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ST. GEORGE’S T H E B U L L E T I N O F S T . G E O R G E ' S S C H O O L // S U M M E R 2 0 1 9

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INTRIGUING SG OBJECTS


Director of the Horton Center for Learning Joe Lang meets with Katie DeSa ’22, Tharaly Joseph ’22, and Sam Adusei ’20 for an academic coaching session in the lower library. (Charlie Sorenson ’20 works on his computer in the far left corner.) The Horton Center will be relocated to the former Study Hall in Memorial Schoolhouse in September 2020.


ST. GEORGE’S

SUMMER 2019

T HE BU L L ET I N OF ST. GEORGE'S SCHOOL

F E AT U R E S

D E PA R T M E N T S

04 Diman Award winner

0 2 Letter from the

In her acceptance speech, Sandy Restrepo ’01 challenges students to sustain commitment to service

06 Between two worlds Russian-born Tim Pozitkov ’19 writes and directs a film that both honors and challenges his homeland

14 Cool stuff Learn about some of the notable — and quirky — objects housed in the

Head of School

0 3 Campus News 3 1 Alumni News 4 1 Class Notes 8 0 Student Essay

St. George’s Archives

32 A traveler of many roads A desire to see the world led Chad MacArthur ’70 through a meandering journey to his life’s work in public health

34 ‘Transcendence’

ON THE COVER This SG letter sweater belonged to varsity swim team co-captain Richard Garcin ’54. P H OTO : A N D R E A H A N S E N

Kate Gubelman ’87 has created a thought-provoking work of art reflecting on the years she spent caring for her aging parents

36 A foundation for life and service Lt. Col. Andrew Atkins ’96 recalls valuable lessons learned on the Hilltop

The St. George's Bulletin is published biannually. It's printed on 8pt. Stirling Matte Cover and 70# Stirling Matte text by Lane Press, South Burlington, Vermont. Typefaces used are Antwerp, Brix Sans and Brix Slab. Please send correspondence to bulletin_editor@ stgeorges.edu. © 2019 St. George's School

OUR MISSION In 1896, the Rev. John Byron Diman, founder of St. George’s School, wrote in his “Purposes of The School” that “the specific objectives of St. George’s are to give its students the opportunity of developing to the fullest extent possible the particular gifts that are theirs and to encourage in them the desire to do so. Their immediate job after leaving school is to handle successfully the demands of college; later it is hoped that their lives will be ones of constructive service to the world and to God.” Today we continue to teach our students the value of learning and achievement, service to others and respect for the individual. We believe that these goals can best be accomplished by exposing students to a wide range of ideas and choices, in the context of a rigorous curriculum and a supportive residential community. Therefore, we welcome students and teachers of various talents and backgrounds, and we encourage their dedication to a multiplicity of pursuits — intellectual, spiritual and physical — that will help to enable students to succeed in, and contribute to, a complex, changing world.

stgeorges.edu

The Bulletin of ST. GEORGE'S SCHOOL Jedd Whitlock Director of Advancement Cindy Martin Associate Director of Advancement Suzanne McGrady Director of Communications & Marketing Jeremy Moreau Web Manager Alexander Silva Digital Communications Specialist Anna Beckman Designer


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A LETTER FROM THE HEAD OF SCHOOL

BY ALIXE CALLEN

st. george’s school

// SUMMER 2019

“ Our archives are a treasure trove, a means to connect the members of today’s school community to the history of St. George’s — and also to each other."

From the Hilltop

O

ne of my first stops after being named

a variety of purposes. In a chapel talk this spring, one

Head of School was the St. George’s

of our graduating students, Colin McGillivray, Class

School Archives, located on the lower

of 2019, shared an excerpt from a poem written by

level of the Nathaniel P. Hill Library.

John Wheelwright, Class of 1916, drawing parallels

The draw to the Archives was both

between Wheelwright’s experience on the Hilltop to

professional and personal. While I was eager to learn

that of students today. Val’s son, Will Simpson, Class

the history of our school, I was also curious to glean

of 2014, recently used the archives to research the

insight into the Hilltop experiences of my great

experiences of Ronald Wood Hoskier, Class of 1914,

grandfather (Johns Hopkins Congdon, Class of 1903),

for his Middlebury College thesis. (Hoskier was one

grandfather (James B. Congdon, Class of 1941),

of the 38 Lafayette Escadrille pilots in World War I).

great uncle (Charles B. Congdon, Class of 1940), and

And another young alum, Sadie McQuilkin, Class of

uncle (James B. Congdon, Class of 1966) – all now

2012, accessed the archives as she documented the

deceased. The visit did not disappoint. St. George’s

history of coeducation at St. George’s for her thesis

Archivist Val Simpson had gathered a wealth of

at Harvard.

artifacts that told my family’s St. George’s story. I learned that my great grandfather had won the Powel Cup for athletic achievement, that my great uncle had been Senior Prefect, and that my grandfather had been the Assistant Director of Camp Ramleh. Val even uncovered video of my uncle, who died over 35 years ago, playing quarterback on the football team. Students, faculty, and alumni routinely seek out the SG Archives, accessing this tremendous resource for

Our archives are a treasure-trove, a means to connect the members of today’s school community to the history of St. George’s — and also to each other. And so we are delighted to bring some of the treasures of the Archives to you in this edition’s cover story — because there really are a lot of interesting, intriguing, and just plain cool things there. Check them out!


st. george’s school

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SUMMER 2019

Campus News

Honors Biology students Logan MacLear ’22 and William Gooch ’22 work in the Rios Conservatory.

IN THIS SECTION

04 06 09 1 0

Diman Award Winner Between Two Worlds Handbells Continue to Inspire Caring For Our Campus


Alumna challenges students to sustain commitment to service long after St. George’s

This page: Sandy Restrepo ’01 is the 2019 recipient of the John B. Diman Award, presented annually to an alumna or alumnus whose personal accomplishments or public service contributions are greatly valued by the school. Facing page: Ms. Restrepo giving her acceptance speech and talking afterwards with Ashley Fallas '20 and Karla Acosta '22.


CAMPUS NEWS

that it’s important that all of the values and all

of the lessons you learn …

you carry with you every where you go."

SUMMER 2019

community on the Hilltop

//

“ You build such a strong

survivors of domestic violence. She said she’s still using those skills as she now works with many immigrants trying to escape violence at home. “There are so many people who are fleeing … a lot of horrible things in their own countries. You wouldn't put yourself through that journey if it wasn't something you thought was worth it.” Ms. Restrepo earned her bachelor’s degree in Latin American Studies with a minor in history from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) and her juris doctor from the Seattle University School of Law. She is the first in her family to graduate from college and obtain a professional degree. It wasn’t, however, until her third year of law school, shortly after the birth of her first son, when she helped win a case involving a detained mother of two from Guatemala, that she decided to pursue immigration work. Ms. Restrepo came to St. George’s from Santa Ana, California, through the A Better Chance scholarship program, which places talented underprivileged students in private boarding schools. She is the daughter of two immigrants: Her mom was born in Mexico, and her dad was born in Colombia. Both eventually obtained legal status, and so the topic of immigration was always close to home. “But it wasn't until I actually saw what it took to put a case together that it just opened my eyes — and my heart — to that whole world,” she said. These days, as a co-founder of the nonprofit legal aid organization Colectiva Legal del Pueblo, Ms. Restrepo represents individuals in various stages of the immigration process, mainly focusing on deportation defense. Her organization, which started with three volunteers in 2012, now has 12 staff members, including six attorneys. Concluding her speech in May, Ms. Restrepo ended with a quote from Lilla Watson, the indigenous Australian activist, academic and artist: “If you have come here to help me you are wasting your time, but if you have come because your liberation is bound up with mine, then let us work together.” “And so again, I challenge you,” Ms. Restrepo said. “Let us work together to build a better world for us and for our children and for everyone on this planet.” ■

st. george’s school

Sandy Restrepo ’01, now an immigration attorney outside Seattle, is this year’s recipient of the school’s highest alumni honor, the John B. Diman Award, which is determined each year by a vote of the St. George’s Board of Trustees. She accepted the award during a chapel service on May 18. In her acceptance speech, Ms. Restrepo, who received an exuberant round of applause when she noted she was the first Latina to win the award, urged students never to forget what St. George’s teaches about working in service to others. “Building community power,” she said, “is very important. You build such a strong community on the Hilltop that it’s important that all of the values and all of the lessons you learn … you carry with you everywhere you go.” Interviewed prior to her speech, Ms. Restrepo said she learned “incredible life skills” and found her calling to help others while at St. George’s. “I think once I got to college I was able to maintain and balance a lot of different things in my life because that's what boarding school taught me.” On the Hilltop, she spent many hours outside class doing community service. She was a counselor at Camp Ramleh, volunteered at the Boys & Girls Club of Newport County, and established St. George’s first schoolwide Day of Service with classmate Beth Walker ’01 in 2000. She was also a volunteer on the call line of a women's shelter — one of the first experiences she had with

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// SUMMER 2019

Russian-born Tim Pozitkov ’19 writes and directs a film that both honors and challenges his homeland


BETWEEN TWO WORLDS T

imofey Pozitkov ’19 was sitting in Empire Tea & Coffee in downtown Newport reading an op-ed on RT.com when he got the idea for his latest film. Tim, who was born in Vladivostok, Russia, said he was struck by the writer’s negativity regarding Ukraine’s efforts to move on from its Soviet past. “I said to myself, ‘Gosh, Russia's really abusing its power — being like a father figure to a lot of those ex-Soviet states — not letting them make their own political decisions, dabbling in elections, and sending propaganda and money to the leaders who are in support of Russia's political system.’” An actor and a film buff from an early age, Tim turned his outrage into the foundation for “Diaspora,” a movie he wrote and directed as a Student-Devised Performance Project, one of several afternoon-activity options offered this past spring. With a cast and crew of 20 students, Tim worked for several months on the project. Writing and editing the screenplay took place between the spring of 2018 and December during his free time; casting took place over the winter and early spring. Much of the film was shot with rented equipment in a few rooms in Sixth-Form House over several weeks this past April and May. Tim’s faculty advisor on the project, theater teacher Sarah Ploskina, said projects like Tim’s are important because they give students a genuine experience making art — and the chance to see what they’re capable of. “It's central to my mission that students have authentic opportunities to make plays and films; to do the actual work, to feel the push and pull, to struggle and to rejoice, themselves,” she said. Tim’s marks the latest in a recent series of student-written and directed performance pieces, beginning with 2015’s “Behind the Hills,” a play about the 1994 genocide in Rwanda by Catherine Farmer ’15 and Laurie Germain ’15.


08 st. george’s school

// SUMMER 2019

Anna Braz ’19 stars in “Diaspora,” written and directed by Tim Pozitkov ’19.

“Diaspora” examines themes of loyalty and love, oppression and freedom – and outlines the internal struggle that Tim says remains among his friends back in Russia. “The kind of argument that's going on with a lot of Russian youths is whether we should respect our Soviet past and base our values and morals off of that, or whether we should switch to more western views,” he said. “Those two clash heads all the time — and it goes into education, religion, economics, and industry.” Tim said he wrote the two main characters in the film — two sisters several years apart in age played by Anna Braz ’19 and Natalie Hansel ’20 — to represent “the more mature and much more stable and much more Western point of view” vs. the “younger and kind of indoctrinated younger generation [who hasn’t yet been exposed to other viewpoints] and who only seems to have a conservative narrow view of what's happening.” Russian art and culture pervade the film, which also stars Claire Leamon ’19 and Lana Gaige ’20: Tchaikovsky plays in the background of a dinner scene, while shots of a character with a scarf over her head and holding a candle are a nod to one of the paintings Tim would see at a traditional cafe in Vladivostok. The red scarves the characters wear in the film are a reference to those worn by the Young Pioneers, a mass youth organization for children aged 9–15 that existed in the Soviet Union between 1922 and 1991. Tim, now 18, was born in Russia, but moved to Singapore as a baby and went to British schools until he was 9. He returned to Vladivostok when his mom, who grew up in the port city, was hired as the CEO at a local hospital. “So we moved back to Russia, but obviously that adjustment for me — from a very liberal, fast-paced, glitzy city like Singapore all the way to Vladivostok, Russia — didn't really vibe with me. I spent two years in Russia before I was like, ‘I can't do this anymore. This is too much. I don't see a future here. If I stay here, nothing's going to happen with my life.’” On his own, Tim, then just 11, applied to the Harrow International School in Hong Kong — and got in. He even managed the visa application process by himself. He had been at Harrow for three years when he found St. George’s online. He was struck by an image of Old School and the red doors. It reminded him of Darren Aronofsky’s

“Requiem for a Dream.” “There's this famous sequence where Jarrod Leto's character is running toward a woman in a red dress and, I don't know, those visuals kind of lined up in my head,” he said. “I'm like, oh my gosh. That's really funny. That's like the red door. That's like the red dress. So I chose St. George's probably based on its location and something was telling me … and my mom also said the same thing: I think St. George's is where it's at for you.” Still, he said, his family didn’t want him to forget his personal history. Tim had a Russian tutor throughout most of his time in Singapore because his family wanted to make sure that he was fluent in the language and aware of the country’s literary and cultural significance. “My mom insisted when I was younger that I read a lot of Russian literature,” he said. “Earlier this year she asked me ‘What book are you reading right now?’ and I'm like ‘Virginia Woolf’ and she's like, ‘She's not Russian.’” At last check, Tim was on the third volume of “War and Peace,” and hoping to be finished by the end of the summer. When “Diaspora” premiered in Madeira Hall on May 17, students were enthusiastic in their support. “[Tim] felt his peers rally around him in a new way,” Ms. Ploskina said. “The homegrown nature of the StudentDevised Performance Project really reverberates through many layers of Hilltop existence — and I know the vibrations are still moving through because I hear other students speaking up to say they want to write plays, compose music, and make films that reflect their experiences, too.” Inherent in the project, Tim said, was his desire to honor his personal journey, but keep the internal dialogue going. “Honestly, I feel like I'm torn all the time between supporting my country and not really agreeing with what the leaders of my country necessarily stand by. So there has been a lot of figuring things out — and assessing and analyzing,” he said. Having now lived abroad and been exposed to more than just Russian media, Tim said, “it's given me this good mediator position where I understand both sides and I can come to conclusions myself. “Diaspora,” Ms. Ploskina said, showed how art can strengthen St. George’s sense of community. “What could be a stronger commitment to building trust and understanding than to share our human experiences, our identities, our fears?” she said. “To me, the desire to do so speaks loudly as a testament to our students' immense potential — as artists, as citizens, and as working community members — of which we've only scratched the surface.” ■ Tim heads to France this summer to pursue a global BFA in film art, a joint degree program of Emerson College in Boston and Paris College of Art.


Following a morning announcement at assembly, enough students signed up to wield the four-octave set of handbells, which were made by Pennsylvania-based company Schulmerich. “There was absolute enthusiasm” among club members, Sparlin said. “They truly loved being able to make music together, loved accepting the challenge, and were inspired when they realized they had just completed a really complicated passage and could really play.” Peripheral equipment was purchased to properly care for and store the handbells like special tables, music stands, and lights so they would last through the years, according to Sparlin. “When you’re playing handbells, you have to wear gloves, white gloves, because if you leave fingerprints on the bell metal, that will start corroding and eventually change the pitch of the bells,” Sparlin said. “So, at all times you wore gloves.” As the handbell choir’s first director, Sparlin made sure anyone could join the club – students or faculty. “That was an important aspect of what I hoped to produce was the community coming together in making the music, not being an exclusive student organization,” Sparlin said. “We always had faculty-related people in the choir and everyone seemed to appreciate that a good deal,” he added. “It represented an important aspect of the community experience at St. George’s – to have an organization where you had the combined efforts.” PASSING THE BELLS

The handbell choir needs an adult to serve as director and when retired faculty member Betsy Leslie worked on campus during the 1980s, she answered the call and kept the club in harmony. “It wasn’t anybody’s real mission,” said Leslie, who had no experience with handbells, but was drawn to them after hearing the “Carol of the Bells.” “We had these beautiful things and students needed something to do … There wasn’t going to be a continuing program unless an adult was willing to help organize it.”

Handbell choirs have been making beautiful music on the Hilltop since 1979, thanks to a donation from an alumnus and his father.

SUMMER 2019

FIRST NOTES

Leslie said she enjoyed seeing the effect the handbells’ music had on people while conducting at performances. “I used to love looking down into the body of the chapel at the end of a piece and seeing these faces that almost looked entranced, as if they were waiting for the notes that were whirling around to kind of settle into their hearts,” said Leslie. St. George’s assistant director of music Wendy Drysdale first remembers seeing the cases of handbells in some cabinets inside the old conference room of what is now the Brown Center. She’d seen handbells on T.V. before and knew some were on campus. With some free time on her hands and a half hour available for student activities after study hall, Drysdale began her tenure as director of the handbell choir in 1997, holding rehearsals once a week and continuing the program to this day. “There’s a camaraderie, a fellowship, just like any team working for a common goal,” Drysdale said. “With handbells, you’re always in tune and you can reach immediate success because if you can play your note at the right time, it really sounds neat.” This year, enough students joined for a full handbell choir and faculty interest in joining was so high that Drysdale formed a separate faculty handbell choir for the first time to meet the demand. “This year, I finally managed time to form an adult handbell choir on the urging of some faculty and staff,” Wendy said. “When I asked, a few said it was on their bucket list. It’s something they saw and heard here at St. George’s and I opened the door for them. A little break from comments and grades.” ■

09

//

Special occasions on the Hilltop have been accompanied by the sounds of handbells for decades ever since St. George’s received a $2,500 gift to purchase them in 1979 from Lee Hastings Bristol Jr., and his son, former SG math and photography teacher Henry P. Bristol II ’72. Dale Sparlin was the only faculty member teaching music at that time. He taught a few courses, and was instrumental in beginning the tradition of an annual musical, but was hired mainly as the organist and choirmaster for chapel. It was Sparlin who created the SG handbell choir soon after hearing the school had gotten the gift from the Bristol family. “I had previous experience with handbells at quite a few other places, so it became a natural thing for me to pick up and get something started,” Sparlin said. “They’re absolutely beautiful no matter what, but in the acoustics of the chapel, that thrilled me. I was looking forward to their arriving and initiating an ongoing program so that we could use them in that setting.”

e

CAMPUS NEWS

st. george’s school

bells c d n a H onti nu e to in s p i r


PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BASED ON IMAGES FROM 2019 AND 1923.


Caring for our campus

Now, as final fundraising continues, the building — which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places — goes offline for a year as our expert architecture and building crews begin work this summer. We'll keep you posted as this exciting work progresses.

SUMMER 2019

Your generous donations have helped us move ever-closer to our $11 million goal for the project, allowing us to move forward with a comprehensive historic preservation and renovation effort that will ensure the building’s vibrant use for generations to come.

//

T

he well-worn stairs of Memorial Schoolhouse are testimony to its enduring place in the lives of St. George’s students since the structure was completed in 1923. This year, we’re incredibly grateful that the St. George’s community has come together in a big way to give back to this venerable Hilltop building.

st. george’s school

PRESERVING A BELOVED BUILDING

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Caring for our campus

st. george’s school

JUST IMAGINE...

// SUMMER 2019

RISD STUDENTS RESEARCH MEMORIAL SCHOOLHOUSE PROJECT Thirty-two students from the Interior Architecture Department at the Rhode Island School of Design were on campus Monday, July 1, as part of their studies in adaptive reuse of historic buildings. Accompanied by four faculty members, the students spent the day taking measurements and learning about the Memorial Schoolhouse renovation project from seven SG panelists: Director of Operations George Staples, Archivist Val Simpson, Academic Coach Sarah Mason, Director of Advancement Jedd Whitlock '94, Director of Technology Robyn Cavanaugh, Peyton Mulhern ’19 and Olivia Quinn ’21. The RISD students are now back on the East Side designing potential solutions for turning the Study Hall into the new home of our Horton Center for Learning. The architect of record on the project is Vision 3 Architects in Providence. While there is no expectation St. George’s will incorporate the RISD students’ ideas into the project, we can't wait to see what they come up with. The students’ designs will be unveiled on July 26 at RISD, and models and drawings will be on display in the Hunter Gallery this fall.


14 st. george’s school

// SUMMER 2019

50 A

s we approach our school's 125th

George's in these next pages; we simply picked

anniversary in 2021, it seems

out some of the quirky and fabulous objects we, as

fitting to reflect on our past and

a school, have managed to salvage and safeguard.

the rich history that has become an important

In fact, Mrs. Simpson reports, “There is so much

trademark of St. George's. Here we present a

cool stuff in here,” is a common refrain among

sampling — admittedly small, but hopefully

visitors to the archives.

captivating — of objects that each tell a little

In this digital age, what should be preserved,

story about our school. Most of these 50 items

indeed what can be preserved, is top of mind.

are housed in the St. George's School Archives,

Much of what we create and communicate today

these days overseen by our esteemed and ever-

is ephemeral. No longer do we have many papers

vigilant Archivist Val Simpson. A few objects

to tuck in a folder and save for future generations

are still in use on campus, treasures that we walk

to read and reflect on. What will replace the

past everyday, perhaps without knowing their

documents, pins and pennants of the past and

origin.

help us tell the story of our school in the decades

We do not purport to tell the vast story of St.

far beyond this one?


1

map of the hilltop, late 1940s

Artwork by Kitty Hoyt, wife of English teacher Norry Hoyt.

2

gold baseball charm, 1928

The charm is engraved with the initials of C.L. Roberts ’30 on one side and the score of the 1928 Middlesex game on the other. The trustees presented the entire team with the miniature gold baseballs that year to celebrate the victory.

3

Fur-lined Coat, 1915

School founder the Rev. John Diman used a large interior pocket of this coat to protect his books and papers during long walks to and from St. Columba’s Church.


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4

letter sweater, 1954

This sweater belonged to varsity swim team co-captain Richard Garcin ’54.

5

story book, 1925 Ogden Nash, SG Class of 1920,

co-authored this book with friend, Joseph Alger ’18.

6

photo of mobile kitchen, 1941

During World War II, St. George's School donated this mobile meal unit to Sussex County, England.

7

civics club minutes, 1941

The club debate during this particular meeting was about whether or not the U.S. should enter the war. Six of the 29 SG casualties of WWII were from the Class of 1940.

8

consecration book, 1928

Everyone who attended the Consecration of the Chapel received a copy of this book, and many had the dignitaries add their signatures to the inside covers.

9

medallion, 1914 This Red and White Council

membership medallion belonged to one of the associate editors of The Red and White.

10

Stock Certificate, 1901

John Diman and the Board of Trustees raised funds toward the purchase of our Middletown campus using stock shares. This certificate is for seven shares purchased by the Rev. Diman.


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19 microscope, late 1800s st. george’s school

A possession of science teacher Edward Sturtevant (SG Faculty 1898-1939), this instrument was sold with a wooden case and accessories by Benjamin Pike’s Son Opticians in New York.

the lance, 1908

// SUMMER 2019

12

The first edition of the school yearbook featured a pen and ink drawing of St. George.

13

library register, 1914

Books acquired for the library were recorded by Headmaster’s Secretary and School Registrar Julia Sheldon. This page lists authors of books acquired March-May 1914.

14

processional cross, 1919

Mathematics teacher the Rev. Arthur Newton Peaslee donated this elaborately painted cross, which honors members of the school community killed in WWI. It is still used in services today.

15

brass bell, c. 1937

For many years this bell was used as the official morning alarm clock. No snooze button to press! Before his retirement, employee Bill Holmes recounted to a Red and White reporter that some of the boys had been heavy sleepers. He would ring this bell within a few inches of their heads. “When they woke up, there sure were fireworks,” he said.

16

Binney Cup, 1903

These days, the Binney Cup is awarded on Prize Day to the student with the highest academic average in the sixth form. From 1903 through 1997, both fifth- and sixthformers competed for the Binney Cup, though just one winner was chosen. Marian Guyon Purchas Smith ’76, whose name is engraved on the base of the cup, was the first female to earn the prize. Indeed 1976 was a banner year for women on the Hilltop. Rian’s classmate Addie Dix was the first female senior prefect at St. George’s, showing women made their mark at the school very soon after coeducation began in 1971.


20 st. george’s school

17

enamel button, 1942

Modeled on popular campaign badges of the era, this pin touted a rivalry of a different sort.

// SUMMER 2019

18

hot dog cart, 1990s

Emblazoned with the phrase, “Franks for the Memories,” this cart was a fixture in King Hall until the early 2000s. As shown here, it was sometimes used as a prop in the annual fall Pie Race. The cart is “the one that got away” according to Mrs. Simpson. It escaped proper archival treatment and, alas, all that remains are the memories.

19

samovar and teacup, c.1951

Afternoon tea was a popular tradition on the Hilltop for many years.

20

tray, 1970s These red-orange trays

were used in King Hall for decades, but their use was terminated in the early 2000s to conserve energy and water.


21 Movie Camera,

1965

This 16mm camera, made by the French manufacturer Beaulieu, was used by our athletic department to film games.

22

vinyl record, late 1960s

Winfred E. Johnson, choirmaster from 19641971, oversaw the production of this album.

23

booklet, early 1970s

This publication features writing and photographs by members of St. George's AfroLatin Association. “To Be Young, Gifted and Black,” is a 1969 collection of autobiographical writings by Lorraine Hansberry, the playwright best known for “A Raisin in the Sun” — the first play written by an AfricanAmerican woman to be staged on Broadway. Integration began at St. George’s in 1963.


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SUMMER 2019

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dance card, 1939

SG boys would add the names of girls

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sailor’s cap ribbon, 1960s

This ribbon from an Italian sailor's cap

who had agreed to dance with them on

collected by Mary Boatwright Edgar, wife

this pocket-sized card of the dances

of William Edgar Jr ’37 and mother of

scheduled for the evening.

William ’62 and Robert ’65.

25

centennial quilt, 1996

From adding a single stitch to spending many laborious hours, hundreds of people participated in the creation of this commemorative piece during the Centennial celebration.

26

galvanometer, early 1900s

Named after Italian scientist Luigi Galvani (1737-1798), this galvanometer measures the movement of charge (electrical current). This and many other vintage pieces of lecture demonstration equipment were salvaged from the du Pont Science building before work began on the west side of the Academic Center in 2014.

27

school guest book, 1897

A bound notebook with lined pages, this contains signatures of friends and family visitors shortly before the decision was made to rename the school “St. George’s.”

29

Trowel, 1928

This silver piece commemorates the Consecration of the Chapel with a Latin inscription.


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st. george’s school

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SUMMER 2019

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shovel, 1959 Representing the student

body, 1959 classmates Peter Archer and Francis Fox used this shovel at the groundbreaking for the Van Beuren Gymnasium.

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drawing, 1908 Architect and artist

Charles A. Platt imagined this possible landscape layout for the school, though the design was never realized.

32

school seal press, 1907

A new seal press was needed that year as the school incorporated as an educational nonprofit institution.

33

swan cup, 1902

This prize was presented by Mrs. Andrew Swan to the writer of the “Best Original Story” in a competition between The Dragon and Cloyne Magazine (of the Cloyne School). In this year, the winner was Leonard Bacon ’05, who went on to become the Pulitzer Prize winner in 1941 for best volume of verse, "Sunderland Capture."

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T-shirt, 1988

Spring Dance Weekend that year had a ’60s vibe.

