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the

Art of Entertainment

AUDIO/VIDEO • HOME THEATER • LIGHTING CONTROL • HOME NETWORKING • AUTOMATION

Photography by Billy Cestaro except as noted

A personal high-definition theater. Music throughout the home. Perfect lighting for every occasion. Simple touchscreen controls. An ACS system is designed and engineered like no other by the leading company in the industry. Working with clients, designers, builders and architects, ACS designs systems that complement any décor. Call 800-382-2939 for a free consultation. ACS makes technology simple.

Photography by Phillip Ennis

Established in 1974, Audio Command Systems is proud to once again be voted the leading high-end audio/video company in the Northeast by CEPro magazine, the industry’s leading publication, May 2008. ACS offers a complete line of environmental controls with a forward-thinking approach to energy conservation technology.

Audio Command Systems 800-382-2939 www.audiocommand.com

NYC/West LI • Hamptons • Greenwich, CT • Florida • California

ACS_DansPapers2008F.indd 1

ACS installations feature CRESTRON remote control systems and LUTRON lighting controls

ACS is one of Crestron’s largest dealers in the U.S.

5/2/08 12:11:21 PM

272 feet along the water’s edge…under construction…in Southampton! This brand new waterfront home features 360 degrees of water views…nestled between the sandy beaches of the Great Peconic Bay and Cold Spring Pond, with Peconack Golf Club neighboring its eastern vantage point! All the bells and whistles in this one-of-a-kind new construction…with detailing and finishes chosen to create the perfect upscale retreat…including top-of-the-line materials throughout, and even an elevator. The luxuries of the leisure-lifestyle on 3 levels designed with an open floor plan, offering water vistas in each and every room…from its great room, 3 bedrooms plus sitting room, to its gourmet kitchen. Complete with its own dock, community tennis, deeded beach and boating rights... this fabulous, and quite unique, property has it all for the ardent waterfront enthusiast. Ready for your enjoyment within the immediate future...come and see it for yourself now!

EXCLUSIVE: $3,825,000

invest in the very best of the Hamptons…

DANA J. BERGER, PRINCIPAL BROKER CELLULAR: (516) 458-5100

89 HENRY ST • SOUTHAMPTON, NY 11968 OFFICE: (631) 283-7999

www.HamptonsFineHomes.com www.HFHLLC.com

S AVING THE PLANET NE VER LOOKED THIS

spectacular. What’s more beautiful than a crystal blue pool? One that’s environmentally green. At J. Tortorella, we create pools that are exquisitely elegant, energy efďŹ cient and ecologically sound. Each pool is magniďŹ cently designed to transform your landscape into a luxurious private oasis of your very own, with advanced technology to help preserve the natural resources we all share. At J. Tortorella, we’re keeping this planet beautiful, one spectacular pool at a time. Let us design yours. Visit our showroom today.

Exquisite pool environments Energy efficient heating systems State-of-the-art pool and spa automation High-performance pumps Salt & ozone sanitation systems Built-in cleaning and circulation systems

* 4ORTORELLA3WIMMING0OOLSs#OUNTY2OAD 3OUTHAMPTON .EW9ORKssWWWTORTORELLACOM

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N ewly C ompleted C ustom H ome Southampton, New Yo rk

By Appointment 34 Parrish Pond Lane Southampton, NY 11968 917-273-1773

IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY 10,000 S.F. (incl. finished bsmt) - 6 Bedroom Suites plus Maid’s Room - 10 ft ceilings, formal dining room, great room, large gourmet kitchen family room, and much more. Fully Furnished or Unfurnished - 2-acres - Site Plan Approved For Tennis. Sale Price: $3,850,000 Unfurnished ($3,995,000 Furnished) Custom Homes Design and Construction Since 1989

Owner: Highland Development Assoc. LLC - James DiRenzo (www.hdahomes.com) For more info and inspection: (631) 537-2707 or (917) 273-1773; Video Tour www.SuffolkHomeTours.com/hda.html. Located in Southampton’s Parrish Pond Estates, and less than 10 minutes to the Village and beach DIRECTIONS: From Southampton Village – West on Hill Drive (Old Montauk Highway) to St. Andrews Rd (Fire Station on corner) Then north on St. Andrews approx. 2 miles to Parrish Pond Estates sign – Turn left and follow to #34 Parrish Pond Lane

Broker Cooperation Welcomed (Open Listing).

No warranty or representation, expressed or implied, is made as to the accuracy of the information contained herein, and same is submitted subject to errors, omissions, change of price, or other conditions, withdrawal without notice, and to any special listing conditions, imposed by owner.

Grown in Italy Pressed in Italy Bottled in Italy Loved Worldwide

The #1 Italian in America ™

For information about Italian olive oil and recipes visit www.colavita.com

I’ve reached Crescendo. Have you?

Theater Rooms

THE HEIGHT OF PLEASURE. See it. Hear it. Feel it. It’s the coming together of the best in today’s high-end home technology with the art of great interiors. Premium brands like Runco, B&W, McIntosh, Focal, Krell and Crestron. Designed, programmed and installed by on-staff professionals who outperform the competition every time. Backed by a unique 24/7 client service commitment that will never leave you hanging. Reach Crescendo. Get inspired by the room designs in our 3,300-square-foot, state-of-the-art showroom on Southampton’s Main Street, or call for an in-home consultation.

PHONE

CRE001_10.625x13.5_4C_TheaterRooms.indd 1

631.283.2133

WEBSITE

WWW.CRESCENDODESIGNS.COM

6/25/08 2:20:44 PM

Your new home...

is just across the pond. LUXURY CONDOMINIUMS

VISIT OUR FURNISHED MODEL Brokers Cooperation Invited Single Family and Semi-Attached 3 & 4 bedroom designs with 3.5 baths Full Basements and Garages Maintenance Free Lifestyle with Pool and Clubhouse SOMO (south of Montauk Hwy) Dellaria Avenue, Southampton 

 



www.pondcrossing.com 



For Information Call 516-330-1941





Sales OfďŹ ce Open 11-5pm Take the Sunrise Highway (RT-27/CR39) to Tuckahoe Road Intersection in Southampton (next to StonyBrook Southampton Campus); From East, Turn Left onto Tuckahoe Road at Light; From West, Turn Right onto Tuckahoe Road; Proceed to trafďŹ c light/Montauk Hwy; Turn Right onto Montauk Hwy and take the ďŹ rst left onto Dellaria Avenue

Developed By Kenilworth Equities, LTD. The complete terms are in an Offering Plan available from the Sponsor. File # CD07-0496. All Rights Reserved.

Poxabogue Golf Center BRIDGEHAMPTON • NEW YORK LOCATED ON MONTAUK HIGHWAY 631-537-0025 WWW.POXGOLF.COM

WORLD CLASS PGA/LPGA GOLF INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAM MEET THE PRO’S MIKE MELTON, PGA DIRECTOR OF GOLF FORMERLY OF OLD WESTBURY G.C.

LESLIE ANDREWS, LPGA INSTRUCTOR FORMERLY OF MONTAUK DOWNS

PARKER WEAVER,PGA, FIRST ASSISTANT FORMERLY OF TALLGRASS C.C.

JEN RHEE INSTRUCTOR FORMERLY OF OLDE VINE G.C.

CALLIE AADLAND, LPGA, INSTRUCTOR FORMERLY OF MAIDSTONE G.C.

ROBERT VISHNO, TEACHER POXABOGUE G.C.

REGISTER NOW FOR OUR JUNIOR GOLF SUMMER CAMP PROGRAM AGES 7 THRU 14 YRS. EIGHT 4 DAY SESSIONS FIRST WEEK STARTS JUNE 29 th CALL 631-537-0025 TODAY

REGISTER EARLY AS CLASSES FILL QUICKLY LONG ISLAND’S LARGEST DRIVING RANGE (80 Grass and Hard Surface Stalls)

NINE HOLE EXECUTIVE GOLF COURSE Large Practice Putting Green

FULLY STOCKED GOLF SHOP * Club re-gripping on site * Custom Club fitting

DINE AT OUR FAMOUS FAIRWAY RESTURANT BREAKFAST & LUNCH DAILY OWNED BY THE TOWNS OF SOUTHAMPTON &EAST HAMPTON Linda Kabot, Supervisor/ Southampton William McGinty, Supervisor/ East Hampton OPERATED BY: LONG ISLAND GOLF MANAGEMENT INC. Edward Wankel, President Michael Melton, Director of Golf

Existing Structure

ERIK P. GABRIELSEN 4th Generation in the Building Trades Since 1917

Project In Design - 3000 sq. ft. Addition and Garage - Watermill Project Nearing Completion-Southampton Village Project Nearing Completion-Southampton Village

ERIK P. GABRIELSEN ERIK P. GABRIELSEN 4th Generation in the Building Trades ERIK P. GABRIELSEN 4th Generation in the Building Trades

- Since 1917 4th Generation in the Building Trades

- design by Veronica Blanco ••DESIGN/BUILD DESIGN/BUILD ••NEW NEWHOMES HOMES & & RENOVATION/ADDITIONS RENOVATION/ADDITIONS ••ARCHITECT/DESIGNER ARCHITECT/DESIGNER ON ON STAFF STAFF ••PERMIT PERMIT EXPEDITING EXPEDITING ••BUILD BUILD WITH WITH US... US... CUSTOM CUSTOM DESIGN DESIGN &&STAMPED STAMPED BLUE BLUE PRINTS... PRINTS... NO NO COST COST TO TO YOU YOU ••BUILDING SQ. FT. FT. SQ. BUILDING FROM FROM $250 $250 PER PERFT. SQ. ISLAND BUILDING LLC LLC ISLAND EAST EAST BUILDING

11 Main Street, Southampton, NY 11968 11 11 Main Main Street Street 631-283-0231 Southampton, NY 11968 11968 Southampton, NY 288-0213-Westhampton 631-283-0231 631-283-0231 324-0537-East Hampton hamptonbuild@yahoo.com hamptonbuild@yahoo.com hamptonbuild@yahoo.com

GARDEN

SHOP

·

NURSERY

·

LANDSCAPE

·

DESIGN,

BUILD,

AND

M A I N TA I N

6

Ways to Tell Ahead of Time If You’re Selecting the Right Landscaper. 1. 2.

Will they complete the job within budget? Marders gives you a firm cost, not a +/- 10% or so guesstimate.

Will they complete the job on time? Our crews are on our payroll and are trained by us. They remain on your site until the job is finished.

3.

Do they provide a written guarantee? Marders gives you a 2-year written guarantee which we’ve stood behind for some 30 years.

4.

Will they get all the necessary permits, apply for variances, appear before Town or Village Zoning Boards etc.? Do they know the local regulations? Often violations are discovered after the job is started costing time and money to remedy.

5.

Will you have to settle for a cookie-cutter design? Most landscapers have a limited variety of trees to sell you. The result is cookie-cutter landscaping. About half of our multi-million dollar inventory is big and/or unusual trees and our Buyer works with our national network of Growers.

6.

Do they have a design staff? We have our own design staff and work well with Landscape Architects and Landscape Designers.

Photograph by Douglas Young

one than anjyect. e r o m o st n pro Yet we cotrust to do your you’d

For a World Too Full of Sameness Snake Hollow Road, Bridgehampton · 631.537.3700 · www.marders.com

FILMS ON THE HAYWALL FRIDAY NIGHTS JUNE 27-AUGUST 29

Alfred Hitchcock’s THE BIRDS Federico Fellini’s 8 1/2 Jean-Luc Godard’s BREATHLESS Fred Zinnemann’s HIGH NOON Laurence Olivier’s HAMLET Jacques Tati’s MON ONCLE John Huston’s MALTESE FALCON Francis Ford Coppola’s THE CONVERSATION Orson Welles’ F FOR FAKE Leo McCarey’s DUCK SOUP

At Marders, 120 Snake Hollow Road, Bridgehampton 3 Madison Street, Sag Harbor 631/702.2306 · info@silasmarder.com · www.silasmarder.com

ART GALLERY

SCULPTURE GARDEN

CINEMA

LANDSCAPE AND FURNITURE

Dans_Paper_2 prep.indd

1

6/17/08

2:12:41 PM

Paddle with the Kayak Pros at Peconic Paddler

For expert advice on buying or renting a kayak or canoe speak to Jim Dreeben, the professional paddling pioneer at Peconic Paddler. He is the Kayak Man. Jim is in his store on Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays and other days by appointment (if you can get him out of his kayak). ON: PHO Y T the t ave Mos We h World’s Kayak ble orta f m Co

61/2 yr old Jared in his 26lb Raven Kayak with a 20oz. paddle cean ve O aks a h We Kay ing Surf

“Terry Paddling her Epic Kayak”

O C E A N S U R F K A Y A K S

21o z. G r Pad aphite dles

W E S P E C I A L I Z E

“Jim Doing an Eskimo Rescue” St Pad and-U p dle Now Board Her se

“Jared in his Nordkapp with a 23 oz Paddle”

Peconic Paddler specializes in sea kayaks, fishing kayaks, super-safe SIT-ON-TOP kayaks and the TYPHOON, the world’s most comfortable kayak. Also, canoes for fishing and canoes for cruising. And, for the more serious paddler, for great exercise and excitement - SOLSTICE GTS from Current Designs.

Canoes, Kayaks & Outrigger Canoes BEST BEST OF THE

2006

Hundreds in Stock

Yakima Roof Racks

Open Thursdays through Sundays • 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM 44 years in business

631-369-9500 89 Peconic Avenue Riverhead info@peconicpaddler.com

Kayak Demo Day Saturday, July 12 Test Paddle a Bunch of Kayaks for Free

PECONIC PADDLER

BEST BEST OF THE

2007

Dave Smith

Bob Fritsky

MarineMax Yacht Center 8 Water Street Sag Harbor, NY. Cell: (609) 709-4246 dave.smith@marinemax.com

MarineMax Yacht Center 8 Water Street Sag Harbor, NY. Cell: (954) 347-6769 bob.fritsky@marinemax.com

NORTHEAST DEALER FOR RIVA, FERRETTI, PERSHING AND MOCHI

SISTERSHIP

33’ RIVA SUNRIVA 2005 DEMO

STYLISH, DARK BLUE HULLED CENTER CONSOLE WITH CONCEALED HEAD. TWIN 370 YANMARS’ WITH TWO SPEED TRANSMISSIONS GUARANTEE 35 KNOTS. HIGH STYLE, GREAT DETAILS.

SISTERSHIP

44’ MOCHI CRAFT 2007

BEAUTIFUL ORIENTAL BEIGE HULL, TWIN 575 VOLVOS PROVIDE SOLID 28K CRUISE, SUN ROOF, COMPLETE ELECTRONICS, MIDSHIP MASTER PLUS BOW GUEST STATEROOM BOTH WITH ENSUITE HEADS.

SAG HARBOR BROKERAGE LISTINGS:

50’ PERSHING 2004

TWIN 800 MAN’S, ARNESON SURFACE PIERCING DRIVES. LUXURIOUS 3 STATEROOM, TWO HEAD LAYOUT WITH CHERRY INTERIOR. POWER SUNROOF, 40 KNOT CRUISE. OFFERED AT $ 1,015,000.

FERRETTI 681 2008

35 KNOT TOP FROM THIS THREE CABIN WITH ENSUITE HEAD MOTORYACHT. FULL BEAM MASTER WITH ATTACHED OFFICE AND HUGE PICTURE WINDOWS. $4,200,000.

M a r i n e M a x i s a N e w Yo r k S t o c k E x c h a n g e l i s t e d c o m p a n y. ( N YS E : H Z O )

EXPLORE MORE THAN 2,000 YACHTS AND B OATS AT

WE HAVE A WIDE SELECTION OF YACHTS AVAILABLE FOR DAILY OR WEEKLY CHARTER IN THE NY, CT AND NJ VICINITY INCLUDING A 52’ RIVA RIVALE, A 59’ RIVA MERCURIUS AND A 62’ NEPTUNUS. CALL FOR DETAILS. DAILY RATES FROM $2,500 INCLUDING CAPTAIN PLUS FUEL AND FOOD.

MAR I N E MAX.C O M

TRI-STATE YACHT CHARTERS:

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 4 www.danshamptons.com

O PEN HOUS ES THIS WE E K E ND Saturday, July 5 th & Sunday, July 6 t h AMAGANSETT

6XQǧDPSP $EUDKDPÇ V/DQGLQJ5Gǧ English Country 5BR, 5,300 sq. ft. home close to ocean and bay beaches. Attention to detail - top of the line. Gunite pool, lush landscaping. CoExcl. Dir: Rt. 27 East - left on Abrahams Landing Rd. F#62599 | Web#H15940. (DVW +DPSWRQ 2IČŠFH  6DWǧSP &OLII5Gǧ This 3BR, 2BA contemporary is tucked up against a 2.5 acre private dune reserve. Completely renovated with the elegant styling of the published designer/owner, this light ďŹ lled property exudes happiness and success. Top-of-the-line appliances and ďŹ xtures add a sense of sophistication to this home. F#66499 | Web#H10379. $PDJDQVHWW 2IČŠFH  6DWǧSP &UDQEHUU\+ROHǧ Enjoy views of bay and your own path to private bay beach from this 3BR, 2.5BA home on a shy acre with pool and a/c. Move-in condition with formal dining room, 2 living rooms, lots of decking, roof deck for 3600 views. F#250994 | Web#H13604. $PDJDQVHWW 2IČŠFH 

BRIDGEHAMPTON

6XQǧDPSP )DLU+LOOV/DQHǧ Savor the uniqueness of this new 5BR, 6.5BA hilltop traditional. Features include den, great room, 3 ďŹ replaces, family room, chef’s kitchen w/ dumb waiter, formal dining room. Gunite pool and screened in porch. Excl. F#52475 | Web#H0152475 Dir: From Rt. 27 East in Bridgehampton, left onto Butter Lane, right onto Scuttle Hole Road, left onto Brick Kiln Rd., right onto Fair Hills Lane. %ULGJHKDPSWRQ 2IČŠFH  6XQǧDPSP  6KDG\3DWKǧ Bridgehampton New, traditional-style home in tree-ďŹ lled Bridgehampton location. Set on a landscaped acre at the end of a cul-desac, 7,000sf, 5BR, 6BA, professional kitchen, great room, ďŹ replaces, LR, FDR, 2-car garage, gunite pool, expert ďŹ nishes. Excl. F#57821 | Web#H0157821 Dir: From Rt. 27 in Bridgehampton, take Butter Lane north, right onto Scuttle Hole Rd., left onto Brick Kiln Rd. right onto Fair Hills Ct., left onto Shady Path. %ULGJHKDPSWRQ 2IČŠFH 

6DWǧDPSP /XPEHU/DQHǧ Beautiful renovated village home with 2 bedroom guest cottage, gunite pool, lush landscaping. Total renovation to upgraded amenities and modern conveniences. Close to Village and not far from ocean beaches. Excl. F#63284 | Web#H54724. Dir: Montauk Highway East, left at monument onto Bridgehampton Sag Harbor Turnpike, veer left onto Lumber Lane. /RUL%DUEDULD %ULGJHKDPSWRQ 2IȩFH 

EASTHAMPTON

6DWǧSP %XOO3DWKǧ Prime 2.12 acre site on Bull Path nestled in the near Northwest area. Well-built architects designed 6,068 sq. ft. home and handsome pool and lawn area with all the bells and whistles. This eye pleasing traditional with 5-6BR and 7.5BA is completely Energy Star compliant home with prof. kit., den, LR, great room, gym, 2.5-car gar. and optional screening room. F#55333 (DVW +DPSWRQ 2IȩFH 

