesters of this course (501 & 502) or (502 & 503).

C H I a /. /A C H I N ES E L A N GUA G E (A ) Prerequisites: Chinese IV (H), or IV by invitation The yearlong Advanced Chinese Language and Culture course is designed for qualified students who are interested in completing Chinese studies comparable and equivalent in content to fourth-semester college/university courses in Mandarin Chinese. The goal of this course is to further develop students’ proficiency in the target language and to enhance their understanding of the Chinese culture through discussions of topics reflecting multiple areas of Chinese society and culture and the use of various authentic multimedia and literary materials in different linguistic registers. While the course engages students in an exploration of both historical and contemporary Chinese culture, it also prepares students to demonstrate on the AP Chinese Language and Culture exam their level of Chinese proficiency across the three communicative modes: interpersonal, interpretive and presentational. This course is conducted entirely in Chinese. For students who wish to take the Advanced Placement Chinese Language and Culture exam in May, supplementary materials will be recommended by the teacher. A yearlong course.

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F R E a/ . /A F R EN C H LA N GUA GE ( A ) Open to IV, V & IV by invitation

Prerequisite: French IV (H), or III (H) by invitation

Advanced French Language and Culture is a yearlong course that builds language and communication skills in addition to expanding students’ knowledge of the broader francophone world. Students continue their exploration of francophone culture in both contemporary and historical contexts as they study the major themes of the Advanced curriculum: World Challenges, Contemporary Life, Families and Communities, Public and Self-identities, Science and Technology and Aesthetics and Beauty. All the while, students build essential skills in a second language: critical thinking and analytical skills, communication, collaboration and information/media/technology. Students conduct research and give frequent presentations on a variety of topics related to the different themes that reflect their knowledge of the francophone culture and to further hone their communication skills. Extensive use is made of online resources: French-language newspapers, magazines and newscasts such as TV5, Journal Télévisé and 7 Jours sur la Planète. Texts used include “Allons au-delà,” “AP French: Preparing for the French Language and Culture Examination,” “AP Prenons and Panaché Littéraire.” For students who wish to take the Advanced Placement French Language and Culture exam in May, supplementary materials will be recommended by the teacher.

S PA a / . /A S PA N I S H LA N G UA G E (A ) Open to V & VI by invitation

Prerequisite: Spanish IV (H) or III (H) by invitation

This yearlong college-level course prepares the student for the AP Spanish Language and Culture Examination in May. It is designed to improve the students’ listening, speaking, reading and writing skills as well as their cultural competency. In addition to a comprehensive review of the grammar studied in previous courses, students will read short works by a variety of literary masters, including but not limited to Cortázar, Borges, García Lorca, and Guillén. Furthermore, presentations on current events in Latin America and Spain promote cultural understanding and serve as subject matter for both discussion and essay writing. Authentic recorded materials and films are used to complement this course, so as to further develop listening comprehension. Students will also record their own short presentations, and write comparative essays as well as shorter written pieces, with a focus on both formal and informal communication. Candidates for this class are expected to demonstrate a high level of proficiency in the language, as well as a general knowledge of the history, literature, customs and values of the Hispanic world. For students who wish to take the Advanced Placement Spanish Language and Culture exam in May, supplementary materials will be recommended by the teacher. The class is taught exclusively in Spanish.

S PA o / . /A S PA N I S H LI T ER AT U R E (A ) Open to V & VI by invitation

Prerequisite: Spanish V or by invitation

This yearlong course is designed for advanced students who have successfully completed Spanish 510/A Advanced Language and Culture or who have been recommended by the teachers of the Spanish department. Our purpose is to instill a passion and love for the literature and culture of Spain and Latin America in our students and to help them communicate with fluidity and composure while analyzing the historical readings, literature and art studied in class. Students will learn research techniques and will write formal essays and research papers in Spanish. The reading list consists of many of the works selected by the College Board for the AP Spanish Literature and Culture exam. For students who wish to take the Advanced Placement Spanish Literature and Culture exam in May, supplementary materials will be recommended by the teacher. We also continue to develop the students’ grammar and vocabulary skills as they are necessary for verbal and written communication and literary analysis. The class is taught exclusively in Spanish.