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catalogue of st. george’s school, 1898-1899 Students of all ages were listed in single alphabetical columns as either “Scholars” or “Day Scholars.” Beginning in 1908, enrollment had grown enough to arrange the names by forms instead. Sixth-formers were listed first, firstformers listed last.


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u.s. flag, 1926 This flag, from Rear Admiral

Richard E. Byrd's 1926 flight expedition to the

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chapel needlepoint cushions, 1930s-1960s

North Pole, was given to Vincent Astor ’10 to

These were made by faculty spouses and others

thank him for his financial support. The flag has

and were often decorated along the side edges

been displayed in the Head of School’s office for

with memorial tributes to alumni. Margery

at least 60 years.

Wheeler, wife of George Wheeler ’27, was remembered to have spearheaded the effort

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mirror note, 1930s E.F.L. Bruen ’32 was the recipient of

this note, composed during Study Hall by his friend “Gordon," who apparently was skilled in writing in “secret code.”

during her time at SG.

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lower-form beanie, 1904

At its founding in 1896, St. George’s admitted day students as young as age 8 and boarders at age 11. Within a few years, the youngest boys admitted were First Formers. The first form was discontinued in 1930; second form in 1966. This beanie belonged to Thomas Ives Hare Powel ’06.

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club competition plaque, 1904-1913

One group of students vs. another, the Sachuest/Sakonnet rivalry continued until 1933 — and was revived by the school prefects in 2008-09.

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Ceremonial Key Ring

It is not known when these first became part of the festivities, but by Prize Day 2019 many school prefects would remember passing along these “keys to the school” to the next year’s elected student leaders.


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brass plaque from WWI ambulance, 1917 The ambulance was donated by St. George’s to the Norton-Harjes Ambulance Corps. The story holds that it took a near miracle to recover this plaque at the end of the war; therefore, it was considered a precious memorial object at SG.

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felt pennant, 1940s

These were popular dormitory room decorations.

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battalion uniform, c.1917

The activity of the School Battalion continued under the leadership of Headmaster Stephen Cabot during the remaining days of WWI.


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This metal sculpture (and its partner), which adorn the Nathaniel P. Hill Library, were rescued by former Art Department Chair Richard Grosvenor following the 1964 demolition of the Manufacturers Building in Providence.

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wrought iron handle, 1927

The blacksmith Samuel Alexander Yellin created this and many other pieces of ironwork for the St. George's Chapel, which still adorn the building today. Born in Poland in 1885, he was commissioned by chapel donor John Nicholas Brown, Class of 1918.

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Dragon Sculpture


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calendar, 1929

Ten years before the design of our current school shield, this calendar featured the traditional St. George's Cross.

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camp ramleh album, 1926

Camp Ramleh started in 1926. This page features photos from the first camp session of 1931.

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board of trustees record, 1907 Handwritten by Secretary Edward Sturtevant, this page of meeting minutes was accompanied by John Diman’s letter announcing gifts of King Hall and Arden Hall affixed to the left page.

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Game Football, 1904

The rivalry between St. George’s and Middlesex School began in the fall of 1902.

The St. George’s Archives boasts thousands of objects, but there are still some coveted pieces of nostalgia we’d love to acquire for our permanent collection. Archivist Val Simpson notes the following items are on her “wish list.” Should you have an item or items you wish to donate, she’d be thrilled to receive your message at archives@stgeorges.edu

WISH LIST: Headmaster’s Award (miniature dragon statue); WWI School Battalion hat or certificates; early 20th-century school clubs’ enamel lapel pins; and SG-related photos, photo albums, scrapbooks or personal journals (any era).


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Alumni News

IN THIS SECTION

32 41 43 80

Alumni in the News Class Notes Memorial List Student Essay

Celebrated author and journalist Sylvester Monroe '69, P'95 addresses the community in chapel on Feb. 7. He described his experience as part of the first ABC (A Better Chance) cohort of black stu­dents at SG and highlighted the strides in diversity SG has made since then.


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ALUMNI NEWS

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A TRAVELER OF MANY ROADS a desire to see the world led chad macarthur ’70 on a meandering journey to his life’s work in public health

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Chad MacArthur ’70 has lived and/or worked in more than 30 countries and, after decades in the public health field, is now considered one of the world’s experts in preventing the spread of an infectious disease called trachoma, which causes blindness. If you happened to come across him in 1980, however, you may have seen him juggling in a West Berlin circus. MacArthur has taken a serendipitous journey to his current career — mostly the result of his desire to explore the world. “To me it was just wanting to see new vistas and to look at different ways of life — culturally, socially. I was also drawn to the physical beauty of a lot of different countries,” he said. “[Travel] just kind of infected me and grew — and eventually it helped me make career choices.” MacArthur had his first overseas travel experience as a sixth-former at SG, when he and classmate Stuart Ross ’70 studied abroad in Belgium with the Experiment in International Living program. After SG, MacArthur went to Bucknell University and majored in English and history. Then he “ended up just kind of wandering for probably 10 years,” he said. Taken by the theater, he set off for New York, where he studied acting, “but mostly ended up driving a taxi.” So he headed to South Paris, Maine, where he studied mime, juggling, and clowning at the Celebration Barn Theatre.

It was during a subsequent monthslong trip to Mexico and Guatemala when he got the idea for his next job. The weather was very, very hot, he recalled, and one of his travel companions told him about her experiences working in Alaska. “I looked at a road map I had and Alaska looked all so bright and cool and everything, so I said ‘I think I'll just go up there.’” Within weeks he had made his way to Seattle, where dozens of commercial fishing boats were getting ready for the season. For the next four years, MacArthur worked many 20-hour days fishing for salmon out of Ketchikan, Alaska. “And those four months of the fishing season … provided me with sufficient funds just to go travel around and explore the world,” said MacArthur, who used the downtime to journey to Central and South America as well as Europe. Sometimes, he would do street theatre to earn some extra cash and for two hunting seasons he worked as a cook in a camp outside Yellowstone National Park. In 1980, MacArthur moved to West Berlin, Germany, where for two years he was a juggler and clown in a circus tent next to the Berlin Wall and on the streets of the city. He also taught circus skills at a local theater school. “When all of that ended, I decided it was time to find a profession that allowed me to be overseas and abroad and traveling, but that didn't force me to keep running away to get another visa,”


// SUMMER 2019

Opposite page and top left: Chad MacArthur in his commercial fishing days in Alaska. Top right: Performing as a clown in Barcelona. Second photo from the top: The Tempodrom in Berlin, a circus tent where Chad performed as a juggler and clown in the early 1980s. Bottom two photos: Chad at a January workshop he conducted in Kapoeta State, South Sudan.

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he said. MacArthur got a master’s degree in education and taught English in Barcelona, Spain, and worked for four years as an education supervisor at the Philippine Refugee Processing Center in Bataan, a camp for refugees who had been accepted for resettlement in the U.S. “There was something that really impressed me about living in a very remote area with a number of different cultures,” he recalled. “The refugees were Vietnamese, Laotian and Cambodian, and most of the staff was Filipino.” By the time MacArthur joined Helen Keller International in 1997, he had gotten another master’s degree, in public health, at the University of Alabama/ Birmingham and worked for five years at ORBIS International, an NGO focused on the prevention of blindness. Throughout his 16 years with Helen Keller, what the World Health Organization called “neglected tropical diseases” became a focus of MacArthur’s work. He lived in Mozambique for four years and South Africa for more than a year working with ministries of health “to plan how they're going to reach the [World Health Organization] goal of elimination of trachoma as a public health problem,” he said. The human suffering MacArthur has seen while working in underdeveloped countries is heart-wrenching. “They are [sights] that are highly disturbing,” he said, “not only because of what the individual is experiencing, but the fact that anyone has to experience this at all.” These days, MacArthur lives with his wife, Lisa Tapert, in South Harpswell, Maine, about 40 miles from Portland, and he still travels about a week to 10 days every month for the firm he founded in 2014, MacArthur/Tapert Global Health Consulting. When we spoke this spring, MacArthur had just returned from South Sudan. In the previous year he had been in Burkina Faso, Mozambique, South Africa, Cameroon, Zanzibar, Central African Republic, Papua New Guinea, and Oman. He was pondering a trip back to Cameroon and to Burkina Faso, and perhaps Mauritania this year. He’s optimistic that public health organizations in lower-income nations are making good progress in eliminating neglected tropical diseases, particularly with increases in funding and drug donations. Pfizer, for instance, donates its antibiotic Zithromax, which helps combat trachoma. Looking back, is this the career MacArthur thought he would have? “No, not at all, I always imagined that ...” he trails off. “Actually I have no idea what I imagined.” But he can still juggle. ■


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Architect and artist Kate Gubelman ’87 (top left) and scenes from her art installation, “Transcendence” in Jalisco, Mexico.


ALUMNI NEWS

‘TRANSCENDENCE’ boxes, medical records, and plastic tubes — which she began to keep in 2011, about eight months before her mom passed away. The art represents the many sides of family life: anxiety, respect, devotion, grief, and love. Ms. Gubelman said the time she spent caring for her parents over eight years “was positive in a lot of ways.” Still, she said, “there are lots of things you don't want to necessarily know about your parents, and secrets that you didn’t know, that you end up finding out. So it's a combination.” Ms. Gubelman said she was impressed that her parents approached the end of their lives with grace. The two continued to host cocktail hours and invite people over. She called her mom “feisty.” “She was a real fighter. She wouldn't give up. She wanted to participate. She wanted to go out. She wanted to be in the community.” Her father was also “very dignified about the process. A lot of things that people do not take well or with dignity, he did,” she said. “And he did not allow it to get him upset or put him in a bad mood.” When both of her parents heard about her idea to create a work of art from her experience, they were incredibly supportive. “They had no reservations, even though … the installation kind of reveals a whole lot about them. It was incredibly personal and other people could've taken it in a completely different way,” she said. Her mom didn’t get to see the completed works, but her father was alive through much of their creation. “He loved going out [to the studio]. He loved seeing it. He was happy that I was doing something creative that I felt good about,” she said. Ms. Gubelman is now hoping to find other galleries and spaces that might host “Transcendence.” The installation, she said, “is not meant to have any specific political message either way. It's more for questioning. … Certainly [health care] is something that's in the news a lot and affects all of our lives. “Really what I was trying to do,” she added, “was to make people think about the vulnerability of all of us.” ■ A video about Kate’s art installation, produced by Bradley Gaurano, may be found at: https://goo.gl/SK2XFm Follow Kate on Facebook and Instagram at @LK Gubelman.

SUMMER 2019

Kate Gubelman ’87 was always close to her parents, and so when the two grew older and had health issues, Ms. Gubelman set aside her career as an architect to care for them. The three were living in Mexico, but would often travel to Houston Medical Center for treatment. The routine, she said, was “all-consuming.” “Even though we had 24-hour nursing for my parents, it still required organizing all the doctors, talking to all the doctors, figuring out what was needed, going in for tests, everything ...,” said Ms. Gubelman, whose father, Oscar Gubelman, was in the St. George’s Class of 1945. What came out of this period of her life, however, includes a thought-provoking work of art. “I didn't want to start to resent [my parents] for the fact that I wasn't working,” said Ms. Gubelman, who earned her bachelor’s degree in architecture at Cornell and has since been mainly self-employed designing homes. “I had chosen to be a caregiver because I wanted to help them, but I also didn't want to later feel like I had lost those years of my life. So I decided I needed to come up with some sort of a project that would be cathartic to me — and also make me feel like I'd accomplished something in that time.” The result is “Transcendence – A Celebration of Those with Perseverance,” an art installation now on display in Ms. Gubelman’s studio, a set of abandoned grain silos she renovated in El Sacrificio, Jalisco, Mexico. (She credits former St. George’s Art Department Chair Richard Grosvenor for inspiring her love of architecture.) The idea for the installation, which consists of six artworks — “Thresholds,” “Entanglement,” “Transparency,” “Immunity,” “Prism” and “Gauntlet” — came to her on a trip to the Contemporary Arts Museum in Houston. “I went and saw one of the shows … and thought that it would be a good idea to do … some sort of art to express the experience. I'm not very good at writing and speaking, so I thought, well maybe I could do something in art that would address the magnitude of this process — for both the patients and the caregivers.” The pieces consist mainly of debris from Ms. Gubelman’s parents’ medical treatments — things like IV bottles used at home, X-rays, blister packs, pill

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In our life there is a single color, as on an artist’s palette, which provides the meaning of life and art. It is the color of love.” - Marc Chagall

st. george’s school

DEVOTION TURNS INTO

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A FOUNDATION FOR LIFE AND SERVICE


ALUMNI NEWS

LAYING DOWN THE LAW Atkins previously worked at Fort McNair in Washington, D.C., as a deputy legal counsel for the

ENTERING THE SERVICE Soon after graduating from West Point in 2000 with a degree in German and Spanish, Atkins put his education to use as a tank platoon leader responsible for four tanks and 16 soldiers at the National Training Center in California’s Mojave Desert. Several of Atkins’ soldiers were native Spanish speakers and, although they all spoke English, it was easier to group them in his tank and speak Spanish with them and

Facing page: Atkins (standing, far left) and the 10th Mountain Division legal detachment in Gardez, Afghanistan, in 2014. Above: Atkins and his wife, Alison Atkins, at South Korea's highest military court, in 2017.

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On Sept. 12, waking up was a realization of the seriousness of what I was doing and also that I truly had a heartfelt conviction in serving our national defense.

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English to everyone else on the radio. “Driving through the desert, you’ve got aircraft flying overhead, there’s pyrotechnics going off in the training you’re doing, there’s hundreds of vehicles, there’s dust everywhere, it’s at night sometimes,” Atkins said. “In your headset, you’re listening to the radio network for your tanks and anyone who is sliced to work with you, but you also have to listen to your boss’ network, and then you have to command your own tank, so there’s a lot happening.” “That was Spanish training that went back to elementary school, but really was formative from Conchita Kreisler at St. George’s and then the professors I studied under at West Point,” added Atkins. Atkins has served in the 8th U.S. Army; 1st Armored Division U.S. Army; and 10th Mountain Division U.S. Army in countries all over the world like South Korea, Germany, Afghanistan, and Iraq. He was 16 months into his military service when the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11 happened. “Like anyone who’s served since 2001, 9/11 had a huge impact on me. I remember waking up the next morning and realizing, this is what I signed up to be a part of,” Atkins said. “Our country is going to go through a test of how we respond to this and how we prevent this from happening in the future. I couldn’t have foreseen that in 1996 when I graduated, but that’s what I signed up for and that’s what I made a commitment to. That morning on Sept. 12, waking up was a realization of the seriousness of what I was doing and also that I truly had a heartfelt conviction in serving our national defense.”

st. george’s school

When Lt. Col. Andrew Atkins ’96 first arrived at St. George’s School, he didn’t yet know he would later attend West Point or how much the Hilltop would help ready him for it. “St. George’s is very good preparation for the military academies. I just remember it being so rigorous, but, also, I enjoyed it,” Atkins said. “I enjoyed the work because I had some great teachers like Jeff Simpson, Robert Kmen, and Conchita Kreisler. These are three teachers whose classes were very challenging for students, but I enjoyed the subjects and I enjoyed our discussions.” Outside the classroom, despite not considering himself athletic at first, Atkins ran on the cross country and track teams under coach Ted Hersey. “Fortunately, I figured out I could run a little bit and Coach Hersey inspired me to take that seriously and commit myself to trying to be better, trying to run faster, trying to be part of a team that would win races and win track meets,” said Atkins. “And we did because he was particularly inspiring.” English Department Chair Jeffrey Simpson remembers his sixth-form elective class, Imagining Childhood, as one of his “most vital and dynamic” classes and said Atkins was a key factor in that. “A talented writer, insightful reader, and hard worker … [Atkins] liked to delve and was never content with surface commentary,” Simpson said. “Most of all, though, I valued his energetic, thoughtful participation in class discussions.” Although Atkins said nothing gets you ready for the pressure of getting yelled at in the face or marching correctly with a rifle over your shoulder, the requirements and schedule at SG helped prepare him for a similar daily regimen of mandatory sports, military training, and a tough academic program at West Point. “That experience at St. George’s carried through. I had to get through basic training. It was 42 days long,” Atkins said. “I knew if I could get through basic training into the school year, I probably was going to be OK.”

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ALUMNI NEWS

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// SUMMER 2019

U.S. Army Military District of Washington and Joint BACK TO THE HILLTOP Forces Headquarters National Capital Region. Atkins returned to the Hilltop in February to speak “Our country is a country of laws, not of strongmen with students while he was in the area for an inter… and the public expects that our government acts in national law conference on security in the Korean accordance with those laws,” Atkins said. “Soldiers peninsula at the Naval War College in Newport. He expect their commanders, their leaders, to also act served for three years on two separate tours in Seoul within the law. When we go to do humanitarian with United States Forces Korea, working closely with assistance in a country that’s suffering from some South Korean officers and soldiers there almost every crisis or we go to a combat zone, our allies expect us day. as Americans to act within our reputation as a country “Having gone on to serve in countries around the that adheres to legal norms and rules.” world, I Lawyers, according to Atkins, help accomplish the appreciate country’s national security objectives by coming up the value with analyses and recommendations on courses of of our milaction that accomplish any mission lawfully. itary alli“Part of it is making sure our training for soldiers, ances and sailors, marines, and airmen includes discussion of the that these law of war, of how you handle prisoners, of whether aren’t you can shoot at a hospicheap or tal from which the enemy formed is engaging you,” said overnight,” Atkins. “There are legal Atkins questions there that are said. “Part of why I going to have big signifserve and why I want icance and are going to to continue serving is make soldiers pause and to continue to conso, through their traintribute to the United ing, you help soldiers States alliances across understand what they the world that make need to do in a moment of our way of life and our crisis, a moment of decieconomy and our politision and action, and not cal system possible.” just an individual solider, That appreciation of but a senior commander teamwork even goes – a general or an admiral back to some of Atkins’ responsible for thousands most proud moments Above: Atkins' ID from his days at St. George's. / A snapshot from practice with the and thousands or people.” cross-country team (he is second from left). at SG. Recently, Atkins started “When I look back on a new job at the Pentagon in the Office of Legal St. George’s, the things that give me the most pride Counsel for the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff in are not things that I did by myself,” Atkins said. Washington, D.C. Any action coming to the Chairman “It’s, on a kind of whim, trying out for the musical for a decision that involves a funding question or intersenior year, along with our cast and crew, putting on national, humanitarian, or security assistance or an “Little Shop of Horrors.” Cross country and track internal investigation, Atkins will be one of many offi– Ted Hersey’s teams were winning teams every cials at the Joint Staff who review that prior to it going year and that was a lot of people coming together to to the Chairman. make that happen and man, I’m proud of our success, “The Pentagon is a busy place and the pace of work but also just of the work we put in together, that we there is going to be high. I think it’s going to be the shared in. Rigor that gave us something to be proud most demanding thing I’ve ever done,” Atkins said. of for life.” “The subject matter that I deal with will be similar to “Ted Hersey, Jeff Simpson, Conchita Kreisler, what I’ve done in the past, but the level of the actions Robert Kmen and a lot of other teachers,” he added. I’m reviewing or the discussions that I’m participating “They gave me a lifelong sense of pride in working in will be higher than anything I’ve done.” hard, of learning for the sake of just learning about “It’s intimidating,” he added, “But I’m fortunate to the world around you, but also in being kind and being have worked for some very good attorneys and officers compassionate and genuinely and enthusiastically and to have been part of good, solid teams of people caring about the wellbeing of the people on your team, that I think have trained me and given me the skills to whether that’s a military squad or an athletic team or enter the job.” your family.” n


ALUMNI NEWS

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Young alums rally to help child refugees remain in school

st. george’s school

Back to class

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SUMMER 2019

Students at the Return to Learning pilot program for Syrian refugee children in the Bekaa Valley in Lebanon.

“The world is witnessing the highest levels of displacement on record,” according to the United Nations. “An unprecedented 70.8 million people around the world have been forced from home by conflict and persecution at the end of 2018. Among them are nearly 30 million refugees, over half of whom are under the age of 18.” If these children end up in a refugee camp, nonprofit humanitarian groups like Save the Children are often brought in to set up places for them to learn and play. “These refugee camps, they take care of your basic needs – your shelter, water, food, security a little bit, but what they don’t focus on is education. That’s an afterthought,” said Aaron Fossi, Save the Children’s Director of Individual Philanthropy. “Right now, the average length for a refugee to be displaced is 17 years, so we’re talking about an entire childhood gone for your average refugee.”


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ALUMNI NEWS

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As Save the Children celebrates its 100th anniversary this year, its centennial campaign, The Promise of Childhood, created the Return to Learning Fund with the goal of making sure that refugee children have access to learning opportunities within 30 days of displacement. It was this goal that three Dragons took to heart. Hayden Arnot ’12, Esme Yozell ’10, and Eliza Ghriskey ’10 are all on the Young Patrons Committee of Save the Children and have helped raise more than $150,000 for the Return to Learning Fund over the last two years through two fundraising galas and other smaller events. “The Return to Learning Fund is about education being just as important as food and water and shelter in an emergency,” Yozell said. “Because when there is a natural disaster or people have to leave their homes [because of] war, education is the first service to be interrupted and the last service to be restored usually.” This money has supported pilot programs in Lebanon and Kenya and funded everything from school supplies, transportation, teacher wages, and the creation of a rapid general assessment tool called Holistic Assessment of Learning and Development Outcome. The assessment tool is a mobile application that facilitators can use on site to collect data like a child’s previous schooling, disabilities, home-learning environment, and to determine the curriculum needed for them to reach where they need to be. COMMUNITY FIRST Since its founding 100 years ago, Save the Children has changed the lives of over 1 billion children. Arnot and his family have been involved with Save the Children for years, but it was during a hike with his aunt (a Save the Children employee) when he decided he’d like to do more to get the millennial generation involved with the organization. He pitched the idea to Yozell and a few other friends in New York City and together they formed the Young Patrons

Eliza Ghriskey ’10, Will Rosen ’11, Macgill Davis ’10, and Esme Yozell ’10 at the Young Patrons of Save the Children Gala in New York on May 18.

Committee in fall 2017, with Arnot and Yozell as co-chairs. Ghriskey joined the committee in its second year after attending the first gala and helps with communications and social media. “I think the reason why Return to Learning resonates with the Young Patrons is because our committee is a bunch of people who attended some of the best boarding schools and best universities, and we had every opportunity for success. We wanted to give some type of opportunity to children who didn’t have [those advantages] for education,” Arnot said. Since the Return to Learning initiative didn’t have a dedicated funding source, Yozell said the Young Patrons Committee really had the ability to make a difference. “We all thought it was a great idea. It just made sense. Education is what brought us together,” Yozell said. “St. George’s really instilled in us how important it is to give back. We had our community service days and Camp Ramleh. You just see it around you all the time. Community first always at St. George’s.” Getting younger generations’ support for efforts like Save the Children’s is key to sustaining them, according to Arnot. “It’s important because everybody should be giving back in some way, especially those of us who went to school, who are so fortunate and have the ability to give back,” he said. “If another generation just doesn’t get involved, then the giving and support for Save the Children will eventually stop.” STEMMING A CRISIS Lebanon has received a huge influx of refugees as a result of the Syrian Civil War. Many are in informal settlements in the Bekaa Valley and, without school, the children usually work with their families in the fields of nearby farms or just sit around because of the distance between settlements and lack of opportunities to socialize with others their age. Thanks to the help of Young Patrons funding, Save the Children has set up a pilot program for the area with a goal of reaching 1,000 out of school refugee children. Approximately 27 facilitators and 30 staff and local partners have been trained there on how to use the assessment tool.“What the Young Patrons are doing is immensely important,” Fossi said. “They’re paying it forward. The footing that they got to start their lives, they’re using that and putting it towards helping kids who haven’t had a lot of help in life.” The Young Patrons, who are also on the board of Save the Children’s Centennial gala this September, are already planning their own third annual gala in May 2020. Fossi traveled to Lebanon and saw firsthand the impact the initiative was having on the children, some who had never seen the inside of a classroom or had any sort of formal teaching. “It’s really brilliant just to see how… deeply, deeply grateful they are to sit in a classroom a few hours a week,” Fossi said. “They’re excited, they’re eager, they want to learn, they just need the opportunity.” n

Link to Donate: www.savethechildren.org/returntolearning


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Class Notes Camilla de Braganca '09, Jelani Odlum-Lansiquot '09, Izzy Evans '09, Callie McBreen '09, and Max Priest celebrating friendships and good weather at Alumni Weekend in May.


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CLASS NOTES

st. george’s school

BECOME A CLASS CORRESPONDENT! See an empty place where your class column should be and want to see it filled? Reconnect with old friends? Rally the class for your next reunion? Contact the Alumni Office at 1-888-I-CALL-SG or ClassNotes@stgeorges.edu.

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1939

Mr. Todd passed away on Dec. 21, 2018 and we honor him for his many years of service as correspondent for the Class of 1939. He will be missed.

1940/41

Please contact the Alumni Office at 1-888-I-CALL-SG or ClassNotes@stgeorges.edu if you would like to volunteer to serve as class correspondent or to submit an update.

1942

Phillip F. Thomas, 540-486-4167

1943/44/45

Please contact the Alumni Office at 1-888-I-CALL-SG or ClassNotes@ stgeorges.edu if you would like to volunteer to serve as class correspondent or to submit an update.

1946

David H. Couch, dc-mlc@verizon.net

1947

The Rev. King passed away on Jan. 16, 2019, and we honor him for his many years of service as correspondent for the Class of 1947. He will be missed.