6DW 6XQǧSP  :KLWH 3LQH 5RDG ǧ  Life is enriched in this 6BR, 6BA traditional-style ideally set on 1.9 acres and featuring hardwood oors, 2-car garage. 2 ďŹ replaces, exercise room and pool. Excl. F#60902 | Web#H51786. Dir: Montauk Hwy East, left on Stephen Hand’s Path, left at fork onto Old NW Rd, about 2 miles to White Pine Rd. %ULGJHKDPSWRQ 2IČŠFH  6XQǧSP 6SULQJV)LUHSODFH5Gǧ DesignerĂ­s own compound located within a quick drive to the ocean and bay beaches. This spectacular residence has it all, with 6BR, 4BA (including one with steam shower), 2 sitting rooms with ďŹ replaces, professional kitchen and gym. Excl. F#53739 | Web#H0153739. (DVW+DPSWRQ2IČŠFH 6DWǧSP +HGJH5RZ/DQHǧ Spacious 5+ bedroom, modern is a minute to heart of Village and beaches. Open living and dining w/ďŹ replace, 2nd story master suite, whirlpool bath, newly added wing with music room, media playroom, ofďŹ ce, bedrm and bath. Pool, sundeck, lush private garden. Excl. F#64932 | Web#H26034. Dir: Osborne Lane in East Hampton Village, right onto Cedar Street, left onto Hedge Row Lane #11. %ULGJHKDPSWRQ 2IČŠFH  6XQǧSP 1RUIRON'Uǧ This newly-built Mediterranean-inspired luxury vacation home of almost 4,000 square feet in one of East Hampton’s most popular waterfront communities is truly one of a kind. Four bedrooms and ďŹ ve baths a professional kitchen with granite countertops, radiant heat oors, 3 ďŹ replaces. Excl. F#62692 | Web#H53705 (DVW+DPSWRQ2IČŠFH

)UL 6DWǧDPSP +XQWWLQJ$YHǧ In the heart of East Hampton Village, pristinely landscaped on 1.7 acres, 4BRs, 2.5BAs plus an addition 500sq. ft of ofďŹ ce space with bath, heated pool. Dir: Newtown Ln to Osborne Ln, right on Huntting Ave. driveway around the corner on the right. Excl. F#62793 | Web#H55652 (DVW +DPSWRQ 2IČŠFH  6DWǧSP 0RQWDXN$YHǧ 4BRs, 3BA, plus a den/5th BR. Huge dining area, large deck and a heated pool. A wonderful traditional for all seasons with hight ceilings and bright, lite rooms. Dir: North on hands creek road to montauk ave. Right on Montauk Ave to # 9 on the left. Excl. F#51122 | Web#H0151122 (DVW +DPSWRQ 2IČŠFH  6XQǧDPSP +DUERU%OYGǧ This elegant 4BR traditional features ďŹ ne craftsmanshipthroughoutits3,200sq.ft.ofliving space. The interior offers a living room, formal dining room, an excellent kitchen and 2.5B. Additional amenities include CAC, full basement and a garage. F#58346 | Web#H0158346. $PDJDQVHWW 2IČŠFH  6XQǧSP &HGDU'Uǧ Newly built post modern with 4BR, 3BA on a quiet street close to bay and marina. Open kitchen, granite countertops and stainless steel appliances. 1st oor with laundry room, bedroom and bath. Master bedroom with walkin closet. CAC, ďŹ replace and hardwood oors throughout. Excl. F#65923 | Web#H40000 (DVW+DPSWRQ2IČŠFH 6XQǧDPSP  'HOHYDQ 6W ǧ  Beautiful, newly constructed 2-story farmhouse, situated on a lovely .46-acre property with room for a pool. Features include a large covered porch, living room, formal DR, kitchen, 4BR, 3BA, ďŹ replace, and CAC. F#53045 | Web#H0153045. $PDJDQVHWW 2IČŠFH  6XQǧDPSP  'HOHYDQ 6W ǧ  This adorable 3BR house provides a bright and immaculate living space, including a family room, kitchen with dining area, and 2 baths. Situated on a landscaped .25-acre property with room for a pool. Located in a quiet area, minutes to both the village and the bay. F#53050 | Web#H0153050 $PDJDQVHWW 2IČŠFH 

EASTQUOGUE

HAMPTONBAYS

6DWǧDPSP  2OG 7RZQ &URVVLQJ ǧ  Classic village home, minutes to ocean and shopping, 4BR, 2.5B, LR, DR, 2 fpls, den overlooking deck, privately landscaped lot, bsmnt and gar. Room for pool. Excl. Dir: Main St., left on Meeting House, right on Little Plains, left on Old Town Crossing. F#63883 | Web#H55772 6RXWKDPSWRQ2IȩFH

6XQǧDPSP 2FHDQYLHZ5Gǧ 3-level custom built home on private ag lot with deeded “Sunrise Terraceâ€? access for swimming/ boating on Shinnecock Bay. Open living area with gourmet chef’s kit., fpl, cathedral ceilings all on top oor with views overlooking Shinnecock Bay and the Ocean. F#64930 | Web#H49469 :HVWKDPSWRQ%HDFK2IČŠFH

6DW 6XQǧSP 6KLQQHFRFN+LOOV5Gǧ Pristine with open oor plan, 3BRs, 2BAs, fpl, granite kit., ďŹ n. bsmnt and gar. Pool, hot tub, pvt. and groomed landscaping. Exclusive. Dir: Cr.39, south on GreenďŹ eld Rd., rt on Shinnecock Hills Rd. F#66649 | Web#H14649. 6RXWKDPSWRQ2IČŠFH

6XQǧSP :DVKLQJWRQ'Uǧ Dock your boat at this newly renovated bayfront home, situated on a deep water lagoon in a private bayfront community. Enjoy entertaining on the spacious mahogany deck with endless waterviews from every vista. This fabulous 5BR, 3B home offers every amenity you can imagine. F#47776 | Web#H0147776 :HVWKDPSWRQ%HDFK2IȩFH

WATERMILL

6DWǧSP .LQJ6Wǧ This 3BR, 1BA cottage offers old world charm. Sip lemonade on the front porch or relax in the spacious backyard. This home is centrally located between the beaches and town. A fabulous 2.5 car garage with a loft is a dream for anyone who enjoys a workshop or hobbies. Excl. F#65833 | Web#H37851. Dir: Ponquogue Avenue Or Springville Road south to King Street, proceed to #19 +DPSWRQ%D\V2IȩFH

SAGAPONACK

6DWǧDPSP  6DJJ 5RDG ǧ  New estate style home with water view vistas, 6 plus bedrooms, gourmet kitchen, ďŹ nished basement, 3-car garage, gunite pool with waterfall and pool house. Excl. F#58952 | Web#H0158952. Dir: Montauk Highway East, north at trafďŹ c light in Sagaponack. %ULGJHKDPSWRQ 2IČŠFH 

SOUTHAMPTON

6XQǧSP  0DOOR\ 'U ǧ  Newly constructed showcase home consisting of 5,200 sq.ft. of living space, 6BR, 4.5BA, opulent master bath, custom kitchen and 3-car garage. This home offers appointments not seen at this price. F#62711 | Web#H55888 :HVWKDPSWRQ%HDFK2IȩFH

6DWǧDPSP  3DUULVK 3RQG &RXUW ǧ  Savor life in this brand-new 5BR, 4.5BA traditional. Spacious great room, secluded den, library, family room, formal dining room. 3 ďŹ replaces heated gunite pool, 3-car garage. 6,000 sq.ft. of living space on 1.4 acres. Classic hospitality. Excl. F#62298 | Web#H35715. Dir: From Rt. 27 eastbound, right on Tuckahoe Rd., left on Parrish Pond Court. %ULGJHKDPSWRQ 2IČŠFH 

SHINNECOCK HILLS

6DWǧSP  0HFR[ 5RDG ǧ  2-story traditional style home under construction. Expert details, ďŹ nish, & amenities. 5BR, 5BA, 2 half baths. 2 kit. areas: Inside: w/fpl, adjacent screened-in porch and stone patio. Gunite pool. Bordered by reserve. Excl. F#57953 | Web#H0157953 Dir: East on Rte 27, see the Milk Pail on the left, make a right onto Mecox Rd. %ULGJHKDPSWRQ 2IČŠFH  6DWǧSP  0LOO )DUP /DQH ǧ  Gambrel-style home featuring 5BR, 4.5BA. Vaulted ceilings, double-height windows, great room, professional-grade kit., family room, 3 fpls, patios & htd gunite pool. Excl. F#60420 | Web#H35711. From Rt. 27 In Southampton, left on David White’s Ln, bear right on 7 Ponds Rd, right on Upper 7 Ponds Rd, right on Mill Farm Ln. %ULGJHKDPSWRQ 2IČŠFH  6DW 6XQǧDPSP  1DURG %RXOHYDUG ǧ  Renovated traditional-style home in top waterfront community with 5BR, 4B, 3 ďŹ replaces, modernized kitchen, light-ooded FDR, sitting & living rooms. Landscaping, gunite pool. Excl. F#62539 | Web#H53472. Dir: 27 East to Montauk Hwy, right on Mecox, right on Narod Blvd. %ULGJHKDPSWRQ 2IČŠFH 

WESTHAMPTONBEACH

6DWǧSP 0HDGRZ:D\ǧ Endless views of nature is this immaculate, contemporary beach house immersed in acres of preserved wildlife in the Estate Section. Gourmet kit. and open living area has vaulted ceilings, a fpl and walls of glass overlooking the heated gunite pool with views of preserve. Newly updated 4BR, 3BA. Secluded, private, yet perfect for gracious entertaining and ultimate relaxation. Including furniture-turn key and ready to enjoy! F#61646 | Web#H52668. :HVWKDPSWRQ%HDFK2IȩFH

F O R B E AfU T I F U L I N V E S T M E N T S P R U D E N T I A L E L L I M A N  C O M 1144773

LONG ISLAND

M A N H AT TA N

B R O O K LY N

QUEENS

THE HAMPTONS

NORTH FORK

Š2006. An independently owned and operated member of Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc. is a service mark of Prudential Insurance Company of America. Equal Housing Opportunity. All material presented herein is intended for information purposes only. While, this information is believed to be correct, it is represented subject to errors, omissions, changes or withdrawal without notice. All property outlines and square footage in property listings are approximate.

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 24 www.danshamptons.com

INTERIOR WINDOW TREATMENTS We Do It All!

• VERTICALS • DRAPERIES • SHADES • WOOD BLINDS • WOOD SHADES • SKYLIGHTS • LUMINETTES • SILHOUETTES • THE ULTIMATE WINDOW TREATMENTS FROM 2” TO 4” LOUVERS • EXPERT INSTALLATION

WE WILL BEAT ALL WRITTEN ESTIMATES!

We bring the showrrom to you for accuate color coordinating and measurements

FROM MANHATTAN TO MONTAUK FEsRtimEateEs

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WE SPECIALIZE IN MOTORIZED WINDOW TREATMENTS!

631-324-8299 1-800-646-4755

Specializing in ALL Window Fashions

537-3330 • Display Sales Fax 631-537-6374 • Our Classified office is now at 51 Hill Street, Southampton, NY, 11968 • Classified Phone 631-283-1000 • Classified Fax 631-283-2896 • www.danshamptons.com •

East End Tick & Mosquito Control

Southold

287- 9700 324- 9700 765- 9700

www.tickcontrol.com

1044982

Bo t

East Hampton

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MAIN STREET Dr. Robert Ruggiero OPTICS BEST BEST 2007 OF THE

Contents 57

Plots Foiled 15 Plots to Do In the Billboard Discovered by County Police

61

Hippity Hop Not The Gin Lane Bunny Who Thought Too Much Late That Night

61

New Order at Dan’s: It’s All Here, Plus More

63

Hauled Off Public Gotchas with Handcuffs During the Last Half-Century

63

Wall-to-Wall Mattresses and Thirty People

65

ArtHampton Will Barnet Celebrated, Andy Warhol Auctioned

65

Cowardly Threats Against Couple

67

Queen of Chic Jackie Rogers: Chanel Model, Fellini Actress, Designer

69

10 Years at WHBPAC State-of-the-Art Space Embraced by Community, Class Acts

69

Reading In the Hamptons at Starbucks? Not.

71

Who’s Here: Barbara Walters, journalist

72

East Hampton Gets Bond Break, Signatures Mount Against McGintee

78

On the Edge: Concierges Who Do Anything (Almost...)

81

At Shelter Island Lounge, it’s Your Pleasure

84

The Hampton Subway Newsletter

87

Hampton Tradition XLIV — LVIS

94

Taiwan: A Place to Rest, Invest

115

Go Green, Live Large with David Bach

116

Southampton Trustees: Who Are These People?

119

Fourfold Increase in Traffic Congestion

122 151 164 170 171

Review: Les Liaisons Dangereuses Through the Grapevine Pet Agree Take a Hike Classic Cars

i ca l S o l u t i

on

an

Dan's Papers was founded in 1960 by Dan Rattiner and is the first free resort newspaper in America. VOLUME XLVII NUMBER 15 July 4, 2008

1142439

UP TO 60% OFF

Exams • Contacts • Emergency Service Most Extensive Selection Including Cartier • Chrome Hearts • Oliver Peoples

82 Main St. Southampton 631•287•7898 1141944

Special Supplement: Wine Guide pg. 151

Seeking customized investment solutions for your portfolio? Investors can now have their own separately managed account managed by an experienced investment manager available through Morgan Stanley. A separately managed account provides: > A portfolio tailored to your needs and goals > Professional investment management > Tax harvesting opportunities

Go Fish 10 Minute Golf Y Factor Inspirations Fashionista

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To discover the value of a professionally managed account available through Morgan Stanley, please contact:

THE MOST COMPLETE COMING EVENTS GUIDE IN THE HAMPTONS This week’s coming events are in the following sections:

Scott L. Capone Vice President Financial Advisor

Art Events – pg. 131 Benefits – pg. 188 Day by Day – pg. 188 Kids’ Events – pg. 166 Movies – pg. 98 Nightlife – pg. 150 Take 5 – pg. 123

285 East Main Street, Suite 100-103 Smithtown, New York 11797

WEEKLY FEATURES

631-360-5022 scott.capone@morganstanley.com

1145765

Visit morganstanley.com/individual.

Morgan Stanley & Co. Incorporated offers investment consulting and other services through a variety of investment consulting programs, which are opened pursuant to written client agreements. Each program offers investment options and features that are not necessarily available in the others. For further information please refer to the applicable Morgan Stanley & Co. Incorporated Disclosure Document, available from your Morgan Stanley Financial Advisor. It is your responsibility to choose the program, and the investment managers within that program, and to weigh any investment decision carefully.

172 173 178 180 185

Art Commentary Classified Daily Specials Dan’s North Fork Earthly Delights Err, A Parent Flick Picks

130 225 146 194 160 167 124

Gordin’s View Green Monkeys Hampton Jitney Honoring the Artist Letters To Dan Mini Movies Police Blotter

99 86 38 130 203 125 203

Service Directory Sheltered Islander Shop Til Silvia Lehrer Cooks South O’ The Highway Twentysomething Whispers

204 193 187 143 58 97 77

This issue is dedicated to Christie Brinkley.

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 25 www.danshamptons.com

1146354

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 26 www.danshamptons.com

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DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 27 www.danshamptons.com

SLEEPY’S ® CELEBRATING OUR 50TH ANNIVERSARY

MORE FINANCING CHOICES THAN ANYONE

SALE

4TH OF JULY MATTRESS

NO Deposit NO Payment NO Interest 24 Months Up To

Heldover FINAL DAYS! Special Holiday Hours: July 4th 9-7, Sat. 10-9, Sun. 11-7 Sale ends 7/6/08

24 mos with any Tempur-pedic, Comforpedic, Stearns & Foster, or BodyDiagnostics purchase. 18 mos with min. $799 purchase. 12 mos with min. purchase of $199. Under the promotion, no monthly payments are required on the promotional purchase and no finance charges will be assessed on the promo purchase as long as you pay the promo purchase amount in full within 24/18/12 Months (the "promo period"), and (2) you pay, when due, the minimum monthly payments on any other balances on your account. *See below for additional information.

Up To

59* Queen

Per month

2PC. SET

REG.

reg. 699 $

99

sale 349 $

99

sale

18

reg. $89999 sale$44999

MONTHLY PAYMENTS*

Per month

REG.

sale

24

MONTHLY PAYMENTS*

24

29

99**Queen $ 2PC. reg. $79999 sale$59976 SET 24

Per month

REG.

sale

Twin 2 pc. set . . . . . .$ 59999 $39999 46 Twin 2 pc. set . . . . . . $69999 $34999 $1459 Full 2 pc. set . . . . . .$ 69999 $49999 11 $ 54 13 Full 2 pc. set . . . . . . $79999 $39999 $1667 King 3 pc. set . . . . . .$104999 $79999 $

BEAUTYREST PILLOWTOP

ROYAL POSTURE

KING KOIL FIRM

75** Queen $ 2PC. SET

24

Twin 2 pc. set . . . . .$54999 $27499 Full 2 pc. set . . . . .$64999 $32496

*Subject to credit approval by GE Money Bank. Tax and Delivery Fee not included in monthly payments. Applies to purchases made on Sleepy’s consumer credit card account. No finance charges will be assessed on promotional purchase amt. until final billing statement. No finance charges will accrue on promotional purchase amt. if you pay this amt. in full by due date as shown on final billing statement. If not, finance charges will accrue on promotional purchase amt. from purchase date. If payment is not paid when due, all special promotional terms may be terminated. Variable APR is 22.48% as of 9/18/07. Fixed APR of 28.49% applies if the minimum payment is not made by the payment due date two times in any six consecutive billing periods. Minimum finance charge is $1.50. Standard account terms apply to non-promotional purchases. Existing cardholders should see their credit card agreement for standard terms. Optional credit insurance/debt cancellation charges on your promo purchase are not deferred and are not subject to the promo terms. Previous purchases do not apply.

 Cape  Shore  Mountains  Islands

14

$

$

Fixed minimum monthly payments equal (1/48th) (1/36th) (1/24th) of purchase amount are required during promo period in addition to any other required minimum payment. 48 mos avail. with any Tempurpedic, Comforpedic, Stearns & Foster, or BodyDiagnostics purchase. 36 mos. avail. with min. purchase of $799. 24 mos avail. with min. purchase of $199. *See below for additional information.

We Deliver Everywhere!

1/2 PRICE SIMMONS PILLOWTOP

MONTHLY PAYMENTS*

17**Queen 2PC.

Per month

reg. $89999 sale$69999 SET 24

sale

REG.

1667 Twin 2 pc. set . . . . .$ 69999 $49999 $2084 2084 Full 2 pc. set . . . . .$ 79999 $ 59976 $2499 $ 3334 King 3 pc. set . . . . .$109999 $89976 $3749 $ $

POSTUREPEDIC ULTRA FIRM PERFECT SLEEPER 800 COILS

BODY ESSENTIALS

22

SET

Per month

REG.

reg. $129999 sale$79999 36

sale

Twin 2 pc. set . . . . . . 999 699 Full 2 pc. set . . . . . .$119999 $ 74999 King 3 pc. set . . . . . .$179999 $119999 $

99 $

99

MONTHLY PAYMENTS*

19 $ 2084 $ 3334 $

45

24

$

99**Queen 2PC. SET

reg. $124999 sale$89964 36

30

$

56*Queen

$ 99 2PC. reg. $149999 sale 1099 SET

sale MONTHLY Per month REG. PAYMENTS* $ 99 $ Twin 2 pc. set . . . . . . 899 64999 $1806 Twin 2 pc. set . . . . . .$129999 Full 2 pc. set . . . . . .$114999 $ 79999 $2223 Full 2 pc. set . . . . . .$139999 King 3 pc. set . . . . . .$169999 $129999 $3611 King 3 pc. set . . . . . .$199999 Per month

REG.

36

36

$

11** Queen 2PC. SET

sale MONTHLY Per month REG. PAYMENTS* $ 79999 $2223 Twin 2 pc. set . . . . . .$119999 $ 99999 $2778 Full 2 pc. set . . . . . .$149999 $ 159999 $4445 King 3 pc. set . . . . . .$229999

PERFECT SLEEPER®

BEAUTYREST ®

16

$

POSTUREPEDIC®

67 PER MONTH*

REG. $49999 SALE $39999

QUEEN 2 PIECE SET

TM

23**Queen 2PC.