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S PA o / / /A , o / -/A , o /] /A S PA N I S H V I (A ) Open to VI by invitation

Prerequisite: Spanish V-1,2, or 3, or 510/A or 601/A; may be taken apart or consecutively

The main goal of this course is to promote a global understanding of the social, cultural and historical aspects of the Spanish–speaking world as students continue to develop their reading, writing and conversational skills. The course will be divided into distinct units that include the study of history and culture of a variety of regions in the Spanish-speaking world. Overarching course themes may include ancient civilizations, discovery and conquest, independence and dictatorships, immigration and other contemporary issues. Course materials include readings, selected short stories and historical films. The class is taught exclusively in Spanish. Pre-requisite: Spanish 501, 502, 503 or 510/A AP Spanish Language and Culture, or Spanish 610/A AP Spanish Literature and Culture with teacher recommendation. Offered fall (611), winter (612) and spring (613), and may be taken singly or in any combination.

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SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING & MATH M T H / /. A L G EB R A I Open to III This three-trimester course in algebra is designed to enhance the student’s understanding of the properties and operations associated with real numbers. The course content includes the study of the real number system, linear functions and their graphs, solving linear systems and inequalities, quadratic functions, exponents, radicals, polynomial functions, factoring, and applied problem solving. Students are required to have a College Board-approved graphing calculator. If they receive the approval of the Mathematics Department, students who take Algebra I in the third form may take both Geometry and Algebra II in their fourth-form year.

B I O - /. B I O LO GY Open to III & IV Students explore the complexities of the living world and the relationships among major topics in modern biology, including the chemistry of life, cell structure and function, energy ow in nature, principles of inheritance, modern DNA technology, evolution and taxonomy, human anatomy and physiology, plant and animal interactions and the dynamics of ecosystems. A variety of modern laboratory studies are presented, including the differentiation and analysis of bacteria cultures, the testing of ionizing radiation and acid rain on plant growth, gel electrophoresis of viral DNA digests, the comparative anatomy of selected vertebrates and population studies in local environments.

M T H - /. G EO M E T R Y Open to III & IV

Prerequisite: Algebra I

This three-trimester course in Euclidean Geometry investigates the definitions, postulates and theorems of two and three dimensional figures. During the first trimester, study will focus on the building blocks of geometry; the various shapes and their properties, angles, parallel lines, as well as using geometric software to investigate patterns and make conjectures. Writing mathematical proofs will also be introduced. The second trimester will include advanced study of polygons, circles and area formulas. The final trimester includes the study of solid geometry, similarity and an introduction to trigonometry. The concepts of logical reasoning, problem solving skills, as well as organizational skills will be stressed throughout the year.

B I O - -. / H B I O L O GY (H ) Open to III & IV by invitation Honors biology is a survey course in which students explore the living world at many levels (molecular, cellular, organismal and ecological.) The course is structured around the theme of evolution beginning with the pre-biotic planet Earth and culminating with our modern biosphere. Topics include: cells, biochemistry, energetics, reproduction and inheritance, evolution, anatomy and physiology of plants and animals and ecology. The pace of the course is rigorous and students are expected to have strong independent study skills. In lieu of a textbook, students make use of online resources. QualiďŹ ed honors students may be given the opportunity to take the Advanced Placement examination in biology.

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M T H - -. / H GEO M E T R Y ( H ) Open to III & IV by invitation

Prerequisite: Algebra I

This three-trimester honors course includes all of the elements of Math 210, but has a limited number of seats available, requires more and deeper preparation by students and advances through topics at a faster pace. Students who wish to enroll in the honors section should express that desire on their Course Planning Worksheets, and indicate Math 210 as an alternate. Students are enrolled based on a stated request, demonstrated motivation to tackle the course’s increased demands, achievement in other mathematics courses and standardized test scores where applicable.