1948

Peter O. C. Austin-Small, paustinsma@aol.com

1949

C. Jackson Shuttleworth Jr., 631-331-6098

1950

John T. Bethell, john.bethell@verizon.net ■ Joe Burnett spent just a year and a half with our class, but he capped his St. George’s career with a slew of swimming records and the Binney Cup, awarded to the top-ranking scholar in the fifth and sixth forms. He went on to star as a swimmer at Yale, take an M.D. from Harvard Medical School, and become professor of dermatology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, specializing in marine venoms. But Joe’s early days at SG were a test of his mettle, as he recalls in the following reminiscence. “I owe a lot to St. George’s, to my classmates, and to four faculty members who had a formative impact on my later life,” Joe writes. “I arrived from Lancaster, Pennsylvania, as a late-starting fifth former in January 1949, and my classmates accepted me. I had the luck to meet Jay McLauchlan, who’d been at the school since second form, at the Providence railroad station. He helped me get a bus to Newport, and then a taxi to the school. I arrived near midnight, and the Rev. H. Martin P. Davidson — the school chaplain, universally known as Padre — got me settled in. The late John Lawson, another classmate, taught me the social graces. My mother had fitted me out with a blazer and light-gray trousers, but she didn’t know that the pants should have been dark gray. I’d been recruited to St. George’s by the swimming coach, Norris D. Hoyt, a former NCAA

Above, top to bottom: Dr. Joseph Burnett ’50 as a fifth former on the 1949 Dragon swim team (bottom row, third from right). / Dr. Burnett , professor emeritus at the University of Maryland School of Medicine still swims every morning.

backstroke champion and captain of Yale’s 1936 swim team. I had been a swimmer in Lancaster and was practicing on my own for local meets, with support from my uncle, a former Lehigh University breaststroker. He suggested I write Bob Kiphuth, the legendary Yale coach who’d won 98 percent of his meets over a 40-year interval. I did so, and got a reply suggesting that I adopt a daily regimen of half-hour workouts. Since I was already swimming three hours daily, that advice fell flat. My uncle, who had recently moved to Wallingford, Connecticut, invited me to visit after Christmas 1948. He introduced me to Dr. Hoyt in New Haven, and we attended a Yale swimming


CLASS NOTES

MEMORIAL LIST Anderson Todd ’39, Dec. 21, 2018 B. Gordon Dickey ’40, June 11, 2018 Ivan S. Obolensky ’43, Jan. 29, 2019 Donald Byers Barrows Jr. ’44, Jan. 27, 2019 Gordon F. Merrill ’46, Oct. 17, 2018

John “Jack” J. Reydel ’47, Dec. 20, 2018 Richard L. Townsend ’49, April 14, 2019 Sidney Keith Jr. ’51, Aug. 15, 2018 Michael S. del Neill ’51, May 21, 2018 Phillip D. Stone ’51, May 2019 John Hall ’53, Oct. 7, 2018 Stephen R. Wainwright ’57, March 2, 2019 Dana Barnes ’59, June 1, 2019 Abbott Gardner III ’62, June 28, 2019 Scott M. Milliken ’73, Dec. 22, 2018 Alexander L. Ellwood ’86, July 18, 2017

COMMUNITY Marcia Rogers, former faculty, P ’74, wife of former faculty member William S. R. "Robin" Rogers ’44, June 14, 2019

hits the pool. “Swimming a 440 takes five times longer than it did at SG or Yale,” he explains, “because I am more buoyant and cannot sprint into the wall, so must do open turns rather than flip turns.” And after the swim? “Before lunch, I audit lectures on Great Courses videos.” This is one disciplined individual. n “I’m still running, attending board meetings, taking cruises, and enjoying life in our magnificent senior living facility, the Glenridge on Palmer Ranch in Sarasota, Florida,” writes Howard Crowell. “We made our annual skiing trip to Telluride, Colorado, this past winter. The snow was deep and coming down sideways, and my lack of skiing prowess was revealed to an embarrassing degree. Didn’t matter! Had a great trip, and by the time this note appears, we’ll have taken an American Cruise Line ‘Revolutionary War Historical Cruise’ on the Chesapeake Bay. We’ve also started a Model Sailing Club here at the Glenridge: We have 21 members with radio-controlled sailboats, and the competition is

SUMMER 2019

Jonathan L. King ’47, Jan. 16, 2019

//

Davidson. He had written a book titled ‘Good Christian Men,’ which I still have. In sixth-form year he led us in studying other religions of the world. After retiring as chaplain, he moved to a parish in Frostburg, Maryland, and then to Baltimore, where he served in a convent and a church. My wife and I saw a lot of Padre, as he looked out for our Baltimore house while we were away and sometimes came for Thanksgiving dinners. He died in 1997, and the school chaplaincy was endowed in his honor. His influence on me was spiritual. The fourth faculty member to impact my life was an English teacher and football coach, Jeremiah Ford II. He taught me to read with speed and comprehension. On arriving at the school, I learned that an exam on John Galsworthy’s ‘The Forsyte Saga’ was set for mid-January. Mr. Ford wouldn’t let me out of it, so on top of swimming meets, other homework, and social events, I had to read the entire massive book in three weeks. I had a difficult time academically in those early weeks. I might add that Mr. Ford had two crafty pedagogical tricks. He assigned paperbacks with sexy covers, like James M. Cain’s ‘The Postman Always Rings Twice,’ so that we’d read rapidly to discover the juicy parts — though often they weren’t all that juicy. Another trick was to project written passages on a big screen, with each word illuminated for a few seconds. The illuminated spots gradually expanded to cover more words, then whole sentences, and finally an entire paragraph, yielding insights into the mental process of reading. Swimming, memorization, and the ability to read rapidly helped me through college and medical school, and I later read some economics, enabling me to build a nest egg for my family and an endowment for my local medical school. All that traces back to the experiences I gained in my year and a half at St. George’s.” Joe retired from research and teaching in 2004 and was inducted into the School’s Sports Hall of Fame the same year. His swimming accomplishments are documented in the Hall’s exhibit space adjacent to Hoyt Pool. He and his wife, Kitsie, now live at Blakehurst, a retirement community in Towson, Maryland, north of Baltimore. Joe routinely rises by 6 a.m., works out at a gym, reads three daily papers, and then

st. george’s school

practice. Just over a week later I was swimming laps in the old Behrend Pool at St. George’s. A meet against Providence’s La Salle Academy was about 10 days away. Dr. Hoyt revealed to the team that his strategy would be to exhaust Kerry Donovan, La Salle’s top swimmer, by having me swim the 200 and then the individual medley a few events later, while immediately before the medley John Lawson would challenge Donovan in the 100. The strategy worked beautifully: Kerry and I went stroke for stroke, and I touched him out at the end. He swam well on the open water, but my turns were better, and we won the meet, 48-27. In the summer of 1949 I continued to swim with an outfit called the Mid-Atlantic Seniors, winning all the freestyle events from the 200 to the mile, and taking junior national titles in long-distance and medley events. Kerry, meanwhile, lowered his 100 time by three seconds. We didn’t face each other during the 1949–50 season, and after graduation I entered Yale with the class of 1954; Kerry took a post-grad year at Exeter and enrolled at Yale a year later. We had freshman teams in those days, so Kerry and I didn’t connect at the varsity level until 1952–53. That year he and I were on a 4x100 relay team that placed second in the NCAAs, making us all-Americans. After Yale I went on to Harvard Medical School, while Kerry stayed in New Haven and won the NCAA championship in the 50-yard freestyle. As a mentor, Dr. Hoyt — ‘Uncle Norrie’ to his swimmers and the students in his English classes — took me a long way. At 87, I still swim every day. Another faculty member who meant much to me was our German teacher, Dr. Charles Thornblade. He taught me to memorize, assigning 10 nouns to learn by heart every week in preparation for the College Boards. He also taught me never to leave an exam early. I once finished a test before time was up, handed in my paper, and returned to my room. Dr. Thornblade soon knocked on my door. He wanted to impress on me that if I hadn’t left early, a useful last-minute thought or two might have come to mind. To drive home that lesson, he proposed to give me a grade of zero if he found any mistakes in my work; if it was perfect, I’d get 100. I got a zero. A third faculty member who inspired me was the Padre, Father

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// SUMMER 2019

fierce. What a blast!! Heading for our 65th reunion at St. Lawrence University at the end of May. Oh, does time fly! Life is a whirl, and our good fortune is not taken for granted.” n Jerry Ford: “A new knee and two previous hips have kept me upright, and my continuing practice as an architect has kept my brain and drafting skills alive. (I hope my former art teacher Bill Drury would be impressed.) Since I live in Princeton, New Jersey, I was called on to help corral my old Tiger ’54 classmates to attend our 65th reunion in May … And since I’ve been trying to be happy as an old widower, I would be pleased to meet an incredibly wealthy widow who is beautiful, has a sense of humor, and skills with computers.” n Jack Hopkins wrote last year that he was “up and around, but limited to where my walker will go. I don’t drive, which puts the pressure on my ‘Trouper Judy.’ I sure hope my problems don’t wear her out.” When we checked with Jack in April, he was upbeat. “I am back amongst the living … Life is good!,” he wrote in an email. “Still have to use a walker, but once in a while, just a cane. We have a new great-grandson who came to visit a week ago with his whole family. He is a good baby, and his 4-year-old sister is learning to adjust. So nice! They live in Burlington, Vermont, so we seldom get to see them. We’ll be going to Columbus, Ohio, in 10 days for our youngest grandson’s graduation from Ohio State. Wow!” n Ted Hussey sends this update: “I have stepped away from our KAP(SS) 4KID(SS) ministry and turned it over to our team of five former submariners who visit the Children’s Hospital of Georgia here in Augusta every Friday morning. Last December we celebrated our 500th visit with a reunion of the 2,500 Honorary Submariners we have recruited over the past 11 years. Our first recruit in 2007 was my godson, Adam Veale, who now works on Capitol Hill in Washington. Our SubVets base presented me with a proclamation recognizing my service as founding chaplain of the ministry, and ordaining me Chaplain Emeritus. Also, I am again the president of our homeowners association.” Ted adds: “My wife, Nancy, has taken up playing the piano, following an instruction course on the internet. She is very disciplined about the lessons and enjoys them thoroughly. In the fall of 2018 we

1951 1952

Proclamation from KAP(SS) 4KID(SS) ministry recognizing the service of Ted Hussey '50 as founding chaplain and ordaining him Chaplain Emeritus.

spent a week in Orange County, California, seeing our families there and meeting our first great-grandson, Cole Robinson. His mother, Tara, is our son Christopher’s daughter. She is a nursing supervisor in the city of Orange, and is now 12 years clear of the leukemia she survived in high school. It is a joy to have miracles in the family.” n This from our Gloucester, Massachusetts, woodworker and sculptor, Jay McLauchlan: “I have retired from staircase design and construction, and am sculpting in wood and granite, emphasizing the deterioration of the marine environment. I have been practicing Tai Chi for eight months, which helps greatly with balance and coordination. Sold my Tartan 37 and have downsized to a small catboat that Sara and I can sail comfortably. I continue to volunteer at Maritime Gloucester, a working waterfront museum and educational center, in charge of the marine railway. n Ted Tansi wrote in April: “I am feeling quite well, which surprises me as I will be 88 in a few weeks. I will be going on a cruise in May to Atlantis in Nassau (Greek ‘Island of Atlas’), which Plato said existed around 300 B.C. I am also planning to go from Florida to New England in August to visit my four children and five grandchildren. I remain in high spirits and still play poker (no-limit Texas Hold ’em) five days a week. I do a lot of smiling.”n Enfin, this note from Kent Turner: “We’re a year and a half now in a retirement community in Endwell, New York, and all is well. Have successfully sold our Binghamton house at auction. Our best to all.”

Mitchell Pierson Jr., mitchpierson@gmail.com

George Peterson III, agpeterson3@yahoo.com ■ Dick Almond is resting comfortably in a nursing home in New York with views of the Cathedral of St. John the Devine. He says it is a decent place but not a four-star hotel. As you would expect, he has found interesting people with which to talk. Wife, Roxanne, is in their apartment, a two-story walkup – a challenge these days. His son and daughter-in-law visit from Madison, New Jersey, with Dick’s granddaughter, 9, and grandson, 13. A fine legacy! He welcomes calls from our class. n Tim Sturtevant and Carol are breezing through life in Vero Beach in their new apartment and living a joyful life in Woburn; although they have rented a house for three months this summer in Newport. They are avid golfers still. Tim is experimenting with acrylics and is proud of a picture of his son and his wife in a kayak where facial recognition is less distinct – a challenge all artists face. n Animal lovers George Kilby and his wife Farley own two dogs: a Cockapoo (Cocker and Poodle mix) and an Ausidoodle (Australian Shepard and Poodle mix). Careful George, that Shepard might find and herd in a flock of sheep! George’s son, Tom, works for Delta and United and flies freely while son, Wit, is remodeling their vacation home in Carbondale, Colorado. Did you know Kilby is an active skier? His daughter lives in Studio City, California, where husband, Tony Hale, is a TV actor, starring in “Veep.” n Wow! If you want a jolt of energy, phone Randy Brown. As I reported earlier he and his wife, Dede, sold their large 1738 ancestral house and moved to Heritage Harbor, a retirement community near Annapolis with multiple recreation opportunities and wonderful walks that Randy advises for us couch potatoes. With another arriving in April, grandchildren will total eight plus two great-grandchildren – a fabulous legacy! Phone Randy for pointers on staying in shape. n Ben Palmer is still working hard at the family business started by his great-grandfather of servicing all aspects of heavy trucks. He is selling his big house to reduce taxes while eying Port St.


CLASS NOTES

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should call Jim for a jolt of energy.

1953

1954

Please contact the Alumni Office at 1-888-I-CALL-SG or ClassNotes@stgeorges.edu if you would like to volunteer to serve as class correspondent.

1955

Thomas H. Stevenson, tomstevenson@verizon. net / Robert L. Ceres, rceres@cox.net ■ Bob Ceres writes: As some of you are aware, I’ve been casting about trying to find “a few good men” willing to help put together these notes until our reunion in May of 2020. My hope is that by then we’ll have a good plan to present to those of us attending for discussion and approval. So far, I’m happy to report that we have at least one very able classmate, with only a few minor problems that I’m sure we’ll find a way to live with. I’m talking about classmate David Hoopes. Here’s an approximation of his offer that I’ve

SUMMER 2019

William C. Prescott Jr., wprescott@ wheelerschool.org n Dan Bray writes that he and family have had some problems in the past year. Aside from his own birthday (85), his wife Marlyn had a stroke six months ago and cannot talk or walk. We are all hopeful, he says. Sadly, again, their son Randy died seven months ago, and they miss him dearly. n On a happier note, Harry Fisher writes: “Traveled by sea from Miami to Hong Kong, a voyage of two and a half months through the Panama Canal to Hawaii, Tahiti, Samoa, Australia, and Indonesia. A fine way to escape a Boston winter. Future travel plans include England and France. (We will keep this up as long as we are able.)” n As for your scribe, my family and I are doing pretty well. I have had two back surgeries, neither of which has left me pain-free, but I can still get around, albeit much more slowly than I would like. Am finishing my stint on the St. George's Board of Trustees (after 12 years), but am involved with three other schools, so life is never dull. Please keep in touch, as the spirit moves you!

//

Lucie in Florida despite owning houses in Maine and Key Biscayne. Oh! Those taxes! Following SG, Ben started married life early; as evidenced by nine children, now 14 grandchildren, and three great-grandchildren. Having defeated early health problems, he is active and a worthy scion. n It is always fun to talk with Barry Sloane who seems to have almost total recall of his experiences at SG. He was crew captain our senior year at SG when on Lake Quinsigamond, Massachusetts, for the prep school regatta, we were ahead of Kent, the team to beat, when we collided with a row boat wandering over the course and punched a hole in its side. Peterson at bow almost fell out. With all the crew in tears, the race ended. The person in the rowboat was arrested. You can tell Barry keeps in shape by the vigor in his voice. Despite a treadmill in Framingham and one in Barnstable, he takes long walks. Irene and Barry are justifiably proud of their grandson, Tommy, a serious deep-water diver. n Carl Grashof has an exemplary attitude toward growing older as we all are. He mentions some arthritis pain, which is somewhat alleviated by cortisone shots but the best medicines are the long walks with his dog. He and Marita are ensconced in Bellingham, a retirement community west of Philadelphia where the food is good and “the residents are old but fun to be around even when they forget who they are or what’s going on.” He has formed a singing group at Bellingham but his joy is the choir of St. Francis in the fields, “the best choir I have ever sung with.” What a lifetime of pleasure Carl has had with his love of singing! n What in irrepressible person Jim Witker continues to be. Jim’s love of painting is stronger than ever, evidenced by an art show at the Clovis Point Vineyard on the North Fork of Long Island. Jim joked that after visitors see his dazzling colors, a glass of wine will seem right. He bemoans the over-building and influx of tourists around South Hampton, but, hey, more art buyers, too! Many of us, I suspect, never knew about the many successful businesses Jim started and then sold. He rightly sees himself as an entrepreneur who then guides developing companies as with educational pamphlets, which attracted large orders from major companies, i.e., Exxon. Any classmate, who believes his life is over,

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1954

65th Reunion

CLASS OF 1954, 65TH REUNION Peter Thorp and Ham Meserve.

accepted with pleasure. “Let me be clear … I am not soliciting the position, but offering to help. Besides … an overly profane, old-school Republican, former Marine who goes out of his way to never be politically correct is probably not the sort you want speaking or writing on behalf of even a class as old school as 1955.” So, it’s a start, and it’s good to have a volunteer, with perhaps some small room for improvement. n Speaking of rabid Republicans, and on a far more somber note, I recently called Bill Longfellow, thinking I’d catch up with his latest political insights. Unfortunately, I was shocked to find him recovering from two very serious spinal surgery operations that occurred last fall. Now, he’s in the recovery mode, but still having difficulty with his speech, mobility, neck movement, and ability to swallow normally. However, he is off most of his post-operative meds, and has begun an extensive physical-therapy program. He’s determined to regain his health and mobility, and is planning to attend our 65th if at all possible. We skipped our usual verbal political banter, but one thing completely unchanged is his mental toughness to get back to functioning normally. Drop him a note of encouragement (P.O. Box 203, Cape May, NJ 08204, or call (215) 850-6037). n Next,


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CLASS NOTES

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//

Marty moved to Talbot County. I started in the St. George's choir in the fall of ’51 with Dave Pratt. Dan arrived a couple of years later when Allister Brown led the group. Dan followed me to the University of Pennsylvania, where we both became members of the fraternity of Delta Psi, ‘St. Anthony Hall’ and sang in the Penn Glee Club. Over time, we both have managed to find groups with which to sing since then. I am now in the choir of St. Mark’s (Episcopal) in Waterville, Maine. So, six decades later, we are both still working at making a ‘Joyful Noise" — brother ‘Hallies’ and Dragons. I trust this rocket finds you in good spirits. Cheers! Laurie"

SUMMER 2019

Six decades later, Dan Dent '57 (bottom left) and Laurie Driggs '55 (top right) are still making a 'Joyful Noise' with the Easton Choral Arts Society.

and included to whet your appetite for reading the next chapter of these notes, here’s a preview of the next edition. First, a paragraph or two from Roger Smith discussing the late life crisis of leaving New England roots for life in Colorado. Second, a paragraph or two from David Hoopes with a similar theme, and finally, an entry from Dan Hutchinson on a mystery subject. Stay tuned! n Last, and as you know, Roger, Sparky, Pick, and I have made a preliminary round of calls, and inter alia, have tried to remind everybody to get back to St. George’s for our 65th reunion in May of 2020. In addition to the four above, a number of you have responded positively, and will make a serious effort to attend. Those in this category include: Laurie Driggs, David Hoopes, Dan Hutchinson, Bill Longfellow, Blaine Matthews, Chris Peet, Peter Rand, Bill Riley, and Bob Simmers. For those not listed, please give it some thought. n From Laurie Driggs: "Dan Dent ’57 now lives in Easton, Maryland, my old home, and though I now spend most of my time in Athens, Maine, with my wife, who is the human resources director at Unity College, I still go back and forth to Talbot County to check on my house and my body (medical appointments). In the fall of 2018, I was in Maryland long enough to join the Easton Choral Arts Society in rehearsals for its December Christmas concerts before heading back to Maine. Dan joined the group soon after he and

1956

Robert S. Ingersoll III, robertsingersoll@aol.com ■ This is not “A Tale of Two Cities”; it is A Tale of Two Climates. While Jay Doolittle and June were challenged to the max by one of the most brutal winters in Montana history, John Gamble and Kitty are tending the camellias and azaleas in Georgia. As Jay writes about life in their renovated barn residence in Pray, amid huge snows and seemingly endless days of sub-zero temperatures: “We are loading up the wood stove now ... and this activity goes on throughout the night. June gets the 2 a.m. shift and I take the 4:30 a.m. one. What fun. We are being treated, however, to a stunning ‘elk parade’ spectacle when

Book cover of "Easy Kill," the third suspense novel by Charlie DuPuy '56.

herds numbering as many as 300 trek single-file from the nearby Beartooth highlands to seek shelter and sustenance in the pastureland around the ranch. The snow is so deep that looking at them you see no legs as they appear to be adrift on the white stuff, many only a dozen yards from our deck. How they get through the nights is a mystery and the same for all the neighborhood cattle.” ■ Meanwhile, in Milledgeville, central Georgia, John writes: “When Bob called and wondered if I would drop a note about our weather here in central Georgia — in response to Jay's dreadful winter in Montana — I thought, well uhhh, given what’s going on in the rest of the country I’d say our weather is great. What about the heat, Bob persisted. In the summer here, we like to say: You are in Georgia; what do you expect. I answered. Here I am to my surprise at 82. How is life going? What to say? Children? Yes, four, all doing well. Grandchildren? Yes, seven. Great grandchild? Yes, one so far. Still a practicing psychologist but working ever so little, and promising to close the office soon. Kitty is fine but slowing a bit. Yes, a heart attack for me three years ago and now regular visits to cardiac rehab where in addition to taking care of my heart I give classes to new arrivals on the costs of stress and depression. Kitty and I have traveled for years having started in our forties and have some future trips lined up. So that’s about it, except to mention that the dogwoods are out, camellias and azaleas are blooming wonderfully and its 74 degrees today.” ■ It may also be cold in Maine, but lobsterman and author Charlie DuPuy is on a hot streak. His third suspense novel, “Easy Kill,” is out and available in both hard and softcover at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and many other outlets, as well as electronically. It features the derring-do of E.Z. Kelly, a former Special Forces female combatant, now a civilian in Miami in the midst of a terrorist attack. “A blend of violence and humor, with a touch of romance,” says Charlie. That's just the beginning of E.Z.’s exploits. Charlie has the second of an envisioned E.Z. series in the hands of an editor and is working on a third!


CLASS NOTES

Mr. Wainwright passed away on March 2, 2019, and we honor him for his many years of service as correspondent for the Class of 1957. He will be missed.

1959

William A. Briggs Jr., wbriggs41@aol.com n Hi all! It was so great to catch up and to use the occasion of our 60th reunion to collect these terrific updates. Thanks to all! n Blayney Colmore: “I think I may have published another novel since our last reunion, called “The Spy and the Priest.” I think the St. George’s library has a copy. St. George’s continues to hold a happy, if fading, place in my memory. I will forever credit Bill Schenck for being the first mentor to help me see I might have a useful life. The school, like so

SUMMER 2019

Jeffere F. Van Liew, comrepro@aol.com n Last year I tried to organize our aging class’s 60th reunion. Five of us committed to go. Alas, we all showed, except I only saw two at the Saturday night dinner at the ice rink. Two others did come, however they left before the Saturday lunch in the tent outside of King Hall. To say I was disappointed is an understatement. n None of our class has contacted me since our “60th reunion.” Their disinterest is sad. Through this post, I am appealing to my classmates to please contact me with an update on their current circumstances (good or bad). n As far as my circumstances, I am 80, I have whipped bladder cancer, I have had three back operations, I have had a reverse shoulder replacement, I play tennis, I am now healthy as a horse, I run my real estate company (Van Liew Real Estate Advisors), I am treasurer and board member (since 1996) of our local private beach club founded in 1927 (where I had my first job as lifeguard in 1957), and in my spare time I drive for Uber throughout the tri-state area (NY, NJ & CT). n Both my children (Camilla ’88, a veterinarian, and Brad, on-the-edge adventurer) and my two grandchildren, Tate and Wyatt Van Liew, live in Charleston, South Carolina. I was divorced in 1995. n I look forward to hearing from my classmates! We care about you.

cruise ships and rental properties in warm places during the winters. (My ‘youthful’ updated picture was taken last July on a cruise to Norway within the Arctic Circle). Our four kids are prospering, and there are no babies left among the seven grandchildren. The youngest is 16 and the oldest 26, and latter is an aeronautical engineer who has been traveling all over the world demonstrating virtual-reality products. (Don’t recall any jobs available like that back when we were that age.)” n Thomas Winslow: “It is hard to believe that 10 years have passed so quickly since our 50th. Like the old saying, time sure flies when you are having fun … Over the last decade, Sheila and I have made three trips for extended stays in England, twice by ship, which sure beats flying! Four years ago, we sold our yacht, MV Tranquility, after 12 wonderful and adventurous years of cruising the Pacific Northwest, British Columbia, and Alaska. We continue to enjoy life in our newfound home in Portland, Oregon, after so many years in the San Francisco Bay Area. n “Even as an old guy, it has been hard for me to retire, as I still have many maritime contacts needing my technical services, which clearly keeps the old mind going, and it is also good for the ego. Of note, in 2016 and 2017 I served as manager for the construction of a 100-passenger expedition cruise ship, the MV National Geographic Quest, building at Nichols Shipyard on Whidbey Island north of Seattle. I have finally come to the realization that it is now time to professionally retire for good, but I do spend time being involved in several maritime organizations and societies. As we gather for our reunion, I cannot resist saying what a significant part St. George’s has played in Sheila’s and my life. It is a blessing to be a member of the Class of 1959, and have so many lifelong friendships. Thanks to the internet, we still keep in touch on a regular basis. Following in my footsteps our son, Jonathan graduated from St. George’s, also in another wonderful class from the school. Now in our third generation at St. George’s, is granddaughter, Lizzy ’19. Sheila and I are extending our stay east, to attend this great event and celebrate with our family. It has been a great ride!” n Olaf Thorp: “The last five years have been good ones

//

1958

much of the world, has moved along so markedly since we were students, that gratitude remains the fragile thread that connects me.” n Kane Phelps: “In 2011 I transitioned from my career as a social worker in child protective services to doing therapy in private practice. My office is within walking of my condo in beautiful Pacific Palisades, California. I started a group with the theme of Positive Aging that has been running for over a year. There is a growing sweetness in my marriage to Dee Dee that is going on 45 years. Our mutual motto is ‘we aim to please.’ Blessings abound throughout our little family of three adult children and five grandchildren, not the least of which is vibrant good health. I did experience a heart attack two years ago, but now have two stents and seven daily pills that allow for a full and active life. I have become a big Pickleball aficionado. It is the fastest growing sport in the U.S. Also, I am an active member of the local Optimists Club, am active in the Los Angeles Zen Buddhist community, and serve as president of our condo’s HOA. Finally, I have just recently been inspired by a brilliant and colorful ancestor (five biographies written about him between 2003 and 2005 — Five!) who is generally acknowledged as a forgotten founding father of our country, Gouverneur Morris. I’ll bring his story to the reunion.” n John Adden: Earlier in the year, John had written: “I do not get to the States very often, but did manage a good trip to Maine and Los Angeles last summer to see family. I remain grateful for my time at SG, long ago though it was: good friends, good education.” In April, he updated his classmates: “A quick email to let you know that, following the death of my wife a month or so ago, I’ve returned to Taiwan to keep myself busy with [architecture] work until later this year. Unfortunately, I won’t be able to join you all at the reunion. Please give my best to everyone and I hope it’s a great success." n John Dunnell: “It was almost 10 years ago – after five years of retirement – that I entered a new career in title insurance. I retired from that last year, having become overwhelmed with serving on the Board of Directors for my 55+ community (old people complain a lot!). Liz and I still have found time to travel quite a bit – mostly

st. george’s school

1957

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CLASS NOTES

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// SUMMER 2019

1959

60th Reunion

CLASS OF 1959, 60TH REUNION Back Row: Bill Starkey, John Dunnell, Chip Angle, Howard Richmond, Pete Soverel, Twistar Brown, Pete Illoway, Tom Rusling. Front Row: Derek Storm, Bill Briggs, Sandy Jacques, Fran Fox, Peter Archer, Ted Scull, Tom Winslow, Harry Strachan.