On Exceptional Values

MONTHLY PAYMENTS*

Body Diagnostics

$

SAVE $ 100

SUPER PREMIUM

reg. $169999 sale$129999 36

sale MONTHLY PAYMENTS* 89964 $2499 $ 109999 $3056 $ 179964 $4999 $

REG.

sale

Twin 2 pc. set . . .$ 39999 $ 29976 Full 2 pc. set . .$ 47999 $ 379 99 King 3 pc. set . .$ 69999 $ 599 76

24 MONTHLY PAYMENTS*

1249 1584 $ 2499 $ $

All models available for purchase and may not be on display. Sleepy’s reserves the right to limit quantities to 1 set per customer. Photos are for illustration purposes only. Not responsible for typographical errors.

SLEEPY’S

EAST SUFFOLK SHOWROOMS

The Mattress Professionals ®

EAST HAMPTON 65 Montauk Hwy Rt 27 (Just E. of East Hampton Bowl) 631-329-0786 SOUTHAMPTON 58-60 Hampton Road (Near Aboff’s) 631-204-9371 SOUTHAMPTON 850 North Hwy (Opp. True Value Hardware) 631-283-2470 HAMPTON BAYS 30 Montauk Hwy (Hampton Bays Town Ctr) 631-723-1404 BRIDGEHAMPTON 2099 Montauk Hwy (Opp Bridgehampton Commons) 631-537-8147 RIVERHEAD 1440 Old Country Rd (Waldbaums Shop Ctr) 631-369-4297 RIVERHEAD 1180 Old Country Rd (Near Target Center) 631-727-7058 RIVERHEAD OUTLET 1199 Rt 58 (Cnr of Harrison Ave Opp Taco Bell) 631-727-6250  MANHATTAN SHOWROOMS

CANAL STREET 277 Canal St. & Broadway (2nd Floor) CHELSEA 777 6th Avenue (Ave. of the Americas - Btw. 26th & 27th)

For more information

®

CHELSEA 600 6th Avenue (Near Old Navy/Bed, Bath & Beyond) CHELSEA 92 7th Ave., Between 15th and 16th St.( Opp. Jenson Lewis) CHELSEA 49 West 23rd St. (Next to PC Richard’s) CHELSEA 22 West 14th St. (Next to Dee & Dee) EAST SIDE 157 East 57th Street (Bet 3rd Ave & Lexington) EAST SIDE 969 Third Avenue (at 57th Street)  EAST SIDE Platinum Plus 962 Third Ave. & 58th St. (Bet 57th & 58th) FIFTH AVENUE 425 Fifth Ave & 38th St. (Opposite Lord & Taylor) FIRST AVENUE 1115 First Ave (Opp. Bed, Bath & Beyond) GRAMERCY PARK 201 E. 23rd St, 2nd Fl. (nr. Zeller Tuxedo) HARLEM 169 E. 125th Street (Between 3rd & Lexington, Opposite Pathmark) HARLEM 2150 Third Ave. (Between 117th & 118th St) HERALD SQUARE 36 W. 34th St (Between 5th & 6th) LEXINGTON AVE Platinum Plus 810 Lexington Ave. (Btw. 62nd & 63rd) LINCOLN TUNNEL AREA 475 9th Avenue (Next to H&R Block) LOWER EAST SIDE 250 East Houston St. (Btwn Ave A & B)

CALL 1(800)SLEEPYS (753-3797) ®

Showroom Hours: Monday thru Saturday 10am to 9pm, Sunday 11am to 7pm



Next Day Delivery When You Want It!

Choose Your 4-Hour Time Window Same Day Delivery arranged. Excluding holidays and store pick-ups. Delivery to NY, Westchester, NJ, MA, CT, RI, NH, VT, VA, MD, PA & DE. Road conditions permitting. Available on in-stock models. Delivery Fees Apply.

LOWER EAST SIDE 138 Delancey St. (Near Dunkin Donuts) MANHATTANVILLE 166 W. 125th St. (Opposite Powell Offices) MURRAY HILL 192 Lexington Ave. (Formerly Ethan Allen) PARK AVE SOUTH 440 Park Ave South (Btwn 29th & 30th Streets) SOHO 176 Avenue of the Americas (Corner of Spring Street) TRIBECA 140 Church St. (Between Warren & Chambers) Grand Opening UNION SQUARE 874 Broadway at East 18th St. (Near ABC Carpet) UPPER EAST SIDE 336 East 86th St. (Next to Gristede’s) UPPER EAST SIDE 337 East 86th St. (Between 1st/2nd, Opp. Gristede’s)  UPPER WEST SIDE 2080 Broadway & 72nd St (2nd Fl.) Enter on Broadway UPPER WEST SIDE 2330 Broadway (Between 84th & 85th St./2nd Floor) UPPER WEST SIDE 2804 Broadway (1 block North of Gristedes) UPPER WEST SIDE 120 W. 72nd St (Btwn Columbus & Amsterdam) UPPER WEST SIDE 747 Columbus Ave. (Next to Rite Aid) UPTOWN 2581 Broadway 2nd Floor (Between 97th & 98th Streets) WASHINGTON HEIGHTS 611-615 W. 181st St. (Near Chase Bank)

www.sleepys.com

Clearance Merchandise Available ©2008 SINT, LLC.

Owned & Operated by the Acker Family for 4 Generations - Louis 1925, Harry 1950, David 1975, AJ 1980, Stuart 1995, Rick 2000 & Julian 2005

NEARLY 700 LOCATIONS

1142883

0% Interest 48 Months No Money Down Equal Monthly Payments

1/2 PRICE SERTA PILLOWTOP

1145738

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 28 www.danshamptons.com

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 29 www.danshamptons.com

LIFE, LIBERTY & THE PURSUIT OF HAPPINESS

5HDG\WREX\RUUHÀQDQFH" /HWXVKHOS\RXH[HUFLVH\RXUULJKWV ZLWKDORZUDWHPRUWJDJH

Named Top Mortgage Originator for 12 Years in a Row

Let us bring you home.

#1 Mortgage Originator in the Nation (2007) www.ManhattanMortgage.com • Manhattan (212) 593-4343 • Bridgehampton (631) 537-7765 • Brooklyn (718) 596-6425 • Croton-on-Hudson (914) 271-3540 • East Hampton (631) 324-1555 • Harrison (914) 686-7787 • Jericho (516) 937-5555 • North Carolina (704) 660-0029 • Palm Beach (561) 832-4380 • Rye (914) 967-0094 • Southampton (631) 283-6660 • Upper Montclair (973) 744-3149 • Vermont (802) 875-2288 • Westhampton (631) 288-4555 • Westport (203) 227-5230 REGISTERED MORTGAGE BROKER - NYS BANKING DEPARTMENT/ALL LOANS ARRANGED THROUGH 3RD PARTY LENDERS · LICENSED MORTGAGE LENDER/BROKER - CT DEPARTMENT OF BANKING · LICENSED MORTGAGE LENDER – NJ DEPARTMENT OF BANKING AND INSURANCE/ALL LOANS ARRANGED THROUGH 3RD PARTY PROVIDERS · LICENSED MORTGAGE BROKER MB 2274 – MA DEPARTMENT OF BANKING/WE ARRANGE BUT DO NOT MAKE LOANS · LICENSED MORTGAGE BROKER – VT DEPARTMENT OF BANKING · CORRESPONDENT MORTGAGE LENDER - FL DEPARTMENT OF FINANCIAL SERVICES · LICENSED MORTGAGE BROKER AS TMMC MORTGAGES UNDER CA FINANCE LENDERS LAW · LICENSED MORTGAGE BROKER AS TMMC MORTGAGES – NH BANKING DEPARTMENT · LICENSED MORTGAGE BROKER – NC COMMISSIONER OF BANKS · RESIDENTIAL MORTGAGE LICENSEE – IL DEPARTMENT OF FINANCIAL AND PROFESSIONAL REGULATION DIVISION OF BANKING 1142876

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 30 www.danshamptons.com

PLAZA FLOWERS AND MECOX GARDENS ARE PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE

PLAZA FLOWERS AT MECOX GARDENS S O U T H A M P T O N

FOR SUMMER 2008

631.283.6452 257 County Road 39A

1141979

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 31 www.danshamptons.com

Celebrating Our

11

th

Sag Harbor

YEAR

TR PLE CROWN WINNER

Best WaterFront Restaurant • Best Lobster Dinner • Best Seafood Restaurant

As We Start our Second Decade Open 7 Days a Week • Happy Fourth of July

Delicious Food • Fabulous Drinks • Sinful Desserts

Lunch Served ~ Monday through Saturday Dinner Served ~ Monday through Sunday Brunch Served ~ Sundays

Special Events

Catering

Weddings

Sag Harbor

(631) 725-5858 www.bsmith.com

1143218

Long Wharf at Bay St. Sag Harbor, NY

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 32 www.danshamptons.com

Publisher: Kathy Rae Director of Advertising: Richard A. Swift Founder and Executive Editor: Dan Rattiner Managing Editor: Susan M. Galardi Assistant to the Publisher Ellen Dioguardi Faculty Advisor Elaine K.G. Benson Display & Web Sales Executives Annemarie Davin, Catherine Ellams, Karen Fitzpatrick, Jean Lynch, Tom W. Ratcliffe III, Jim Smith Classified Advertising Manager Lori Berger Classified & Web Sales Executives Kathy Camarata, Steve Daniel,Sam Pierce, Joyce Pisarra, Christina Poulos, Patti Kraft, Richard Scalera Graphic Designer/Classified Web Coordinator Frank Coppola Features Editor Tricia Rayburn Associate Editor Victoria L. Cooper Web/North Fork Editor David Lion Rattiner Assistant Editor Tiffany Razzano Shopping Editor Maria Tennariello Wine Guide Editor Susan Whitney Simm Production Director Nicole Caruso Art Director Kelly Merritt Production Assistant Genevieve Salamone Graphic Designers Joel Rodney, Derek Wells, Gustavo A. Gomez Business Manager Susan Weber Distribution Manager Thomas Swinimer Web Specialist Matt Cross Webmaster Leif Neubauer Proofreader Bob Ankerson Contributing Writers And Editors Janet Berg, Roy Bradbrook, Alan Braveman, Lance Brilliantine, Patrick Christiano, TJ Clemente, Rich Firstenberg, Guy-Jean de Fraumeni, Renée Donlon, Sally Flynn, Bob Gelber, Barry Gordin, D. Guest, Annette Gunnels Garkowski, Steve Haweeli, Ken Kindler, Amanda Kludt, Ed Koch, Silvia Lehrer, Christian McLean, Betty Paraskevas, Jan Silver, David Stoll, Maria Tennariello, Debbie Tuma, Marion Wolberg Weiss, Emily J Weitz, Joan Zandell Contributing Artists And Photographers David Charney, Kimberly Goff, Barry Gordin, Christian McLean, Katlean de Monchy, Richard Lewin, Michael Paraskevas, Ginger Propper, Tom W. Ratcliffe III, Lisa Tamburini Dan’s Advisory Board Theodore Kheel, Chairman, Richard Adler Ken Auletta, Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel Avery Corman, Frazer Dougherty, Dallas Ernst Audrey Flack, Billy Joel, Roy Scheider John Roland, Mort Zuckerman ROLEX

OYSTER PERPETUAL AND YACHT- MASTER ARE TRADEMARKS.

1141696

© 2008, Brown Publishing Use by permission only. President & CEO: Roy Brown

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 33 www.danshamptons.com

HAMPTON BAYS

HOURS: Monday - Thursday 9 a.m. - 7:30 p.m. • Friday & Saturday 9 a.m. - 8:30 p.m. • Sunday 12 noon - 6 p.m.

DELIVERY AVAILABLE

SOME EXAMPLES OF OUR LOW PRICES

WINE & SPIRITS Barefoot Wines Bella Sera Pinot Grigio Bistro Wine Pinot Noir Banfi Brunello di Montalcino Antinori Tignallo Cavit Pinot Grigio Concha y Toro (all varieties) Domaines Ott Rose Hess Chardonnay Kendall Jackson Chardonnay Naia Verdejo Ruffino Chianti Santa Margherita Pinot Grigio Simi Chardonnay Woodbridge (all varieties) Yellowtail (all varieties) Veuve Cliquot Champagne Freixenet Cristalino Korbel Brut J. Roget Champagne Jolanda Proseco Fleur de Mer Rose Bacardi Rum Johnnie Walker Red Scotch Jack Daniel's Whiskey Milagro Silver Tequilla Jose Cuervo Tequilla Jose Cuervo Tropina Tequilla Smirnoff or Svedka Vodka Skky Vodka Long Island Vodka Long Island Vodka

magnum magnum 750 ml 750 ml 750 ml magnum magnum 750 ml 750 ml 750 ml 750 ml magnum 750 ml 750 ml magnum magnum 750 ml 750 ml 750 ml 750 ml 750 Ml 750 Ml 750 ml magnum magnum magnum 750 ml liter magnum magnum magnum liter 750 ml

6 @ 8.49 ea 2 @ 10.00 ea 7.99 59.99 99.99 10.99 7.99 31.99 11.99 3 @ 11.99 ea 13.99 13.99 19.99 14.99 10.99 3 @ 9.99 ea 36.99 8.99 7.99 11.99 3 for 9.99 10.99 12 @ 9 ea 22.99 34.99 40.99 20.99 19.99 14.99 20.99 22.99 37.99 30.99

Hampton Bays Town Center 46 East Montauk Highway

1142085

728-8595

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 34 www.danshamptons.com

A WRITER’S SUMMER STONY BROOK SOUTHAMPTON WRITERS CONFERENCES 2008 Impressive Speakers. Important Topics. Inspiring Events.

SOUTHAMPTON CHILDREN’S LITERATURE CONFERENCE

SOUTHAMPTON SCREENWRITING CONFERENCE

SOUTHAMPTON WRITERS CONFERENCE

Wednesday, July 9

Wednesday, July 30

Newbery Award winner Richard Peck

Award-winning screenwriter Kenneth Lonergan—You Can Count on Me, Gangs of New York

Thursday, July 10 Thursday, July 31

Emmy Award winner Mitchell Kriegman

Screenwriters Linda Seger, Michael Hauge, and Karl Iglesias present a night at the movies

Friday, July 11 Noted photographer and children’s book author Arlene Alda

Saturday, July 12

Friday, August 1

t Theater Even

7:30 pm, Avram Theater An Evening with Robert Benton

Theater Event

Oscar-winning screenwriter and director— Bonnie and Clyde, Kramer vs. Kramer, Places in the Heart, and Empire Falls

7:00 pm, Avram Theater “The Phantom Tollbooth”

Saturday, August 2

Hamptons Musical Premiere Book by Norton Juster Lyrics by Sheldon Harnick

Monday, July 21

Nobel Laureate Derek Walcott

8:00 pm, Avram Theater Two Very Funny People, One Wonderful Evening

Thursday, July 17

Sunday, July 13 Best-selling children’s book author Emma Walton

t Theater Even

Wednesday, July 16

Acclaimed fiction writers Amy Hempel and Meg Wolitzer

Friday, July 18

The Southampton Writers Conference presents new plays by Winnie Holzman and Christopher Durang

Distinguished authors Elizabeth Benedict, Melissa Bank, Matthew Klam

Tuesday, July 22

Saturday, July 19

Wednesday, July 23

7:30 pm T h e a t e r E v e n t Avram Theater “I Must Be Off” by Roger Rosenblatt Two one-act plays Directed by Jim Simpson Starring Alan Alda, Havilah Brewster, and Sigourney Weaver

Sunday, July 20 Pulitzer prize-winning biographers Steven Naifeh and Gregory White Smith Sponsored by the Pollock-Krasner House

t Theater Even

7:30 pm, Avram Theater A Tribute to Screenwriter/Director Alan J. Pakula Author and critic Molly Haskell presents a retrospective of Pakula’s films, including Klute, All the President's Men, and Sophie’s Choice.

Extraordinary writers Marsha Norman, Frank McCourt, and Roger Rosenblatt Pulitzer Prize winner Philip Schultz and National Book Award finalist Carol Muske-Dukes

Thursday, July 24 Celebrated novelists Ursula Hegi and Hilma Wolitzer

Friday, July 25

Theater Event

7:00 pm, Avram Theater An Evening with Billy Collins Gala Launch of The Southampton Review

All theater events are open to the public. To reserve your seat, call: (631) 632-5032 E-mail: southamptonwriters@notes.cc.sunysb.edu  Web: www.stonybrook.edu/writers The Southampton Writers Conferences are presented by the Stony Brook Southampton Master of Fine Arts in Writing and Literature, Robert Reeves, Director. Illustrations by legendary playwright, screenwriter, cartoonist, and Stony Brook Southampton faculty member Jules Feiffer. Stony Brook University/SUNY is an affirmative action, equal opportunity educator and employer. 0804097

1145741

WATERFRONTวง วง  EHGURRPV JRXUPHW NLWFKHQ open living area, den, 2 stone fireplaces, up and down deck space for dining and relaxing, 1.2 acre property with lovely lakeside landscaping, att. garage, outdoor shower and path to water's edge. Web# H44735.

WATERVIEWS&SUNSETS วงวงExtensively landscaped and designed. Master suite, guest rooms, 2-story living area with marble fireplace, open kitchen, decking, heated 20x40ft. pool, 2+ garage, central air and vacuum. Exclusive. Web#H0158366.

ENJOY THE SIMPLE PLEASURESวงวง Newly renovated cottage with first floor glimpses of Lake Montauk. Features living room and separate den, 2 bedrooms, 1 bath, 2-car garage and private backyard. Plenty of expansion possibilities on this shy acre. Co-Exclusive. Web# 64924.

BEACHHOUSEPERFECTION วงวงOn over .5 acre this ranch has an eat-in kitchen, formal dining room and living room with fireplace, 3 bedrooms and 2 baths. Family room with fireplace and hot tub which opens to deck. Private backyard with outdoor shower and 2-car garage. Exclusive. Web#H53914.

BYTHESEAวงวงPremier property directly across from the ocean. The Surfside Inn offers a restaurant/bar, charming inn, office/apartment space, detached garage and parking. Exclusive. Web#H54736.

MONTAUKBYTHESEAวงวง Forever ocean views from this 4 bedroom beach-house nestled in the Dunes of Amagansett. Steps away from the beach and centrally located between Montauk and East Hampton. Enjoy the best of all. Co-Exclusive. Web# H43652.

TOP OFTHEWORLD VIEWS วงวง Situated on one of the high points in Montauk and offers ocean views from everywhere. Three bedrooms, plus loft, 2.5 baths, 3 fireplaces, partially finished lower level, heated pool, huge deck and shared tennis court. Exclusive. Web# H37733.

SURROUNDEDBYPRESERVEวงวง Sits on 1.3 acres this 3,000+ sq.ft. home has gourmet kitchen, dining area, sunken living room with fireplace and greenhouse sitting room. Master suite, 2 additional bedrooms, 2-car garage, artist studio and private beach rights. Co-Exclusive. Web# H44562.

f

1143227

LONG ISLAND

M A N H AT TA N

B R O O K LY N

QUEENS

THE HAMPTONS

NORTH FORK

ยฉ2006. An independently owned and operated member of Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc. is a service mark of Prudential Insurance Company of America. Equal Housing Opportunity. All material presented herein is intended for information purposes only. While, this information is believed to be correct, it is represented subject to errors, omissions, changes or withdrawal without notice. All property outlines and square footage in property listings are approximate.

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 36 www.danshamptons.com

Sunblock For Your Home!

Install Vista Window Film enjoy your view from sunup to sundown.

Vista Window Film Blocks 99 % of the sun’s damaging UV rays and dramatically reduces fading and cuts down on glare. Air condtioning bills will be lower because Vista Film reduces excessive solar heat. Vista window film is so transparent that once installed you’ll never know it’s there! Only your professional installer and your furnishings will know for sure. The Choice of Architects, Interior Designers & Window Treatment Companies

Lifetime Warranty.