C H M ] .. I N T R O C H EM I S T R Y Open to IV & V by invitation

Pre- or co-requisite: Algebra II

Students in this course study the complexity of matter and the dynamics of chemical interactions. The focus is on integrating theory and basic concepts with qualitative and quantitative experimentation in the laboratory, while at the same time reinforcing specific study strategies for applying basic mathematics in chemistry. A variety of topics are covered, including the history of chemistry, a review of the metric system, the evolution of the modern atomic theory, matter-energy relationships, the periodic table, the mole concept, stoichiometry, chemical equilibrium, acids and bases, oxidation-reduction reactions and a survey of organic and biochemistry. The text used is Glencoe’s “Chemistry: Matter and Change,” 2008.

M T H ] .. I N T R O A L G E B R A I I Open to IV & V by invitation

Prerequisite: Geometry

This full-year course builds on key components of Algebra I and Geometry by presenting the fundamental concepts necessary to preparation for Precalculus. Students review the real number system, linear functions and their graphs, quadratics, exponents and polynomial functions, factoring and applied problem solving. Students will also encounter new material in the graphing of polynomial functions; exponential and logarithmic functions, and the complex number system. Use of College Board-approved graphing calculators is required. Students will be enrolled based on a stated request and achievement in other mathematics courses.

A R T/ S C I ] . /- - PR I N C I P L ES O F E N G I N E ER I N G Open to all forms

Prerequisites: Visual Foundation & Chemistry

This two-trimester course is a survey course of engineering. The course exposes students to some of the major concepts that they will encounter in a postsecondary engineering course of study including materials, proposal writing, research and fabrication. Students will have the opportunity to develop skills and understanding of concepts through problem-based learning. Used in combination with a team approach, this course challenges students to continually hone their interpersonal skills, creative abilities and problem-solving skills by using engineering concepts. It also allows students to develop strategies to enable and direct their own learning, which is the ultimate goal of education. Students will employ engineering and scientific concepts in the solution of engineering design problems. Students will develop problem-solving skills and apply their knowledge of research and design to create solutions to various challenges. Students will also learn how to document their work and communicate their solutions to their peers and faculty members.

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C H M ] /. C H EM I S T R Y IV & V

Pre- or co-requisite: Algebra II

The study of chemistry provides us with the opportunity to explore the stuff of which the universe is made and the manner in which it combines and recombines to make up the world as we know it. Students in this course review the history of experimental science that has led to our current understanding of matter and energy. They gain experience in methods of measurement, laboratory technique, analytical methods and observation of chemical change. Both qualitative and quantitative skills are developed through problem solving, analysis of laboratory data and research. Whether isolating pure substances through distillation, determining molecular mass by measuring freezing-point depression, comparing rates of molecular diffusion or noting the shifting in equilibria under different conditions, emphasis is on how humans can observe, measure and come to understand the atomic and molecular basis of all that surrounds us. The text used is Glencoe’s “Chemistry: Matter and Change,” 2008.

M T H ] /. A L G EB R A I I Open to III, IV & V

Prerequisite: Geometry

In this second-year algebra course, students review and expand the study of real numbers begun in Algebra I. Students learn how to solve polynomial equations of increasing complexity and to apply their solutions to “real world” situations. New topics explored in Algebra II include graphing polynomial functions, exponential, logarithmic, and rational functions and the complex number system. Students enhance their understanding of the important features of College Board-approved graphing calculators.

M T H ] -. / H : H O N O R S A L G EB R A I I Open to III, IV & V by invitation

Prerequisite: Geometry

This three-trimester honors course includes all of the elements of Math 310, but has a limited number of seats available, requires more and deeper preparation by students and advances through topics at a faster pace. An honors section of Algebra II is offered to advanced students which covers conic sections, counting principles and probability and sequences and series as time permits. Students who wish to enroll in the honors section should express that desire on their Course Planning Worksheets, and indicate Math 310 as an alternate. Students are enrolled based on a stated request, demonstrated motivation to tackle the course’s increased demands, achievement in other mathematics courses and standardized test scores where applicable.

C H M ] -. / H C H E M I S T R Y (H ) Open to IV & V by invitation

Prerequisite: Algebra II

The study of chemistry allows students to better understand how the world around them works by exploring the links between the sub-microscopic world and processes occurring on the human scale. Students taking honors chemistry at St. George’s School receive a rigorous practical and theoretical background in the fundamentals of this subject. Key topics include atomic and electronic structure, states of matter, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, reaction kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases, and electrochemistry. Learning within the classroom is supplemented by work in the laboratory, a customized online textbook, and other web-based resources. Honors Chemistry differs from general chemistry at St. George’s in that it places a larger emphasis on the quantitative aspects of the subject and covers many topics in greater depth.