(despite a golf game which is going steadily downhill): No major health problems (knock on wood), the arrival of three more grandchildren, a night well spent on the summit of Mount Kilimanjaro, involvement in a number of nonprofits, the opportunity to reconnect with classmates, and much more.” n Harry L. Strachan III: “Marion and I celebrate our 48th anniversary, July 17, 1971, this summer. I share the exact date with my sixth-form roommate, Geordie du Pont. My retirement since our 50th Reunion maybe typical — trips to the gym, doctor's appointments, interaction with our four grandchildren: Callie, 17, and Kyle, 14. They live nearby. We have two more in Los Angeles: Sam, 9, and Thomas, 8. We see them twice a year in L.A. on their birthdays and for two yearly visits to St. Louis. We have taken a few cruises, traveled and kept with friends I've also had time to reflect on where I've been and where I'm going. Growing old has at least two advantages. With failing short-term memory, I have the pleasure of hiding my own Easter eggs and with strengthening long-term memory; I am completely prepared for the 60th Reunion. Marion and I can't wait!” n Howard A. Richmond II: “It is hard to believe that 6o years has passed since we left St. George’s. A degree in history from Duke, six years in the Navy stationed on destroyers in the Pacific, a career in sales and marketing at

IBM, my own small consulting company, three sons, and two granddaughters pretty much sums up my life these past 60 years. My father enrolled me at St. George’s after a rather dubious series of misadventures in my early life and was convinced the school ‘saved’ me from a rather unsure future. He probably was not too far off. For a number of my classmates it probably is a familiar refrain. I credit St. George’s, Duke, and the Navy as providing the foundation for a successful and happy life. My thanks to the Hilltop and my classmates for all the memories.” n Twistar Brown: “Emma and I remain in good health. We summer from November to April in Sanibel, Florida, and winter in Down East Maine from June to September. May and October are spent maintaining our old house in Pennsy now occupied by our older daughter and her more-or-less permanent boyfriend. (A nice couple but with the cleanliness standards of college freshmen.) Younger daughter Alice lives with husband Greg and four great kids, ages 16-8 near Toronto. He teaches languages - especially Greek and Latin at a very upscale prep school, and coach’s ice hockey, skiing, golf, cricket and you name it. She teaches sciences at a fundamentalist Catholic school. They are all awesome jocks. Mens sana in corpore sano. n “E. plays tennis daily. I retired from surgery a lifetime ago and exercise manically: 100

plus miles/week biking and 1/2 mile daily in the pool. In the summer you can often find us on Raven's Nest, our sailboat, which has cruised from North Carolina to Nova Scotia but is now content to restrict herself to Maine waters.” n Peter Archer: “Life is full of extraordinary happenings. I am happy to say that this experience is about my dear wife Kate and me. The story begins in early 1930s, in Philadelphia where my mother and father and Kate’s mother and father were neighbors and close friends. In 1937 my father and mother were married. That same year he started working for J.F. Mcfadden, a North Carolina cotton company. In early 1938, he was transferred to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, to represent the company. Several years later, Mr. Townsend. Munson, Kate’s father, was also relocated to Rio de Janeiro to represent The Rockefeller Foundation. The crib-age twins, Peter and Michael, were ecstatic to have a lovely 2-year-old girl to chat with. I cannot deny it but I swear it must have been ‘love at first sight.’ Fast forward to the 1950s; Michael and I attended St Paul’s and St. George’s schools. As our parents still lived in Rio, we were destined to spend the short holidays (Thanksgiving and Easter, and sometimes Christmas) with Mom’s mother Mrs. Thayer, who lived in Chestnut Hill, Pennsylvania. David Williams and his young sister Ann Starr, who lived on the main line, were the conduits to other lovely ladies, such as Kate Munson (who had moved back to the USA), Betsy Clement, and Lyn Myers, etc. What nice memories. I remember once visiting Kate at her home. I was dazzled. However, I could not muster enough courage to approach her too closely as her ‘pipsqueak,’ 10-year-old wide-eyed sister Elizabeth was sitting on the porch watching my every move. What a brat, I thought. In my senior year at SGS I lucked out again when Kate accepted my invitation to our class’s Senior Spring Dance. She was accompanied by her dear friend Betsy Clement, who was Bill Briggs’ date. Two years later (1961), I was fortunate to be chosen as her escort at her and Betsy Clement’s coming-out party in Philadelphia. Once again, I was on top of the world with glee Incredible as it may seem it would be almost 40 years


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worthwhile task awaiting. Writing travel stuff continues and three books about sea travels that no longer exist has had its rewards. Another concerning significant travel experiences is underway. Recently, a Singapore-based friend and I founded QuirkyCruise.com, an information website about small ship travel on expeditions, under sail, and along coasts and rivers. Suellyn stepped down as head of Trinity School (est. 1709), and the first woman to hold this position. Her background in education comes in handy for volunteering at a Bronx charter school. Lecturing aboard the Queen Mary 2 in the spring and fall gives us an excuse to spend time in Britain and Europe before returning on the westbound crossing. Other destinations have included independent travel by train in India, a self-guided Land Rover safari in Namibia and Botswana, river trips in Russia and Southeast Asia, and family visits to Australia. We intend to stay in our New York apartment as long as we can, so please come by. We even have a spare double berth.” n Dana Barnes: “Fellow classmates, 60 years ago I had an assignment to write a brief bio for The Lance. I did not get it done on time so Norry Hoyt and Bill Briggs got me off the hook so our deadline could be met. Things have not changed. I have waited until the last minute to update the last 20 years. We moved from our farm in North Carolina 12 years ago to Sun City Carolina Lakes, a Del Webb retirement community with a golf course. I’ve had several heart-related issues and currently have a pacemaker and wear an LVAD heart pump. I am still here! Caryl had a stroke five years ago and passed away last October of renal failure. Doree, our oldest, has a daughter and has been living with us for five years. She has been a wonderful ‘caregiver.’ Greg, our artist son, has three children and travels around the country doing shows. Doug and Ginger have two children. Doug, who some of you may remember, is a Cisco Systems Director for an IT company in Charlotte. I’ve had a good life thanks to the education and opportunities given to me when I attended St. George’s.” n Pete Soverel: “Pretty much on cruise control. Highlights: healthy with relaxed life style – international travel hunting and fishing around the world / stable, loving family:

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Seattle, and participating in the AARP sponsored tax aide program. We help people of all ages prepare and submit their federal income tax. (Washington State has no state income tax, so we do not have to worry about that.) My health is mainly still good, although I seem to interact with the medical profession more often than 10 years ago, getting various things removed or repaired. After a crash with a stop-sign-ignoring car, I have given up motorcycling. I walked away from the crash with only bruises, but the bike needed parts no longer available, and it seemed like time to switch to four-wheel transportation.” n Geordie Du Pont writes: ”If you are Lucky enough to live by the water; you are lucky enough." — Barbara & Chip Angle “If you are lucky enough to have been happily married since July 17, 1971; you are lucky enough." — Marion and Harry Strachan “We are “lucky enough“on both counts. We live on the water near the Angles and share the same wedding date as the Strachans. My Patricia is an angel. Our children, their spouses, and our grandchildren take after her. So, when all 10 of us are together in our seaside cottage three long weekends each summer; it is bliss. The rest of the time Patricia and I are scrambling to pay our taxes. We both work full time with Patricia doing most of the heavy lifting. Networking is essential to my health insurance agency and I am an Ambassador for both the local Chamber of Commerce and a nonprofit organization devoted to youth suicide prevention and mental health awareness. The Jordan Porco Foundation has events on 140 college campuses nationwide with a ‘nine out of ten’ theme. Nine students can be on the lookout for the tenth who may need help. Youth suicide is 100 percent preventable. Age is gaining on me. Recently an orthopedist refused to give me a knee replacement for a bum knee. ‘I’m giving you the same warranty for that knee as the rest of you,’ he said, ending the appointment. However, I remain optimistic. You can bet I am going to baby that knee through our next three reunions.” n Ted Scull: “The last decade has flown by, kind of scary actually. Retire, never, not as long as there is a

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until Kate came back into my life. My wife Helen and I were shopping at a furniture store on Cape Cod when out of nowhere came a loud clear voice; ‘That must be one of the Archer twins.’ there was Kate Munson Rowe, as pretty as ever. By some mysterious force, our paths crossed once again! She was now married to George Rowe, a friend and classmate at St Paul’s School. They had two children, about the same age as our two children, with four grandchildren. During the next several summers, we socialized on the Cape. Their home then San Francisco, California. I was living in Trumbull, Connecticut Sadly, George passed away in 2008, and my wife Helen passed away in 2010. In early 2011 Blayney Colmore called from Los Angeles, California, and declared that he had the ‘perfect woman’ for me. Two small problems; not only did she live in Los Angeles but she was also being dated by David Williams. After checking with Davey (who gave me permission), I decided that I also had better hedge my bets. I made dates with three other lovely ladies, one of which was Kate Munson Rowe, my childhood sweetheart, who lived in San Francisco. Our first date was so perfect and so full of wonderful feelings I decided to commute to San Francisco several times. I never looked back. I proposed to her in March, while cruising on a boat in the San Francisco harbor, and we got married on Aug. 27, 2011. And I ask you; with all these forces at work, is there is any doubt that we were meant to be together? And so we are, and very happily n Derek Storm: “To update the bio from our 50th reunion, which was 2009, I note that my retirement, which was less than a year old, then, has continued in the same style. I am still somewhat active in nuclear physics research at the University of Washington, and I still sail the same boat with my wife Cindy. Cindy and I got married in 2010, after being together for 21 years. She is now retired too and we go skiing weekly in the winter with a group that rides a bus to and from a local ski area. We sail less in the winter than we used to, but still try to do a series races that take place once a month. I have found a couple of volunteer activities that are fun. I am teaching sailing at the Center for Wooden Boats on Lake Union in

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wife – Marion; children Christine, Gregory, and Camille plus three grand and one great grand kiddos / continuing salmon/steelhead conservation work around the Pacific Rim – Kamchatka to California (www.theconservationangler. org. In 2012, out of the blue, Headmaster Hamblet called informing me that I had been selected as the 2012 Diman Award recipient. To say I was shocked is a serious understatement. I assume that one of you nominated me as I had had no serious contact with the school since graduation, and it is difficult to assume the school itself had followed my various careers 1959-2012.” n Stone D. Coxhead: “I have been living in the San Francisco Bay Area for the last 55 years. I am a real estate investor and property manager. My wife Suzy died in 2011. I continue to live on the Tiburon peninsula in Marin County where I am 8 miles north of the Golden Gate Bridge. My sister lives in the Sonoma wine county. Our fearless leader, Senior Prefect Peter Archer, lives 20 minutes away over the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco I enjoy hiking, biking and tennis. Peter Archer and I recently took on two former Princeton tennis players and beat them in straight sets at the California Tennis Club. Mary Ware (an avid tennis player) is my significant other and we have had several dinners with Peter and Kate. On occasion Olie Thorp and Margo have joined us. We added to our real estate holdings in 2001 by purchasing a rental house at 188 Kane Avenue across the street from the Vermillion House property and near the SGS campus. We rent the house out to the school, which uses it as a faculty home. The rental income does not amount to much, but we get capital appreciation and tax depreciation benefits. I intend to eventually gift the house to the school.” n Victor Sheronas: “We’re all transitioning into that period of life when so much of our time, and increasingly so, is spent with doctors and on medical and health issues. The dings and dents suffered by aging; ‘growing old ain’t for sissies!’ I have had several cardioversions (zapping my heart) and several cardiac ablations (mapping and zapping areas inside the left atrium) to deal with atrial flutter and atrial fibrillation. The last six-hour ablation procedure seems to have done the trick.

But, my CIDP neuropathy has been proceeding at a little faster than glacial place; cannot walk without my rollator, nor for long distances. My wife, Lisa, has been dealing with various foot infections since late December 2017. The first installment has been fixed; but the second installment is still a work in progress. Her healing is proceeding at a glacial pace. Other than that, we are good and still mobile and active. I look forward to the therapeutic benefit of vegetable gardening this season. For the past two years, Lisa and I have been tutoring second-graders who are not yet reading on grade level. It has been quite rewarding and fulfilling. The innocence, trust, and acceptance of these youngsters is uplifting; they set the bar high. We have indulged in our share of traveling over the past several years. In January 2017, we went to Argentina for about two weeks. We visited my nephew and his girl at his finca in the hills above La Cumbre. June 2015 found us spending two-and-a-half weeks in France. We took a barge trip through the middle of France and spent time with some dear friends; the trip was just voluptuous and sybaritic. Last summer, we again went across the pond to visit Italy, England and France. We had a mini family reunion at a villa rented by my Argentinian nephew, visited a grade-school chum in England a celebrated anniversaries with our dear French friends.” n Richard Angle: “Three and a half years ago I was hit by a car while attempting to cross the street in L.A. Pretty seriously injured with a fractured skull and two smashed ankles. Still not walking very well, but the brain seems to be more affected by old age than the accident. Still wintering in Sun Valley. Used to be a pretty good skier; now I stick to the greens and blues and avoid bad weather—but I’m skiing! Just back from skippering a bareboat charter with family in the Seychelles, so life is pretty darn good despite my handicapped ankles. Am very lucky to have a fabulous wife and family, to live in gorgeous places, to have enjoyed my long Time Life career and then a shorter stint at Save the Children, and now to serve on several not-for-profit boards.” n Dave (aka “Dink”) Williams: “My roommate, Tony Dauphinot, and I drove my 1953 Plymouth across the

country in September of 1959 and matriculated at Stanford. Two years later, I transferred to Colby College, changed my major from English to biology in order to complete the pre-med requirements and, in the fall of ’63, enrolled in the Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia. That summer my teenage sweetheart, Molly, and I were married. I think she still holds the Winter/Spring dance record for attendance (seven, I think). After getting my M.D. degree in 1967, I interned at what was then the Misericordia Hospital in Philadelphia and then went on to residency in internal medicine at the Maine Medical Center in Portland. In 1969, I answered the call and, for the next two years, served as the Medical Officer for a Destroyer Squadron home-ported in San Diego. I spent the summer of 1970 in the Gulf of Tonkin. Then I went on to four more years of post-graduate training in cardiology, two at the University of Vermont in Burlington and two at the University of San Diego. I was then fortunate to be invited to join the staff at the Scripps Clinic in La Jolla where I spent the next 35 years until I retired. We were blessed with two fine dogs, Fred and Rookie, and two fine children: Holly, a PGA golf professional, and Davey, a civil engineer. It has been a rich and rewarding life and I will always think of St. George’s as providing the foundation. The only bump in the road occurred in 2005 when Molly was diagnosed with acute leukemia. She fought the good fight for a year but went aloft in 2006, a loss from which I will never completely recover. From San Diego I send my best wishes and a sharp salute to my classmates. Onward!” n Pete Illoway: “WOW, how time flies. It seems like only yesterday we were at our 50th reunion and now it is time for out 60th. Wish I had taken better care of myself. In actuality, I am in good health and have only had one stent. Chloe is also doing very well. I completed 14 years in the Wyoming Legislature, ran for Secretary of State but lost and ran for Mayor of Cheyenne. Beat all the men but not the women, so I am still lobbying the legislature and serving on several boards including the Airport Board, Taxpayers Board, First Interstate Bank Advisory Board, and others. I have just completed my second three-year term on the


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1960

Joe Wright ’60 with his 37-pound catch in Canada.

SUMMER 2019

Peter R. Bartlett, prbartlett42@gmail.com n I check in again for the Class of 1960 in April of 2019. These notes reflect classmates’ future plans which by the date of the publication of the Summer 2019 Bulletin will be in the past, and hopefully the contributors will still be among the 23 known class survivors next year for our 60th SG Reunion. n Joe Wright writes more about his regular fishing expeditions, many with George Crozer. More about George later in this piece. Joe is particularly proud of the results of this year’s trip (his 17th) to Quebec. “2018 was by far my best. Seven fish in six days with this 37 pounder.” Please see the accompanying photo; the fish is almost as big as Joe is and required two men to hold it. He plans a trip with George to Massachusetts in June in search of striped bass. “Saw Anne and Chad Gifford in Nantucket. Anne still looks 19. Chad and Joe not so much! I continue to correspond with Airell Jenks and Cliff Iverson re: politics. No one has died yet!” n Don Chadwick and family continue to travel, most recently on a Disney cruise with their grandchildren as I write this. “May be going to the Orient next year.” Don reports that he and his wife, Janice, enjoy “pretty good” health, whatever “pretty good” means! Initially, George Crozer deferred reporting but came through a few days ago. George confirmed his plans to join Joe in June for striped bass fishing. This will depend on his recovery and rehabilitation from hip replacement surgery at the end of April; he thinks his plan is “doable.” George noted his 50th year with White and Case last September,

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year purchased their first home, in Simi Valley. Here on the home front, I converted my two self-published consumer guides on factory-built homes to a print-on-demand enterprise selling exclusively on Amazon, vastly simplifying my life. I am contemplating publishing some of the other six books I have written over the decades, but feel no pressure. Further proof that writers never retire: I just wrapped up six rewarding years as an editor/collaborator on “Last Second in Dallas,” a major work on the Kennedy assassination by Josiah Thompson, a nationally prominent private investigator, old friend, Yale grad, and a fine author widely regarded as the dean of assassination researchers. University Press of Kansas will publish it in 2020. Elsewhere, during this same period, Susan and I have found ourselves becoming serial adopters of small, senior dogs from our local dog rescue nonprofit. We call ourselves the Happy Trail's End committee. Thus, here in the autumn of our years, and still in good health, we quietly cruise along, so grateful for this time to continue our journey within. n And from me, Bill Briggs: The past 10 years since our 50th Reunion have been quite interesting. About five years ago my wife, Joan, and I began seriously planning for our ‘retirement years.’ We considered moving from Rhode Island to Florida for all sorts of reasons, including the weather. We began to focus our attention on the West Coast part of the state and after several months decided to settle in the Lakewood Ranch area, about five miles north of Sarasota. Plenty of places to swim in the Gulf, play golf, and get involved with organizations to keep one’s mind focused on everything from yesterday’s history to tomorrow’s future. Fortunately, we are able to do a lot of traveling to visit family members and friends all around the country. I am still a member of the Defense Orientation Conference Association, a Washington, D.C.-based, not-for-profit DoD/DoSsponsored organization, which makes it possible for Joan and me to travel to military bases/installations and diplomatic embassies/consulates in the U.S. and around the world. When one can act to keep one’s body working and one’s mind busy, it’s fortunate.”

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Wyoming Business Council and served my last year as Co-Chair with the Governor. Our newly elected Governor has appointed me to the Wyoming Community Development Authority (whose mission is to help citizens attain quality and affordable housing), so I am staying reasonably busy. Chloe and I have taken several cruises on Regent through the Panama Canal by way of the Cayman Islands to Los Angeles, the inside passage from Vancouver to Anchorage, and Istanbul to Spain. We also spend time in Hawaii and Mexico as well as enjoying staying at home. Cheyenne and Wyoming are wonderful in the spring and summer. Chloe’s four grandchildren are doing well. Her granddaughter is a freshman at the University of Wyoming and my two grandchildren live in Pinedale. My grandson Blake will graduate this May We have enjoyed returning to the Hilltop about every five years. It gives us the chance to visit family in Philadelphia. St. George’s was a wonderful experience. I wish I had studied as hard as Bill Buell wanted me to. We look forward to continued good health and continuing our active and healthy life in Wyoming.” n Sandy Jacques: “Since 2009 there have been several significant updates to report. We now have 16 grandchildren and one great grandchild. Birthdays and Christmas are a challenge. We have yet to gather every one of the families together. They are spread out N, S, E and W. We sold our home in Rockport, Massachusetts, and bought a condo here just down the street. Moving was quite an undertaking that some of you may well understand. After more than a year later, we are still getting settled. As part of our downsizing, we also sold our sailboat. I have not rerun for any town government positions having handed these over to the next generation, much to Kay's relief. The only position I have now is treasurer and property manager of the condo association.” n John Grissim: This past decade Susan and I truly entered elder hood, reaching a cherished milestone —growing old together. And with it has come change. In 2017, Jasen Robinson, Susan's wonderful son who came into my life at four, married Cindy Ramos, a lovely southern California girl he first met in college. They have thriving IT careers in Los Angeles and last

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and “celebrated by billing hours on an LNG project financing while in Florida this past winter.” He plans to go to Paris this summer, and is “loading up with Euro futures now as invariably the Euro hits a yearly high when my wife is there shopping.” George remains in close “email contact with John Robb on a wide range of weighty subjects such as science, politics, philosophy, and history. n Bill (Woody) Wood Prince “dealt with a bit of a problem when I had seven vertebrae fused last May. The good news is that I am fully recovered and, more importantly, relatively pain free.” However, he laments that his golf game has taken a downturn as he tries “to learn a new body when I swing.” He and his wife are heading for Alaska in May and we should stay tuned to the next Bulletin when he will regale all of us with his “lifetime bucket list trip.” n As in the case of others listed above, my wife and I continue to travel. We did a three-week cruise around the British Isles this past September; we had not been to the U.K. in more than 25 years. I am still active in the Flying Physicians Association and will attend the Annual Meeting in Fort Worth, Texas, in June. And as with Woody, we will travel to Alaska, in our case in September. We flew our plane to Juneau and up to Whitehorse, Yukon Territory, more than 20 years ago, but need to see more. Like the Chadwicks, we are taking our whole family (ages 12 to 78) on a trip to the Baltics in June 2020 after the Class of ’60 Reunion in May. Thanks to all of the above for keeping in touch. Best wishes to everyone in the St. George’s family from the Class of 1960.

1961

Gaylord C. Burke Jr., gaylordburke@gmail.com ■ While you will be reading this in the summer, it may be helpful to recall that winter was not so long ago. For some it probably seemed as if it would never end. Recent summers have seemed too many to be the same. n Bill (Batch) Batchelder writes: “We have had as rough a winter in North Conway, New Hampshire, as I can remember. Can’t tell you how many times I have shoveled my roof. I guess it’s good exercise, but I am ready to get my exercise on the golf course. Looking forward to some golf with Pete Bouker in Maine

during July. Hopefully the snow will be gone by then.” n From further south, Chris Simonds writes: “Still active managing Passarim (environmental) Reserve with my wife, Luciane, here in southern Brazil. Best wishes to all!” n Maybe things aren’t endless after all. Chris Jenkins writes: “Another two months in Stuart, Florida, flew by again. Why did time go by so slowly when we were in boarding school? Must be an age thing. We had several meals out with Dick Eggleston and his wife Tish. Always enjoy going out with a fellow conservative. Only two years until our 60th. Looking forward to seeing you all then. Chris” n Yes, only two years until our 60th Reunion. There is still plenty of time to make reservations, but now is a good time to start thinking about it and include it in your travel plans for 2021. I, too, am looking forward to seeing each of you there.

1962

George H. Helmer, wbi@vermontel.net ■ Bill Edgar: “We went up to SGS a couple of weeks ago to see our grandson be Tevye in ‘Fiddler on the Roof.’ Our second is on the tennis team. Who would have thunk!” ■ Dick Ely is active in the north country of New York working on his thawing hydro sites, also starting new projects in New Hampshire and California. His wind prediction technology is under test with the AI analysis engine being currently held up. “Wife in Calcutta for lunch talk on Gates worldwide mothers’ milk composition studies. We are off this summer to merry old England for family. Our summer coast house north of San Francisco is available for brethren ... Come visit.” ■ Dick Pew: “I finally gave up motorcycling last year being rear-ended twice in one year by people not paying attention as they blabbed away on their cell phones and never even applied their brakes. Neither Diane nor I suffered any injury in either accident but I am sure the outcome would have been different on my motorcycle. I have ridden motorcycles for about 50 years and I really miss the feeling of being one with the machine while carving turns on the back roads of Virginia but I'm too old for broken bones.” We all know how he feels – the clumsy skiers that could not catch me 20 years ago, are now life

The half-shoveled roof at the home of Bill Batchelder '61 during a rough winter to remember.

threatening! ■ Terry Meyer is coming out of a Maine winter trying to decide whether he should dive into the all-consuming pursuit of another year of vegetable gardening and fresh eggs for his farm stand or refurbish the sailing yacht that has been sitting shrink-wrapped in his yard for several years. ■ Jeep Newman called to tell me he is still thoroughly engaged in businesses of real estate development, start-ups, etc. We had 30 minutes of laughs, so I am delighted to report that the Jeep Newman sense of humor we all remember is very much alive and well in Charlottesville. ■ Geoff Quadland: “My wife Deb and I are still healthy and enjoying life.” They love their home and his workshop and their bearded collies. “We have bred dogs that have done very well in the show ring. One won the U.S. National bearded collie show, and another has been shown at Westminster. Most every week I volunteer at a historic village (Westfield Heritage Village), in their 1860s print shop. It makes me realize how different things are now, compared to when we grew up. I’m so glad we grew up when we did, with fields, woods and a brook to play in, instead of burying our faces in a cell phone.” ■ John Ruthrauff: “I’ve moved to the Center for Democratic Education in Washington where I continue to work on influencing the Group of Seven and Group


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55th Reunion

1964 CLASS OF 1964, 55TH REUNION Ford Ballard, Bob Delgado and Mike Morris.

Above, top to bottom: Bobbi and Bob Chope '63 on Easter Island. / Richard Verney '64, Hiland Doolittle '64, Tommy Thayer '64 and Bayne Stevenson '64 in Boca Grande, Fla.

of Twenty summits. I had a recent work trip to Paris, London and Lyon for G7 work. My wife, Kathleen O’Toole, is semiretired from community organizing and has four poetry books published with another on the way. She was elected Poet Laureate in Takoma Park, a two-year term. Still sailing and biking. My grandson will be 4 in July. … We do get to Maine for sailing, usually on one of the schooners. We like the J&E Riggin that sails out of Rockland. I got my 50-ton Coast Guard license 15 years ago when I thought of working on

the schooners. But that never came to fruition.” ■ Cabot Lyman: “Hi Everyone, I thought you would all like some fun news with Antony and Anna receiving this award: ‘LONDON, ENGLAND — Anna, the 65-foot cold-molded sailing yacht built by Lyman-Morse in 2018, won a prestigious Classic Boat Award at an exclusive event held at the Royal Thames Yacht Club in Knightsbridge on April 2.’ Anna and Tony collaborated on this project with my son Drew. Working with Tony and Anna — the two of them are a class act! It took me back to the days of refurbishing the old ’49 Ford with Tony and Terry in ’61- ’62? We used a basement under a dormitory. Which one? Who would have thought?” ■ Jill and I had a lovely Vermont winter with a ton of snow, a well-stoked wood stove, fine skiing and snowshoeing, a welcome eight days in Zihuatanejo, and – as I look out the window – a promising spring thaw!

This year he traveled to Patagonia, the Isle of Skye in Scotland, and London. He has great plans to help his grandchildren learn to sail on Starbuck. He also continues to research, write, kayak and hike. ■ George Clifford was in Georgia recently visiting his grandchildren. He has energetically bicycled across Italy twice and is planning a ride through France this year. ■ Bobbi and me, we delight that Gavin Newson is our governor. For those who do not know, he married us in 2006 when he was mayor of San Francisco. He knew Bobbi from her work and their mutual interest in the homeless problem. The ceremony was in his private office after hours with our family and friends. We continue to travel extensively and had a most exciting adventure to Easter Island (aka Rapa Nui) and Polynesia last October. Earlier in the year, our travels included Borneo, Brunei, Vietnam, Thailand, and Singapore. ■ Would love to hear from you.

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1964

Robert C. Chope PhD, rcchope@sfsu.edu ■ Lucien Wulsin and I have remained in good contact. He frequently travels to Oakland to visit his granddaughter Lula. He also has been in contact with some of us like Joel Huber, George Clifford, and Richard Bowman to discuss the Democratic presidential candidate field.