T EL 631-420-4101 / FAX 631-420-4105

www.nywindowfilm.com 1145223

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 37 www.danshamptons.com

GIVE YOUR CHILD A HEALTHY SMILE

Many parents don’t realize how early dental problems can occur, or just how important those “baby teeth” are! Prolonged and frequent bottle or breast feeding can cause baby bottle tooth decay. Diets high in sugar from fruit rollups, sticky candies, juice and soda can also cause lots of cavities. Thumb and pacifier habits can cause malformations of the palate. Children are not done losing their baby teeth until they are 12-13 years old! These teeth hold the spaces for permanent teeth, shape your child’s face, and help with speech, eating and chewing. Dr. Nancy Cosenza specializes in dentistry for children from infancy to their teenage years. At Hampton Pediatric Dental Associates, we know that not only children, but their

teeth, are entirely different from adults. In fact, pediatric dentists require 2 years’ additional training and education beyond dental school! (There are only 5,000 pediatric dentists in the U.S. and we’re the only pediatric dental practice in the Hamptons!) Our office is colorfully painted and cheerfully designed a definite “kid-friendly” environment. Our staff is geniunely warm and cheerful too! Call us at (631) 287-8687 if you have any questions or would like to arrange an appointment. Remember that good dental habits and experiences started in childhood will last a lifetime! We know how to make kids leave the dentist’s chair smiling -- and their parents, too!

NOW W AVAILABLE Digital Radiography uses 80% less Radiation with x-rays for your child!

631•287•TOTS S (287-8687) 1141837

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 38 www.danshamptons.com

Announcing the Upcoming Show Tours Lineup… Belmont Park – “A Day At The Races” – Wed., July 16th – $90 pp. – Enjoy an exciting day at beautiful Belmont Park. Its mile-and-a-half (2.4 km) main track is the largest dirt course in Thoroughbred racing and is world-famous as the home of the Belmont Stakes, the third leg of the Triple Crown. Every major champion in racing history since the early 20th century has competed on the racecourse — including each of the 11 Triple Crown winners. Note: Dress is semi-formal - men must wear jackets, and women should wear dresses, skirts or pant suits. Absolutely no jeans or sneakers. World Yacht Dinner Cruise – Sat., July 19th – $145 pp. – Take a three hour voyage to enchantment where you can indulge in sumptuous cuisine (a four-course dinner), dance to delightful music and enjoy gracious and attentive service against the dramatic, ever-changing panorama of the world’s premier skyline. Yes, there is a dress code: Gentlemen are required to wear jackets, ties are recommended. Jeans, shorts and sneakers are not permitted. Thimble Islands, CT – 1-Day Tour [Narrated Cruise] – Thurs., July 24th – $125 pp. – The Thimble Islands are an archipelago of small islands in Long Island Sound, in and near the harbor of Stony Creek, CT. The islands themselves – are comprised of 23 that are inhabited (most of them wooded), numerous barren rocks and hundreds of reefs visible only at low tide. Also included in this wonderful tour is lunch at the U.S.S. Chowder Pot III, a visit to the Shore Line Trolley Museum (with trolley ride) and Hilltop Orchards. The Bronx Zoo – Sat., July 26th – Adults $65 pp. Children $55 pp. – Take a walk on the wild side at the world’s greatest zoo! With award-winning, cutting-edge exhibits, such as the Congo Gorilla Forest, and featuring over 4,000 animals, there is no other zoo in the world that offers the diversity, superb viewing, and world-renowned expertise that assures a rewarding experience and the knowledge that visitors can make a difference in the world around them. Included are your General Admission, Wild Asia Monorail, Skyfari Cable Car one-way, Children’s Zoo, Congo Gorilla Forest, Butterfly Garden, Bug Carousel, Zoo Shuttle unlimited and deluxe round-trip transportation. Mohonk Mountain House Resort (A Historic Landmark) – 1-Day Tour – Sun., Aug. 3rd (Brunch included) and Tues., Oct. 14th (Hot & Cold Buffet Lunch included) –$115 pp. Enjoy the top of the Shawangunk Ridge and surrounding Lake Mohonk. You’ll see thousands of acres of unspoiled scenery, including beautiful rock formations and 128 gazebos overlooking the mountains. The only structure on the virtually untouched land is the sprawling land-marked Victorian Mohonk Mountain House. You’ll even have a carriage ride around the grounds. “The 39 Steps” – Wed., Aug. 13th – $155 pp. – Nominated for 5 Tony Awards, this hilarious and thrilling whodunit is based on the classic Alfred Hitchcock film. Part espionage thriller and part slapstick comedy, the production features four actors who portray all the characters and all the action from the 1935 Alfred Hitchcock film, including the chase atop the Flying Scotsman train, a bi-plane crash and the death-defying finale in London’s Palladium Theatre. Lunch for this show tour is at La Petite Auberge Restaurant.

“Gypsy” – Wed., Aug. 20th – $182 pp. – Starring the legendary Patti LuPone. “Gypsy” is the ultimate story about an aggressive stage mother. Join Rose, June and Louise in their trip across the U.S. during the 1920’s, when vaudeville was dying and burlesque was born. Jule Styne’s music and Stephen Sondheim’s lyrics include “Let Me Entertain You”, “Everything’s Coming Up Roses”, and more. Dinner will be at Da Rosina Ristorante Italiano. Cape Cod, MA and Newport, RI – 3-Day Tour – Mon.-Wed., Aug. 25th-27th – $534 pp./do. – In Cape Cod, you will have guided tours, traveling through such places as the colonial villages along Route 6A and a visit to Provincetown (where a dune ride is planned for you). Of course, you will be able to enjoy a lobster dinner before leaving the Cape. In Newport, tour the famous Ten Mile Ocean Drive and Bellevue Avenue Mansion area, and more. Pennsylvania – National Quilt Extravaganza 2-Day Tour – Fri.-Sat. Sept. 5th-6th – $279 pp./do. – This is the east coast’s largest, most prominent textile arts event all under one roof. Over 200 vendor booths featuring everything for quilt, fiber, wearable and textile artists; workshops, lectures and demonstrations are presented by leading instructors; the finest collection of quilts, garments and wall hangings and a quilt competition with prize money. Nova Scotia & Cape Breton Island – 8-Day Tour – Sat.-Sat., Sept. 6th-13th - $1,910 pp./do An exhilarating tour is in store for you on this eight day journey. It is filled with wonderful sightseeing experiences (guided tours), boat rides and more. It’s a fabulous time to visit our friendly neighbor to the north. Call for a full itinerary. National Geographic Presents: “Real Pirates” at the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia – 2-Day Tour – Sat.–Sun., - Sept. 13th-14th - $376 pp./do. – See the world’s first exhibition of authentic pirate treasures recovered from the wreck of the Slave/Pirate Ship Whydah, which sank to the ocean floor off Cape Cod. There is also much more to see on this excursion – a fun-filled historic Philadelphia tour and visits to Independence Hall, Christ Church and the National Constitution Center.

Also Available: NY Mets Games 7/24, 8/19 & 9/14 - NY Yankees tickets are all sold out Brimfield Antique Show – Sat., 9/6 The Big E – Sat., 09/13 and Sat., 09/20 Boothbay Harbor Maine Four Day Tour – Sun.-Wed., 9/14-9/17 Culinary Institute – Wed., 9/17 French Cuisine & Thurs., 11/20 Italian Cuisine Autumn in the Pocono’s – 2-Day Tour – Sat.-Sun., 9/27-28 “Boeing-Boeing” – Sat., 10/4 Lake George/Adirondack Fall Foliage 3-Day Tour – Sun.-Tues., 10/5-7 “Lion King” – Wed., 10/15 Tour of Grand Central Terminal & High Tea at the Waldorf – Thurs., 10/16 Tour of the Hamptons – Thurs., 10/16

SHOW TOURS INCLUDE –

Lunch or dinner (unless otherwise indicated), a Hampton Jitney professional driver, tour escort and deluxe round-trip transportation. Call for complete package details.

To Book A Show Tour Call: 631-283-4600 or 212-362-8400 Extension 343 to reach our Southampton office; Or dial 631-477-2862 to reach our Greenport office. We also offer trips to Foxwoods Resort Casino, customized tours and charters for any group and more.

Visit us online at

www.hamptonjitney.com

for the most complete list and details of all Hampton Jitney tours and shows.

North Fork pick-up and drop-off locations are as follows: Greenport, Southold, Cutchogue, Mattituck, Jamesport, Aquebogue, Riverhead, Farmingville, Melville Marriott.

Get the Best Price on Tickets with a Value Pack Ticket Book! Call, Stop in or Go Online to Purchase. • They never expire • Simple to purchase • Save time and money • Any rider can use - anytime

South Fork pick-up and drop-off locations are as follows: East Hampton, Bridgehampton, Southampton, Westhampton, Farmingville, Huntington.

Show tour reservations are accepted only with payment at the time of booking: credit card by phone, cash or check at HJ reservation desk in the Omni lobby. Credit card sales are processed at the time of the reservation. Cancellations will be accepted on a conditional basis – we will attempt to resell the seats, but do not guarantee to do so; if not resold, the customer is still obligated to pay for the non-sold/non-cancelable parts of the package. Any change, refund or cancellation will incur a $15 per person service charge.

Through our online website reservation and Value Pack order system, Hampton Jitney is open 24 hours a day for information & reservations. Make your travel reservations quickly and accurately, then place a secure order for your Value Pack Ticket Book.

1145205

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 39 www.danshamptons.com

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DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 40 www.danshamptons.com

1143223

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 41 www.danshamptons.com

Here’s The Rave Review In Last Sunday’s

By LIESL SCHILLINGER Published: June 29, 2008 New York Sunday Times, Style Section

lages of Westhampton, Hampton Bays, Southampton, Bridgehampton, East Hampton, and Amagansett," he doesn't get stuck in a single all-RangeRover traffic jam or spot one herd of Calypso-clad weekenders grazing at overpriced brunch cafes. Each town he passes is "quiet as a mouse," all the stores closed.

IN THE HAMPTONS My Fifty Years with Farmers, Fishermen, Artist, Billionaires, and Celebrities. By Dan Rattiner. 368 pp. Harmony. $24.95.

But nothing he's ever written seems more far-fetched than one scene he describes in his memoir, "In the Hamptons." Driving on a sunny June weekend through the "sleepy little vil-

There's the flawless young heiress who captivated Mr. Rattiner at 20, tearfully inviting him to a midnight tryst on the beach after her parents made her cancel a date (German shepherds barred the way to the mansion). There's the artist Willem de Kooning, in his cups and off his chair at a restaurant, ranting in slurred words, "I'm the greatest living painter in the world." (Mr. Rattiner helped drag him away from public scrutiny and into the back seat of his car).

D

AN RATTINER loves to invent preposterous tales. In Dan's Papers, the free newspaper he founded in Montauk in 1960, he occasionally runs a bogus story to see if anyone notices. In 1966, he reported on a sea serpent sighting in Bridgehampton (WCBS fell for it and sent out a helicopter). And in 1991, he made up a festival called Flight to Portugal, in which contestants raced cars off a cliff into the ocean by the Montauk Point Lighthouse: "The one who gets the farthest toward Portugal wins."

figures, famous and obscure, who have weaved themselves into his personal mythology over the last 50 years. Each portrait is written in unassuming language, with emotional punch, telling detail and impressive recall.

This neutron-bomb tableau is not one of his hoaxes: it is 1956, on the day the author, then 16, first set foot in Montauk, before the philistines approached the hedgerow, before the Hamptons were "The Hamptons." Mr. Rattiner pays tribute to the local

Less glamorous but no less compelling are the middle-aged hoteliers Esther and Sarah, who basked daily on aluminum lawn chairs in front of their Memory Motel, "tanned, heavily oiled," and wearing "nearly identical jaguar bikinis"; and the smooth, goodnatured Bing Crosby look-alike, Frank Tuma Jr., vice president of the Montauk Improvement Company, who let Dan's Papers occupy the mezzanine of his building for free. Mr. Rattiner is a great appreciator of other people. To find as many memorable New York characters gathered between two covers, you'd have to look back to Joseph Mitchell's "Up in the Old Hotel."

In The Hamptons

My Fifty Years with Farmers, Fishermen, Artist, Billionaires, and Celebrities.

Published by Harmony Books, a Division of Random House. $24.95 Wherever Books are Sold • Makes a Perfect Gift for Houseguests

Go to danrattiner.com for more information. 1146358

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ALL ITEMS .750 ML UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED ORGANIC WINES

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11.

Candoni Pinot Grigio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 12.99 True Earth Red Blend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 13.99 True Earth Chardonnay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 13.99 Bonterra Merlot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 13.99 Bonterra Sauvignon Blanc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 11.99 Bonterra Chardonnay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 10.99 Bonterra Zinfandel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 12.99 Bonterra Cabernet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 13.99 Lolonis Cabernet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 20.99 Frey Vineyards Chardonnay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 13.99 Badger Mountain Riesling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 13.99

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Coppola Claret Cabernet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 16.99 Coppola Merlot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 16.99 Robert Mondavi Napa Cabernet ‘05. . . . . . . . . . . .$ 23.99 Robert Mondavi Napa Cabernet ‘03 . . . . . . . . . . .$ 99.99 Rodney Strong Sonoma Cabernet . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 15.99 Kendall Jackson Cabernet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 17.99 Kendall Jackson Merlot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 17.99 Gary Farrell Merlot. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 31.99 Meeker Sonoma Merlot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 33.99 Clos Du Bois Merlot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 14.99 Gary Farrell Pinot Noir . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 36.99 Wild Horse Pinot Noir . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 21.99 MacMurry Ranch Pinot Noir . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 15.99 Simi Sonoma Zinfanfel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 16.99 Moterina Zinfanfel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 12.99 Bogle Petite Sirah . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 39.99 Opus One 2002 Vintage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$169.99

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CALIFORNIA REDS

CALIFORNIA WHITE

Chateau St. Jean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 11.99 Clos Du Bois Chardonnay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 12.99 Coppola Chardonnay. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Olivier . . . . . . . . . .$ 13.99 Chalone Vineyards Chardonnay . . . LeFlaive . . . . . . . . . . .$ 9.99 Bogle Chardonnay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .“Les . . . . . . . .$ 10.99 Kunde Sauvignon Blanc . . . . . . . . . Setilles” . . . . . . . . . . .$ 12.99 Kunde Chadronnay . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bourgogne . . . . . . . . . . .$ 12.99 Kenwood Sauvignon Blanc. . . . . . . . . .Blanc . . . . . . . .$ 10.99

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FRENCH WINES $16.99 Chateau Larose Trintaudon Haut . . . . 750ml . . . . . . . . . .$ 16.99 Chateau Lalande Borie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 25.99 Chateau Duhart Milon Roth 98. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 35.99 Connetable Talbot St. Julien . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 24.99 Hob Nob Pinot Noir . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 9.99 Georges Duboeuf Muscadet De Beaumes . . . . . . .$ 16.99 Paul Jaboulet Parallele “45” Cote Du Rhone . . . .$ 10.99 Hob Nob Chardonnay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 9.99 Louis Jadot Pouilly Fuisse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 22.99

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Villadoria Gavi Gavi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 12.99 Teruzzi Terre Di Tufi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 16.99 Santa Margherita Pinot Grigio. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 21.99 Ecco Domani Pinot Grigio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 9.99 Santi Pinot Grigio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 11.99 Cavit Pinot Grigio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 11.99

ITALIAN WHITES

PATH LIQUORS

ITALIAN RED

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Bertani Amarone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 73.99 Coppo Brachetto D’Acqui . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 28.99 Masi Amarone Costasera Classico. . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 55.99 Da Vinci Chianti . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 12.99 Frescobaldi Remole Toscana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 9.99 Frescobaldi Nippozzano Chianti Rerva . . . . . . . . .$ 18.99 Antinori Santa Cristina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 11.99 Ruffino Riserva Ducale Gold. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 36.99

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Rosemount Estate Shiraz Diamond . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 10.99 Penfold’s Koonunga Hill Shiraz . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 11.99 McWilliams Estate Shiraz. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 9.99 Puerto Veijo Carmenere, Merlot,Cabernet,Syrah .$ 9.99 Los Cardos Cabernet Sauvignon . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 8.99 Luigi Bosca Doc Pinot Noir Reserve . . . . . . . . . .$ 13.99 Luigi Bosca Doc Malbec D.O.C. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 16.99 Trapiche Broquel Malbec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 16.99 White Haven Sauvignon Blanc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 16.99 Brancott Sauvignon Blanc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 10.99

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Louis Roederer Cristal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 249.99 Dom Perignon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 159.99 Veuve Clicquot Yellow Label . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 37.99 Lamarco Prosecco . . . . . . . . . . . Veuve . . . . . Clicquot . . . . . . . . .$ 10.99 Moet White Star . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Yellow . . . . . . . . . . .$ 38.99 Moet Nectar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Champagne . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 41.99 Moet Rose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $37. . . . . . 99 . . . . . . .$ 44.99 Martini & Rossi Asti . . . . . . . . . . . . 750ml . . . . . . . . . . .$ 9.99

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Yellow Tail Wines All Types 1.5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 11.99 Barefoot Wines All Types 1.5. . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . $ 8.99 Woodbridge Wines All Types 1.5 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 12.99 Beringer Pinot Grigio 1.5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 8.99 Beringer White Zinfandel 1.5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 8.99 CK Mondavi All Types 1.5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 10.99 Georges Duboeff Cuvee White or Red 1.5 . . . . . .$ 10.99 Sutter Home White Zinfandel 1.5 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 7.99 Bella Sera Pinot Grigio 1.5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 10.99 Bolla Wines All Types 1.5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 10.99 San Giuseppe Pinot Grigio 1.5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 13.99 Almaden Wht Zinf, Merl, Cab, Chard, 5 Liter box$ 15.99 Banrock Station Merlot 3 Liter Box . . . . . . . . . . .$ 15.99 Yago Sangria 3 Liter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 13.99 Yago Sangria 1.5 Liter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 8.99

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Baileys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 25.99 Grand Marnier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 37.99 Drambuie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 35.99 Irish Mist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 35.99 Kahlua . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 21.99 Fragoli Strawberry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.99 Danny Devito’s Limoncello . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 20.99 Campari Aperitivo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 27.99 Sambuca Romano . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 24.99 Molinari Sambuca . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 24.99 Midori . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 19.99 Disaronno Ameretto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 23.49 Dekuyper Schnapps Peach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 9.99 Dekuyper Schnapps Apple . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 9.99 Dekuyper Schnapps Watermelon . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 9.99

NEW ZEALAND / CHILEAN / AUSTRALIAN WINES

CHAMPAGNE

BIG BOTTLE VALUES

LIQUOURS

NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERROR.

268 MIDDLE COUNTRY RD CORAM CORNER OF 25 AND 112. (HOME DEPOT SHOPPING CENTER) LESS THAN 3 MILES NORTH EXIT 64 LIE

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Newly constructed 10,000 sq/ft. professional office building located in prestigious Southampton. Ten 1,000 sq/ft. office suites available, each with its own private bathroom. Larger suites are available,if needed. Amenities include individual electric meter, hot water heater, high efficiency air conditioning/heating, 24 hour surveillance, basement storage and ADA accessible. Parking will accomodate 57 vehicles.