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S C I ] ] /, ] ] -, ] ] ] M A R I N E S C I EN C E Open to IV, V & VI (for Geronimo crews) This trimester course is taught on board Geronimo during the school year. It is largely experiential and unique to each voyage track incorporating elements of navigation and seamanship, marine ecology and oceanography. The core of the Geronimo experience is building the seamanship and navigation skills to serve as crew on an ocean-going sailing vessel, while learning lessons in leadership and collaboration. Topics are introduced in a class setting, and then skills are executed and built while on watch. In navigation, we will start with a foundation of basic coastal piloting and progress to celestial navigation, giving students a strong foundation in traditional navigation. Part of the course will closely relate to our geographic location and include components of ecology, marine biology, oceanography and meteorology. Sailing on board Geronimo will afford you a unique perspective for comparing different marine ecosystems. We will employ hands-on explorations of ecosystems, from estuaries and pelagic plankton communities to tropical coral reefs, whenever possible. Geronimo’s long-standing research project, a sea turtle population study in cooperation with the University of Florida, will also be a component of this course. This course is also designed to help you gain a better understanding of our interconnectedness with the marine environment and to develop an appreciation for the role of the ocean on a global scale.

C O M ] c /, ] c -, ] c ] H U M A N S & C O M P U T ER S Open to IV, V & VI Cyberterrorism, human-computer interaction, communications protocols, artificial intelligence, data driven decisions: what does it all mean? This one-trimester course explores the latest computer topics and technologies. This is much more than an introduction to computers course; we explore basic computing, problem solving and ethics. Basic computing is an introduction to computers today. Students explore the human computer interaction, including computer input, output, memory, storage, processing, software and the operating system. The “Pictures do lie” section introduces students to photo manipulation and image processing software to create unbelievable images. Images are then combined with text, music and animation using presentation software. Problem solving introduces students to basic problem definition, algorithm creation and solution finding. Using a simple programming language, students will learn how to employ sequential, selection and repetitive programming statement to solve problems. Spreadsheets will then be used to teach students how to analyze and manipulate data in support of decision making. The final theme will be interspersed throughout the semester: computer ethics and morality. Discussion topics include: intellectual property, privacy, piracy, hackers, viruses and security. Students will research and draft position papers on these various topics. This is a stand-alone course with no prerequisites that is designed to whet a student’s appetite for computers and technology.

C O M ] a /, ] a -, ] a ] R O B OT I C S Open to IV, V & VI This introductory project-based course is designed for any student who wants to learn how to approach and solve problems using computer programs. No prior programming experience is necessary. Students learn how to create digital and physical robots that interact with the world they live in. They begin the course by mastering Jeroo, a small object-oriented programming language that allows them to immediately see their digital robot executing commands on an emulator. The next step is developing physical robots that have touch, sight, sound and rotational sensors. These robots are programmed using the NXT graphical software and then the more powerful NXC programming language.

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M T H c .. I N T R O PR EC A L C U LU S Open to V & VI

Prerequisite: Algebra II

This course unifies topics previously studied in algebra and geometry and provides the foundation needed to support future coursework in calculus, discrete mathematics and statistics. During the first trimester students will study trigonometric functions, their graphs, inverses and applications. The second trimester will synthesize trigonometric functions with a review of linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions through the application of regression analysis. The final trimester will be devoted to the study of some advanced topics in precalculus. College Board- approved graphing calculators are required for this course. Students interested in taking Math 400 should indicate this on their Course Planning Worksheets and list Math 410 as an alternate. Students will be enrolled based on a stated request and achievement in other mathematics courses. Completion of 400, 410 or 420 satisfies the requirement for graduation from St. George’s School.