Robert E. L. Taylor III, retaylor3d@gmail.com ■ After nearly three years of writing, rewriting, editing and polishing by four professional screenwriters, Colin Hanna has completed a screenplay for a film on the life of Frederick Douglass. He will send a copy to anyone interested, in the hope that those who read it will send


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him their reactions. Email: Colin@Hanna. net. Anyone can sign up for updates at www.mrdouglass.com. ■ Ford Ballard is still in Newport, where he leads tours of mansions for the Preservation Society four days a week. He’s working on getting hearing aids and having cataract surgery. ■ Hiland Doolittle is celebrating being above ground in Tampa. He joined Tommy Thayer, Richard Verney and Bayne Stevenson for a lunch at Bayne’s place in Boca Grande.

1965

Jonathan M. Storm, deadeye@well.com ■ Doug Watson won the 12th Annual ’65 March Madness contest, with one of only two entries that correctly selected Virginia as the eventual winner of the NCAA Basketball Championship. Most players ignored the Cavs for perennial contenders Duke, though a few misguided souls went with North Carolina (including, of course, Skip Branin, who picks them every year because the slick haberdashery of coach Roy Williams so closely matches his own). There were a respectable 22 entries this year, and the John and Ramsay Scott Endowment for Storytelling swelled by $2,465, thanks to contributions from spectators Dan Mead and Peter Gerrard and 13 technical fouls, at $5 per. Branin landed 11 of them, and the usually circumspect Tony Castle two more. Fouls accrue for improper behavior, most of which involves insulting the Lord High Commissioner III. Losers send $100 for each entry to the winner, who then donates the entire pot to the endowment, which used to account for a nice tax deduction, but now may require a little creativity to amount to a windfall. Doug joins past winners Richie Sayer, Jim Maloney, Rex Murphey, Charlie Miller, Mark Earle, Fred King, Skip, and your humble scribe and high commissioner in the Winners Hall of Shame, along with our only two-time winner, Dick Brickley. And one year, the winner was an interloping guest of Rex’s. ■ In another momentous sports event, Duby Joslin attended a reunion of the 1979 crew of Tenacious, Ted Turner’s yacht that won the Fastnet race that year, which was devastated by a terrible storm that resulted in 23 lost boats and 16 lost lives. The meeting was

Dan Mead '65 at the bottom of a 200-foot gorge in Big Bend National Park, Texas.

held at the New York Yacht Club, where Turner donated a full-rigged model of the boat. Honorary classmate Steve Lirakis was there to photograph the proceedings. ■ Dan Mead checked in from the bottom of a 200-foot gorge in Big Bend National Park. He and wife, Sally Eagle, had meandered there from Los Angeles this winter, via Joshua Tree National Park and El Paso. The plan was then to go back the other way for a raft trip through the Grand Canyon. The photographers are still exhibiting in schools and giving slideshows. ■ Enough of this snow! Chip Luddecke sold his house in Park City and now spends winters in Ponte Vedra, Florida, returning with the scarlet tanagers and piping plovers to Shelter Island in the summers. Chip and wife, Courtney, join Rex, Mark, Dick, Skip and Jimmy Gubelmann as part-time residents of the Sunshine State.

1966

William C. Strachan, wstracha@cox.net ■ We have heard from Charles Hovey, Jamie Kenworthy, Chris Wood, and David Mitchell, who all promise to send in some info on their doings soon … maybe … sometime. At least we know they are still with us. ■ Harry Campbell writes: “I retired from our advertising agency four years ago and now live on a sheep farm I bought in Newport, County Mayo, in the

west of Ireland. Brittney and I had been visiting the area for several years to fish for salmon and sea trout on Lough Beltra, and a friend told us the farm — Grouse Lodge — was up for sale. It is surrounded by rugged mountains on three sides, and Lough Beltra is a half mile south. There is good fishing on rivers and lakes within an hour’s drive. Newport is a scenic onestreet town at the mouth of the Newport River on Clew Bay. It has four pubs, two craft butchers, a grocery, two lunch spots, a huge church, and a small hotel. Grouse Lodge came with 60 acres of pasture, woodland and bog, three barns and 20 sheep. After three lambing seasons, sheep now number over 100. Sheep do not require a lot of attention, and a local hill farmer who has worked on the farm since he was a young boy, helps us out. We use the fleece sheared from our sheep to fill dog beds we manufacture. Any SG classmates who find themselves in the west of Ireland are welcome to visit. We have plenty of room and privacy — and a pantry well stocked with Irish whiskey and Guinness. What more could anyone ask for?” ■ Richard Miller writes: “I'm here in San Rafael, California, where Anne and I have our home, and I have the office for my nonprofit, iRest Meditation. Anne and I are entering into our 38th year of marriage (Aug. 16, 1981), with two kids: Jennie, 34, is a senior scientist for Defenders of


CLASS NOTES

1968

William L. Campbell, billcam2000@ yahoo.com n Larry Luddecke writes: “Triskaidekaphobia aside, our youngest son Stu had a perfect wedding on July 13 to a lovely young lady, Whitney, the newest Luddecke, and she bravely took the name that you have to tell everyone how to pronounce. As for me still playing, recording, and writing. I am until I can’t. The good thing about getting older ... it all seems so much easier now. As Larry Bird used to say, ‘On a good night the whole game is in slow motion.’ I feel the same about playing now ... the song is laid out like the runway in front of a pilot coming in for a landing. I’m thinking 20 measures ahead and all I have to do is set her down on the runway at the end of the song. True empty-nesters — closest kid lives in Brooklyn, next is Carson at SMU

SUMMER 2019

Peter H. French, phfrench4@gmail.com ■ Many, if not most of us, are now retired. Some of us did it willingly and gracefully, perhaps with a touch of nostalgia. Others couldn’t depart fast enough, bolting for the exit door and bowling over former colleagues in an effort to “hit the street and get away.” And others adopted the hybrid approach, neither “fish nor fowl,” the proverbial semiretired strategy. ■ It’s fair to say Jeffery Jackerson falls into the latter camp. “I formally retired from my medical practice Jan. 1, 2018. Life was good with no night or weekend responsibilities, Yay! But I was foolish enough to stay in contact with my former colleagues who told me two guys had decided to leave. There is a real shortage of radiologists at the moment with old guys retiring (editor’s note: we’re NOT old) and young guys being so sub-specialized they stay away from areas in which they weren't fellowship trained. It’s a bit of a mismatch. I was invited to come out of retirement to help until they could replace me. My medical license was to expire March 31, 2019, so it was agreed I’d work up until then. It's emotionally satisfying to know you can still play the game. While I could do without the work, the social aspects to working with a group of some 50 technologists, nurses, support staff and the like was the bait that drew me back. These folks were a second family with whom I’d worked for 25 years. It was tough to walk away. So I finally had my second retirement March 29, 2019: two parties — one by the medical staff, the other by the techs. It’s great to leave on a high note and know the door would be open if ever needed. Perhaps that’s why Milton had to write ‘Paradise Regained.’” ■ Jeffery, you should have consulted with Bill Abbott re: retirement; he knows

in my opinion, my 76-year-old brother being just amazing (guess there's hope for us yet). This was in preparation for a family climb of Kilimanjaro in January. Then skedaddled back to NYC in just three days. The first half of this trip was just as fun and included Crystal Bridges Museum in Bentonville, Arkansas, and three days with a friend in Santé Fe.” Now, “cut to black,” skip ahead four months, and it’s January 2019. I climbed Kilimanjaro with my two older brothers (71 and 77), my two children, Alice and Henry, and four nieces. We spent eight days in the mountain park, flew home to do an antiques show in NYC and then back to Brussels for duties with CINOA (Confederation Internationale des Negociants en Oeuvres d’Art). It so happens I’m president – it’s a federation of art and antique dealers around the world. Thankfully have been back in NYC since. Will be in Athens and the UK in June and am still trying to figure out my summer. Tempted to do a literary tour of the US, but need to design it first. My kids want me back at Burning Man, which is a lot of fun, but exhausting.” ■ Clint, your wanderlust and world tour sounds wonderful, but tiring – just typing your travel itinerary I had to stop and take a nap! OK, little boys, that’s all for now. As of April 19, I’m collecting notes for the next Bulletin later this year. Drop me a line or call anytime, with any news of note.

//

1967

how it’s done. As the ever-peripatetic Bill reports, “The retirement travels of the Abbotts continued in 2018. To escape cold Nor’easters we flew to California in March, stayed with a friend in Orange for a week, then got on the Emerald Princess in LA. Headed southwest to Hawaii where we visited the big island, Oahu, Maui, and Kauai. Went to Volcano National Park exactly one month before it blew. And did the compulsory tours of the Arizona and USS Missouri Memorials — most impressive! Next stop was Samoa, Bora Bora, and Tahiti. Eight days at sea back to LA. Back home had a surprise visit from our Colorado family contingent — great to have all the grandkids in one place.” Next sojourn, “In November ’18 flew to Denver for our granddaughter's fifth birthday and Thanksgiving. Retirement and being able to travel has been great. As I write this (March 31, 2019), we're on a 10-day cruise in the Southern Caribbean, and we have another cruise scheduled in November from Rome back to Fort Lauderdale.” ■ I've had the pleasure of conversing with Clint Howell a couple of times since the fall, which I'll reprise here. “Got in touch with Paul Fees and drove up to Cody to see him and his wife, Nancy. Went to the Buffalo Bill Museum and told them they must go to Burning Man, the festival I went to in the Black Rock desert. (I was terribly upset that I had to leave Burning Man as early as I did because Grover Norquist was giving a lecture I wanted to attend.) You can do whatever you want there. I tend to go out early in the morning, view the sunrise, come back and go to a lecture (beekeeping, Platonic solids, how to beat the lottery, etc.), have lunch, take a nap, hang out with my kids, and then watch the lights come on. There are 70,000plus people there and it's amazingly well organized. I left Paul and Nancy with the Burning Man survival guide in case they choose to go. I drove through Yellowstone en route to Cody and saw a wolf, Old Faithful, and extraordinary scenery. Spent one night at Paul and Nancy's (Man, am I the only classmate who hasn't crashed at the Fees’ house?) and then drove south to Breckenridge to meet up with my two older brothers in order to climb Mt. Quandary, a ‘fourteener’ (one of 40 in the state). We were slow but the aggregate of 246 years between us was considerable

st. george’s school

Wildlife in Washington, D.C.; and Sean, 28, who runs the outside salesforce for IdeaScale.com. Wonderful to see them now able to buy us dinner! Life is good. Amazing to know that back in 1966 I would never have guessed I'd be where I am now, doing what I'm doing, helping in so many ways. Feels good to be of service. My best to everyone coming back into the fold!”

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// SUMMER 2019

Law in Dallas, and then Stu and Whitney loving their new life in Denver. Everyone is happy thriving ... we’ll take it! Hi to all! Anybody coming through Boston, please give us a shout. Peace and carry on.” ■ Frank Campion writes: “I showed a selection of paintings large and small in a group show at the Long View Gallery in Washington, D.C., in January/February and that was quite an experience. I am talking to them now about maybe doing a solo show in 2020. Unfortunately, my gallery in Charlotte, North Carolina, closed so I am still casting about for representation there as well as anywhere else that will have me. All suggestion/recommendations welcome. Now for a moment of shameless self-promotion: you can see my work at frankcampionart.com.” ■ Andrew Botsford and his partner Lulie were here for a wonderful Thanksgiving feast and I see Chris O’Neill around town every once in a while. ■ Aforementioned Botsford presented a “Shakespeare Sampler” in Southampton, New York, earlier this year working with another actor to present sonnets, soliloquies, and scenes. Unfortunately, his role as Portia in “The Merchant of Venice,” which earned him much acclaim in the fall of 1964 at SG, playing opposite Bob Edgar ’65 as Shylock, was not included. He also opens May 23 as Elyot in the Hampton Theatre Company production of Noel Coward’s “Private Lives,” in Quogue, New York. ■ David Halwig is newly added as an adjunct to the faculty of George Mason University and just completed his first cohort on Enterprise Risk Management for a bunch of Chief Risk Officers from around the country. “Guess it was a success — no protests, no picket lines, no banners, no walk-outs. They let me live to teach another day.” ■ Bill Campbell and Bowdy Brown got together for a glorious dinner atop the Detroit Athletic Club overlooking the Detroit Tigers playing the Oakland A’s while reminiscing about school days flying to Providence with buddy Jack Barthwell ’68 and Bill’s brothers, Harry ’66 and Tom ’70. There was the time we climbed up onto the wings and into a minuscule plane in Providence holding the pilot to fly to Middletown to save cab fare. Very scenic, very nervous, landed in a cornfield more or less, only to then have to call a cab to SG. ■ Here is a small update from Tom

1969

50th Reunion

CLASS OF 1969, 50TH REUNION Back row: Peter Cannon, James Mainzer, Peter Smith, Peter Moore, Graham Fitzsimons, Francis Hubbard, Harrison Reynolds. Front row: Charles Spalding, John Hartnett, Cater Monroe, Sylvester Monroe, Peter Bippart, Christopher Holleman, Malcolm Wells Haskell. Not in photo, but also at reunion: Howard Balloch, Jay Coogan, Miguel De Braganza, Robert Ducommun, Robert Fardelmann, Web Golinkin, David Pascone, and Taylor Pyne.

Cummins: “We spent most of December and New Year’s in Cusco with the family, a true joy. But there also was a true a moment of pause trying to explain the baby and crucified Jesus to my grandchildren. We will be in Paris all of May as I am again giving lectures at L’Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Science Sociales, which is great as I can’t even pronounce it, and I never passed French, Latin, or Spanish or much else for that matter at SG. No harm, no foul. Loved seeing everyone last year but all too briefly.” ■ Stephen Schmidt writes: “I have been busy being a laboratory specimen rat for medical treatments for the Big C prognosis. As they say in Bavaria, ‘Let’s have a look and then maybe we’ll see.’ We’re working on a complete cure, or at least a nice long lease on life, which meant spending half my time in bed (reading, of course) and the other half on the couch (also reading) for weeks with no hair. Mornings I would drag myself to the couch, and evenings I was back in bed again. But I am doing much better now; I even managed to chop the wood I needed for the winter, and slowly my old energy is returning. As soon as I could stand up after half a year, it was off to home in Italy. The view of my neighborhood from

across the lake on the Isola Bella is the same as a painting, which hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C. It is so beautiful over here (and I haven’t even started on Italian cooking yet) that sometimes I think I have already died and gone to heaven. (But it looks like I will be sticking around to torment my fellow humans a while longer.) On the Lago Maggiore, we have the places where Queen Victoria and Giuseppe Verdi, not to mention Toscanini, used to stay from back in the days when the Orient Express went from the Simplon Pass through Stresa on its way to Milan. Now the divorced wife of Berlusconi, Veronica, (alimony ca.€300 million, although the courts have juggled that figure around a couple of times in order to eke out revenge for Berlusconi having had the mafia murder a Milan judge to get his media business set up) lives across the lake from us. Things are a lot cheaper on our side, but at least in our little port of Caldé we have the Sunset Bar with its collection of many of the best wines produced in Italy. And the view, of course, can’t be beat at sunset — nomen est omen. Virtual hugs and embraces all around; I really missed you all at the 50th last year and I look forward to the


CLASS NOTES

1970

Stuart C. Ross, stuartross318@gmail.com ■ Digging deep into the mailbag this time, I almost came up empty but pulled a rabbit out at the last minute. That is the result of a delightful stay with Regina and Ande Rockefeller in Boca Grande, Florida. Wendy and I have been going down to BG for a week or so in March for the last five years, usually staying in the Gasparilla Inn, but this year we were treated to cozy quarters in the Rockefellers’ pink guest cottage just a few blocks away. Ande has been coming to Boca Grande since he was a child, and met Regina, a native Floridian, at Tufts, racking up 40-plus years of marital bliss, plus two daughters, Tory and Lisa, along the way. To put it succinctly,

Regina and Ande Rockefeller '70 in Boca Grande, Fla.

1971

Jeffrey Longcope, jlongcope@earthlink.net ■ Philip Williams writes: “My playwriting is keeping me busy: three productions of three different plays in three different theatres here in South Florida in March, including “Can’t Live Without You” at the Willow Theatre in Boca Raton. In May, I will present a paper at the William Inge Theatre Festival in Kansas, and in June I’ll be at the Valdez Last Frontier Theatre Conference up in Alaska for a week. In August, my play “All Together Now” will be produced at the Vermont Pride Festival in Randolph, Vermont, just before I retire from Miami-Dade County Public Schools. Then I’ll get another job.”

John H. Stewart II, johnstewartathome@ yahoo.com ■ We are saddened to report the demise of Scott Milliken ’73, who will be remembered for his kind, playful demeanor; unceasing good cheer, and philosophical dedication to the things that really matter in life. After graduation from St. George’s in ’73, he earned a degree in journalism from the University of Maine-Orono, eventually settling in Blue Hill, Maine. A celebration of life was attended by about 150 family and friends, including a number of his classmates in January. All indications are that shared fond memories were abundant and in the end, a good time was had by all — because that’s the way Scott would have wanted it. For a touching account of his life, we refer you to the portrait published in the Ellsworth American: www.ellsworthamerican.com/obituary/scott-milliken/ ■ Lem “Corky” Shepherd recently checked in to call our attention to the opening of a local “Porsche experience” car enthusiast center in the Los Angeles area, where we both reside. “Funny, the younger engineers buy Teslas, due to their image and because Elon Musk owns SpaceX. I used to drive a pickup truck and thought that was what real engineers should drive. I continue to work on satellite acquisition here at the Los Angeles Air Force Base. Still looking to get a boondoggle trip back to New England.” He can be reached at Lemuel. shepherd.1@us.af.mil

1973

H. Andrew Davies, hchixdigme@aol.com / William G. Dean, wdean7@aol.com ■ Our friend Scotty Milliken died suddenly on Dec. 22, 2018, in his 64th year. A group of us traveled to Blue Hill, Maine, for his crowded memorial service: Tom Bullitt, Jimmy Dean ’72, George Gebelein, Tony Graetzer ’72, Matt Hyde, Danny Moseley, and me, Colin Wood. The picture captures our mood following the joyful-sad recollections of his children, family and friends. Our happiness is what Scotty would have wanted. Scotty was my first friend at St. George’s School. We were like brothers. His laugh was the best payoff a clown like me could ever have — a selfless, helpless, convulsive thing I’d pretty much always aim for, no matter we

SUMMER 2019

Charles C. Spalding Jr., cspalding@spaldingcpa.com

1972

//

1969

Ande is one happy camper. He and Regina spend six months in Florida and six in Massachusetts, where he enjoys season tickets at Fenway, growing tomatoes, swimming, walking his dog, and generally being retired. He’s recently had to give up his favored means of transportation – his Cessna 128 plane, which he flew up and down the East Coast for many years – but he has substituted a gorgeous navy blue 29-foot Hinckley Talaria Runabout powerboat named Spirit, for daytime picnics and sunset cruises to favorite watering holes on other islands in Charlotte Harbor. At the helm, doing 30 knots over sun-kissed aquamarine seas, has to be Ande’s favorite spot in the whole world. But as he told us the other day, his absolute favorite job is grandfather. With four grandchildren under the age of 7 (three boys, one girl) it is easy to see why, with kids’ toys scattered everywhere around their house. Pictures of Ande and Regina with their grandkids are also on every surface, ready to be replaced with more recent ones as the kids grow up. They are always looking forward to the next familial visit, with all the chaos and fun they bring. ■ Finally, Ande and I are totally psyched for next year’s 50th Reunion, so you all will be hearing more about the planned reunion events as well as the Class of 1970 Gift, which we are hoping will put our preceding classes of 1969 and ’68 totally to shame. Lots more on that to come!

st. george’s school

day I can return. And I am hoping to bring a little music with me just so you know what you have been missing all this time. My energy has to return first, but I want to entertain you all as soon as possible with the ‘Goldberg Variations,’ of course to show off, but also because the piece is an incredible musical experience. Might help some in the class to understand why someone like me would go into the business of starving artist. Steve Romeyn once said to me playing Bach was all I was good for. He was probably right.” Replies Steve: “I am deeply concerned about the psychological impact I may have had on my dear classmate Mr. Schmidt, however, just maybe, my unintentional but negative remark may have motivated him to achieve greatness! Did I really say that????!

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// SUMMER 2019

We remember Scott Milliken '73. Above: From The Lance: George Gebelein '73, Danny Moseley '73, and Scott. At right, top to bottom: Scott on his boat with his gal Maggie last summer / Attending the memorial service are, front, from left to right: Dan Moseley '73, Jim Dean '72, George Gebelein '73, Colin Wood '73. Rear, from left to right: Tony Graetzer '72, Matt Hyde '73, Tom Bullitt '73.

were commiserating about our love lives or playing fast-catch or arguing over who rode shotgun or what was real or who was superior at this or that. If you heard that laugh and weren’t a fool you loved him right away. If you elicited that laugh — oh man, best thing ever. His children — Luke, Nina and Molly — are beautiful, just like their dad. I love you, Scotty. I hope to see you again. —Col.

1974

Michael H. Walsh, mhwnpt@gmail.com ■ Russell Long, who lives in San Francisco, was visiting the East Coast last summer (2018). He was here with his 13-year-old son, Rowan, showing him haunts from Russell’s past. Their first stop was New York City, where Russell grew up on the Upper East Side. They then drove up the coast, stopping off at his sister’s place in Niantic, Connecticut, (near New London) where he said he had a great visit with her and also got in a lunch with his old friend from St. George’s, Michael Newburg, who lives nearby in Essex. They then came to Newport for a night. He’d put the word out the week before via email that’d he’d like to meet up with anyone from our class and would take us all out to dinner. Jerry Kirby emailed back, “Michael,

Russell, I would love to catch up but I leave Saturday night for Italy to race in the Palermo to Monte Carlo race. Let’s have a rain check.” Sue Cohen Small called me back saying it was her husband’s birthday that night and they had dinner reservations in East Greenwich, Rhode Island. Sue is going back to full-time teaching this year at Salve Regina University, teaching kids how to become teachers! Mary Gooding had a family cookout at her sister’s place in Little Compton and Beverly Joslin Muessel was on a boat over in Martha’s Vineyard. Russell was here for one night. We met up at the Clarke Cooke House down on the wharf where Russell was concerned about his

vegan diet and seemed to recognize certain sailboats on the wall from the days he spent in Newport sailing in the America’s Cup. It was cozy and Russell looks great, so thin and fit, “Well I run everyday and I do yoga.” We talked about the insane real estate prices in San Francisco and how much the cost of living is going up, up, up out there and then everywhere (even here in Newport). His son could not have been sweeter, a well-behaved, polite and wide-eyed kid. Russell took him up to SG and said it was a like a ghost town up there in the middle of the summer. Early the next morning they were off to Boston, Cambridge, and Harvard to take another walk down memory lane. It is always pleasant to see Russell and I loved meeting his son. He is so “up” provocative and progressive! ■ Mike Leonard called me out of nowhere, right on my birthday on Dec. 6 while I was driving to Boston. I thought his number was a telemarketer but I answered it anyway and to my surprise, “Hey Mike, its Mike Leonard.” He said he was on his way back to San Diego from Poland where he was doing some consulting work for the company he presently works for (secret military stuff). He was here to visit his folks who live on Cape Cod and then up to see his sister, who lives north of Boston. We kept going back and forth about meeting for lunch but our timelines did not coincide. I did get a lot of phone time in with Mike, and he sounds great. His voice on the phone is so calming and reassuring. We quickly blabbed about different things, including St. George’s, current events (Trump), and Keith Cornell’s fun wedding (of all things) that Mike attended way back when. Anyway, I always feel good about volunteering to rep our class for the Alumni Bulletin when I get a call from someone who lives far away like Mike Leonard. I am glad to know they have someone to call when they are in town! ■ For some odd reason I happened to be invited to the Flower Show in Portland, Maine, on opening night March 27. Someone had an extra ticket. Do I want to go? Sure. Why not? So, I’m at the show walking around looking at all the different venues, Maine style, garden displays with some great granite structures, bulb booths, apothecaries, homemade ice cream stands, to some weird woman who made brooms and was showing the


CLASS NOTES

public how to use them (hello) and on and on. I was thoroughly enjoying myself when who do I see across the room, Caleb Mason with his wife Anne. I knew Caleb was from Portland but last I spoke to him, he said he had moved to Vinalhaven, an island off the coast. Boy was he surprised to see me, “I thought I was hallucinating.” Caleb is still working for Visit Portland, a promotional company that markets his region of Maine, both nationally and internationally. He stays in their condo in South Portland where his aging mother-in-law lives. He helps his wife care for her. ■ Gail

1975

Please contact the Alumni Office at 1-888-I-CALL-SG or ClassNotes@stgeorges.edu if you would like to volunteer to serve as class correspondent.

1976

Clifford L. Dent, dentcliff@gmail.com

SUMMER 2019

Above, top to bottom: Russell Long '74 and his son Rowan. / Mike Walsh '74

Gillespie Garcia: “I didn’t know Maine had a flower show? Nice touch of spring I bet. I am having a ball here in South Carolina. Life is good. Give me a call if you are back in Maine. I will be there June-September.” ■ John M. Clarke Jr.: (Bubba): “My son Ben is at IYRS (International Yachting Restoration School) in Newport and liking it. He is in the composite program learning how to build light but strong stuff. He is living on Webster Street between Spring and Thames. He just enjoyed the St. Patrick’s Day celebration but was mad about cover charges that day. I introduced him to Pour Judgment on Broadway, and he is there every Sunday night drinking 'Gansetts and listening to music. He says the band is very good. Rest of the family is doing well. One is a bond trader in New York. My daughter is working at HubSpot in Cambridge. My youngest is in his last semester at Cornell. I am celebrating writing my last tuition check. Sue is still putting up with me. I am pretty sure I would be a mess without her. I am still working but thinking of scaling back. Unfortunately, our parent company is not ready for that so we will see. I think I will be out of the country for Alumni Weekend

//

CLASS OF 1974, 45TH REUNION Back row (left to right): Mike Newburg, John Clarke, Gerry Lauderdale, David Wanders, Caleb Mason, Doug Logan, Melissa Logan, Jeremy Henderson. Second row from top: Peter Drakos, Shonna Drakos, Peyton Fleming, Keith Cornell, Andy Vermilye, Ben Eshelman, Nat Foote, Doug Dechert, Nancy Corkery, Sally Walsh, David Corkery, Alec Walsh, Harris Healy, Beth Fleming, Susan, Chip Whitcher/Sadie Forbes. Third row from top: Josephine Lauderdale, Sue Foote, Elliot Swan, Jim Greenfield. Front row: Paul Rogers, John Sutton, Mike Walsh, Louisa Wright, Mary Gooding, Sue Small Cohen, Beverly Joslin.

st. george’s school

1974

45th Reunion

so we will have to pass. Thanks for doing this!” ■ David Corkery: “All is well here in Boston. My older son got married last fall and my younger guy is moving to Charlotte, North Carolina, in June. Life goes on. Hope all is well with everyone and Nancy and I look forward to Friday night at our 45th.” ■ Craig Fitt: Great to hear from you and thanks for the class updates! Unfortunately, I will not be making our 45th reunion as Bruce and I will be in Ireland celebrating a friend’s 60th birthday. Definitely planning to attend our (Gulp) 50th. ■ Anne Jenkins: “I am still in the Congo and I work for a Chinese company. It is Congolese law that you have to retire at 65. My plan is to stay working in the Congo until 2020. I am thinking of setting up home base in Maui, Hawaii (presently Colorado). Hopefully, will do that this year. My daughter Hillary is getting married in Bend, Oregon, in June, so the timing for class reunion does not work for me. I will not be in the States in midMay. My other daughter, Abby, is moving there from Newport as well. I look forward to more class emails! Take care.” ■ Mary Gooding: “I just went on SG’s website to sign up for our reunion and there is a great article on there about our own Anthony Mason. Definitely a must-read. Way to go, Anthony! Love the picture of you and Aretha Franklin. Hope all is well with everyone.” ■ David Wanders: “My sonin-law, John Moore, signed a five-year contract with the Boston Bruins (Number 27, left hitting defense). I’ll be visiting the Gahden (Boston Garden)! If you are not a Bruins fan, delete now.”