For Lease Information Contact

JYK MANAGEMENT, LLC. 631.433.1241 email: tankconslt@aol.com 1146427

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Plots Foiled 15 Plots to Do in the Billboard Discovered by County Police By Dan Rattiner Two weeks ago, some vandals defaced the very insulting billboard on County Road 39 with graffiti. The billboard, put there by the county without consultation with anybody else, was cleaned the next day, and subsequently, the Suffolk County police embarked on an investigation to find out whom the perpetrators might be. They have made no arrests yet, but so far they have uncovered an astonishing 15 plots to deface, blow up or entirely remove this very expensive sign. Here are these 15 plots. 1. The Southampton Council of Churches had made plans to remove the weapon that is in the police officer’s hands on this sign and replace it with a cross. Emails show considerable correspondence with rabbis and Muslim clerics in the area about whether a cross would be okay, or if should it be something else. The final decision was already made — it would be a cross, but it would have to be wood, so people would

recognize it as the device that paralyzes the villain in the movie Dracula. The painting of the wooden cross had already been ordered and completed, and they were just waiting to coordinate the night on which this defacement might occur. But now the plot has been uncovered. 2. E-mails have determined that the Southampton Town Trustees have been working to hatch a plan to knock down the sign

believing the sign to be both rude and insulting to visitors who might shop in the stores, has been plotting to attach a chain to the sign to haul it off into the woods. They have approached all members of the Chamber who are either in the construction business or the house-moving business, and all expressed a desire to do this. According to the e-mails, the plot was discovered just in time, as the selection of who might do this was scheduled for tomorrow night. 4. Members of the Southampton Town Police Department, who were as surprised as anybody to see this horrific sign, have been discussing the idea of issuing tickets to the county for being in violation of town law 17, 4.5 which considers the erection of a billboard in that town to be a crime. Indeed, county investigators have already determined that more than 50 tickets have been written, one for each day the billboard has been there, and are on a sergeant’s desk awaiting approval from the town supervisor to tape them to the sign. The fine is $500 a day. 5. Members of the Southampton Association, the group of bluebloods who live in Southampton, have been holding discreet and unofficial meetings to have the billboard

A BH farmer was planning to cut down the sign and use it to cover a leaky roof of one of his barns...

Dan Rattiner is the founder of Dan's Papers. His memoir, In the Hamptons: Fifty Years With Farmers, Fishermen, Artists, Billionaires and Celebrities, published by Harmony Books, is currently available wherever books are sold.

with a four-wheel-drive Jeep. They worked out an alibi for the Jeep, since the tracks it makes could be traceable if they use those Plaster of Paris thingys. The only thing holding this up is determining which of the members’ Jeeps they ought to use, and how to arrange reimbursement for damage to the vehicle, if that were to occur. 3. The Southampton Chamber of Commerce,

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South O’ the Highway

(and the North too)

Congratulations go to Dan Rattiner, Executive Editor of Dan's Papers, for the rave review his memoir, In the Hamptons, got in The New York Times last Sunday. (The whole review is published on page 107.) * * * Works by some of the world’s greatest artists of all time — Willem de Kooning, Alexander Calder, Andy Warhol, Milton Avery, David Hockney and Louise Nevelson (someone everyone will want to meet after seeing Edward Albee’s new biographical play, Occupant) — will be on display at Vered Gallery’s annual silent auction and benefit on July 10. Bidding takes place through July 6, and ends with the Last Bid Party from 5-7 p.m. A portion of proceeds will benefit the Trauma Victims of Sderot, Israel. For more information, call 631-324-3303, or visit veredart.com. * * * Lara Shriftman and Elizabeth Harrison threw a party at Rita Schrager’s Southampton estate last Saturday to celebrate their third book, Party Confidential: New Etiquette for Fabulous Entertaining. Guests dressed in denim and diamonds and included Woody Johnson with fiancée Suzanne Ircha, Fox News’ Phil Keating, MSNBC’s Dan Abrams, Men’s Health editor Dave Zinczenko, rocker Matt White, boxer/trainer Michael Olajide, George Wayne and Kelly Bensimon. * * * Amagansett’s Sarah Jessica Parker is in talks to star in the upcoming movie, The Ivy Chronicles, about a single girl who lives in a series of wildly unrealistic apartments in New York City and helps rich kids get into elite private schools. The project is based on a novel by Karen Quinn, and will be produced by Jerry Weintraub. * * * Frederico Azevedo of Unlimited Earth Care in Bridgehampton won the blue ribbon from Martha Stewart at an Invitational Garden Container Exhibition at LongHouse Reserve in East Hampton on June 28. The exhibition will be on display all summer, Wednesdays through Saturdays, from 2-5 p.m. * * * Attention, (mature) American Idol fans! Registration for LifeStyles’ immensely popular Senior Idol Competition is officially open. The contest, in its fourth running, is open to New York State residents ages 50 and over, and will hold two rounds of auditions before the finals on September 28 at Suffolk County Community College’s Van Nostrand Theater. For more information, call 631-286-0058. * * * Christie Brinkley’s very public divorce 1146445

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Billboard

(continued from page 57)

defaced. Their plan, discovered by an undercover agent at a coming-out party, was to add the word “Please” after the words, “Strictly Enforced.” Papers were confiscated by investigators. 6. Members of the North Sea Gun Club were planning to riddle the billboard with gunfire, and finally do it in with a volley of hand grenades and six-inch artillery rounds on the upcoming night of July 14. 7. Members of the Hampton Bays Skateboarders Association have made plans to paint the sign, haul it away and use it for a ramp at their new skateboarding park in that town. This would have taken place on July 11. 8. Weight Watchers of Southampton, Inc. were planning to bring ladders and paint to the billboard on the night of July 5 in order to “slim down” the officer leaping up from the far side of the police car by blending in his beefy sides. They say “as is,” the sign is a poor example of what a police officer should look like. 9. Friends of Horace J. Molinarski, the overweight Suffolk County officer who was photographed in the act of leaping up from behind the side of the police car, had been planning to bring a lawsuit on his behalf, saying he was tricked into having his picture taken in this manner and thought he was just posing for a bathing suit commercial for “Saturday Night Live.” According to recent e-mails, however, this had escalated into a plan to black out Officer Molinarski’s image with black paint. 10. Members of the Shinnecock Indian Reservation were found to be planning to fire

flaming arrows at the sign until it caught fire and burned to the ground. They say that because the billboard is right near the turnoff to go to the reservation, it was clearly aimed at them. The plan was discovered by a Suffolk County police officer who has been trained to translate smoke signals. 11. The Nature Conservancy was discovered to be planning to have the billboard carefully removed and then stored in a warehouse because, as they said in e-mail correspondence, it blocks an otherwise wonderful view of some trees and grasses and occasional small animals. The Conservancy was planning a midnight raid that would have more than 200 members, both men and women, cutting down and personally carrying off the sign. It would be the way to do it with the least environmental impact. 12. The New York Long-Distance Bicycle Club was planning to cut the sign down and haul it off because it was put up right across the most popular bike route on eastern Long Island. This would have happened July 11. 13. A Bridgehampton farmer was discovered to have been planning to cut down the metal sign, paint it over and use it to cover one side of a leaky roof on his barn. This was scheduled for July 5. This plan was discovered while the farmer was shopping for large amounts of glue in Agway. 14. Members of the Sag Harbor Alternative

Health and Therapy Group were planning a four-hour meditation in front of the sign on the night of July 7, hoping the result would be that the sign would self-destruct as a result of bad vibes. “The karma of the sign is completely wrong,” one of their e-mails said, according to a Suffolk County Police Department investigator on this case. 15. The Southampton Architectural Review Board had contacted the Southampton Highway Department to remove the sign on the grounds that it was “just too plain ugly.” The cover story of this, which was scheduled for July 3, would have been that they had accidentally removed the wrong sign. A spokesperson for Suffolk County Police Department said that though members are saddened by all the people who will have to be arrested due to these plots, they are heartened by the fact that the sign has been such an attention-getter. They have currently completed the painting of a new sign, which is even worse than the old. It shows a giant police officer with fangs rounding up and carrying off law-breaking motorists in nets. It will be replacing the current sign before the first of August. Anyone who has information that could result in the arrest and conviction of anyone involved in these plots should anonymously contact the Suffolk County Police Department at 631-852-COPS in order to claim their reward. •

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Hippity Hop Not The Gin Lane Bunny Who Thought Too Much Late That Night By Dan Rattiner On a recent late-night outing, I ran into a bunny that, I believe, was at the top of the bunny bell curve in the thinking-too-much department. He was on Gin Lane in Southampton, in the middle of the street, and because the road there is straight, we saw him from a long way off. We captured him in our headlights. We slowed down as we approached, of course. We had no desire to run over a bunny. From the bunny’s perspective, however, the headlights were getting bigger and bigger and closer and closer. Many another bunny would have immediately made the decision to run off. And

that would be that. But this bunny didn’t. He stood there, an alarmed look on his face. Clearly there was danger approaching, no doubt about that. For a moment, instinct took over, and he turned and ran toward the side of the road. But then, it seemed to me, he started having second thoughts. Was this really the right way to get away from the danger? He stopped and thought. He was off to one side but still on the road. I slowed further. Maybe it’s the OTHER way, he thought. And so he scampered back into the road and then off to the other side where he stopped again before reaching the other side.

I was now at a complete stop. Fortunately, there were no cars on Gin Lane at that hour. He looked up and stared at me. There I was. These two bright headlights. No, he thought, it’s back the other way. And so he scampered across the road, but again stopped before reaching the other side. “Hey,” I shouted. I was in a convertible. He could hear me. He perked up both ears and wiggled his nose. My fiancée, who was with me, perked up her ears and wiggled her nose. “Get out of the way,” I said to the bunny. He was looking straight at me. Okay. And so he scampered right down the (continued on page 64)

NEW ORDER AT DAN’S: IT’S ALL HERE, PLUS MORE With this Fourth of July 2008 issue, you’ll notice some changes in Dan’s Papers with our revised format and cleaner design. Everything you’re used to finding is still on these pages — perhaps not exactly where it’s been. In addition to some adjustments in the front, we’ve restructured the second section of the book into three more intuitive categories: Arts & Entertainment, House/Home, and LifeStyle. In addition to our comprehensive North Fork section we’ve added a new Shelter Island section, and new columns by accomplished, knowledgeable experts in their fields. Arts & Entertainment leads off with per-

forming arts features and event coverage including theater reviews by Gordin and Christiano, film reviews and listings. Cinephile Ian Stark has replaced the late Guy DeFraumeni as our film critic with his “Flick Picks” column. With a background in film studies, Ian has helped create film libraries and collections for individuals and organizations. On the pop music front, Assistant Editor Tiffany Razzano, who published her own music magazine and e-zine, covers the local music scene in her column, “BackBeat.” Part two of A&E is Fine Arts and Books. In addition to Marion Wolberg Weiss on art top-

ics and our book reviews, Features Editor Tricia Rayburn (a published Simon and Schuster author of novels for teens) writes about local and pertinent issues for writers in her column, “By the Book.” Sylvia Lehrer’s cooking column is in Dining and Nightlife, as well as related features on food, drink and entertaining in and out of the home. The House/Home section will feature decor articles by accomplished home design writer Mary Beth Karoll. April Gonzales, East End garden designer with 20 years in the industry, gives us “Earthly Delights.” Both the avid or reluctant gardener will want to read (continued on the next page)

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 62 www.danshamptons.com (continued from previous page)

April’s quick-hit advice of the moment in “What to Do Right Now” at the end of her column. The Homelife section is dedicated to families with children or 4legged creatures. In the column, “Err, A Parent,” Managing Editor Susan Galardi contributes musings on the foibles of parenthood, and makes recommendations on best bets for kids and families. For the furry set, Jenna Robbins, a professional trainer well known to the East End, tells pet lovers everything they need to know in her weekly column, “Pet Agree.”

Photo by Alison Caporimo

New Dan’s

Our LifeStyle section includes Beauty and Fashion, featuring three new columns: “Fashionista” by Kelly Krieger, covering trends in the industry; “FashionPlate” by Seventh Avenue guru Tony Vargas; “Raving Beauty” by Janet Flora, an established fashion and beauty writer based in New York; and Maria Tennariello’s “Shop ‘till you Drop.” “Inspirations” and “Y Factor,” as well as short features on well being, follow in the Health and Fitness sections. Lastly, in Sports and Outdoors, you’ll find Dan’s editorial/production team, front row: Nicole Caruso, Production Director; Susan Galardi, Managing Editor; Tiffany Razzano, Assistant Editor. Ken Kindler’s “Take a Hike,” Bob Top row: Victoria Cooper, Associate Editor; Tricia Rayburn, Features Editor; Gelber’s “Classic Cars,” Rich David Rattiner, Web/North Fork Editor; Kelly Merritt, Art Director. Firstenberg’s “Go Fish” and the new, occasional column, “10 Minute Golf ” by local pro and golf writer Darren DeMille. We’ll have sporting features from stand up paddle boarding to snorkeling to flying, and of course, riding the ponies. The new section on Shelter Island, the respite from your East End respite, includes Sally Flynn’s “The Sheltered Islander,” and feature stories and observations from newcomer Greg Burt about the Island. Our North Fork section, edited by David Rattiner, will continue its full coverage of the place to go to get away from it all that has so much to offer. There are also some changes in the front section of the paper. Founder Dan Rattiner will continue to welcome readers with his unusual and insightful observations, stories and hoaxes, and we’ll continue to cover news and “stories behind the news” as they relate to our readers. Regular features writers T.J. Clemente and Debbie Tuma are now joined by Susan Saiter, Ian Stark and Greg Burt. The new weekly real estate column, “Estate of Mind,” will cover topics important to buyers, sellers, investors and agents on the East End. Created by Susan Galardi (who created the Residence section of the South/East Hampton Press), the column will be shared by several writers on the real estate beat. And for those looking for the newest, strangest or most interesting trends, look to Associate Editor Vicki Cooper’s column, “On the Edge.” This restructuring, with a new, cleaner look and fresh, new columns, was accomplished through a collaboration and support of the entire staff — to name just a few: Publisher Kathy Rae, Advertising Director Richard Swift, Production Manager Nicole Caruso (page design), Art Director Kelly Merritt (headline/banner design), Assistant to the Publisher Ellen Dioguardi (voice of reason), Dan Rattiner (voice of experience), and all the dedicated, talented editors in the editorial department: Tricia Rayburn, Victoria Cooper, David Rattiner and Tiffany Razzano. Welcome to the new Dan’s. I have a feeling you’ll let us know, one way or another, how you feel about the changes and additions. We look forward to it. –Susan Galardi, Managing Editor susang@danspapers.com 1045027

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 63 www.danshamptons.com

Hauled Off Public Gotchas with Handcuffs During the Last Half-Century By Dan Rattiner The handcuff arrest of Vered is not the first time a prominent figure has been arrested in this manner in the Hamptons. It seems to happen about once every 10 years. In 1968, the publisher of this newspaper (me) was arrested and carted off in handcuffs quite publicly for failing to show up in court to fight what I thought was a ridiculous traffic ticket. I had the date wrong. I was 28 years old. And when I was not in Judge Frood’s East Hampton courtroom at the appointed time, he issued a bench warrant. A cop handcuffed me where he found me, and marched me across the sidewalk on Newtown Lane in front of

everybody to get me booked at the police station, which, at that time, was on that street a few doors down from Scoop. An account of this event is in my memoir, In the Hamptons, just published by Random House and on sale everywhere. In 1973, IRS agents invaded an art opening at the Tower Gallery on Jobs Lane in Southampton, removed all the paintings and took away painter Edith Irving in handcuffs in front of all the gallery goers. Edith was the wife of Clifford Irving, an East Hampton writer who wrote a fake biography of Howard Hughes and swindled a $400 thousand advance out of McGraw-Hill. Edith, also indict-

ed, was having her work seized for back taxes. In 1994, Jerry Della Femina and his partner David Silver were arrested and carted off in handcuffs for displaying pumpkins on the lawn of their store across from the bowling alley in East Hampton, because the village interpreted the pumpkins to be a “sign.” Della Femina was not publishing his own newspaper at the time, and when he learned he would be arrested, he called me in the hopes of getting the event published in Dan’s Papers. (He succeeded.) I told him what happened to me, and suggested he make sure he got a picture of himself being hauled off in handcuffs (continued on the next page)

WALL-TO-WALL MATTRESSES AND THIRTY PEOPLE By Dan Rattiner Just before dawn last Sunday morning, Southampton Town Police quietly tiptoed across the newly mowed lawn of a $3-million mansion in Southampton, skirted the pool, the tennis court and hot tub, and then opened the unlocked front door to go inside and step over the bodies there to check for zoning violations. They found quite a few, not the least imporDan Rattiner is the founder of Dan's Papers. His memoir, In the Hamptons: Fifty Years With Farmers, Fishermen, Artists, Billionaires and Celebrities, published by Harmony Books, is currently available wherever books are sold.

tant of which were about three dozen 20- and 30-year-olds fast asleep in rooms with wall-towall mattresses, trying to sleep off the drunken stupor they had gotten themselves into late the night before. These people were then herded out into the yard in the dark, where, with eyes bloodshot, hair a mess, and clothes disheveled, they stood in line to be interviewed by policemen with flashlights who were interested in knowing just who these individuals were. Of course, who they all were, were very important up-and-coming college graduates looking for a fancy good time in the Hamptons for the summer, in a grand house not far from

the ocean — in this case, at 674 Millstone Road. And they received summonses for a variety of things such as overcrowding, having no fire alarms or carbon dioxide sensors and for just being bad people for participating in activities that had outraged the neighborhood for three weeks — urinating in the yard, yelling all night, coming and going until the wee hours of the morning, and showing no concern for the rest of the neighborhood. Families live along Millstone Road. There are laws against this kind of thing. It’s not hard to locate “group” houses and landlords looking for 20 or 30 people to popu(continued on page 90)

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Bunny

(continued from page 61)

white line, hippity-hopping away from me for about 20 feet, after which he stopped again. He scratched his head. No, this is not right. I crept forward 20 feet, too, so now we were in the same relationship to one another as we were before, but further down. He looked at me. “Get out of the way!” I shouted louder. Well, running down the white line hadn’t worked. So I’ll try running off to one side again. And he did. But again he stopped. And then once again he ran across the road the other way. Maybe it’s THIS way. Was it this way? “Make up your damn mind!” I shouted at him. And so, finally, under this urging, he scam-

pered at top speed off in the direction he had first gone until he had gotten up a good hippity-hop across somebody’s well-mowed lawn. I’ve been occasionally thinking about this bunny. Our encounter was two nights ago. Had there been something physically wrong with him? Had he lost his compass? No. Once he got going into his happy, across-the-lawn hippityhop, he seemed quite normal and bunny-like. The incident was over. All was forgotten. Maybe this bunny was just like somebody who can’t stay focused. I know people like that. They start on something, then stop and start on something else. It makes you nuts. Maybe the bunny had perceived some predator on one or the other side of the road a few minutes before I appeared — a fox or some-

SEASON TWO: SUSTAINA BLE TREASURES T H URSDAYS, 8 : 0 0 P M, AVRAM T HEATER July 10

thing — and after seeing the headlights could not remember on which side of the road he was. Over here? Over there? Oh, God, which is it? Mostly, however, I think this bunny was just a compulsive worrier. People like that worry themselves sick. And if they stop worrying, they worry they have nothing to worry about. They go to doctors. Most doctors tell them to try not to worry. Worrying puts strain on your body. It can tire you out, shorten your lifespan. Better to see a psychiatrist and work out what it was in your past that caused you to become somebody who does all this worrying. Find it out, deal with it, and, when it comes up, have little tricks you do to get yourself to stop. Or perform the relaxing techniques you’ve learned. Start at the crown chakra and go all the way down to the bottoms of your feet. I want to tell all this to the bunny. But which way did he go? •

Handcuffs

(continued from previous page)

because it would be great publicity, as I regretted not having such a picture when it happened to me. He didn’t get it at first, which surprised me since he is an advertising man, but soon he did, and when the time came, he had somebody there at the ready. Vered’s arrest last month is therefore the fourth incident of its kind in the last 40 years. So I think we can be handcuff-free until perhaps 2018, if the trend continues. Of all those arrested, the only one who made any money out of it was Della Femina. He sued the village and won. I had never known that before. Seems to me that since I was his coach and manager at the time, he owes me a commission. •

Joint Concert with Pianofest/Brahms, Liebeslieder Waltzes, Op. 52

July 17 Jazz with Joel Frahm and friends

A Jazz Feast

July 24 Sylvia McNair (Cabaret) with Ted Taylor on piano

It’s Good to Have You Near Again

July 31 Jill Grove (Mezzo-soprano) with Kathleen Kelly on piano

August 7 Patrick Carfizzi (Bass-baritone) with Kathleen Kelly on piano

August 14 Christine Brewer (Soprano) with Craig Rutenberg on piano

August 21 New Jazz Generation with Chris Higgins (Bass), Frank LoCrasto (Piano), Greg Ritchie (Drums), and Rebecca Martin (Vocals)