P H Y c . . I N T RO P H Y S I C S Open to V & VI by invitation

Prerequisite: Algebra II

Students in this course examine topics ranging from mechanics to optics and electro-magnetism to thermodynamics, from both a current perspective and an historical perspective in a less mathematical way. Galileo’s Renaissance, Ben Franklin’s Colonies, and Hawking’s Universe are discussed along with current trends in research. Laboratory work is an essential component of this course. The text used is Kirkpatrick and Francis’ “Physics: A Conceptual World View,” 7th edition.

C O M c . /, c . -, c . ] C O D I N G : JAVA PL U S Open to V & VI This coding course uses the Java programming language to understand computer science and its applications in various fields. Building on algorithms within the language, and of students’ own creation, the course is designed to develop a basic understanding of Java as well as constructs of any programming language, to encourage enthusiasm in the field of computer science and to build confidence in creative problem-solving. Through collaborative projects, students produce tangible solutions to problems, and build practical applications through St. George’s Fab Lab. The course uses a range of online resources and has been designed for SG students by a team of teachers and mathematicians on the Hilltop.

M T H c /. PR EC A L C U L U S Open to V & VI

Prerequisites: Algebra II or Algebra II (H)

Like Math 400, this course unifies topics previously studied in algebra and geometry and provides the foundation needed to support future coursework in calculus, discrete mathematics and statistics, but does so at a faster pace. During the first trimester, students will review linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions through the application of regression analysis. During the second trimester, students will study trigonometric functions, their graphs, inverses and applications. The final trimester will be devoted to the study of advanced topics in precalculus to include a focus on sequences and series, probability, topics in analytic geometry and limits. College Board-approved graphing calculators are required for this course. Completion of 400, 410 or 420 satisfies the mathematics requirement for graduation from St. George’s School.

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PHY c/. PHYSICS Open to V & VI

Prerequisite: Algebra II

A thorough development of Newtonian Mechanics leads to other topics in physics. Electricity and magnetism, fluids and optics all are investigated in both class and laboratory settings. Outside projects and original design exercises will lead students to understand and better appreciate the physical world from a rigorous scientific perspective. The text used is Serway and Faughn’s “Holt Physics,” 2006 edition.

S C I c / /, c / ] M A R I N E B I O L O GY Open to V & VI

Prerequisites: Biology & Chemistry

This trimester course is designed for students with an interest in marine biology and oceanography and provides an excellent background for students who are interested in further study of the oceans and the organisms that inhabit it. Estuarine, coastal and marine environments and the organisms that inhabit these environments are studied in this course. The technology needed to monitor and maintain marine ecosystems is practiced in the lab and in the field. Readings from scientific journals and the internet will supplement class lectures. Offered fall (411) and spring (413).

B I O c -. /A B I O L O GY (A ) Open to V & VI by invitation

Prerequisite: Chemistry

Advanced Biology is equivalent to a first-year college biology course. Frequently, college biology is taught in large lecture format. The small class size at St. George’s encourages interaction between teacher and students and promotes student-centered labs and activities. The curriculum is rigorous, covering cell anatomy and metabolism, genetics, evolution, botany, human anatomy and physiology and ecology. Technology utilized in the course includes high-quality light microscopes, computers, spectrophotometers, Vernier computer-based laboratory probes and gel electrophoresis equipment for analysis of DNA. Regular laboratory experimentation reinforces concepts and provides experience in scientific thinking. Current research into HIV/AIDS and the efforts to develop a vaccine are woven throughout the course, providing a unifying theme and a window into the methods of modern science. The course makes frequent use of readings from current science journals and reference books. The textbook for the course is “Biology” by Campbell and Reece, 9th edition.

C H M c -. /A C H E M I S T R Y (A ) Open to V & VI by invitation

Prerequisites: Algebra II & one year of chemistry

This intensive yearlong, college-level course prepares students for the Advanced Placement examination. Note that it is expected that students will have studied a prior year of chemistry, providing the background for the fast pace and in-depth treatment this course offers. Emphasis is given to atomic structure and multifaceted quantitative problems dealing with stoichiometry, equilibrium and thermochemistry. Weekly labs concentrate on developing laboratory techniques as well as collecting, analyzing and presenting data. The text used is Brown’s “Chemistry: The Central Science,” 11th AP edition.