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Edwards, Kathleen Barbaresi, Anna Newburg, Peter Barbaresi, and Danny Newburg, all looking happy and well-fed. I hope this note finds you in good shape as well.

//

1978

Leslie M. Greene, lmg4187@optonline.net

SUMMER 2019

1979 Left to right, Ben Edwards '77, Barbara Edwards, Kathleen Barbaresi, Anna Newburg, Peter Barbaresi '77, and Danny Newburg '77, all looking happy and well-fed in London.

1977

David A. Todd, dtodd@wt.org ■ Be careful! You never know where Dragons might lurk. I hear reports that Tod Wales and Peter Maduro met in Vienna to confer about serious and high-minded psychological issues, following the teachings of the Austrian psychoanalyst Heinz Kohut. International financier and man of mystery, Ben Edwards, also made a cameo appearance at the meeting. ■ Peter Maduro also reports the very happy news that he and Mary are expecting a child. If any of you have wise, experience-tested child-rearing advice that you’d like to share, here is a good target. ■ Meanwhile, Elena Kissel has been convening with Peter Barbaresi in Middletown for the SGS Alumni Board of Visitors, visiting Beth Nixon in Newport for some no-doubt good purposes, seeing Belinda Kielland in Florida for husband Bev’s birthday celebrations, and joining daughter Lucy and son-in-law Evan for a raging Cajun Christmas in New Orleans. ■ There have been sightings in the West too. After working in the film industry with David Lynch (“Twin Peaks”, “Mulholland Drive”) and others, John Wentworth has cropped up in Mammoth Lakes, California, where he has skied, hiked, founded the Mammoth Lakes Trails and Public Access Foundation, and served as town mayor. ■ John is not the only one surviving cold climes. Shelly Randall is up in New Hampshire making her way through rain, sleet, and snow from practicing law in the child protection world to practicing yoga in her barn! ■ A little farther south, we have

heartening news from Molly Baldwin, who is entering her fourth decade of running ROCA, a nonprofit in Boston and Baltimore helping young people climb out of poverty, avoid violence, and transform their lives. ■ Some are on the move, and hard to track down. Jay Pierrepont is active in sustainable investing in wastewater treatment, agriculture and other areas, and bounces between California, New Jersey, Maine, and beyond. A busy life! He reports that he is falling behind on mowing the lawn and cleaning out the garage. ■ Just to prove that we are not making any of this up, we have photographic proof of some of these wandering dragons. See the photo of some who sprang up in London! Ben and Barbara

1979

David F. Bayne, dfbayne@aol.com ■ Igor’s Dreams – usually they involve raccoons – but last January they involved us. On a Saturday in the dead of winter, our 40th Reunion festivities began in earnest – well it may be better to say that they began in “Igor-ness” – as Geoff Chapin, Carla Barbaresi, Alison Horton, Bob Smithers, Igor Sikorsky, David Bayne and Jon Bayne ’14 gathered for the annual “Igor’s Dream” release party at Two Roads Brewery in Stratford, Connecticut. Stratford is the home of Sikorsky Aircraft Corp. and Two Roads honors our Igor’s grandfather, Igor Sikorsky I, each year with a special Russian Imperial Stout aged in various barrels (this year it was rye whiskey, absinthe, and ruby port). Igor, his father, and uncles attend the celebration each year to sign bottles and regale the Sikorsky faithful with “Igor the Elder” stories. After multiple rounds of Igor’s Dream, Igor arranged for us to have a behind-the-scenes tour of the Two

40th Reunion

CLASS OF 1979, 40TH REUNION Back row: Scott Delany, John Holder, David Bayne, Yves Ullens, Igor Sikorsky. Front row: Thomas Lamont, Shawen Williams, Alison Horton.


CLASS NOTES

1980

1981

Our heartfelt thanks go out to Charles de Kay, who has served as correspondent for the Class of 1981 for the past seven years. We are hoping another member of the class will step forward to reach out to

Please contact the Alumni Office at 1-888-I-CALL-SG or ClassNotes@stgeorges.edu if you would like to volunteer to serve as class correspondent.

1983

Please contact the Alumni Office at 1-888-I-CALL-SG or ClassNotes@ stgeorges.edu if you would like to volunteer to serve as class correspondent.

1984

Brian M. Duddy, bduddy @maximgrp.com

1985

Eugene P. Hanrahan Jr., ladagene@netscape.net / C. Fritz Michel, cfritzm@mac.com ■ Your self-appointed specially assigned prosecutor (SAP) has the draft of his latest investigation on the good deeds of his classmates (or at least reports from people who were kind enough to respond to his panicky, last minute e-mail). This draft has been snuck past the Attorney

1984 CLASS OF 1984, 35TH REUNION: Jim Thompson, Tad Van Norden, and Sandy McLane.

35th Reunion

SUMMER 2019

Roads Brewery by one of its owners. Keep your eyes open for next January’s Igor’s Dream event. It’s a winter’s afternoon that is well (miss) spent. ■ Connecticut has been “rich” in Class of ’79 sightings as Dave Rich surfaced from his day job as the executive director of the nonprofit organization Supportive Housing Works in Bridgeport. Supportive Housing Works is dedicated to ending homelessness in Connecticut and, under Dave’s leadership; its work has helped Connecticut achieve a marked decrease in its chronic homeless population and assisted in ending homelessness for veterans altogether. Dave and I caught up in Westport in mid-March for a drink, and, other than the color of his hair, little has changed about Dave. Big smile, warm heart, and an attitude that we can make the world a better place one person at a time. Keep up the good work, Dave! ■ Mary Walton sent her regrets about not being able to attend Reunion Weekend. Wisely presuming that any reason she gave would be the subject of these notes, Mary left her reasons vague but wanted to send her regards to everyone. Everyone say “hi” back – “Hi Mary!” Mary, please pencil in the third weekend of May 2024 now and we will see you at our 45th Reunion. ■ Not so wisely, Steve Rockwell also sent his regrets about attending the Reunion explaining that he was being unavoidably detained in the State of California. Before you jump to any conclusions, Steve assured me that his presence was required for the staging of the world premiere of a new play “The Things We Do” in the Los Angeles area. ■ Josh Anderson also had an Igor sighting of his own in Maine at another event at which Igor spoke about his grandfather. Aside from being 40 years older, the two

1982

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Igor Sikorsky '79 and Josh Anderson '79

David T. Gardner, davidgardner61@gmail. com ■ Philippe Cattier: Greetings from Croatia! Life over here is going well. Our daughter Elena is turning 11 this year and we will be celebrating our 20th anniversary. Chatting with Bob every few months and looking forward to our reunion of next year. See you there! ■ David Gardner: I want to remind everybody to check out the SG Class of 1980 FB page! It’s a great way to keep up with the crew or post your updates whenever you want. We only have 45 members, so I know there are a bunch of you out there. Life is good for the DTGs here in coastal Georgia – Ty is at CU Boulder and Ellie is in Boulder with him, working in Denver. I think maybe Colorado has drawn them from us for a good while! Dana and I are busy in the residential real estate business with our own little brokerage, which is now nearly 18 months old and doing fine. Cheers

classmates twice a year for updates. Our class correspondents keep those valuable Dragon friendships alive! Please consider volunteering — and reach out to us at ClassNotes@stgeorges.edu or 1-888-I-CALL-SG.

st. george’s school

have not aged a day since our graduation (in geological time). ■ So long and stay in touch.

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CLASS NOTES

st. george’s school

// SUMMER 2019

General and has been leaked in its entirety. All e-mails have been obtained by lawful means. ■ Roman numeral one is that the Hon. Chrissy Jampoler-Houlahan won her race for Congress to represent Pennsylvania’s 6th congressional district. The district includes Chester County and the southern part of Berks County. She trounced her opponent winning 58.8 percent of the vote. She currently serves on the Armed Services, Foreign Affairs, and Small Business Committees. She recently co-sponsored sweeping healthcare legislation that promises to “lower healthcare insurance premiums with strengthened and expanded affordability assistance.” Her service in Congress is after having already dedicated three years to the US Air Force right after college. The special prosecutor is super inspired. ■ Sources known to the special prosecutor (an email from Allegra di Carpegna) informed him that Allegra recently moved back to Santa Fe, New Mexico, from London, where she had been living for 20 years. She recently earned her master’s degree in art therapy. She began a new company in Santa Fe entitled Art to You. It provides in-home and business art-therapy sessions. She says that her two beautiful boys are 20 and 14 and that life is good! ■ The special prosecutor’s investigation led him to Linda (Dunn) Garnett, whose daughter Isabelle ’22 (a.k.a. “Belle” to her friends) loves SG and spent her Spring Break in the Southern District of Florida. Linda regaled her daughter with tales of Spring Breaks past with amphibious landings via the intercostal waterway. Linda has also begun to train her golden retriever to be a therapy dog for the Mt. Sinai cancer ward. ■ Lyerly (Spongberg) Tuck witnessed her youngest two (of six) children head off to college. She has moved to the District of Connecticut, where she was kind enough to invite the special prosecutor to go boating last summer. He was in the Southern District of New York for a swim race where the special prosecutor’s sister, Lisa (Hanrahan) White ’84, and her son viewed the finish from a helicopter tour while the special prosecutor’s brother Michael Hanrahan ’88 crewed the support boat. ■ Based on information and belief, fellow class agent Fritz Michel recently gained the good favor of the special prosecutor by treating him to his

favorite West Hollywood sushi bar while Fritz was visiting the Central District of California. Fritz and the special prosecutor also met in the Southern District of New York last summer. Fritz gave the special prosecutor and his agent (his 9-year-old son) some insider information on fun New York activities such as a Virtual Reality video game arcade near the Empire State Building. The special prosecutor and his agent practiced hand-to-hand combat with the boxing game. Hilarious. A source close to the special prosecutor viewed the Instagram account of Fritz and inferred from circumstantial evidence that Fritz recently vacationed in the French Alps with his family. After spending many manhours reaching out to Fritz (reception on les pistes is notoriously spotty), the special prosecutor finally made contact with Fritz, who informed the special prosecutor that he had been working on a more important case involving the theft of his car from his driveway. When the car was recovered, it was loaded with stolen furs. The special prosecutor is intrigued by Fritz’s case. ■ Mike van Beuren, a known international sailor, provided more information on Fritz’s activities. Fritz saw the English Beat and Squeeze in New York City last year whereas Mike mourned the recent passing of the Beat’s incomparable Ranking Roger. On a happier note, a beautiful blonde woman recently approached Mike at a Newport coffee shop and hugged him. Temporarily perplexed, Mike soon realized that the hugger was Alix (Horne) Coolidge who was in Newport for her daughter Sophie’s graduation from SG. Alix told the special prosecutor previously that Sophie ‘18 loved every minute of her time at SG and took full advantage of all it had to offer. Mike also attended a parent’s weekend at Salisbury when there was an announcement that a boy named Peter Schellbach had won a prize (best lacrosse shot? best guitarist?) Mike tracked the boy to the spitting image of his proud father Pete Schellbach Sr. ’86, with whom Mike had a great visit. Mike has been playing a great deal of league hockey where he frequently encounters Steve Connett ’86. Mike looked forward to the alumni hockey game, but alas, it was cancelled. Mike encourages any hockey players in driving distance to attend next year in early February. Hopefully Mike will revisit the

Central District of California soon. ■ Randy Cutler is preparing to weather the Brexit storm in London working for Fidelity. He is off to Brussels and has promised the special prosecutor an update on the latest negotiations. ■ Heidi Ottley-Sinnott is living in Sun Valley and is working as an event planner and fundraiser for nonprofits. Her husband, Ed Sinott, has retired after selling his landscaping and nursery business after 40 years. Heidi splits her time between Hobe Sound and Sun Valley. She is able to stay in touch with Ken Coppoletta, Mimi Lawson-Johnston Howe, Linda Dunn Garnett, and Chris Merton in Hobe Sound and Pete Cook and Dana Schmaltz in Sun Valley. Heidi is also now a proud grandparent. ■ Tony Burnett is currently outside the jurisdiction of the special prosecutor in Singapore where he and his family now live. He says that it “has been so much fun living [there].” Hopefully, he will connect with the special prosecutor’s brother Michael, who has been working on some film projects there recently. Tony jets to Hong Kong from time to time where he hopes to connect with John Eckerberg, who apparently lives there. Is this information true, John? The special prosecutor would like to know. ■ The special prosecutor spoke on an unsecured line to Pete Cook, who will be an empty nester as of next fall. Both of his boys will be off to college within an hour of each other in North Carolina. Pete recently returned from Sun Valley, where he saw Heidi Ottley-Sinnott and Dana Schmaltz. Pete and Dana are on the SG Board of Trustees now, so the special prosecutor will be extra careful with his choice of words describing their activities so as not to antagonize the powerful. ■ Cuyler Morris informed the special prosecutor that he has sold Morris Yachts to the Hinckley Company, so the special prosecutor assumes.

1986

Please contact the Alumni Office at 1-888-I-CALL-SG or ClassNotes@stgeorges.edu if you would like to volunteer to serve as class correspondent.


CLASS NOTES

1989

years.” ■ From Jim “Bear” Dyke: “Mira will open its new winery and hospitality house in August. I hope to see SGS in the Napa Valley. Living in California is different from living in South Carolina. Having our daughter at SGS continues to provide wonderful opportunities to catch up with old friends. On our last trip, we got a tour of the home of calamari and where Chris Lee works. He CASUALLY suggested as we were walking in that the smell was a bit strong, which turned out to be a stunning understatement.” ■ And that, classmates, is all I have to report for this go around. Truly hope you are all well! As always, if anyone is in the New York area and wishes to catch up, I would jump at the opportunity. Be well, Kek.

1988

Michelle Doty, mmd@ cmwf.org / Alfred Jay Sweet IV, ajsfour@gmail.com

1989

Sissy Dent Aerenson, sisharris@me.com / Stafford Vaughey Meyer, stafford@ staffordmeyer.com / J. Craighill Redwine, Jr., craighillr@me.com

30th Reunion

CLASS OF 1989, 30TH REUNION Third-row standing: Nick Varney, Becky Mohr, Allison Ariail Erdle, Libby Nissen Yancey, Bill Wright, Brooke Connell, Jennifer Burr Raysman, David Dickenson, Melissa Scruggs Patrick, Julia Courtright, Tom Wang, Suzannah Shogren, Forrest Badgley, Scarlet Snow Johnson, Han Kolff, Susan Andrade Bistline, Jamie Fitz, Tori Pulling, Stafford Vaughey Meyer, Eric Wiberg, Robin Belliveau Macleod, Addison Werner. Second-row seated: DJ Fernandes, Katharine Fisher Maroney, Charles Ruma, Jeff Kimbell, Whitney Smith Schrauth, Colin Born, Tarni Levett Fondren. Front row on ground: Katie Michel, Craighill Redwine, Almus Thorp, Sissy Dent Aerenson, Lilly Phipps Cardwell.

SUMMER 2019

Concord on occasion from Cambridge and we have lunch at my favorite farm-to-table place. I see Carrie McNally Maechling when she drops her son off at school. My niece is at St. George’s, she loves it, and I get to hear very cute news of classmates’ kids who are also there.” ■ This from Neil O’Grady: “Veronica Toro and I are going to the Newport Open at the Tennis Hall of Fame at The Newport Casino in July (with her younger son. We’ll do the Newport tourist stuff) and plan to meet up with Chandra Cannon ’88 (who Veronica went to Bates College with but I haven’t seen since SGS), which we are looking forward to. Hopefully, we’ll see other Dragons in the area too. Fingers crossed.” ■ Derek Nelson writes with both happy and sad news: “Hope all is well. I have a son, Alden Guidry Nelson, born April 21, 2018. I am sorry to report that my brother, Alden Ladd Nelson ’86 passed away the day before Alden was born.” Congratulations on the boy, Derek, and condolences on Ladd’s passing. ■ From Kate Gubelman: “I am living in Ajijic, Jalisco, Mexico. It is a small town on Lake Chapala outside of Guadalajara. I am working in architecture and construction. I have also done some installation art relating to having been a caregiver for my parents for several

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Paul A. Kekalos, pkekalos@mac.com ■ Greetings! Apologies for a somewhat limited report for this entry. I promise to do better next time. Ok, I will start with me. I am good; thanks for asking. Family is swell; kids are growing, all generally A-OK. My wife Alexandra and I had a great time helping Lonnie Stewart celebrate his 50th birthday a few months ago. It is a milestone that we all seem to be either recently past or soon approaching. I can confirm that a smart way to do it is to stage a celebration at a Chinese Banquet Hall in NYC wherein you celebrate both your own 50th birthday, as well as your daughters 16th! Makes for a very dynamic time. Well done, Pauline and Lonnie. ■ Chrissy Connett (now Christina Connett Brophy) reports in with terrific news. “I married Gary Brophy this past January in Fernandez Bay, Cat Island. It's still as wonderful as ever! Harriet, daughter of William Mullins ’86, was our flower girl; it was beautiful. We are naming our new sailboat JUNKANOO after the Bahamian style of music performed at our reception. I am still at the whaling museum, which is a fantastic place to be. Where else can I talk to whale biologists about conservation challenges in the morning and organize an exhibition on Albert Pinkham Ryder in the afternoon?” ■ Anyone who spent time on Geronimo in the Bahamas is probably familiar with Fernandez Bay as it was frequent stop for us back them - a truly beautiful place for what I am sure was a beautiful event! Congratulations to Chrissy and Gary. ■ Chris Lee says he is “Well. Still in Rhode Island — and loving it. Still buying, processing and selling Rhode Island seafood, primarily squid. Dealing with two mostly great high school age children. Still happily married to Sarah Lee. I had a chance to see Bear Dyke and his wife Dawn this winter for dinner in Newport. It was great to catch up. If you are in RI, drop me a line. As the kids get older, I seem to have more free time.” Will do, Casual! ■ This from Jenny Keegan: “I’m living in Concord, Massachusetts, and just started doing development for legal aid. My oldest is heading to college, which is hard to believe. In the summer, I see lots of Hannah. Our kids sail together. And I’ll see Mullins’ wife, Leslie, and Chrissy Connett. Steedman rides his bike out to

st. george’s school

1987

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CLASS NOTES

st. george’s school

1990

// SUMMER 2019

Tyson P. Goodridge, tyson.goodridge@gmail. com ■ Greetings from the North Shore of Boston! I think the biggest “group” news was the 1990 Varsity Lacrosse Team being inducted into the SG Sports Hall of Fame last fall in Newport. On Friday night, we were honored in the Field House alongside the other new inductees, one of whom interestingly enough, lives about a quarter mile from my house here in Wenham: Elizabeth Wheeler Scanlon ’97. Small world. Later that night we also caught up with Kirtley Horton Cameron ’91, Randall Flinn ’92 and a few more I’m forgetting. The next day, we dedicated one of the new turf fields in honor of our fearless coach, Arch Montgomery. Montgomery Field couldn’t have happened without the tireless fundraising efforts of Billy Bush and Stanton McLean. Thanks, gents! The Hall of Famers include Billy, Stanton and your classmates: Alex Condon, Brett Smith, Jeff Mason, Parker Wise, Norm Lao, Tucker Clancy, Dave Cumming, Dave Forbes, Per von Zelowitz, Scott Laton, James Cranmer, Kris Mariaca, Nate Tucker and yours truly. We all had the chance to look at the new Hall of Fame hallway and see that we join fellow classmates Debbie Edgar-Goeser, Laura Stack de Ramel, Caroline Grossman de Lasa, and Monique des Rosiers. Wow, not bad Class of ’90. If my math is correct, 20 percent of our class are Hall of Famers. I think all the credit goes to yet another Hall of Famer, our fearless trainer Wendy Drysdale. Thanks for all the taping, bracing, and icing, Wendy. Couldn’t have done it without ya! You’ll all be happy to know that Wendy is still there doing her thing at SG. She sends a big hello to us (her favorite class at SG). ■ As I type this up, my 13-year-old son and I are getting ready to visit Governors Academy (formerly GDA) for his first introduction to a lacrosse game when the varsity squad visits the North Shore. Big props to Nate Tucker for recruiting the new head lacrosse coach at SG, Dan Leidl. ■ OK, on to the notes... Bob Edenbach is married, living in Japan, and by all accounts having a blast at parenthood. My Instagram feed is a constant visual story of him and his wife and new son travelling everywhere. ■ Frank Guittard: Married with two gorgeous twin girls. Living on Long Island

and having a blast. His note to us: “Best wishes to everyone and hoping all of you are happy and healthy. If you’re passing through East Hampton or any points east to Montauk, I would love to catch up over coffee at Jack’s or some vino on the beach. My wife and I are enjoying life here in the Hamptons, where I keep busy as an architect and chasing after our identical twin daughters, soon to turn 4.” ■ Laura de Ramel. Now working at the Nature Conservancy, living in Delaware, and loving life. Lou and I caught up this past summer and had a blast in the bustling town of Wilmington. ■ Sarah Gee Green. Moved her husband Bill and her three kids to Wayne, Pennsylvania., after a long stint in D.C. They miss Chevy Chase. ■ Whit Hammett and I bump into each other in Boston environs from time to time. Three boys and all is well with him. ■ Mandy Hales Chardoul, Ellie Linen Low, Meera Chabra Gerlach, Bethany Wenner Crocker, Cindy Ebbs, Tres Hipp Small, Liza Wells Meyer and Anne Copeland Scott always get together every year at Ellie’s family place in Dorset. By the time you are reading this, they are probably plotting their next trip there. Have fun, ladies! ■ Georgina Rumsey Levey missed that last trip to Dorset, but she reports the following: “Over the past two years, my career has taken a turn away from classroom teaching and towards homeschool support and educational advocacy. In a nutshell, I teach/support students privately and support families who want alternative learning environments for their children. Of course, because retirement benefits are important too, I drive school buses each day and teach driver education so that I can someday comfortably reap the rewards of the 20 years of public school teaching that I did. As you can see, I’m a pretty amusing sight in my transportation uniform. Fortunately, I still get to continue spreading my love of educational travel through my ongoing job as a Sister Cities Exchange Coordinator, too, so I get to accompany students around the world fairly often and this satisfies my travel bug. When you live in a small town, you have to be creative about your livelihood. On the home front, life just carries on and I spend my time being an active hockey or lacrosse mom and also try to find opportunities to travel with our family.

Like many others with school-age kids, we are always on the move and try to keep all of the balls in the air.” ■ Nick Brashich update: “I just finished up my three years living in Brussels, Belgium, and enjoyed all it had to offer (even all the rainy days). We were able to travel to so many countries and see a large chunk of Europe. Wish I had more time as there are too many places to see. My wife, daughter, and I are now exploring all that Texas has to offer as we are living just outside of Dallas. I am now in charge of our office in Dallas and do my little part to keep America safe. It involves lots of paperwork these days. Life is good and if you are coming to Dallas for work or play, let me know and we can try and catch up over beer/BBQ. – All the best from Dallas, Nick.” ■ Norm Lao: NORM!! He’s missed the last few reunions and was bummed he wasn’t able to get some more ground balls on the lacrosse field at the Montgomery Field dedication. He makes up for it with a SOLID report via email. Here goes. Grab a cup of coffee and settle in … “SWORD FIGHTING: You read right LOL … Sword Fighting. I am heavily involved in what is known as Historically European Martial Arts or HEMA here in Southern California. We are a global community of academics and tournament competitors who study existing medieval fighting manuscripts and try and recreate what the masters of hundreds to a thousand years ago, taught to their pupils, which included royalty, clergy, military, and commoners. It is a wonderfully engaging and EXPENSIVE hobby, but keeps me active and at least mentally youthful. LOL! Speaking of mentally youthful … PODCASTING: You all know me well enough to know that I have ALWAYS loved geek and nerd culture. That has and will NEVER change. I actually have done a few years of podcasting on networks such as Trek.FM (all Star Trek content/my shows were “Warp Five” and “Standard Orbit”), the Fandom Podcast Network (“Blood of Kings” and “DiscoVille”) and my newest LIVESTREAMING project called the “ZócaloCast: A Babylon 5 Podcast.” Come find me and nerd out. LOL! Or have your kids do that … ’cause I know many of you have families now. WOW! Kids … speaking of … FAMILY: No…I actually DON’T have kids, but I have my lovely Carol who I have been with for 20 years.


CLASS NOTES

st. george’s school

// SUMMER 2019

Top: The 1990 Lacrosse Team at the Fall 2018 Sports Hall of Fame banquet. Front row left to right: Scott Laton '90, Billy Bush '90, Dave Forbes '90, Parker Wise '90, Brent McLean '90; back row left to right: Jeff Mason '90, Chris Rodgers '91, Sam Nichols '91, Coach Arch Mongtomery, Kris Mariaca '90, Per Von Zelowtiz '90, Stanton McLean '90, Dave Cummings '90, Tyson Goodridge '90, and Brett Smith '90. At left, top to bottom: Georgina Rumsey Levey '90 in her transporation uniform. / Carrie Elizabeth and Rodney Woodstock '90 / Alex Condon '90 and Rodney Woodstock '90 on the golf course. Above, top to bottom: Norm Lao '90 is heavily involved in "sword fighting," known as Historically European Martial Arts or HEMA in Southern California. / Four adorable daughters of Alex Condon '90.