(631)

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August 28 Liz McCartney (Cabaret) with Marcy McGuigan (Co-star), and Ray Fellman on piano

Rosemary and Time, a Tribute to the Life and Music of Rosemary Clooney

Tickets: $15–$40 To order tickets or for more information, visit www.stonybrook.edu/treasures or call (631) 632-8000. ON DISPLAY: Jim McMullan’s Theater Posters: First Sketches to Final Art Avram Gallery for the Arts, July 10 to September 8

S T O N Y B R OO K S O U T H A M P T ON

less than 100 gal. $10.00 off Expires 07/31/08

State University of New York

For a disability-related accommodation, call (631) 632-8000. Stony Brook University/SUNY is an affirmative action, equal opportunity educator and employer. 0803028 1145742

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DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 65 www.danshamptons.com

“Committee 2000” by Andy Warhol, edition 452 of 2000, signed and numbered, retail value $10,000

ARTHAMPTON Will Barnet Celebrated, Andy Warhol Auctioned By Susan Saiter Will Barnet, who will receive the first Hamptons Medal of the Arts for Lifetime Achievement Award on July 10, has had a career that’s lasted longer than many artists’ lives. But through all the twists and turns in the art world since he began in 1930, the 97year-old painter, lithographer, drawer and printmaker has always held tight to his own vision. As he put it, “I was my own person. I kept my own style.” Not that he kept doing the same thing over and over. He went through distinct periods, sometimes realistic, sometimes abstract. But, “There has always been an architectural

structure behind my work. I had something of my own to say, and it’s very individual, very humanistic in the figures and the portraits. Those are the main elements in my work, but it’s the structure that gives it my identity.” The award will be presented at a gala that kicks off a three-day art sale and series of evening fundraisers hosted by ArtHamptons at the Bridgehampton Historical Society. “We wanted to establish a tradition to honor a great living artist every year,” said Rick Friedman, ArtHamptons founder. “And the work of Will Barnet makes him pre-eminent, one of the top living painters in the US.” Barnet has donated a serigraph print,

“Summer Idyll,” to the event — bid price starts at $6,000. Barnet’s long New York career began in the 1930s. His work then reflected the themes of social realism. “I was greatly influenced by the situation around me, the conditions of people’s lives during the Depression,” Barnet said recently in an interview at his studio in the National Arts Club in New York. One of his most famous paintings from that first period is “Idle Hands,” depicting the despair of an outof-work man with his face buried in his arms, his useless hands resting on his elbows. As the Depression ended and Barnet mar(continued on page 68)

COWARDLY THREATS AGAINST QUOGUE COUPLE By Jennifer Coughlin What would you do if you walked up to your car and found a typed letter threatening your family and your safety? Call the police, right? That is exactly what Quogue residents Samantha Dettmer and Jeffrey Cully did. Except that rather than going directly to the Quogue Village Police Department, the couple contacted the State Police. In the past, Dettmer and Cully have made attempts to pursue a workforce housing project on their property on Montauk Highway. The couple worked extensively for almost a year to put the plan in motion. However, they

encountered a few hurdles, and the proposal fell through. It had not been discussed since. It is unclear why these threats were made. The first lines of the letter read, “This is your only warning! Do not pursue the workforce housing any further,” suggesting to the couple that a Quogue Village employee could be behind these threats. After the State Police were contacted, Dettmer called lifelong friend and mayor of Quogue, George Motz, who immediately notified the Quogue Village Police. Chief of Police Robert Coughlan sent officers Michael Fruin and John Galvin to the scene.

“Because such serious threats were made, I viewed this as a very serious thing,” Motz said. “I made sure that security and coverage were beefed up around their property. We’re still keeping special watch until all of this gets cleared up.” Since his election six years ago, Motz has been a huge advocate of workforce housing. When Dettmer contacted him about the houses on her property that could be easily converted, Motz saw it as a perfect opportunity. By replacing those houses with two new ones, there would be no increase in density of the (continued on the next page)

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 66 www.danshamptons.com

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property. With urging from Motz and even the Department of Health, the couple continued to work on getting their proposal passed by the village. Once they reached a hurdle, they stopped pursuing and the issue was closed. The next lines in the letter read, â&#x20AC;&#x153;You were warned about the real estate sign issues, but could not leave it alone. It would be a shame to have anything happen to your job, your family, or your old wooden buildings.â&#x20AC;? The letter goes on to threaten the coupleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s attorneys, Stephen Steinberg and Joseph Attonito. While both attorneys have expressed concern for their own safety, right now they are just focusing on the wellbeing of their clients. When the couple recently decided to put their house up for sale, they asked the village for special permission regarding the whereabouts of their â&#x20AC;&#x153;For Saleâ&#x20AC;? sign. Normally, the village requires the sign to be a specific distance from the road, but in this case, they allowed the couple to place the sign elsewhere because of the tall hedges in front of the property.

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According to Motz, Cully had asked to be placed on the villageâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s agenda to discuss â&#x20AC;&#x153;sign and other items.â&#x20AC;? As it turns out, a short time before the threats appeared on Dettmerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and Cullyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cars, their â&#x20AC;&#x153;For Saleâ&#x20AC;? sign had been stolen. The agenda, which took place this past Friday, was prepared to discuss the incidents on 107 Montauk Highway. Just one problem: Cully never showed up. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was hoping that Jeffrey and Samantha would be there,â&#x20AC;? Motz said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think we were all hoping to get a better feel of the situation.â&#x20AC;? It is unfortunate that only time will tell us answers to the questions raised by the hate mail. Who wrote the threats, and why? Was the intent to cause controversy? Why were the State Police contacted before the Village Police? Since the issue was made public, no new threats have been made to the family. Hopefully this is a sign that the mysterious author has given up, thanks to the increased security to the family, and public awareness of the incident.

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 67 www.danshamptons.com

Queen of Chic Jackie Rogers: Chanel Model, Fellini Actress, Designer By Victoria L. Cooper from driving.” And since that unforgettable her whole wheat pizzas and sweet red sauce. “I make seersucker sexy,” said Jackie Rogers night modeling in East Hampton she’s The long lines that wrapped the corner of Main about her new Gin Lane collection, a modern returned to the Hamptons and now lives in her Street and Hampton Road (where the Golden take on traditional seersucker that makes “Hansel and Gretel” house in Wainscott with Pear is now) included the likes of young budstripes glamorous and young. Rogers responds her dachshund, Ms. Lilly. ding designers Calvin Klein and Ralph to styles from the ‘20s and ‘30s, and Lauren. collects old magazines for inspiraAnd it’s exactly that sort of hybrid tion. “I love looking at copies of experience that Rogers seems to be Vanity Fair from the ‘30s. Women drawn to. After modeling and working with wide pants and white cotton with legendary “Mademoiselle” Coco gloves on their way to the ‘bathing Chanel in Paris, she returned to New club.’ It’s marvelous. So I took the York and started the then revolutioncotton, the seersucker and made it ary concept, a barbershop boutique. 2008.” Her attraction to the line and “One day I was getting my hair cut at cut stems directly from her unusual Vidal Sassoon when my hairdresser technique of “off grain” design. informed me he was cutting the hair Rogers doesn’t lay straight — she of 250 guys a week at night. I sugprefers less construction because gested we get together and work out then, “You wear the clothes, they of my apartment. He’d cut hair, I’d sell don’t wear you.” Ken Scott’s incredible men’s shirts — Rogers has been influencing the they were all the rage.” It was then Hamptons since the ‘60s when she that Jackie took a stride forward and first came out (back when there was created Jackie Rogers for Men, which Coco Chanel with the “Best models in Paris,” Rogers front and center just one driving lane) to model at the formed a whirlwind of publicity that late Robert David Lion Gardiner’s home in One thing you might not know about Rogers attracted some of the most fashionable names East Hampton. Gardiner was the last heir to is that she claims to have sold the very first of the day, such as Peter O’Toole, Winthrop bear the name of the family that has owned whole wheat pizza in Southampton. In 1972, Rockefeller, Jack Nicholson, Michael Douglas, Gardiner’s Island, on what is said to be one of Rogers opened her men’s clothing store in Gore Vidal and Woody Allen. The idea quickly the largest privately owned islands in the Southampton and by chance, opened up a expanded and her store became the hot spot. world. “It was great fun then. Everyone was so pizza parlor in the space next door called, “The “It was more like a 24/7 party. I remember much more sympathique. It used to be a three- Pizza Parlor next to Jackie Rogers.” She start- when they were shooting The Godfather and hour trip to get out to East Hampton — we ed making pizzas on July 4th weekend, and all the cast and crew came to hang out at my would even stop to get dinner and take a break the place buzzed with diners who wanted to try (continued on page 73)

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Art

(continued from page 65)

and he now feels they represent much of his best lifetime work. Paintings that remain among Barnet’s favorites are “Portrait of Roy R. Neuberger,” done in 1966-67, in which the tycoon’s office space almost overshadows him; “Portrait of T.T.M,” done in 1966, in which the subject is looking away from the lower torso of a nude adolescent girl; and “Homage to Leger, with KK.” At one point during his 70-plus-year career, Barnet was at the forefront of the Indian Space Painting movement. Much of his career as an artist has been as teacher, at such schools as the Art Students League of New York, where he himself studied, and at Yale University. He occasionally struggled to support his family, but times became less difficult for him in the 1970s, “when graphic art came in full bloom and was financially successful.” One of his favorite self-portraits was done in the Hamptons, where he spent many summers. He had always found himself working and socializing with other enormously successful artists, including Jackson Pollock. While he was never close friends with Willem de Kooning, Barnet said de Kooning did attend Barnet’s shows. Barnet’s works are held by the great museums of the world, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art in

Photo by Anne Sager

“Summer Idyll” by Will Barnet

ried and had children, his focus shifted to domestic scenes. One of his most famous oils is “Soft Boiled Eggs,” in which Barnet depicts his family. Barnet went through an abstract period, then returned to figures. He was divorced, then remarried in 1953 to Elena Cirulys. Elena’s mesmerizing blue, up-tilted eyes and enigmatic look, along with the darker and equally magnetic gaze of his daughter, Ona, captivate the viewer from the famous oil, “Mother and Child,” painted in 1961. Portraits became more important in Barnet’s work,

Will Barnet

New York, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the National Gallery of Art and the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. Babcock Galleries in New York represents him. Barnet may be 97 years old, but he is endlessly fascinating in conversation, and his deep brown eyes hold the same disconcerting intensity — almost as if he is looking through you, not at you — as those in self-portraits from his youth. An accident half-a-dozen years ago left Barnet unable to go out without a wheelchair. At home, he is quite mobile in a swivel chair that allows him to entertain guests, move about the studio and apartment, and to paint. Though not quite as much. “Before the accident, I used to work all day.” Now it’s a few hours a day. “Usually in the 1141916

(continued on page 92)

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 69 www.danshamptons.com

10 Years at WHBPAC State-of-the-Art Space Embraced by Community & Class Acts By Tricia Rayburn On August 5, 2005, Emmylou Harris, the multiple-Grammy Award winner whose musical career has spanned genres and decades, stopped singing long enough to turn to her rapt listeners and gently beseech them to care for their “rare bird.” It wasn’t just another signature heartfelt lyric — the renowned songstress was referring to the warm, intimate space of the Westhampton Beach Performing Arts Center, which, in an era of large, impersonal, corporation-owned-and-operated concert venues, is as rare as they come. Harris had been so moved while singing that she felt compelled to share

the moment with her audience. “Attending a show here is a special experience,” said Claire Bisceglia, Executive Director of the WHBPAC. “The hall is so embracing. It’s like being in a private living room — artists can actually see the audience, and guests can have eye contact with an artist, even when they’re sitting in the last row.” Harris’ request echoed the sentiment shared by thousands of local community members and concert-goers who, over the past 10 years, have rallied and raised millions of dollars so that the former United Artists movie theater could survive and thrive as a performing arts center. The transformation began in May 1997, when

a not-for-profit community group led by investor Len Conway and retailer Lon Sabella bought the rundown theater for $300,000. In less than a year, the group raised 60 percent of the $2.8 million needed to turn the space into a state-of-the-art facility. “Back then the village had some issues,” said Bisceglia. “They wanted to be more of a family community, and they thought the theater could be a rallying point for the arts and local economy.” Anyone who’s walked Westhampton’s buzzing, bustling Main Street on a Saturday night in the middle of the summer knows vil(continued on the next page)

READING IN THE HAMPTONS AT STARBUCKS? NOT. By Dan Rattiner Every week, I have been reading individual chapters of the new memoir I have written, In the Hamptons, in different locations around the Hamptons. I have read chapters at Andy Warhol’s estate, at Long Pond, deep in the woods between Bridgehampton and Sag Harbor, at the gazebo in the center of the town green in Montauk and at Atlantic Avenue Beach in Amagansett. I also have had many readings at bookstores and museums and libraries. It’s easy to do this with the chapters in this book because each of the 32 chapters is about 32 different individuals

I have known, including town characters, celebrities and just plain oddballs during the 50 years of running Dan’s Papers. Some of the readings have been great fun. We had Shank Dickenson of Indian Field Ranch in Montauk take attendees down to the beach in Montauk by horsedrawn wagon. We’ve had the owners of Coecles Harbor Boatworks on Shelter Island serve lemonade on the dock to the attendees when I read the chapter on Billy Joel there. I’ve had as many as 30 people attend these readings. This past Friday at 11, I had scheduled a reading at Starbucks in Bridgehampton. I’d

talked to Chris, the manager there, about a month before, and he said it would be fine. Starbucks used to be a bank. I wanted to talk about a former bank president, Merton Tyndall, who long ago lent me money on a handshake for three years before the FDIC put a stop to that. In any case, on the morning in question, about 8:30, it occurred to me that I did not know if anyone had contacted Chris in the past week or so to reconfirm everything, so I called over there. The person who answered said Chris would not be in until three, but the assistant manager, Pete, would be in around 10. Since I (continued on page 93)

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lage members were right, but the WHBPAC encountered significant challenges during its early days. The financial assistance from local community members and business people was astounding, but the board still had to borrow a total of $1.8 million from North Fork Bank when the theater reopened in 1998. Booking talent also proved to be problematic, as the brand-new, 425-seat theater was competing against the likes of Madison Square Garden and Carnegie Hall. “We would make phone calls and people would ask, ‘Where are you?’” said Bisceglia. “It took years to earn respect from booking agencies and talent. But it’s a pretty small club once you’re in it, and people talk to each other. Word got out about our care and professional-

ism, and soon artists used to playing for 30,000 people were adding us to their tour.” Ten years later, the debt’s all paid and some of the biggest names in music — from classical to jazz to alternative — and entertainment are taking to the WHBPAC’s small stage. The Neville Brothers and Boz Scaggs perform this weekend, and throughout the summer Kathleen Battle (July 19), Donna Summer (July 27), K.T. Tunstall (August 3), Herbie Hancock (August 17) and many more will break from stadium-sized tradition to interact with fans in a way they can’t anywhere else. And the fun’s not just for adults; seven weekly day camps, including theater, ballet and Shakespeare, will entertain and engage children of all ages. These performances and

camps comprise the summer portion of a yearround schedule that includes MainStage productions, ongoing children’s arts education, a film series, lectures and special events. To celebrate their success — and ensure even greater future success, in the form of quality programming for all ages and, eventually, a performing arts academy — the Center’s now focusing on expansion. They’ve acquired property and two buildings directly behind the theater, which they purchased with help from generous donors and fundraising, and which were completely renovated by local contractors, electricians, plumbers and landscapers — all of whom offered their services, free of charge. “You know how they say it takes a village? Well, it does,” said Bisceglia. “Everyone on our staff wears many hats. We have an enormously dedicated Board of Directors, a women’s council that extends our reach even further into the community, 80 volunteers and, of course, the community-at-large.” And every little bit helps. While the Center’s come far in 10 years and has hosted more than 325,000 guests, every new year brings the same challenge: raising the $1.2 million required to keep the doors open. Even if the Center sells every single ticket to every single performance throughout the year, those profits only cover half of its operating costs. Which means fundraising, private donations and continued community effort will always be essential. Of course, in the case of the Center, shared effort means shared reward — for Westhampton Beach, the East End (Southampton’s only 15 minutes away) and beyond. “I stand in the lobby and watch people arrive. They come from the area, from Nassau County, even as far as Connecticut and Pennsylvania,” said Bisceglia. “And I call it ‘Noah’s Ark’ — they come in, two by two, in good moods and happy to be seeing a show. But when they leave, they’re all talking and laughing together as a group. Every night, we create a community.” Tom Poole, WHBPAC board member and 10th Anniversary chairman, added, “It’s an honor to help celebrate the ‘little gem’s’ 10th anniversary. I am so happy and thankful that our friends of the theater, both old and new, have stepped forward to lend their time, talent and wealth to help move the theater forward for many, many more years.” Emmylou Harris needn’t worry. Her “rare bird” is in very good hands. Westhampton Beach Performing Arts Center, 76 Main Street, Westhampton Beach, 631-2881500, whbpac.org.

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DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 71 www.danshamptons.com

Who’s Here

Photo by Alan Pearlman

By Gina Glickman Everyone knows Barbara Walters as a TV news personality and, most recently, the host of ABC’s “The View.” And many know that Walters, who has been in the business since 1960, is more than a daytime host: She was the first woman to coanchor on “The Today Show” and ABC’s “Evening News.” Born in Massachusetts in 1929, Walters was surrounded by celebrities at an early age — her father was a theatrical booking agent and Broadway producer who opened a string of nightclubs in the 1930s. As a result of her exposure to high-profile people throughout her life, she was rarely intimidated. A graduate of Sarah Lawrence College, Walters worked as a publicist and then a writer at CBS News. She joined “The Today Show” in 1961 as a writer and researcher, became a reporter-at-large and conducted her own interviews. She became the first female co-host of the show in 1974 — an appointment that occurred only after the death of host Frank McGee, who refused to share the limelight with Walters. In the late ‘70s Walters joined the “Evening News,” and many people know of her difficult relationship with Harry Reasoner, who never wanted a co-anchor. She joined “20/20” in 1979, and the rest is ‘herstory.’ Walters, a pioneer in the news industry, paved the way for all woman journalists worldwide — including me. So it was with great excitement and trepidation that I approached the opportunity to sit down with this true American idol. One hot Saturday evening in the summer of 2006, I was covering a film premiere at the Southampton theater. I just finished an interview with Adrian Brody when Walters shuffled down the red carpet and sped past a frenzy of photographers and video cameras. I politely approached her, asking kindly if she’d answer a few questions on camera. She smiled and replied, “Not today. Let’s try next time.” Fast-forward to the next time: summer 2007, a warm Sunday evening, on the red carpet again for another film premiere in Southampton. (Walters stays at an estate in Southampton which she rents, an arrangement she prefers to owning.) I was told Walters would agree to an interview. Yet again, she shuffled past the press into the theater. Yet again, I politely approached her. “Hello. I’ve traveled far and I’ve been waiting several hours just to ask you a few questions. It will only take a few minutes.” She paused, smiled, then whispered, “I’m sorry. I’m off today, but I owe ya one.” Fast-forward to a sweltering hot Saturday

Barbara Walters Journalist afternoon, June 2008, inside the Book Revue in Huntington, where Walters was scheduled for a signing of her tell-all memoir, Audition. I was told she had agreed to an interview. As I waited, Walters’ press rep informed me that she was running late, coming in from the city, and would not be able to do any interviews.