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S C I c - ./A EN V I R O N M E N TA L S C I (A ) Open to V & VI by invitation

Prerequisite: Biology & either Chemistry or Physics

The Advanced Environmental Science course is designed to be the equivalent of an introductory college course in environmental science. Its goal is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving or preventing them. Environmental science is interdisciplinary encompassing a wide array of topics, ranging from ecology to politics and policy. While the sociological and political aspects of environmental science are addressed in this course, the Advanced Environmental Science curriculum places a primary emphasis upon scientific principles and analysis. Both the course and the Advanced Placement exam are built upon six central themes: science is a process; energy conversions underlie all ecological processes; the Earth itself is one interconnected system; humans alter natural systems; environmental problems have a cultural and social context; and human survival depends on developing practices that will achieve sustainable systems. The objective of this course is to explore the connections within and between the natural and human worlds under the context of these six themes. The text for the course is Friedland and Relyea’s “Environmental Science for AP,” 2011.

M T H c -. / H PR EC A LC U L U S ( H ) Open to IV, V & VI by invitation

Prerequisite: Algebra II (H)

This three-trimester honors course includes all of the elements of Math 410, but has a limited number of seats available, requires and more and deeper preparation by students and advances through topics at a faster pace. Like Math 400 and 410, this course unifies topics previously studied in algebra and geometry and provides the foundation needed to support future coursework in calculus, discrete mathematics and statistics. (See further details under Math 400 or 410.) College Board-approved graphing calculators are required for this course. Students who wish to enroll in the honors section should express that desire on their Course Planning Worksheets, and indicate Math 410 as an alternate. Students are enrolled based on a stated request, demonstrated motivation to tackle the course’s increased demands, achievement in other mathematics courses and standardized tests scores where applicable. Completion of 400, 410 or 420 satisfies the mathematics requirement for graduation from St. George’s School.

S C I c - - EN V I R O N M EN TA L S C I EN C E Open to V & VI

Prerequisites: Biology & Chemistry

This trimester course considers the interdependence and tension between humans and their environment. Discussions of contemporary, social, economic and ecological concerns such as population growth, world hunger, pollution and resource utilization attempt to provide the student with the general background necessary for consideration of environmental ethics. The student will then critically evaluate and analyze the moral choices involved in such environmental dilemmas as: intergenerational equity, the needs of developing countries versus the needs of industrialized nations, individual needs and rights versus the good of both the local and global communities. Classroom learning is supplemented with readings from scientific journals as well as a range of articles from the Internet. Available winter only.

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M T H /A RT c ]] D ES I GN S C I E N C E Open to all forms

Prerequisites: Visual Foundation & two trimesters of Geometry

This one-trimester course is intended to provide students with hands-on experience in designing, creating and analyzing two- and three-dimensional geometric structures, sculptures and models using a variety of media (including paper, wood, metal, ceramics, etc.). Students successfully completing this course will receive one trimester credit in Arts and one trimester credit in Mathematics. Possible topics and projects include tessellations, polyhedra, Platonic solids, Archimedean solids and the mathematics and design of commercial packaging. Class periods for this course would include lecture/demonstration and hands-on labs. One or two field trips to local manufacturing facilities and art museums are included. Each student will maintain a daily journal containing research assignments, design sketches, and potential ideas relating to class projects. The resources of the Arts Center, the Welding Lab, and the Fab Lab are utilized for the hands-on part of this course. Offered spring.

S C I c c /- - D N A S C I E N C E Open to V & VI

Prerequisites: Biology & Chemistry

This two-trimester course is for the student interested in further exploration of the most influential molecule on the planet. The molecular structure of DNA and the central dogma of biology (DNA_RNA_Protein) introduces the course and lays the foundation for study of genetic engineering in modern biology labs. Students perform DNA extractions from multiple sources. Students will become proficient at bacterial transformations, fragmenting and splicing of DNA, DNA cloning and DNA fingerprinting. Applications in forensics, genetic testing and evolutionary biology are explored. Bioinformatics is a rapidly growing field that utilizes computer genomic databases to research and compare DNA sequences. Students delve into this exciting discipline and make extensive use technology as they locate and manipulate genetic sequences. Offered in the fall/winter.