We have a house together, two cats, and have been living in Westminster, California, for the better part of 15 years now. I have been working for Simple Green for 20 years come this December 2019. I actually can’t believe it’s been that long since I have been in Southern California – by way of New Jersey (the Joe Kubert Cartoon and Graphic Art School, 1994-1998), by way of Hobart College in Geneva, New York (1990-1994), by way of St. George’s (1986-1990). There is still so much left to say and tell everyone – but if you wanna keep in touch with me, I am a social mediaholic so you can keep up with all of my shenanigans by following my Twitter and Instagram accounts at GunStarFury. You can find me on Facebook as Norman C. Lao and you can always email me at: nclao1972@gmail. com. I am SO SORRY that I wasn’t able to make it to the BIG 2-5, but I did live … and live WELL through all of the photos and memories shared. I LOVED seeing the team represent MONTY at his field inaugural ceremony. Take care all of you, my good and dear friends. I LOVE YOU and MISS YOU ALL!” ■ Rodney Woodstock: Big news from him! “It’s been a big year for me. Played golf and caught up with Alex Condon. Went on my annual trip to Park City to visit Jay Miles and family. Perhaps the biggest news was that I finally got engaged to a wonderful woman on Valentine’s Day. We plan to get married here in Palm Beach County Florida. Ran into Dean Carballal and wife last weekend in Tampa at a music fest. I’m looking for forward to our 30th reunion in 2020!” ■ Speaking of Alex Condon… “All’s well in Gulf Stream, Florida. Kate and I are super busy with kid activities. Lily (13, volleyball) just got into St. Andrews (where George Andrews spent time as headmaster), Phoebe (10, lax), Annabel (8, soccer and lax), and Piper (3) tags along. Literally we need at least one more parent. We also got a puppy to keep things interesting (King Charles spaniel named Oliver — SG memories as I call him Ollie!!). Still at JPMorgan, finishing up my 20th year.” ■ Justin Craib-Cox, from across the pond: “Still here in London, although my accent remains Chicago-based, and still also working in investment management, until I get replaced by an algorithm. I have twins (a boy and a girl) who will be 8 in

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st. george’s school

// SUMMER 2019

June and they keep us beyond busy. Lots of visits to museums around the city and trips around the UK and Europe. They are both at St. Paul’s Cathedral School, which was set up many centuries ago for the choristers, and now has other students as well. It takes me back to being part of the SG Chapel Choir and I remain grateful for that experience; it certainly helps me to appreciate the talent level of their chorister classmates. It is always good to keep up with the doings of the Class of ’90 and current news from the Hilltop. Excellent to see Mr. Montgomery get the well-deserved honor of a named sports field.” ■ More overseas news. Stanton McLean still in London, doing a LOT for SG, and runs into James Cranmer from time to time. Speaking of Jim, we Facetimed him from the Hall of Fame ceremony where Monty and he traded jokes and insults. ■ Parker Wise writes: “We’re back in Washington following three years in London. Three kiddos under age 6 keep us hopping. It was great to reconnect with the lacrosse guys last fall.” ■ Josh Gillespie: “I’m still tinkering in the renewable energy world, but I’ve been seconded by my company to a joint venture that is based in Spain, so lots of travel overseas. Family is great, but have decided to sell the kids (two girls, good condition, very polite, entertaining all offers).” ■ Kris Mariaca: “Well, as you know, a big highlight for me was our induction into the SHOF, dedication of Montgomery Field and seeing you and so many of our old teammates. Besides that, I have been spending most of my time when not traveling on business to Latin America and on building our new home on Big Moose Lake in the Adirondack Mountains. We hope it to be completed this year and will represent the realization of a multidecade dream for Kristen and me. We will be living there, and I will still commute to my office in Manhattan when not traveling. Would definitely love to see any SG friends up in Big Moose once it’s done, or in NYC.” ■ Rob Ross moved to Lancaster, Pennsylvania soon after the last reunion. He reports that he's ready to harvest some beets, drink some Yuengling Lager, and eat more Scrapple. ■ Samantha Coit Becker: “Hi everyone! I’m currently working part-time in my private practice (psychotherapy) in Providence and

Above (top to bottom): Sarah Terry '92 won the Opera House Regatta in Nantucket with her brother Jesse and two others! SG Alum Wink Mleczko van Ogtrop '91 was there too. / Will Forbes '92 with kids Sarah (11) and Tyler (9) at the Tartan Day Celebration in Philadelphia. At right: (top to bottom): Sara Ely Hulse '92 and family at Disney World in Florida. / Bret Barasch '92 10 hrs. 37 min. after departing CT on his big swim across Long Island Sound. / Bret Barasch '92 and Captain Claude before the big swim. / Lukas Kolff '92 with his family on the beach in Greece.

devoting more time to oil painting, including taking classes at RISD. Spending more time with family has also been terrific. We are currently on holiday in Sorrento, Italy, and looking forward to sailing on Narragansett Bay this summer.” ■ Abel Lineberger has been enjoying the “high life” in Asheville, North Carolina, for the last few years. “As a founder of a new software development group among the ‘Silicon Pines’ (local incubator marketing — not my thing), I have been leading our development group on several international projects. After a few years in the Middle East, the cool green mountains of Appalachia are very appealing. Unfortunately, I failed to consider how much travel this new venture would require; so much for hiking off to the mountains! I had a wonderful dinner with Kate Denckla Peele not that long ago (Kate — Bouchon North?). She's also here in Asheville with her sons. Also loving Norm's podcasts!” ■ That’s it everyone. See you next spring at the 30th! —Tyson


CLASS NOTES

st. george’s school

1991

Please contact the Alumni Office at 1-888-I-CALL-SG or ClassNotes@stgeorges.edu if you would like to volunteer to serve as class correspondent.

//

1992

SUMMER 2019

Sara Ely Hulse, sse@ cbsnews.com ■ It has been a busy winter for the Class of 1992. Lukas Kolff writes: “Greetings from London! The current situation in the UK with Brexit remains rather uncertain, but that is just politics and nobody knows what will happen. Charlie, 11, is going to senior school in September. He has been accepted at King’s Wimbledon College, one of the best London day schools, so we are very happy. Rose, 9, is in Year 4 at Thomas's Fulham and Louis, 4, is going to Reception in September.” Lukas’ corporate finance boutique, Bowline Capital Partners, just celebrated its 10th anniversary and is doing well. The firm remains focused on small-to-medium size private equity and private debt transactions, mainly in Europe, the UK and the Middle East. Jo joined a boutique executive search firm as a partner and focuses on the consumer & luxury retail market. “There is never a dull moment in the Kolff household, but we love the fun chaos,” he wrote. ■ Will Forbes checked in to say that he recently attended the Tartan Day Celebration in Philadelphia with his kids, Sarah, now 11, and Tyler, now 9. It was run by the St. Andrew's Society of Philadelphia. Also present were two First City Troopers, formally known as the First Troop Philadelphia City Cavalry. Forbes is currently on the nonactive roll having been on the active roll from 1996-2000. FTPCC is the oldest active military unit (founded in 1774) and the most decorated unit in the United States Military ■ Drayton Virkler wrote to report that all is going well for the Virkler family in Durham, North Carolina. Laura and Drayton's oldest child, Ella, is a junior in high school, which means that the family is in the throes of finding her the right college. It seems after growing up in North Carolina and living in Singapore for two years, Ella has decided she wants to be cold; so, her current list of schools is heavily weighted towards the Northeast. As a result, Drayton is looking forward to spending more time in

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25th Reunion

1994

CLASS OF 1994, 25TH REUNION: Back row: Brian Rolli, Carleton Hennion, Jedd Whitlock, Chris Davis, Fred House, Blair Fulton, Ted Ahlgren. Middle row: Kristina Smith Gates, Shreve Ariail, Elena Kavanagh Phillips, Beth Nash Eriksen, Dana Fentress Creel, Brogann Tassie Sanderson Bowden, Cam Sterling, Holly Moten Fidler. Front row: Blair Olcott S. de Zagon, Patrick Sloane, Charles Rose, Sara Selbert Savov.

New England and hopefully catching up with classmates! ■ Christian Whiton has been keeping up with SG alums as I am sure people have seen him appear on Fox News alongside fellow SG alum Tucker Carlson ’87 for his show, “Tucker Carlson Tonight.” But, in exciting personal news, Christian got married to Marco McClees in March. The two, who had been dating for 15 years, tied the knot on the Big Island of Hawaii. Some of you already know Marco from our last reunion. They both moved from Washington to Denver in January, although Christian still works for the same lobbying and public relations firm and is frequently back in D.C. ■ Sarah Terry has been seeing some SG alums. She was in Nantucket racing in the Opera House Regatta with her brother, Jesse, and two others. It was a crazy race with waves and 40-knot wind — the very weather making sailing fun — but they won. SG alum Winkie Mleczko van Ogtrop ’91 was also there. ■ Last August also marked an amazing feat for Bret Barasch, who swam across the Long Island Sound in 10 hours and 37 minutes – 15.5 miles from Port Jefferson, New York, to Bridgeport, Connecticut. He dedicated his swim to his good friend Rob Lichtenstein and so he could raise money for St Vincent’s Medical Center in their quest to support cancer patients. ■ My amazing accomplishment – well Sara Ely Hulse is just happy to report

that she survived her first trip to Disney World with her husband and 5-year-old twins, Kathryn and Avery. Much to Alex’s chagrin there was much more princess action then rides, but we all had a great time. It certainly was nice to get out of the cold New York weather and enjoy some Florida sunshine. Work has been exciting, as Sara’s boss at “48 Hours,” Susan Zirinsky, became the first female president of CBS News. It will be interesting to see how the changes evolve and what the future looks like.

1993 1994

Geoffrey C. Siebengartner, geoff@siebengartner.com

Our sincere thanks to Binkie McSweeney Orthwein and Sara Selbert Savov for their faithful service as class correspondents over many years. We would sincerely appreciate another member of the Class of 1994 stepping forward to take over this important role. You would be contacting classmates for updates twice per year and submitting a column for this magazine. Please contact ClassNotes@stgeorges. edu or call 1-888-I-CALL-SG if you are willing. Thank you!


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CLASS NOTES

st. george’s school

1995

// SUMMER 2019

Carolyn Sclafani Mowat, carolynsclafani@gmail. com ■ Carolyn Sclafani Mowat writes: “It has been a big year over here. Our fish Sandy died this winter after having been overfed by the neighbors while we were away skiing. This is the second time this has happened to our fish and family. We are thinking about getting a dog but unsure how it will fair when we leave it for vacation. The twins Harper and Lochlan are almost 8 and Rosie is 11, finishing fifth grade and getting ready for middle school. My mother’s dream came true and I have children ‘just like me,’ which is terrifying. Euan and I continue to muddle through parenthood — hoping no permanent damage has been done. Still up in Massachusetts, but missing California six years later. I hope to run into some of you soon.” ■ Kim Bertrand writes: “After 20 years in the city, my family finally bought a house of our own in the 'burbs. We recently moved from our two-bedroom apartment in Boston to Milton, Massachusetts, just south of Boston. Luckily, we are still close to the city where I work as an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Boston University. Kids are growing up too quickly — Tyler is now 10 and Julie is 7. Feeling very fortunate.” ■ Pat Pendergast writes: “All good here in Miami. Sarah and I have been living in Florida now for 14 years, which seems crazy. Our twins Lily and Finn just turned 8. I have been working for the past nine years in the transportation industry for Ryder running talent acquisition and launching new products. Outside of work, I have been coaching lacrosse and trying to get some fishing in here and there. We get

up to Martha’s Vineyard in the summer to get our Northeast fix and spend weekends in the early summer in the Bahamas on the boat. Hope this note finds everyone doing well.” ■ Sarah Vukovich Mycroft writes: “Things are busy here in Barrington, Rhode Island. My husband Jack and I recently welcomed our fifth child, Rose. She joins her brothers and sisters Camille, 8, Jack, 7, Ben, 5, and Lily, 2. She’s pretty cute.” ■ Jane Nigra Gallina writes: “Proud mom of two girls, Sienna, 4, and Scarlett, 2. Now living in Montreal and loving life as an expat, day trader, author and host to the annual Modern Traders Summit in June each year.” ■ Amanda Coulon writes: “Living the Dream in New Canaan, Connecticut, with two girls Marin and Paloma, ages 7 and 5 and three dogs. Love seeing as many SG folks as I can on a regular basis but not enough and think we should plan a reunion soon.” ■ Eben Colby writes: “I still live with my wife and two boys just outside of Boston. My boys are playing a lot of hockey, so we spend an inordinate amount of time driving around to rinks; plus, I still play a couple of times a week. I’ve been back to campus a couple of times and caught an SG hockey game up here at BB&N. Looking forward to summer when we do a lot of sailing (racing and cruising) on Penobscot Bay in Maine. Work is good. I am still litigating at Skadden with a nice mix of civil litigation/ trials and government investigations. I have also been able to do some interesting pro bono work, including obtaining $22 million resolution in the largest labor trafficking case ever on behalf of Indian workers who were trafficked to the Gulf Coast after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. I also have a current case making constitutional claims on behalf of workers who were mistreated in a government raid of a meatpacking plant in Tennessee. It’s an interesting case that has gotten a lot of media coverage. Hope you and all of the ’95ers are doing well, and that everyone is planning to attend the next reunion. The last one was a great time.”

1996

Daytrader and host to the annual Modern Traders Summit in June each year, Jane Nigra '95.

Anthony L. Champalimaud, alchampalimaud @gmail.com

1997

Jonathan W. Foster III, jfoster06417@yahoo. com ■ Jonathan Foster writes: “My wife and I have been enjoying Rhode Island since we moved to Bristol in 2015. We are just a short ride to SG and have been back a couple of times. We were honored to get married in the chapel in 2016. Our son, Glen, turned 2 in January and is growing up so fast. We both started new jobs this year. Laura works from home for a small consulting firm, and I started with a financial planning company in Providence. I recently had dinner with Christine Sallum, who also lives in Rhode Island. I have spoken to a few other people from the Class of 1997, including Hayes Hopple and Maher Hamdan, and look forward to reconnecting with more.” ■ Curtis Adams writes: “My wife Valerie and I live in Baltimore, and we had our third child in March. Grand plans for my 40th birthday party at the end of February were squashed. We had gender reveal parties for our son, 6, and daughter, 3, but the third baby we wanted it to be a surprise. I work for The Michaels Organization, specializing in affordable housing real estate development.”

1998 1999

Lindsey Houston Salmony, lindsey.salmony @blackbaud.com

I. Andrew McLaughlin, iamclaughlin@gmail.com / Anne Harvey Sharpe, adharvey8@ gmail.com ■ Chad DiStefano moved to Miami five years ago and got married. He was in NYC for a decade before that, mostly getting his soul crushed working for a few investment banks. He is enjoying his newfound quality of life. He has two girls, Luciana, 2.5 years, and Giovanna, 0.5 years, and a dog Giuseppe (5 years old.). Chad and his wife spend a lot of time in Telluride, Colorado, when not in Miami. Chad started his own investment management company two years ago, and has picked up hockey again. His team just wrapped up a three-peat as men’s C-League champions (dynasty?). Chad ran his first marathon this year. ■ Hera McLeod wasn’t able to make it to the reunion this year because she had a


CLASS NOTES

speaking engagement in New Orleans that conflicted. She had a daughter named Isabel on Nov. 18. Her older daughter, Estela, is 5. Hera is working as a systems development manager at Amazon Web Services in Seattle. ■ Emmy O’Connell Lambert let us know she was expecting her second child on May 14. She is excited for Schuylar (who is turning 3 on May 21) to have a little sister. Aside from being busy with mom life, she has

2000

Jennifer Vandemoer Mitchell, mitchelljv @gmail.com ■ Hello! It was great to hear from you all, and I am looking forward to gearing up for our 20th reunion! I cannot believe it’s around the corner. David has been busy with work and traveling a bunch between New York and London. I got to tag along on a recent trip to London, meet up with Serene Murphy, and see her beautiful family, which was great. We also

SUMMER 2019

Above: Members of Class of 1999 gather together in Palm Beach in April: Fred McFerran, Liv Wilson Thompson, Chad DiStefano, Nick Rafferty, Steven Gross and Seth Thompson. / Stephanie Downey Toledo '99 receiving her doctorate in education leadership from Harvard.

made a career transition and has gone back to work doing interior design. She also has her own small design business. She moved to Larchmont, New York, with her husband Dana in February 2016 and has enjoyed being in the ’burbs but close enough to the city. ■ Despite living within a thousand feet of each other, Elisabeth Bernstein Moody and I have not spoken in a very, very, very, long time. Will Seifert and I thought we saw her a few months back, but Will was too shy to say hello and retreated into his martini. We discovered that our kids play together, so we will likely be chatting soon. Her younger daughter Perrine was born in July 2018. Cleo, her eldest, is thrilled! She hangs out with Caitlin Robin all the time, who opened her own law firm a few years back. I will be keeping my eyes peeled. ■ Stephanie Downey Toledo recently graduated with her Ph.D. in Education Leadership from Harvard. She has returned to the Ocean State to serve as the Chief Academic Officer for an urban school district in Central Falls, Rhode Island. While back in Rhode Island for work, Stephanie, her husband Humberto, and their three children – Luke, 6, Dean, 4, and Hope, 2 – live in Massachusetts. ■ Anne Harvey

//

CLASS OF 1999, 20TH REUNION Back row: Bill Hatfield, Will Seifert, Pete Thomson, Peter Allport, Seth Thompson, Neil McLaughlin, Andrew McLaughlin, Ben Ducas. Middle row: Liv Wilson Thompson, Caitlin Robin, Nancy Pack, Anne Harvey Sharpe, Kelly Sullivan Emrick, Norah Haufe Larke, Montana Timchula. Front row: Steve Gross, Kate von Trapp, Helena Marrin Grant, Hunter Knight, Leigh Fenwick.

st. george’s school

1999

20th Reunion

says: “Andrew, you are amazing. I have dropped the ball on class notes.” It is OK, Anne; we are all busy. Feature pieces in the alumni magazine must take up a lot of your time. Anne is still living in Rowayton, Connecticut, with her husband Jamie and two kids Addison, 4.5, and Lochlan, 2.5. Anne works as a neonatal intensive care nurse at Stamford Hospital. She has also been active in fundraising for the hospital to rebuild their Women and Children’s wards. ■ Jared Casey has been called the TJ Burke of Killington, Vermont. He is a ski instructor for Killington Snow Sports and will be a downhill mountain biking instructor this summer. Jared is also working on a couple of exciting real estate initiatives based on future Killington expansion. Ben Ducas and I skied a few days with Jared this winter. On the final day, Jared got tired and had to go in for a rest while Ben and I kept skiing. Keeping up with the big boys is tough work. ■ After six years in Boston, Kate von Trapp moved back to Burlington last August. She is managing a small marketing agency. She is enjoying the Vermont lifestyle in the mountains in the winter and on Lake Champlain in the summer. ■ As for me, I am still living in Manhattan with wife Anna, sons Sandy, 3, Malcolm, 1, and Field Cocker, Tux. I do see a lot of classmates around town and the East Coast. Ben Ducas just moved into town with his wife Alex, which is a nice addition. If he can get his tennis game in order, I will be seeing more of him this spring and summer. While we did not get it done this past winter, I had a solid trip to Aspen with Neil McLaughlin, Nick Rafferty, Tyler Boynton, Peter Thomson, Hunter Knight, Fulvio Traglio, Teymour Golsorkhi, and my brother Callum McLaughlin ’96. Nothing happened; we had no fun. What did you hear?

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CLASS NOTES

st. george’s school

Marriages

// SUMMER 2019

CONGRATULATIONS Christina Connett ’87 to Gary Brophy Jan. 26, 2019

Christian Whiton ’92 to Marco McClees [ 1 ] /March 16, 2019

Will Rabbe ’00 to Brittany Prime Feb. 2, 2019

Dorothy Billings ’02 to Alexander Zani [ 2 ] / Dec. 8, 2018

Henry Sheehan ’02 to Kathryn Allred [ 3 ] / Oct. 13, 2018

1. Christian Whiton '92 and Marco McClees.

Kevin Shers ’02 to Kate McCartan Sept. 8, 2018

Peyton Wallace ’02 to Dominque Porter [ 4 ] / Nov. 17, 2018

Tracy Dana ’03 to Andrew Battaglini Nov. 13, 2018

Shannon Karpovitz ’03 to Austin Kendrick Nov. 4, 2018

Meghan O’Connor ’03 to Kieran Gallagher April 7, 2018

Moana Casanova ’04 to Andrew Quigley Aug. 2018

Lauren Mackay ’04 to Matthew Sooy Nov. 3, 2018

2. From left to right (back row): Ashley Mihos Kennedy '01, Kesa Iskra Lindsay '03, Emma Simmons Anselmi '02, Katharine Harvey Anklowitz '02, Catherine Cook Waldin '03, Emily Whipple '02, Alexander Zani (groom), Logan Unland '02, Henry Sheehan '02, Emily Castelli '03, Nathan Eaton '01, Dana Ross '02. From left to right (front row): Missie Walker '01, Thomas Curtin '02, Dorothy Billings Zani '02, Gerrit Lansing '02. Maria Shevlin '02 and Leigh Fenwick Eaton '99 were also in attendance but missing from photo.


CLASS NOTES

71 st. george’s school

// SUMMER 2019

3. The wedding party of Henry Sheehan '02 and Kathryn Allred included Henry Sheehan '02, Todd Curtin '02, Logan Unland '02, Gerrit Lansing '02, and Alexis Sheehan '00.

Christina Saldivar ’05 to Jorge Garcia Nov. 24, 2018

Anna Bullard ’06 to Chris Ducay Sept. 8, 2018

Field Osler ’06 to Sanford Carton [ 5 ] / June 2, 2018

Isabel Walker ’06 to Daniel DeJesus Dec. 9, 2018

4. Peyton Wallace '02 to Dominique Porter.

Kevin Corkery ’07 to Lucie Nadler Sept. 8, 2018

Taylor Tobin ’07 to Andrew DeLorey Sept. 1, 2018

Angus Anderson ’08 to Gina Poerio Nov. 3, 2018

Will O’Connor ’08 to Alejandro Golding April 27, 2019

Emma Reed ’14 to Josiah Souder April 5, 2019 5. Justin Osler '04, Sanford Carton, Field (Osler) Carton '06 and William Osler.


72

CLASS NOTES

st. george’s school

Babies �

CONGRATULATIONS

// SUMMER 2019

Alden Guidry Nelson to Ashley and Derek Nelson ’87 April 21, 2018

Thea Anselmi to Michael and Emma Simmons Anselmi ’02 July 14, 2018

Rose Mycroft to Jack and Sarah Vukovich Mycroft ’95 [ 1 ] / March 29, 2019

Lydia Lansing to Christyn and Gerrit Lansing ’02 [ 7 ] / Sept. 18, 2018

Isabel McLeod to Hera McLeod ’99 Nov. 18, 2019

Emil Charles Vaillancourt to Uli and Ryan Vaillancourt ’02

Perrine Moody to Drew and Elisabeth Bernstein Moody ’99 [ 2 ] / July 16, 2018

Brae Elizabeth Woodford to Michael and Ashley Platt Woodford ’02

Jan. 5, 2019

1

Malcolm Vietor McLaughlin to Anna Vietor McLaughlin ’00 and I. Andrew McLaughlin ’99 June 19, 2018

Colton “Colt” Everett Franz to Cullen and Erica Burrill Franz ’00 [ 3 ] / March 27, 2019

2

Elizabeth Beck Jonas to Peter and Daphne Neilson Jonas ’01 [ 4 ] /March 2, 2019

Elizabeth “Lila” Beck Young to Josh and Eliza Notides Young ’01 March 2, 2019

Annabelle Demark to Adam and Aurelia Drackett Demark ’01 [ 5 ] / June 20, 2018

Anne “Annie” Button Douglass to Ben and Katie Heath Douglass ’03 April 4, 2019

Lucy Reed Hagist to Tim Hagist ‘03 and Carolyn Woishek Hagist ’03 (pictured with Will (4) and May (7)) [ 8 ] / Oct. 29, 2018

Wilhelmina “Winnie” Waldin to Erik and Casey Cook Waldin ’03 [ 9 ] Feb. 7, 2019

Henry James Soros to Christine and Michael Soros ’05 [ 10 ] / Oct. 10, 2017

Lakey Russell Tomberg to Ryan and Lindsay Horner Tomberg ’03 [ 11 ] / Sept. 27, 2018

Marion Amelia Anklowitz to Jason and Kate Harvey Anklowitz ’02 [ 6 ] / Feb. 20, 2019

3


CLASS NOTES

5

10 6

7

11

SUMMER 2019

9

//

4

st. george’s school

8

got to see Chris Fouts and his family, who came for a ski break in Aspen. Hope you all are well! ■ Alex Jones, who married his longtime girlfriend in January last year, is expecting a little girl in August. They are still living in Bermuda. ■ Amanda Fend says, “I wish I had something exciting to report but really no news ... guess I need to do something fun before the next one! I have loved reading the updates about everyone!” ■ Andrew Roberts, David Mitchell, Tyler Steffey, and George Sargent all got together in Boston last August to rehash old memories. Not much has changed in that George was still the loudest patron at Shojo. Later in the fall Andrew and George crossed paths again, but this time in Charlestown at a first birthday for the son of Paul Schmid. ■ Anna McLaughlin reports the birth of her second son, Malcolm Vietor McLaughlin on June 19, 2018, and says, “that’s about it for me!” ■ Tyler Steffey writes: “Greetings, Dragons. We are well. Ellie is almost 6 and Nico is 3.5 going on 13. Joanna and I moved from Boston out to the ’burbs of Sudbury a few months ago. We could not be happier. I am working as a school administrator in Concord Public Schools, and Joanna is doing some ed consulting. We have a little rescue pup named Taco who, other than always making me hungry, is great. We are keeping busy with outdoor adventures, cycling, and getting used to the serenity of living the burbs life. Please be in touch — especially if you can deliver a Del’s.” ■ Will Rabbe married Brittany Prime, a political fundraiser and UVA graduate, at St. John’s Church in Washington, D.C., in February 2019. ■ George Sargent says, “We moved to Wellesley in November, and we are loving ’burb life. Admittedly, I have started wearing Crocs to the grocery store. Charlie, 18 months, is really gaining confidence. Cannot wait to see everyone at our 20th!” ■ Ali Ingersoll says, “Since breaking my neck in 2010 at my house in the Bahamas, life has been quite a roller coaster. I have moved from Miami to China and now I presently reside in Raleigh, N.C., near my sister. I am happy to announce that I am getting married on May 19 to a wonderful man whom I met online. His name is Aaron and he is from Raleigh. We shared the last three years together taking adventures from hiking Mayan temples in Mexico to

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CLASS NOTES

st. george’s school

//

snorkeling in the crystal blue waters of the Caribbean. We try to find adventures that are handicap accessible and have started a blog to document my life’s adventures at www.quirkyquad.com. I have kept in touch with so many of our friends from SG over the years, and it is so great to hear everyone is still in contact. That is the wonderful thing about having a small class size.” ■ Anna Holm says, “Sending a quick ‘Hello’ from Sweden. All is well. Wishing you all a fab summer!” ■ Emily Talamo says, “I got to have dinner with a few friends in NYC in February including Anna McLaughlin, Amanda Fend and Alexis Barrick — always amazing to be together, just like old times!” ■ Ted Stern reports, “All is well here in the Pacific Northwest.” ■ Erica Burrill Franz says, “My husband Cullen and I had a baby boy on March 27, 2019. My son’s name is Colton “Colt” Everett Franz. All is well.”

SUMMER 2019

2001

Above: Alexis Barrick '00, Emily Talamo '00, Amanda Fend '00, and Anna McLaughlin '00 having dinner in NYC in February. / Daphne Neilson Jonas '01 and her children. / The Hon. Quincey Ross '02 / Oliver Turner '03 with his wife, O'nea, and their two daughters.

Mary Turner Oehmig and Justin P. Cerenzia, sgclassnotes2001@gmail.com ■ Thank you for the class notes, Class of 2001! Here are some updates from across the country: Aurelia Demark writes: “We welcomed our second daughter, Annabelle, in June 2018. She is thriving, and Eloise is so happy to be an older sister. Our dog, Scout, feels a bit marginalized, but secretly enjoys the chaos. Outside of home life, I am busy with my fine jewelry business. We were just in Florida for spring break and saw Katharine Currin and her family. Always love seeing a fellow Dragon, so reach out if you are visiting NYC!” ■ Meanwhile on the West Coast, Daphne Jonas is busy with a new job, new home and a new baby. She writes: “I am working for a company called Cleo supporting pregnant and newly parenting families as they navigate the craziness (good and bad) of parenthood. My brood finally called it quits on San Francisco city living and have moved to the ’burbs of Mill Valley – which we are big fans of. Have had the good luck of running into Becca Sullivan ’00 and her very cute kiddos here in San Francisco. Not too long ago I had the pleasure of visits with both Missie Walker and Eliza Young (sadly not at the same time). My most exciting news is that we have just added yet ANOTHER girl to the mix – born March

2, Elizabeth “Lila” Beck. She is mighty cute, and her two big sisters could not be any more proud.” ■ From New Hampshire, Andrew Grovesnor is still working as a business attorney. He and his wife Sarah have one son, Theo, who just turned four and a new baby boy arriving in June. He has been making a lot of music under the name “Andrew North” and just released an album, “Lost City.” He recently co-wrote a song with the one and only Colby Hewitt, and they may work on some more stuff in the future (Wyc reunion tour 2020?).