Hundreds of Walters’ fans were lined up at the front door waiting to meet and get their book autographed by the TV legend turned author. Clearly, I had a limited amount of time, so I led with the question I was burning to have answered. It related to the recent press surrounding her memoir, and how she shared intimate stories about her professional and personal life — including an affair she had in the ‘70s, when she was in her 50s. The affair was with married U.S. Senator Edward Brooke, whom she remembers as “exciting” and “brilliant.” A moderate Republican from Massachusetts who took office in 1967, Brooke was the first African-American to be popularly elected to the Senate. Both he and Walters knew that public knowledge of their affair could have ruined his career as well as hers, she said. Walters, who will turn 80 next year but has more energy than a woman half her age, recently appeared on “Oprah” to promote her memoir. Winfrey asked if she had been in love with Brooke, who later divorced, and has since remarried. “I was certainly — I don’t know — I was certainly infatuated. I was certainly involved,” Walters said. “He was exciting. He was brilliant. It was exciting times in Washington.” In my minutes-long interview, I asked, “Did you regret anything you revealed in the book, including having an affair with a married man?” Walters replied, “I decided when I wrote the book that if people wanted to know my story they had to have the whole package. This is the whole package. I wanted to do it about my life and my career so that it was something people could relate to — the struggles, the good times, the glamorous times, the difficult times from childhood on.” “And, what about the affair?”I asked. Walters continued, “I know it’s very revealing and I know there are things people will learn they didn’t know before. But, I didn’t see the reason in writing a book if it wasn’t going to be honest.” During my meeting, it was clear that Walters was aware she was “onstage,” but certainly not “auditioning” anymore. She moved gracefully, had a calm presence and was totally on her game, never missing a beat as she joked with fans. I asked, “Does your hand ever get tired after signing thousands of books?” “Somehow, I don’t get tired! I really enjoy meeting new people,” she said, graciously autographing my copy of her memoir. As the only reporter to interview Walters on that day, I was grateful that, in my case, three was a charm. Of all the many things Walters has accomplished, she is also, indeed, a woman of her word.

“I decided when I wrote the book that if people wanted to know my story, they had to have the whole package.” When Walters arrived, I again approached her and said, “Are you a woman of your word?” I briefly recounted my past attempts to interview her, and how she most recently told me, “I owe ya one.” Walters paused, nodded, smiled and said, “Okay!”

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 72 www.danshamptons.com

EH Gets Bond Break, Signatures Mount Against McGintee

mission to pay off its deficit through borrowing, both passing the Assembly and the Senate. If signed by the governor, these items would become law...but with stipulations. According to the legislation, EH Town would be subject to state scrutiny for the life of any bond, which could be as long as 10 years. Furthermore, the town must deliver quarterly budget reports to the state comptroller, as well

as copies of its proposed annual budgets, plus offer a three-year financial plan, notification of any plan to borrow money, all finalized with a requirement that the comptroller confirm and certify the amount of the town’s deficit before any bond may be issued (McGintee claims the town’s deficit is actually only between $9-10 million). But that may not be enough to relax the pointing fingers. McGintee took some major heat at the most recent town board meeting. A crowded room of onlookers watched as Independence Party Chairwoman Elaine Jones took the Town Supervisor to task. Jones took the podium with fervor, criticizing McGintee for an issue involving unused sick time compensation earned by her late husband, actually tearing up the town-offered settlement that she feels was calculated unfairly. Her efforts to have an impact on McGintee didn’t end there, as she has been circulating a petition around town, referencing recent financial infractions, and urging the supervisor to step down from his post. Could this actually work? According to Jones, “Well I don’t think he’s going to go…but we are discussing how to go about removing him. I’ll have to go to the Supreme Court, and I’m currently seeing a lawyer on what [our options] are.” She’s looking for 1,000 signatures, which she feels confident will be achieved. 1,000 people against anyone on the town level can be an important factor, especially if they arrive en masse at the voting center.

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By Ian Stark Let’s face it. Things just are not going smoothly these days for East Hampton Town Supervisor Bill McGintee, and therefore, for the town itself. Remember those heady days not so long ago, when the town was $12 million dollars in the black, and EH Town had an Aa1 credit rating — the highest and strongest bond rating on the Island? Granted, economic issues aren’t always dinner conversation, but once it become public knowledge that now, in 2008, that oncehealthy surplus dwindled to a debt that the State Comptroller’s Office considers to be in excess of $14 million, and that perfect credit rating tumbled four tiers — in one report — the actions of the Town Supervisor have started people talking. However, this past week ended as a positive for Democrat McGintee, as East Hampton Town gained permission from the State Legislature to borrow up to $15 million through bonding to repair the deficit, with a promise kept by a member of the opposing party. In these pages, Assemblyman Fred W. Thiele, Jr. (R, I, C - Sag Harbor) stated: “This is clearly a local decision as to how to close this deficit. [state] Senator [Kenneth P.] LaValle and I certainly are available to assist the Town in any way they wish.” True to his word, the two representatives sponsored bills in their respective legislative bodies that would give EH Town special per-

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 73 www.danshamptons.com

Chic

(continued from page 67)

place â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the last salon existed in Who doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to feel good in my store.â&#x20AC;? their clothes? But sometimes Zest. Gusto. Passion. These are thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s that pair of empire-waist some terms that encompass pants that are a little too starchy, Rogersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; livelihood. Her career has or that great shirt thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s unflatstretched from band singer, film tering in the sleeve â&#x20AC;&#x201D; which is starlet (for Fellini in the movie, 8 why Rogers creates clothes based 1/2), Coco Chanelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s preferred on how they feel. When she first model and now owner of four started with menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s clothing, she retails stores with locations in gave the pieces silk pockets. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I East Hampton, Southampton, was hoping men would put their Manhattan and Palm Beach. hands in their pockets and smile. Romantic highlights include datDetails on that level are very ing a European prince, Sammy important. I want to make all my Davis Jr., Dean Martin and Kirk clients happy.â&#x20AC;? Douglas â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and driving Frank Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s great about the Gin Sinatra to work on the weekends. Lane Collection â&#x20AC;&#x201D; other than the But, perhaps her most impressive colors and soft materials â&#x20AC;&#x201D; is the pairing didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t involve a famous fact that Rogers is donating all man. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am the only designer the proceeds from the sales of her today who ever worked with the adorable pet â&#x20AC;&#x153;love knots,â&#x20AC;? plus a Jackie Rogers with Marcello Mastroianni on the set of 8 1/2, directed by Federico Fellini great Coco Chanel,â&#x20AC;? explains portion of sales from clothing, to Rogers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was a great experience; the Animal Rescue Fund of the Jackie Onassis, finally put her on the map as she influenced the way I make clothes. I one of the foremost American designers. Today, Hamptons. The love knots are available in learned that fashion doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t start with design. her following includes recognized women in seersucker, gingham, denim and many colors. Everything comes from fabrication â&#x20AC;&#x201D; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like politics, finance and entertainment, including Rogers will soon come out with a memoir of sculpting.â&#x20AC;? And when Rogers told Chanel that Condoleezza Rice, Gwyneth Paltrow, Salma her many â&#x20AC;&#x153;livesâ&#x20AC;? and lovers, but plans to stay she was leaving Europe to design clothes for Hayek, Julianne Moore, Nicole Kidman and out on the East End as much as possible. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The men, Chanel responded, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s great. Those Courtney Love. Just recently, Rogers fitted lighting is just so beautiful,â&#x20AC;? says Rogers. And women will drive you insane, anyway.â&#x20AC;? Bethenny Frankel from â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Real Housewives perhaps the area also serves as a pleasant But perhaps Chanel was wrong. The women of New York Cityâ&#x20AC;? in her new Gin Lane reminder of how far sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s come from the days didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t drive Rogers insane. In fact, women Collection for the Belmont Stakes. Frankel of whole wheat pizza. â&#x20AC;&#x153;For any artist itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s imporflocked to her simple and elegant designs. Lee looked fabulous in a seersucker jumpsuit, tant to remember that where thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a will, Radizwell, who brought Rogers to her sister, which Rogers raced to fit in 48 hours. thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a way.â&#x20AC;?

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from Peter Cook continues to make headlines. Brinkley’s daughter with Billy Joel, Alexa Ray, recently told People magazine that she’s proud of her mom for standing up for herself. And the other younger woman, Diana Bianchi, has been preparing to testify at the divorce trial and was spotted sharing breakfast and strategy with lawyer Rosemarie Arnold at The Maidstone Arms in East Hampton. * * * Rock star “Sir Ivan” will be bringing a ‘60s groove and a message of love to the White House in Hampton Bays this Saturday, July 5. He’ll be visiting his old pal, DJ Victor Calderone, and handing out 3,000 copies of his latest single from his new album, his own version of the Stephen Stills/Buffalo Springfield 1968 classic cry for peace, “For What It’s Worth.” The tune fits in perfectly with Sir Ivan’s Peaceman Foundation, which supports anti-violence campaigns. * * * Novelist Alan Furst has called Sag Harbor home for 15 years, and written many of his successful spy novels right here in the Hamptons. His latest, The Spies of Warsaw, was published by Random House this month, and deemed “smarter and more soulful than most espionage spy novels being written today” by The New York Times. * * * Entourage star Adrian Grenier will celebrate his birthday in the Hamptons on July 10. Rumor has it that instead of cake and presents, the popular birthday boy’s asking for $50,000 just to show up. It hasn’t been confirmed whether any of the area’s hot spots have taken him up on the offer, or if Grenier will be blowing out candles alone. * * * Image director Montgomery Frazier and Debbie Bancroft were at the opening of designer Jackie Rogers’ new Southampton boutique last weekend. The Coco Chanel ingénue has designed pieces worn by Lindsay Lohan, Diana Ross, Courtney Love, Julianne Moore, Condoleezza Rice, Nicole Kidman, Gwyneth Paltrow and Patty Lupone. * * * For over two decades, the annual Artists Studio Tour of The Hamptons, sponsored by the Artists Alliance of East Hamptons (AAEH), has provided art lovers and collectors with the unique opportunity to view the creative workspaces of artists who practice their craft on the South Fork. The annual Summer Tour will take place this year on Thursday, July 10 to Saturday, July 12, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. A special advance Preview Exhibition and Reception showcasing the (continued on the next page)

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 75 www.danshamptons.com

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Judy Gold to perform at the JCOH Thanks to the efforts of Guild Hall and The Jewish Center of the Hamptons, actress, writer and comedian Judy Gold will perform her stand-up comedy on July 12 at 8 p.m. at the Center. Known for her critically acclaimed onewoman, Off-Broadway show, 25 Questions for a Jewish Mother, Gold has also won two Emmy Awards for writing and producing “The Rosie O’Donnell Show.” She’s appeared on numerous TV shows, hosting HBO’s “At the Multiplex with Judy Gold,” as well as Comedy Central’s “100 Greatest Stand-ups of All Time,” and twice was nominated for The American Comedy Award’s funniest female stand-up. Tickets are $40 and $35 for Guild Hall and Jewish Center members. Call 631-324-9858 or go to jcoh.org for more information or to purchase tickets.

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DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 76 www.danshamptons.com

ADVERTORIAL Beyond Long-Only Commodity Investment By Managed Account Research, Inc. A well embraced tenant of prudent investing is to diversify your portfolio amongst distinct types of assets which may respond differently to various economic conditions. Be that as it may, Mark Twainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s classic character Puddâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;nhead Wilson turns conventional wisdom on its head by noting the opposite: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Behold, the fool saith, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Put not all thine eggs in the one basketâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; which is but a manner of saying, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Scatter your money and your attention,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; but the wise man saith, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Put all your eggs in the one basket and... watch that basket.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Notwithstanding the spirit of truth in Puddâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;nheadâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s maxim, a sentiment echoed by Warren Buffet who once said â&#x20AC;&#x153;wide GLYHUVLĂ&#x20AC;FDWLRQLVRQO\UHTXLUHGZKHQLQYHVWRUVGRQRWXQGHUVWDQGZKDWWKH\DUHGRLQJÂľSURSHUGLYHUVLĂ&#x20AC;FDWLRQLVDSURYHQPHWKRG to improve the long-term probability of upside performance as well as downside risk exposure. The key is to know how to diversify properly. This is even more so true when considering investment exposure to commodities. The inherent problem is that commodities are not capital assetsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;they are consumable, transformable and perishable assets in which physical ownership does not generate a yield, but a cost-of-carry. Since owning hard assets is not convenient unless one is a â&#x20AC;&#x153;commercial,â&#x20AC;? exposure to commodities as an asset class usually takes place through derivatives trading or investment vehicles which trade derivatives. Derivatives are risk management tools, a â&#x20AC;&#x153;zero-sum game,â&#x20AC;? fundamentally different from the â&#x20AC;&#x153;rising tide raises all shipsâ&#x20AC;? concept of the capital formation markets. The conundrum is that for every buyer of a commodity futures contract there is a sellerâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;sine qua non, there is no intrinsic valueâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;they are simply agreements which commit a seller to deliver an asset to a buyer DWVRPHSODFHSRLQWLQWLPH+HQFHFRPPRGLW\LQYHVWLQJIDFLOLWDWHGIRUĂ&#x20AC;QDQFLDOUDWKHUWKDQFRPPHUFLDOUHDVRQVLVFRQVLGHUHG speculative. That said, in recent years there has been a proliferation of indices which purportedly represent proxies for various markets. Financial innovation, in turn, has converted these proxies into investment products such as ETFs. As a result, investors can now, more than ever, easily diversify their investment portfolios across multiple sectors, in what Goldman Sachs has termed the â&#x20AC;&#x153;multiple betaâ&#x20AC;? approach. %XWGRWKHVHLQYHVWPHQWYHKLFOHVRIWHQHPSOR\LQJDSUHGHĂ&#x20AC;QHGSDVVLYHSRUWIROLRPHWKRGRORJ\DOZD\VVHUYHLQYHVWRUV¡ EHVWLQWHUHVWZLWKUHVSHFWWRFRQVWUXFWLQJZHOOGLYHUVLĂ&#x20AC;HGSRUWIROLRV":HWKLQNQRWÂŤ7KHLURQLFWZLVWLVWKDWWKHPXOWLSOHEHWDSDUDGLJP KDVSRUWHGVNLOOHGEDVHGLQYHVWPHQWGHFLVLRQVFDOOHG´DOSKDÂľE\Ă&#x20AC;QDQFLDOVHUYLFHVSURIHVVLRQDOVWRWKHLQYHVWRU ,QWKHQRWVRGLVWDQWSDVWWKHGHPLVHRIWKHXQSUHFHGHQWHGVVEXOOPDUNHWLQHTXLWLHVOHIWPDQ\LQYHVWRUVGLVSXWLQJ the case for a pure â&#x20AC;&#x153;buy and holdâ&#x20AC;? strategy. Accordingly, investors increasingly turned to investment alternatives, particularly SURJUDPVWKDW JHQHUDWH´DOSKDÂľRUVNLOOHGEDVHGUHWXUQVWKDWH[FHHGWKHSHUIRUPDQFHRIĂ&#x20AC;QDQFLDOPDUNHWV7KLVFKDQJHLQSUDFWLFH has been further validated by the growing institutional demand for active management via hedge funds. We believe that passive long-only commodity investment is at a similar juncture, one where investors will come to realize that VWUDWHJLFDQGWDFWLFDOWUDGLQJLQFRPPRGLWLHVLVWKHSULPDU\UHWXUQGULYHU0DQDJHGIXWXUHVĂ&#x20AC;OOVWKDWJDSDVLWVUHWXUQVDUHSULPDULO\ based on a broad range of strategies, styles and blended approaches. The key is the skill of the trader, who puts all eggs in one basket and then watches that basket closely, with the next step knowing how to diversify across a portfolio of these traders. For these and many other reasons, we think that commodities are vastly different from most other types of asset classes. Investing in general, particularly in commodity traders, is a combined craft of art and science best learned by experience. 4XDOLWDWLYHDQDO\VLVLVUHTXLUHGWREDODQFHTXDQWLWDWLYHPRGHOV$FFRUGLQJO\DSUDFWLFHGJXLGLQJKDQGFDQEHYHU\KHOSIXOLQ constructing managed futures portfolios. With approximately 50 years of combined experience in the managed futures space, the team at Managed Account Research specializes in helping institutions and high net worth individuals diversify into commodity trading programs. For more information, contact Danielle Mendiburu at dmendiburu@ma-research.com. 1146451

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 77 www.danshamptons.com

Whispers With Gina Glickman INDEPENDENCE DAY — VIP STYLE It’s time to celebrate America the Beautiful, Hamptons-style, and that usually means invite-only or word-of-mouth events. So, slip into something red, white and blue, and follow this holiday map to good times! Thursday, July 3. A lucky few will be kicking off the holiday weekend with TV personality, author and professional matchmaker, Samantha Daniels, who is hosting one of her fabulous Red, White and Blue theme parties at her private home. We hear Samantha is taking the night off, but you can bet there will be sparks flying between guests, thanks to her strategic party planning, which includes Strip Poker, Naked Twister and Spin the Red Bull. Friday, July 4. Bravo’s “The Real Housewives of New York City” reality stars will be celebrating their Season II contracts at Jill Zarin’s 5th Annual July 4th bash, draped in Zarin Fabrics and catered by Creative Cuisine. Jill always delivers amazing gift bags, to boot. Guests will feast on a seafood bar, sushi, passed mini-meals and ice cream sundaes topped with red, white and blue sprinkles. Bethenny Frankel will tend bar, servin’ up her signature Skinny Girl Cocktails. If you are desperate for an invite, try signing up for Zarin’s newsletter at . Hands down, the all-around best event on July 4th for any age is the 21st Annual American Picnic Fireworks by Grucci in Southampton! This is a memorable experience packed with all kinds of activities including carnival games, picnic dinner and the most incredible Grucci fireworks display on the East End. The best part of this event is that all proceeds benefit the children of the Southampton Fresh Air Home! Call 631-2835847 for event and ticket details. Saturday, late night, the place to be is outside at Lily Pond nightclub! We hear the East Hampton hotspot will celebrate with a HUGE surprise performance. The mystery singer will perform the national anthem. We also hear that the V1 Jets Royale package is 90 percent sold out at Lily Pond for the July 4th weekend. The package, which is featured on Lily Pond’s bottle menu, includes two tickets aboard a V1 Jet from New York City to East Hampton, chauffeured Bentley service from the airport to the club and a Jerabaum of Cristal with your Lily Pond table. The package sells for $10,000 a pop. Speaking of mystery guests, last Saturday, V1 Jets threw Dina Lohan’s “Living Lohan” Hamptons screening — the lovely Dina spent the entire night (until 2:30 a.m.) in the VIP booth with a group of her closet friends. A spy reports, “Dina had the best time, she hung out with friends and drank bottled water all night.” Saturday, July 5. Stop by designer Lisa Perry’s fabulous Mod-style exclusive Sag Harbor boutique for a sparkling cocktail or two. Then head over to Bay Street Theatre to spend the evening with Bill Clinton, Al Gore, Sean Connery, Regis Philbin, Dan (continued on page 95)

The Gateway to the Hamptons starts at exit 70 A great weekend starts at King Kullen. For your shopping convenience, King Kullen east-end locations include: Bridgehampton • Cutchogue • Center Moriches Eastport • Hampton Bays • Manorville • Riverhead • Wading River King Kullen carries Long Island’s largest variety of Boars Head Products.