S C I / T R S c c ] EN E R GY & ET H I C S Open to IV, V, VI

Prerequisites: one trimester of Bible Studies or World Religions and one trimester of Chemistry or Physics

Anthropogenic climate change is not just a scientific fact — it is a moral issue. To give context to this great moral issue of our time, “Energy and Ethics� is a trimester elective that embraces the relationship between our ethical choices and energy production and usage. The course will begin with some exploration of the language and history of ethics, including both classical and religious perspectives. We will splice this knowledge with an exploration of the physics and chemistry of energy, and how this knowledge has been used to power the infrastructure of our society and economy. This is a course in seeing these connections. This will be done through discussions, readings, lectures and experiments all drawn from the best classical and current literature. The heart of the course will then be the question: What are the impacts of those decisions and how should we act to address them as moral citizens in our local communities and in the world community? Available spring only.

S C I c a ] PR E- V E T E R I N A R Y S C I Open to V & VI

Prerequisites: Biology & Chemistry

This trimester course introduces some of the major concepts in animal science with emphasis on the veterinary aspect of disease and wellness. The expectation is to cover the history of veterinary medicine and the various careers within the field, classification and domestication of animals, medical terminology and comparative anatomy and the transmission, prevention and control of disease. Offered spring only.

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P H Y c o . /A PH Y S I C S / (A ) Open to V & VI by invitation

Pre- or co-requisite: Algebra II (H)

Advanced Physics 1 provides a faster paced and more quantitatively oriented introduction to general physics, with extensive opportunity for design and inquiry-based laboratory experimentation and application of concepts to the real world. Topics include Newtonian Mechanics including rotational motion, mechanical waves and simple circuits. Each student should expect to take the Advanced Placement Physics 1 exam in May. Advanced Physics 1 is considered equivalent to the first semester of an algebra college physics course. The text is Cutnell and Johnson’s “Physics.”

P H Y c q . /A PH Y S I C S / & - (A ) Open to V & VI by invitation

Pre- or co-requisite: Precalculus (H)

Students learn a rigorous approach to a full year of college-level algebra-based physics while preparing for both the Advanced Placement Physics 1 and 2 exams. In Advanced Physics 1 and 2, mechanics, fluids, thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, optics and atomic physics are all studied in detail. Laboratory work is an important and extensive component of the course, with an emphasis on design and inquiry-based labs. Experiments are presented as challenges either to review questions or to introduce new ideas. The Advanced curriculum is a thorough immersion in physics that provides an exciting environment to develop the analytical skills necessary in college. The text is Cutnell and Johnson’s “Physics.”

P H Y c s . /A PH Y S I C S C (A ) Open to V & VI by invitation

Prerequisite: Calculus

Students learn a rigorous approach to college-level, calculus-based physics while preparing for the Advanced Placement Physics C Exams. In Advanced Physics C students study mechanics, electricity and magnetism. Laboratory work is an important and extensive component of the course. Experiments are presented as challenges either to review questions or to introduce new ideas. The Advanced Physics C curriculum is a thorough immersion in calculus-based physics and provides an exciting environment to develop the analytical skills necessary in college. The course is equivalent to the first year of physics taken by engineers and physics majors. The text is Sears & Zemansky’s “University Physics,” 13th edition.

S C I c s ] B OTA N Y Open to V & VI

Prerequisites: Biology

Often relegated to the last chapters of biology textbooks, plants are getting a second look as demonstrated by the success of recent New York Times bestseller, The Hidden Life of Trees by Peter Wohlleben. Rather than rehashing photosynthesis from freshman biology, this trimester course will focus on plant anatomy and physiology. How do plants communicate – internally and with other plants? How can plants regenerate an entire new plant from a small cutting or even from a lump of cells? Imagine if humans had this ability! There will be extensive use of greenhouse and local specimens in this lab-oriented course.