2002

Dorothy Billings Zani, dorothybillings@gmail. com / Gerrit M. Lansing, gerrit. lansing@gmail.com / Dana T. Ross, danatross@gmail.com ■ It was really nice to hear from those of you who responded. Sounds like everyone is doing well and enjoying life. Cannot believe it has already been 17 years since we graduated! Where has the time gone?! ■ Quincey Ross is doing great back home in Arkansas. He is enjoying his new position as Circuit Judge, Tenth Judicial Circuit, and Fourth Division. He hopes everyone is enjoying the lives we began creating so long ago. Whitney Boglioli Lodigiani and her husband, Bryan, reside in Maryland with their three children. Their oldest, Ainsley, starts kindergarten in the fall and everyone is doing well! Logan Unland is still living in New York City with his wife, Serena. Serena is a chef and food writer. Logan and his partners recently spun out of their prior employer to launch Parkman Healthcare Partners, a healthcare-focused investment firm with offices in Stamford, Connecticut, and New York City. ■ Excitingly, a few classmates of ours expanded their families this past year! Last May, Ashley Platt Woodford and her husband, Michael, happily announced the arrival of baby girl, Brae Elizabeth Woodford, making them a family of four. Michael, Ashley, Fintan and Brae live in Orange County, California, and life is awesome. Emma Simmons Anselmi and her husband, Michael, live in Boulder, Colorado, with their two children Elias, 2.5, and Thea, whom they welcomed in July of 2018. They recently caught up with Tucker Miller ’01 who is living in the area and have enjoyed running into a lot of SG friends in Aspen. Gerrit Lansing and his


CLASS NOTES

host a fun wedding! ■ Again, it was great to hear from you all! Congratulations to all those with birth and nuptial announcements! Wishing everyone a healthy and wonderful rest of 2019!

2004

James F. Bittl, jamesbittl@gmail.com / J. Garth Fasano, garthfasano@gmail. com / Julianna C. Howland, julianna. howland@gmail.com / Katharine Sheehan Ronck, katharineronck@gmail.com ■ Robyn Mak, Kooksun Kim ’06, Simon Li ’13, and Jim Bittl all reconnected and met over a delicious Teppanyaki dinner during Head of School Alixe Callen’s visit to Hong Kong in December. They have vowed to continue the spirit with monthly happy hours. ■ Some updates: Robyn is a columnist based in Hong Kong where she leads the coverage of tech-related finance and economic stories in Asia for Reuters Breakingviews. ■ Kooksun has

SUMMER 2019

Bradley G. Hoover, bgh3175@gmail.com ■ Congratulations to Shannon (Karpovitz) Kendrick, who married Austin Kendrick this past November! They enjoyed a small reception just outside of Nashville, Tennessee. The newlyweds then trekked out to Scottsdale, Arizona, for their honeymoon at the Biltmore. Upon returning, Shannon began her new job at a physical therapy clinic close to home. The couple has been busy renovating their home, and Shannon has been taking lots of continuing education courses to further her PT practice. ■ Andrew Taylor is settling into his emergency and critical care residency at UW-Madison and recently got engaged to Jay Gladden. Congratulations, Andrew! ■ Casey Waldin and her husband Erik recently had their first baby girl, Wilhelmina Waldin, aka, “Winnie.” Casey was lucky enough to see some fellow Dragon parents and alumni recently at the annual Palm Beach cocktail party at the Sailfish Club. Always a fun time. ■ Lindsay Tomberg continues to work for Operation Smile as their Director of Global Corporate Development, helping children around the world get the essential surgical care they need to live a happy and healthy life. Lindsay and her husband welcomed their second daughter, Lakey Russell, on Sept. 27, 2018. They love her, but report that her sister Natalie is even more obsessed with Lakey than they are. Lindsay is also thanking her lucky stars that Hillary Longley makes trips to visit and keeps her sane through some super long nights of having a new baby. The Tombergs have relocated to New Jersey, and their door is always open to our SG family! ■ Long time SG Bulletin reader, first-time participant Oliver Turner is in the house! Oli knows it’s been far too long since he’s said hello to the Class of 2003. He’s living in Nassau, Bahamas, with his wife, O’nea, and their two beautiful daughters, Lily and Violet (my little garden). Oli finished his CFA several years ago and has been working as a trader at Credit Suisse. ■ It’s been almost

//

2003

a year since Bill Nordlund and his family moved to Tampa, Florida. Bill continues to work at Amazon. When he’s not working, you’ll find him and Cassandra taking their kids to the beach and Disney World. The couple was looking forward to their adventure to Cuba in May. ■ Colby Brown is finishing up his ENT residency this year. In June, he’s moving to North Carolina to start a one-year fellowship at UNC Chapel Hill in rhinology (a mix of sinus surgery and skull base surgery). ■ After almost 10 years in Las Vegas, Amanda Ix and her family have moved back to the East Coast! They are excited to be living in Darien, Conn. Amanda hopes to run into more alumni in Connecticut than in Vegas. ■ Carolyn Woishek Hagist writes: “On Oct. 29, 2018, we welcomed a beautiful baby girl to the world: Lucy Reed Hagist. Lucy has been a wonderful addition to our family and brings us such joy with her sweet smiles. May , 7, and Will, 4, are great older siblings and love to hold Lucy and give her kisses. We still have an excavation business, which keeps us busy as well! We see Fiona Hagist de Sada ’00 often, Trevor Farmen ’02, Jen ’00 and David Mitchell ’00, and John Whipple ’03 as well. We are looking forward to Meghan O’Connor ’03 and her husband visiting!” ■ Katie Heath and her husband Ben welcomed to the world their little girl, Anne (Annie) Button Douglass, on April 4, 2019! Katie also started a little business, KHD Calligraphy and Concierge, where she does calligraphy and small event details for weddings and intimate events. ■ You stay classy, 2003.

st. george’s school

wife, Christyn, introduced Lydia Lansing to the world on Sept. 18, 2018. She’s happy and healthy. Gerrit, Eliza Notides Young ’01, Missie Walker ’01, and Eliza Baker Holladay ’03 had a fun night in D.C. this past winter. Kate Harvey Anklowitz, her husband, Jason, and their son, Charles, welcomed Marion Amelia Anklowitz to the family on Feb. 20! They are adjusting as a family of four and are enjoying life back on the East Coast in Greenwich, Connecticut! Kate has enjoyed seeing more of her fellow Dragons, especially Dana Ross and Dorothy Billings Zani. ■ In other exciting news, a few of us tied the knot or got engaged recently! Kevin Shers exchanged vows with Kate McCartan on Sept. 8, 2018 in Washington, D.C. Katharine Modisett attended. Henry Sheehan married Kathryn Allred on Oct.13 in Jekyll Island, Georgia. In the spring of 2018, they ditched the Big Apple for Newport, Rhode Island. Peyton Wallace tied the knot with his fiancé, Dominque, in Mexico City last November. Peyton and Dominique are healthy, happy, and working on building their individual companies. Dominique started The Glad Hours, which specializes in luxury loungewear and accessories. Peyton’s company, Pi Movement, recently branched into women’s wear and is working to build out their nonprofit, Pi Percent, where 3.14 percent of revenue is contributed towards building parks, playgrounds, and educational programs to encourage people to get out and move. On Dec. 8, 2018, I (Dorothy Billings Zani) married Alexander Zani in Boston. I think it is safe to say everyone fully indulged and enjoyed the Christmas theme throughout the weekend. There was a solid SG contingency with Dana Ross, Emily Whipple, Emma Simmons Anselmi, Gerrit Lansing, Henry Sheehan, Kate Harvey Anklowitz, Logan Unland, Maria Shevlin, Todd Curtin, Leigh Fenwick Eaton ’99, Nathan Eaton ’01, Ashley Mihos Kennedy '01, Missie Walker ’01, Catherine Cook Waldin ’03, Emily Castelli ’03, and Kesa Iskra Lindsay ’03 all in attendance. Otherwise, Alex and I are enjoying married life in New York City, and I very much like not having a massive personal to-do list now that the wedding is over. Chris Sessa will be marrying his fiancé, Lindsay, this November in Richmond, Virginia. He will use his experiences planning Tuck Shop to

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st. george’s school

// SUMMER 2019

15th Reunion

2004

CLASS OF 2004, 15TH REUNION Back row: Brian Taggart, Katherine Van De Mark Gallagher, Kayla Leeflang Purdon, Jay Kendrick, Jenna Savage Ryan, LeRoy Leong. Front row: Farren Hart Jasysyn, Lauren Merrigan Sanford, Olivia Kerr Barker.

been living in Hong Kong for five years and is working in recruitment. ■ Simon relocated from New York to Hong Kong last year and has been working at Morgan Stanley’s Equity Capital Markets Group where he primarily focuses on advising the initial public offering Chinese tech and healthcare companies. ■ Jim is a new dad whose third greatest accomplishment is getting his Chinese driver’s license (second is marrying a Tabor alumna).

2005 2006

Christina Saldivar Garcia, c.saldivar311@gmail.com

Marisa A. RodriguezMcGill, mrodriguezmcgill@gmail.com / Our sincere thanks to Emily Jagger Lynch for her service as class correspondent for the last ten years. ■ In September, Caroline Guenther started a new job at Uber, where she is a senior manager in a strategy role within product operations working to globalize Uber’s products. Goose is enjoying the new office! She frequently gets to see her ridesharing rival Marisa RodriguezMcGill when she is in town for meetings at Lyft. Luckily, Caroline didn’t let her new job affect her ski season and shared a ski house with Jono Bernbaum and Meagan Kohls in Tahoe where they enjoyed the best ski season in history! ■ Field Osler

married Sanford Carton in June 2018. Congratulations, Field! Everyone should come visit!

2007

Alexandra E. Cahill, alexecahill@gmail.com Schuyler Livingston writes: “My big news is that I got married at SG in July. My parents were also married at SG, so it was very special to keep the tradition. I graduated from Tuck (with Annabel!) in May and moved to Boston in August. I’m working at Analysis Group and really loving it so far.”

2008

Westley A. Resendes, west.resendes@gmail. com ■ To kick things off, Alex Merchant shares some exciting news: “After nearly four years working in the New York City Mayor’s Office, I am leaving the Deputy Mayor for Operations team to get a master’s degree at the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton. My wife, Madeline, and son, Cyrus (now 17 months!), are excited about moving to Princeton for two years. If you are in the area, definitely reach out!” Congratulations, Alex! ■ Samantha Moran has made her way down to Florida, where she is working for Walmart supporting their tech teams. In the Floridian tradition (as the state has the highest number of registered recreational water vessels in the U.S.), she and her

Above, top to bottom: Jim Bittl ’04, Kooksun Kim ’06, Robyn Mak ’04 and Simon Li ’13 in Hong Kong. / Marisa Rodriguez-McGill '06 and Robey.

boyfriend are the proud new owners of a boat. Perhaps their boat will intercept Geronimo on her next voyage south! ■ Liz Levison shares from Manhattan, “I am currently working for Zeckendorf Development, a real estate developer, doing sales and marketing and am loving it! I live in the East Village and love seeing all my St. George’s friends weekly.” ■ Will O’Connor is celebrating his April 27 marriage to Alejandro Golding after nearly 10 years together. Will is also a year into his new job as the travel editor for The Daily Beast. Many congratulations, Will and Alejandro! ■ Devin O’Rourke will also be celebrating his September marriage to Samantha Doherty (Governors Academy ’10) in Chatham, Massachusetts. Devin still resides in Boston and is working as a financial advisor. If you need any advice, you know where to go! ■ And now, wedding news! Angus Anderson celebrated his wedding to Gina Poerio last November. Angus also reports that “the beatings Brian Lowry suffered on the squash courts in Boston were so brutal that Brian needed to move to Burlington, Vermont, and pick up skiing instead.” Hope the slopes are treating you well, Brian! ■ Rob Morgus will be tying the knot in December with Maja Bijelic in his hometown of Sun Valley,


CLASS NOTES

// SUMMER 2019

2009

Isabel H. Evans, Izzyevans22@gmail. com ■ By the time you have read this, we will have celebrated our 10-year reunion. OMG. We’re old! Sadly, a lot of us really look it! Quite literally over the HILLtop lol. Anyways, hopefully the reunion was a roaring success and no one was too petty, including myself. If so, I am sorry in advance! As I write this in April 2019, I will admit to being quite excited, which is testament to how great my life is going. Anyways, you probs already will know this news by now, but if not, here is the best tea I could gather. Everyone on Instagram will know that Doyle Stack and Esme Yozell ’10 are dating, thanks to their regular documentation and that of their dutiful scribe, 2010 class correspondent, and musical aficionado Eliza Ghriskey. Other romance news gleaned from careful research includes the following engagements, with these three women all betrothed: Campbell McNicol, Kate Woestemeyer, and Payton Somers. You go, gals! I do not know the gentlemen associated with Kate and Payton but Campbell’s man is very nice and athletic. Makes sense: Campbell loves tennis, because it is a score of love! I think I mentioned last time but Kajsa MashawSmith is also engaged so my same loser joke can apply to her. Meanwhile Kara Meringolo walked down the aisle last year so is now Kara Lurio. So Yoon Jun got married and moved to Switzerland! What a twist! ■ Piers Kermode and Lulu Keszler

st. george’s school

Idaho. He has been working in national security policy with New America, where his quotes and analysis have been recently featured in The New York Times, Slate, and other impressive publications. We look forward to welcoming you to the SG family, Maja! ■ As for myself, I am wrapping up my time at Yale Law School this May, and I will be moving to San Francisco to work at the American Civil Liberties Union on a two-year Skadden Fellowship. My project will focus on getting law enforcement out of elementary schools nationwide as they disproportionately traumatize children of color and children with disabilities. I look forward to meeting SG alums in the Bay Area. Do not hesitate to say hello if you are visiting!

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10th Reunion

2009

CLASS OF 2009, 10TH REUNION Back row: Jelani Odlum Lansiquot, Hannah Von Meister, Halsey Landon, Sam Kinney, John Harris, Dan Fortunato, Kevin Shelton, Johnny Norfleet, Nathaniel Pearson, Doyle Stack, Campbell McNicol, Catherine Esposito. Middle row: Izzy Evans, Callie McBreen, Patrick Guerriero, Christina Haack, Anna Schroeder, Maddie Carrellas, Tutti Davis, Leslie Muzzy. Front row: Peter Lawson-Johnston, Thomas Growney, Nick Baker, Nick Biedron.

Manley both have new babies, but not together. I ran into Chris McCormack in Williamsburg with his girlfriend and that seems to be going well. Meanwhile former Williamsburg residents Christina Haack and Megan Leonhard have both relocated, Megan to California and Christina to New Hampshire. Wells Howe has also moved to Jackson Hole. ■ According to Facebook, Hannah McQuilkin has started her own company called “Sequoia Immersions,” which “provides wilderness retreats, counseling, and other programs for proactive couples looking to take their relationship to the next level.” Sounds sexy! Speaking of other health matters, Vianca Masucci continues her work as a health advocate at the Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, and Maddie Carrellas is a research assistant at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Both Vianca and I used to regularly visit the SG Health Center, mostly to hang out with Nurse Killeavy, and I wonder if that inspired her career choice. It was so weird. Whenever I had lacrosse practice, I suddenly came down with swine flu. ■ Johnny Norfleet was recently at the US Sailing Team Race Championship and wrote that he saw a bevy of SG alums there including Bettina Redway ’12, Truckie Greenhouse ’17, Max Simmons ’13, Taylor Kirkpatrick ’16, Miranda Bakos ’14, and Pearson Potts ’12. ■ Callie McBreen and I continue

to spend much time together in New York, parleying with managers of various establishments on a regular basis. No tables available? I don’t think so! Her craft is especially exceptional now that she is a full lawyer. I practice as much as possible to keep up. That is all I can think of right now! Hope to see you soon. Bye bye!

2010

Eliza R. Ghriskey, elizaghriskey@gmail. com ■ Hey guys! It is wild that it has been almost a full year since our last class notes. I hope most of you received the letter from SG asking to update your contact info for our 10-year reunion, so if you have not done so, please fill it out. I am looking forward to seeing all of you slightly aged, yet somehow still beautiful, faces next spring at our TEN-YEAR REUNION. Here's hoping we have all accomplished a whole LOT in the last five years so we can one-up each other! But seriously, enough chitchat, let us dive in on what everyone has been up to. ■ Kinyette Henderson is currently in her fifth year teaching in her home state of New Jersey. She is a seventh Grade Leader while also teaching ELA, but still manages to do even more on top of that. “I am looking to start a boy’s book club at my school, as book clubs tend to be a mainly female hobby, where young


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CLASS NOTES

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// SUMMER 2019

Above, top to bottom: Johnny Norfleet '09, Bettina Redway ’12, Truckie Greenhouse, ’17, Max Simmons, ’13, Taylor Kirkpatrick ’16, Miranda Bakos ’14, and Pearson Potts ’12 at the US Sailing Team Race Championship. / Mahmoud "Moudy" Abdel-Maksoud '15 (third from left) accepted the Hoehn Cup-B Division trophy for George Washington University at the 2019 College Men's Team National Championships. Photo by Lisa Scully.

men of color can sit and discuss literature,” she said. “If anyone wants to get involved, I am always looking for sponsors to send some books our way!” When she is not at school, Kinyette is very busy keeping up with her son, C.J., who will be 2 years old in July. ■ Jake Shimmel is currently living in San Diego and absolutely loving it — but honestly, who would not? He got engaged last November at Joshua Tree National Park after making the move out west and becoming a homeowner with his now fiancée. Jake mentioned that other than these major life changes, “We’re just enjoying SoCal, spending our time on the beaches, mountains and, of course, at all the dogfriendly bars/restaurants/parks with our pup. Can’t complain!” ■ Charlotte Edson is working at Starcom as a media supervisor on the Visa Global account. Even though agency life definitely keeps her incredibly busy, she is making time for travel. She just visited Vienna, where her sister Laura

Edson ’16 is studying abroad. ■ Kelty O’Brien recently moved apartments in San Francisco with her boyfriend/co-worker, Drew. That is right; they work together at Facebook and commute together every day. They are so precious. Kelty has been traveling more than anyone I know in the past few years, spending time in Fiji, New Zealand, Australia, France, Italy, and Spain in 2018 alone. Her big trip of 2019? The Maldives. I highly recommend stalking her Instagram. ■ Esme Yozell asked me to announce that she and Doyle Stack ’09 are an item. Yes, you read that correctly. I have been third wheeling with them a fair amount the last few months, but not as much as Thomas Growney ’09 has. The three of them will be traveling to Croatia in June in order to further the popular misconception that Esme is dating Thomas, not Doyle. ■ Attention ladies! Eric Jernigan will be joining the NYC crowd soon. He is finishing up med school at UNC this year and will be starting his general surgery residency at Lenox Hill. We are all already swooning. ■ A group of us made our way out to Colorado in March for our (now annual) SG ski trip. Sydney Mas, Caroline O’Connor, Shealagh Coughlin, Charlotte Deavers, Teddy Swift, Alex Hare, Findlay Bowditch, Hank Myers and myself hit the slopes at Breckenridge. Surprisingly, we left the mountain with no new injuries! We ran into Ollie Scholle ’08, George Gebelein ’08, and Chase Uhlein ’08 at T-Bar for a couple of white Russians post skiing. Some highlights included: Findlay getting annoyed at himself during the Post-It game, Emma falling while skiing and asking us to “leave her there,” Caroline borrowing an entire outfit from one of Ollie’s friends, and Teddy’s dog, Eggsy, falling madly in love with Caroline’s leg. Overall, it was a successful weekend. ■ Speaking of the centennial state, Shealagh Coughlin left us in NYC, much to our dismay, and moved out to Denver last October. She is now a client success manager at Ibotta, Inc., which is a mobile technology company that enables users with its app to earn cash back on in-store and mobile purchases. As any “Bachelor” fan would know, many of the show’s alumni reside in Denver. Here is to hoping you find your Ben Higgins! Alex Hare also made the move to Denver in March to attend coding school, not just

to be closer to the mountains. ■ I just hit my one-year anniversary at The New York Times and am currently living in the Lower East Side. Esme and I are on the executive committee for Save the Children Young Patron’s, raising awareness on the Return to Learning Fund, which aims to create a holistic program to help children return to school within 30 days of displacement. We are hosting our annual gala soon and are hoping to see many SG alums in attendance! Great catching up with everyone (in person and via email). Hope to see you all soon!

2011

Sophie C. Flynn, sophie. flynn@gmail.com ■ As we approach our eighth year out of St. George’s, the Class of 2011 has some big updates to share. By the time you read this, Rachel Sellstone will be Rachel Larcom, as she and Chad Larcom will have tied the knot at the St. George’s Chapel on June 1, with a reception at Fort Adams. Just three days after the wedding, Chad and Rachel are moving to Tacoma, Washington, for Chad to begin his residency in internal medicine. ■ Meanwhile, Caroline Miller will be graduating in May with an MFA in dramatic writing from NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts with a concentration in screenwriting. She shared, “My ‘thesis’ script is actually about St. George’s so stay tuned for that in a theater near you ... or, you know, just maybe find someone who will get it produced??!!” Any takers? Then, Caroline will be traveling in Europe over the summer and moving to LA in the fall to look for work as a film and TV writer. ■ After a few years working at semester schools (High Mountain Institute and School for Ethics and Global Leadership), Seton Talty is excited to be jumping into the policy world with the Climate Campaign at National Audubon Society in Washington, D.C. She is excited to be working on something she is passionate about, especially at an organization that brings people together across the political aisle. Seton is excited to hike around D.C. as much as possible in the spring and summer to survive (“maybe even thrive in?!” Seton wrote) the heat and humidity. ■ Graham Cochrane has completed four years of his eight-year MD/Ph.D. program at the University of Alabama


CLASS NOTES

at Birmingham. Graham wrote that he is “about halfway through my Ph.D. training in rehabilitation science, studying the effects of concussion and multiple sclerosis on vestibular function.” I was even impressed by his email signature, which says that he’s in the “NIH Medical Scientist Training Program.” Go Graham! ■ Zach Mastrodicasa also has graduate school in his future. He will be attending the University of New Hampshire School of Law on an Intellectual Property scholarship beginning this fall 2019. He will be pursuing a law degree with a specific concentration in neurolaw. ■ Victoria Leonard is in New York working at the WHO Global Mental Health Collaborating Centre at Columbia. Victoria wrote, “It was extremely difficult to leave Dar es Salaam, but I knew in order to gain the skills I need to be useful in health contexts there, I need more training. I am investigating which degree makes most sense now. Luckily I’ve been able to return several times in the past few months. I spent March in Arusha, Mwanza, Dar, and Nairobi working on mental health interventions for women with obstetric fistula, and with our partners at the Africa Mental Health Foundation developing a project integrating screening and therapy

in primary healthcare settings.” ■ L'Oreal Lampley graduated from Brown/Trinity, (formally known as Brown University/ Trinity Repertory's M.F.A. Acting Program) in May.

2012

Jack I. Bartholet, bartholet@jhu.edu

2013

Theresa A. Salud, theresasalud@gmail.com

2014

Please contact the Alumni Office at 1-888-I-CALL-SG or ClassNotes@stgeorges.edu if you would like to volunteer to serve as class correspondent.

2015

Please contact the Alumni Office at 1-888-I-CALL-SG or ClassNotes@stgeorges.edu if you would like to volunteer to serve as class correspondent.

2017

Christine Dejoux, cgdejoux@gmail.com / Eva Killenberg, evakillenberg@gmail.com / Henry Savage, hsavage@bowdoin.edu.

2018

Grace K. Hammarskjold, grace.k.hammarskjold22 @dartmouth.edu / Grace Hammarskjold has graciously volunteered to take over the reins of the notes for the class of 2018. Please send updates to the email above!

SUBMIT A NOTE

Please contact your class correspondent or the Advancement Office at 1-888-I-CALL-SG or classnotes@stgeorges.edu.

SUMMER 2019

2014

CLASS OF 2014, FIFTH REUNION: In Alphabetical Order:Josiah Adams, Sam Alofsin, Will Anderson, Tim Archer, Miranda Bakos, Katherine Bauer, Jonathan Bayne, Margaret Cardwell, Peter Carrellas, Teddy Carter, Jaeyoung Choi, Cameron Cluff, Kathryne Coughlin, John DeLuca, Libbie Desrosiers, Avery Dodd, Roger Dorr, Annabella Doyle, Andrew Duff, Nicolas Flores, Bud Fralick, Alec Goodrich, Sascha Grahovac, Carter Haley, Sage Hill, Thomas Kits van Heyningen, Peggy Kilvert, Lexi LaShelle, Sam Loomis, Andrew Lynch, Hannah Macaulay, Peyton MacNaught, Maggie Maloy, Nicholas Mandor, Cecilia Masiello, Miles Matule, Maggie Mead, Virginia Moylan, Meg O'Connor, Charlotte O'Halloran, Callie Randall, Brooke Reis, Tully Ross, Wilson Rubinoff, Lily Sanford, Alexa Santry, Margaret Schroeder, Will Simpson, Sasha Tory, Julian Turner, Luc Woodard, Caroline Yerkes.

//

Fifth Reunion

Thompson W. Davlin, thompson.davlin@ trincoll.edu ■ The Newport Daily News reported this about Jack O’Connor in March: “Newport’s Jack O’Connor was named the New England Women’s and Men’s Athletic Conference tournament’s Most Outstanding Player after helping Emerson College earn its first-ever conference championship recently. O’Connor, the boy’s all-time leading scorer at St. George’s School, poured in a career-high 33 points in Emerson’s 93-75 championship game victory over WPI. O’Connor, a 6-foot-6 junior guard, finished with 56 points in the Lions’ two tournament wins. O’Connor was a second-team all-conference selection who tied for second in the conference in scoring (20.3 points per game), was second in free-throw percentage (89.2) and ninth in 3-point percentage (41.3).” Congratulations, Jack!

st. george’s school

2016

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A. #30 Shovel, p. 24 - Van Beuren Gym groundbreaking, 1959 B. #43 Felt pennant, p. 28 - Dorm room photo from the Lance, 1946 C. #39 Lower-form beanie, p. 27 - Lower-form boys on the front steps c. 1904 D. #4 Letter sweater, p. 16 and front cover - SG Swim Team, 1954 E. #19 Samovar and teacup, p. 20 - Lois Buell serving tea, 1951.

ST. GEORGE'S SCHOOL P.O. Box 1910 Newport, RI 02840-0190

Match these lettered photos from the SG archives with the numbered objects in our cover story: "Cool Stuff: 50 Intriguing SG Objects" starting on page 14. Answers below: Nonprofit Org. U.S. Postage PAID Burlington, VT 05401 Permit No. 19

Profile for St. George's School

Bulletin Summer 2019  

Bulletin Summer 2019