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C O M a . . C O M P U T ER S C I E N C E C O M P R EH E N S I V E : T H E D I G I TA L W O R LD Open to V & VI, IV by invitation

Prerequisite: Precalculus

How does computer technology impact society? What is computer programming and how does it work? How can we use programming and logic to solve complicated problems? The yearlong course, COM 500, is a comprehensive introduction to computer science and programming that aims to answer these questions and more. Students will actively examine and participate in the process of technological innovation through a combination of research, writing, debate, and programming. The course will examine the intent and impact of computer technology through social, cultural, and economic lenses. Students will learn to use the Javascript and Java languages to write their own programs from beginning to end. Topics of study in this course will include (but are not limited to) the history of computer science, current events in technology, the structure and impact of the Internet, and programming syntax and logic. Students will encounter software development, robotics, artificial intelligence, data science, and policy. They will have developed their research, presentation, and discussion skills, and they will have the analytical tools they need to examine carefully the potential positive and negative impacts of a technological innovation. Students who complete COM 500 will have learned Java and Javascript syntax and style, and they will have an understanding of object-oriented programming. This course aims to ensure that students leave St. George’s with a solid understanding of the digital world in which they live and how they might leverage technology to examine problems and create solutions. Should these students wish to pursue further education in computer science, they will have a solid foundation to enter a college-level programming course.

M T H a .. S TAT I S T I C S Open to V & VI Prerequisite: Intro Precalculus In the world today, more and more decisions affecting the course of our lives are based, at least in part, on the results of statistical analysis. In this yearlong course, students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes: exploring and describing data, planning a statistical study, using probability to anticipate patterns in data and statistical inference. This course focuses on the statistical thinking behind data gathering and interpretation and helps students become more discerning consumers of statistics, teaching them to look closely at what numbers from surveys, election polls and medical studies really show.

M T H a /. /A S TAT I S T I C S (A ) Open to V & VI by invitation

Prerequisite: Precalculus

The purpose of this yearlong course is to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing and drawing conclusions from data. Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes: exploring and describing data, planning a statistical study, using probability to anticipate patterns in data, and statistical inference. Specific topics to be covered include descriptive statistics, data collection, linear regression, experimental design, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, and tests of significance. A College Board-approved graphing calculator is used extensively, and students are exposed to statistical software packages especially reading outputs from Mini-Tab.

M T H o .. C A LC U LU S Open to VI and by invitation to V

Prerequisite: Precalculus

Calculus brings together the information and skills learned in previous courses and applies that knowledge to solve a wide variety of different problems. The three-trimester Calculus course begins with the study of limits, advances through differentiation and concludes with integration.

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M T H o /. /A A B C A L C U LU S (A ) Open to V & VI by invitation

Prerequisite: Precalculus

Calculus AB is a three-trimester course in the calculus of a single variable. Each course prepares students for successful completion of the Advanced Placement exam in the spring. AB and BC Calculus contain common topics but the BC course covers additional topics such as parametric equations, vectors and Taylor series. In both courses, students are exposed to concepts, problems and solutions in graphical, numerical, analytical and verbal form.

M T H o -. /A B C C A LC U L U S (A ) Open to V & VI by invitation

Prerequisite: Precalculus

Calculus BC is an extended version of the three-trimester AB course. Each course prepares students for successful completion of the Advanced Placement exam in the spring. AB and BC Calculus contain common topics but the BC course covers additional topics such as parametric equations, vectors, and Taylor series. In both courses, students are exposed to concepts, problems, and solutions in graphical, numerical, analytical and verbal form.

M T H o ]. / H M U LT I VA R I A B L E C A LC U LU S (H ) Open to VI by invitation

Prerequisite: AB or BC Calculus

This yearlong course is intended for students who successfully complete BC Calculus before their senior year. Exceptionally strong AB Calculus students will also be considered. This course extends the fundamental concepts of calculus to functions of more than one variable. Vectors and curves in two or more dimensions, double and triple integrals, line integrals, surface integrals, Stokes Theorem, and Green’s Theorem are among the topics covered. Students will make extensive use of appropriate software and online resources throughout the course.

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Profile for St. George's School

Course Guide 2019-20  

Academic program options for the student of St. George's School in Newport, Rhode Island.

Course Guide 2019-20  

Academic program options for the student of St. George's School in Newport, Rhode Island.