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On the Edge

By Victoria Cooper

Concierges Who Do Anything (Almost...) By Victoria L. Cooper “Summertime and the living’s easy,” as the band Sublime and Gershwin song go. But how easy has the living gotten? Just ask any one of the numerous concierge services out on the East End such as Hamptons Concierge, Hamptons Angels, Your Village Butler or Hampton Delivery Services — they would be happy to help you ease into your new role as a guest in your own home. Some say that time is a thief and it’s especially true if you’re a second, third or

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fourth homeowner on the East End because keeping up the property is not exactly a quick scrub down. But the days of having to worry about making that massage appointment, picking up dry cleaning or keeping up with the seasonal décor are over. In the past 20 years, the concierge industry has grown tremendously — expanding from something that was only seen in exclusive hotels to a business that due to our highpaced lifestyle and culture is advertised as a necessity rather than a luxury. The evolution of the word concierge has come a long way. First derived from a French word meaning “gatekeeper” or “keeper of the keys,” its origins have close ties to the time of nobles, castles and palaces with that medieval, servantlike flair. It was the concierge’s duty to see to the needs of VIP guests as well as keeping track of the many keys to the rooms in the castle — the crossed key remains a symbol of the concierge profession today. But our culture has redefined this once “key keeper” into part personal assistant, part event planner and part life supporter. When it all boils down, all things concierge is about being “in the club,” otherwise known as Les Clefs d’Or, the Society of Golden Keys. In 1952, delegates from nine countries met in Cannes to hold the first congress and created L’Union Europeene Des Portiers Des Grands Hotel (U.E.P.G.H.). Ferdinand Gillet, who was the Chief Concierge at the Hotel Scribe in Paris, made its creation possible. Today the industry knows him as the father of Les Clefs d’Or. Having grown impressively, membership numbers about 5,000 from 30 countries, the latest entry being the Philippines. To become a member of the association, applicants must have a minimum of five years experience as Concierge in a hotel of good standing and be proposed and seconded by two active members of the Clefs d’Or. If you can’t manage to get into this exclusive society, fret not — in 1998 The National Concierge Association (NCA) was established to promote the highest level of competence in the profession and all it takes to become a member is filling out an application. A Chief Concierge will do anything you ask as long as it is morally, legally and humanly possible. Grocery list at Citarella? Mail pickup from the post office while you’re down in St. Barth’s in February? Village beach permits? How about home Reiki or acupuncture services or prescription pick up at East Hampton Pharmacy? Done. Done. And done. The Concierge services in the Hamptons run the gamut. Here are some of the highlights of available services. Your Village Butler boasts the motto, “Your Personal Assistant Service in the Hamptons” and explains its philosophy as “It is our belief that a vacation home is just that — a retreat that is ready when you are.” Services include: House Checking — We are here when you can’t be. Lifestyle Management — When your life gets too hectic, we can help. House Prepping — (continued on page 91)

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 79 www.danshamptons.com

East Hampton: A CliffsNotes History from 1648 By T.J. Clemente The founding of the settlement of Maidstone, later to be called Easthampton (the separation of the words East and Hampton didn’t happen until 1885) is a story of commitment, vision and luck. Historian Henry Hedges, in a lecture given in 1849, made some remarkable points. The first settlers were surrounded by Indians, as Hedges recalled, “On the east, at Montaukett, the Royal Wyandanch swayed the scepter. On the north, at Shelter Island, his brother Poggatacut ruled the tribe of Manhassets, and a third brother by the name of Nowedinah presided over the destinies of the Shinnecock tribe.” There was no contact with Southampton — wilderness separated original settlers John Hand, Thomas Talmage Jr., Daniel Howe, Thomas Thomson, John Mulford, John Stratton, Robert Bond, Robert Rose and Joshua Barnes. Six of the settlers came from Lynn, Massachusetts, as did the original settlers of Southampton eight years earlier. The luck was that the land had plenty of fish, deer and very fertile lands suitable for farming. But it took a stern commitment to build on the land the foundations and traditions of what is now the Town of East Hampton. They settled around the Pond in 8 to 12 acre plots of land. The original homes were small with thatched roofs. The original church of 1653 was located on the east end of the burial ground. East Hampton actually existed practically as an independent country until it formally merged with Connecticut in 1657. It wasn’t until 1664 under the reign of Charles II, that East Hampton was declared, as was all of Long Island, part of New York. During the American Revolution, after Washington’s decisive defeat at the Battle of Long Island, the British occupied the Town of East Hampton, taking over the choice homes to house officers and crown officials. The British seized farm animals and crops as they wished, often torturing women to get information about their husbands, many of whom fled to Connecticut while others fought bravely in resistance to the brutality of their captors. There are accounts that after the war it was very hard for the occupying British forces to leave East Hampton, considering it was such a pleasant place. At this time, part of the British Fleet under Admiral Arbuthnot was permanently anchored in Gardiner’s Bay. In fact the British chose Colonel Abraham Gardiner’s home (now home of Ladies Village Improvement Society) as their headquarters. Summering in East Hampton then were the likes of Sir Henry Clinton, Lord Percy, Governor William Tyron, as well as the infamous Major Andre, who left East Hampton for his fatal trip to West Point with wine glasses given to him by the Gardiners. In 1845, East Hampton resident Julia Gardiner, then referred to as “The Rose of Long Island” due to her beauty, became the wife of then widowed President John Tyler in a ceremony in New York City. Her father, buried in the South End Burial Ground, was

killed in an explosion of a new weapon aboard the Navy vessel Princeton — in front of President Tyler and a dozen other government

officials. The legend is that President Tyler was the first face she saw after fainting when informed her father had died. She too would have died had she not felt faint and went down below before the failed weapon demonstration. The town remained remote until 1895, when the LIRR conducted direct train service to and from New York City. It was quite a sight when the tracks were being laid down because, due to legal battles concerning properties to be traversed, the LIRR actually started in East Hampton to lay track west to Bridgehampton, and east to Amagansett and Montauk. The steam locomotive “Clement” (continued on page 111)

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DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 80 www.danshamptons.com

By T.J. Clemente A very salient issue these days in the Hamptons, and perhaps all over New York State, is the increase in taxes for homeowners — even as the value of their homes and properties decline. In tough times, homeowners have a tendency to scrutinize their home assessments. One expert recently explained that if all assessed real estate values in an area are down 20%, unless the town budget is reduced 20%, taxes will remain the same. That hasn’t stopped homeowners across the state from taking their tax bills to town halls to challenge their assessments. New York State

has had the distinction of having one of the highest property tax rates in the nation, and now both Governor Paterson and the State Commission on Property Tax Relief are in agreement to support a property tax cap so that the taxes that many believe have hit a crisis level don’t destroy the very way of life they were suppose to insure. To those who wonder how their assessments are still going up as the overall real estate market is not, the answer is simple: there are caps to how much a home assessment can go up per year. And whereas home values have gone up a historical 10 times in the last 30 years, in most

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cases, assessments were limited to about 6% a year. One resident said that when the value of her home was going up around $120,000 a year and her equity in the home was growing more than her salary, she was not as focused on tax increases. Now, she said her home value — and salary — have stabilized. Although she isn’t growing equity in the home, her fuel costs (plus other overhead items, such as insurances) are going up, so she’s feeling the squeeze. Second homeowners complain that they are paying school taxes to two towns: the one where they live, and the one were their second home is. The situation in East Hampton, where the town’s government and spending has grown beyond its resources, has been capturing local headlines. The truth is, both Republicans and Democrats have turned a blind eye to the fact that increased services cost more. But there is a constant tax base – that is, the taxable population has stayed about the same while the actual population is growing. This means a greater burden to the taxable individuals. Throw in that the cost of healthcare is perhaps the hardest uncontrollable item to forecast in town budgets, and town officials are in a very difficult position. Supervisor McGintee and the Town of East Hampton are getting an expensive education on these issues. Board members are quick to shout “fire,” but where are their solutions, other than to distance themselves from decisions they had voted on before completing diligent research? In recent months the Supervisor’s office has visited the issue of reassessment for the whole town, citing too many homes and properties still undervalued on the books. McGintee has reportedly said that some sort of tax increase will be needed to shore up the town’s fiscal situation. Opponents are saying, “Don’t blame me, I voted for Wilkinson,” but what jobs, departments and services did Wilkinson promise to eliminate? The real problem lies in the fact that as the town provides more services, it costs more. Better education costs more. Maintaining top-rate fire and police departments costs more. Fixing roads and highways costs more. One resident had Mayor Bloomberg’s approach in reverse. Let’s put a toll up on Route 27 entering Southampton. If you don’t live on Long Island, it’s $20. We can say we want to keep our air clean like he did — not that we want the money for our towns. In a visit to Town Hall I was informed that actual real estate tax payments are not being made by mortgage lenders, because they are not being paid by homeowners who don’t have the money and opt instead to pay a late penalty. Lynn Ryan in McGintee’s office said this situation is problematic. So, even if your home’s value is going down, your tax bill may rise. You can request a reassessment, and you can vote against every school tax increase, but no matter who gets elected, things are going to cost more, and unless services are scaled back, taxes are going to go up.

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 81 www.danshamptons.com

At Shelter Island Lounge, It’s Your Pleasure By Tiffany Razzano There’s no secret password to get into Shelter Island’s secret hotspot, the Pleasure Lounge. Everyone is welcome to hang out in the renovated 19th-century barn-turned-juke joint owned by Joe Lauro, a music historian who makes documentary films on the subject and also plays bass for The Moondogs and part-time for The Lone Sharks, a local mainstay that often plays at the parties at the barn. “When I first bought the house, it was a wreck,” Lauro said. “Then they showed me the barn. I certainly wasn’t going to raise chickens in it, but I saw the potential for a night club.” For the 10 years that Lauro has owned his Shelter Island property, he’s opened up this barn for a huge party, at first every few weeks, but now only every couple of months — including a legendary annual Halloween bash that has practically everyone on the island showing up decked out in their most creative costumes. But don’t expect a proper invitation to one of his parties, or to read about it in the events section of your local papers. News of these free events is spread primarily by word-of-mouth. But boy, does the word spread. Lauro will invite his friends, who in turn invite their friends, who in turn tell their friends…you get the picture. His shows usually draw, on average, 100 people, though he’s seen his barn filled with even more than that.

he said. “It’s what the Hamptons were 30 years ago. There are plenty of regulations, but we’re not regulated to death.” But the most interesting thing about the shows at Lauro’s barn is the barn itself. Lauro has turned it into a museum for a bygone era of music and American culture. His barn pays homage to the music of the ‘40s, ‘50s and ‘60s – and sometimes even earlier than that. Finding most of what decorates the walls of his barn at flea markets or garage sales, and often receiving artifacts as gifts, the walls are covered in old road signs and handmade rock and roll posters. Upstairs, in his loft, is his bar, surrounded by old-fashioned, wooden booths taken from the Chequit Inn when it was renovated. Walking into Lauro’s barn certainly takes you to another time and place. “I just get a hold of this stuff,” he said. “I love the

The Lone Sharks at Pleasure Lounge

reaction of people who have never been here. They walk in and they’re just like, ‘What is this?’” Standing on its own, the barn is a sight to see. But it’s even more so when the barn is packed with all sorts of interesting people and (continued on page 89)

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Not only are these parties free, there is no alcohol for sale. So if you want to drink, you need to bring your own. This keeps Lauro from having to apply for those pesky — and often costly — permits to operate his lounge and pay for liquor licenses. “I run it as a private party,” Lauro said. “I don’t charge. If it’s a benefit, we charge a couple of bucks. But it’s more of a pass-the-hat situation for the bands. We have to be careful what we do because it’s a private party.” He also said that local officials and police don’t bother him about his shows, and are likely to be seen at them. And if a neighbor complains about the noise from the bands, Lauro does whatever he can to comply with their request. “Shelter Island is an unusual place,”

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Joe Lauro

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 82 www.danshamptons.com

To the Lighthouse: Risque Past Revealed

Plum Island Lighthouse

By Alison Caporimo Standing in the mist with a bright eye, the Southold Town lighthouses are more than just bearers of light — they are bearers of history.

Latimer Reef Lighthouse

Dating as far back as 1806, the lighthouses have witnessed the progression of time and tides from their oceanic stations. Long Beach Bar, Orient Point, Plum Island, Little Gull,

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Race Rock, North Dumpling, Horton Point and Latimer Reef are the eight lighthouses that comprise the water-dwelling beacons. While lighthouses are most commonly seen standing regally on postcard prints and in movie backdrops, in Southold, they shed light on a rather risqué past. Little Gull Island Lighthouse, the oldest of the eight, was established in 1806 and located at the eastern end of the Long Island Sound. After the first lighting of its wick, the lighthouse began its career guiding sailors home. The lighthouse also welcomed the war onto its rocky shore. The keepers of the original lighthouse supervised naval activities between the British and the Americans during the War of 1812. In 1813, British troops landed on the island, tied up the lighthouse keeper and extinguished the light. Without this light, sailors risked their lives on the open shores and hoped to avoid collision with other ships (continued on the next page)

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DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 83 www.danshamptons.com

Lighthouse

(continued from previous page)

smuggling Scotch when a storm swept it up to Fishers Island. By the time the Coast Guard arrived at the lost ship, the locals had stolen the ship’s cargo. In December of that year, whiskey from another vessel was stolen once it crashed to almost the same spot as the “Thelma-Phoebe.” After the looted alcohol incidents had been filed, there were reports of strange lights in the vicinity of North Dumpling Island. The light station’s keeper, Burkhart, had been running extra lights around the lighthouse, which were used to facilitate communication between the mainland, the boats and Fishers Island. The keeper had been storing, delivering and selling liquor to Fishers Island residents. Burkhart

smuggled in booze from the ships at night. The ships that collided with Fishers Island were Buckhart’s dealers who had fallen victim to the sea’s volatile disposition. Danger…booze…the infamous lighthouses could not preserve their gangster history without one final ingredient — murder. And the Latimer Reef Lighthouse’s very name proves just that. The reef, located at the eastern end of Fishers Island, was named after James Latemore, a man who spied on the British fleet in Fishers Island Sound during the Revolutionary War. A British lookout spotted Latemore in his tiny boat, and the ship went after him. Latemore ran aground the (continued on page 85)

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Race Rock Lighthouse

and the lighthouse itself. Race Rock Lighthouse, established in 1878, has also experienced its fair share of danger. Located at the west end of Fishers Island and the eastern entrance to Long Island Sound, Race Rock was one of the most perilous obstacles in navigation. During the early 1800s, the Gothic Revival-styled lighthouse witnessed hundreds of shipwrecks. One shipwreck in particular, the steamer “Atlantic,” made headlines. In November 1846, 45 people perished in the icy waters after the steamer collided with the lighthouse. Besides this infamous reputation, Race Rock is known for its engineer, Francis Hopkinson Smith, who also built the foundation for the Statue of Liberty. Along with their dangerous locations, the lighthouses have also harbored illegal activities. During Prohibition, the lighthouse islands were often used to transport illegal booze. The North Dumpling Island Lighthouse, built in 1849, is one of the most infamous for this activity. In April 1923, the yacht “Thelma-Phoebe” was in the process of

What Rock Group, still in performance today, got thrown out of the Memory Motel in Montauk?

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DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 84 www.danshamptons.com

Week of July 4–July 11 Riders: 5,812 Rider miles: 52,446 DOWN IN THE TUBE J. K. Rowling, author of the Harry Potter books, was seen on the Sag Harbor platform. Our sources tell us she said she was on her way

to see Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull in East Hampton. Ace Yankees pitcher Joba Chamberlain was looking at the subway map by the token clerk’s booth at the back of the Three Mile Harbor platform, apparently lost. Also on the subway were Alec Baldwin in East Hampton and Bill Gates in

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Montauk, who said he was looking for a retirement home in that town. HALF OF SUBWAY SYSTEM IS STILL SHUT DOWN The delay on the western half of the subway line, caused by the new double-decker cars on their maiden voyage tearing out all the lighting in the ceiling of the tunnels, is still not fixed. Over 4,000 light bulbs were ordered, but found not to fit into the old antique fixtures. New fixtures are on order and should be in shortly. Oddly, we found that the old, oddly sized bulbs are no longer being made. It turns out these bulbs never go out, and so there has never been a need to replace them since they were installed back in 1928. YARD SALE JULY 8 The Hampton Subway will have a giant yard sale at the Montauk Subway Yards down by the railroad station in that town all day on Saturday, July 8. It will consist of nearly 4,000 light fixtures — many damaged, some fine, all antique. Light bulbs remain in some, and work. Others have shattered light bulbs and should be considered as antique items only. Also being sold are the remains of 10 double-decker railway cars, made in Sweden, all of which have severe damage to their roofs, but are otherwise new. HAPPY BIRTHDAY to Jeanette Backulby of Hampton Bays, who is 53 years old and has worked all her life on the Hampton Subway as a maintenance person. “They used to call us the cleanup ladies back in the day,” she said, as she cut the cake at Subway Headquarters. “But that was then, before women’s lib.” COMMISSIONER ASPINALL’S WEEKLY MESSAGE We regret the further delay of the reopening of the western end of the Hampton Subway between Bridgehampton and Eastport. The new lighting should be in shortly. We are installing a special new lighting system in the tunnels that will save energy. The lights on the tracks will go on only when a train is within a 100 feet of a particular lighting stanchion, and then it will go off five seconds after the last car passes. We do not need lighting in the tunnels when the trains are not going through. And those on the trains won’t notice the difference. We expect this will halve our electric bill. The lights will be on all the time on the platforms, of course. I have, by the way, already bought two of the damaged antique lighting fixtures, and after having a workman bend them back into shape, have installed them on either side of the front door of our oceanfront home in Southampton. They work perfectly. And they make a perfect partner to our front doorbell, which, when you press it, makes the sound of an oncoming locomotive.

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 85 www.danshamptons.com

Lighthouse

(continued from page 83)

reef, which was eventually named after him, and the British seamen chased him. When the British caught up with Latemore, they hung him and buried him in the Sound. While most of the structures have endured the stormy weather and rough lifetime, there is one casualty amongst the lighthouses. The Plum Island Lighthouse is the only light station that is no longer functioning. Established in 1827, the lighthouse experienced its fair share of hardships that led to its demise. During the Spanish American War, the Army decided to build Fort Terry, a coastal artillery base, on the island. Plum Island was also an important strategic post during World War I and II because it protected the entrance to the Long Island Sound and New York Harbor. At one point in the lighthouse’s career, over 1,000 soldiers were stationed there. So what will happen to this historic desperado? Merlon E. Wiggin, the president and founder of East End Lighthouses, Inc., is working to preserve the Plum Island Lighthouse

sonal. Cruisers will gain insight into the fascinating and dangerous history that these structures embody, and get some amazing pictures, too. More than a light in the distance, greater than a speck on the horizon, the Southold Town lighthouses stand tall, shining their lights and weathering the storms. Their rocky faces contort into determined grimaces of cement. If you look hard enough, you can catch them winking. For more information about East End Lighthouses cruise and tour information, visit eastendlighthouses.org.

An early photo of the Plum Island Lighthouse

and keep all of the others up and running as well. “Southold Town has more lighthouses than any other town in the country,” Wiggin said. “We want to preserve these lighthouses.” You can help preserve these historic warriors. Cruises run by East End Lighthouses raise funds for the preservation and restoration of offshore lighthouses. The cruises take you out to meet the light stations, up close and per-

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By T.J. Clemente The headquarters of the Ladies Village Improvement Society of East Hampton, Long Island, Inc. (LVIS) are located at 95 Main Street in the historic 1740 Gardiner Brown House. For the last 113 years the LVIS has been providing East Hampton with many services. Now under the direction of President Joan A. Ehren, the LVIS is preparing for its 112th annual fair, which will take place July 26, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. According to General Manager Mary Anna Jun-Morris, fair proceeds finance local scholarships and maintain the East Hampton Village green, historic trees in town and historic landmarks, such as Ashawagh Hall in Springs. Besides the many booths selling the famous Beach Plum Jam and donated garden items, the fair also offers face painting for children, a petting zoo, three ponies and traditional carousel rides. The BBQ that follows, co-sponsored by the Lion’s Club, starts at 4 p.m. and runs until 7 p.m. The silent auction this year will offer a diversified grouping of items, such as an hour-long seaplane charter, three nights at the posh Hotel Plaza Athenee in New York City, golf packages and exciting getaway trips — including one to Buenos Aires, Argentina. There will also be superb local art. It was noted that, for some reason, the weather is always perfect for the fair. This year, when the volunteers wear the traditional green aprons, white dresses and straw hats, nothing less than the best of weather is anticipated. Jun-Morris talked about how truly impressive the LVIS scholarship program is, and how amazing it was for an organization like the LVIS to raise and award $88,000 in financial aid to students. The breakdown is eight $10,000 awards, two $2,500 awards for local community college attendees and $3,000 for an older woman who decides to go back to school. Another event coming up this summer will be the 100th birthday of Alice Ham, who is perhaps the most senior member of the LVIS. Since 1989, the historic house that was actually moved from right on Main Street to its present location in 1924 by then-owner Winthrop Gardiner, has been the home of the LVIS Bargain Box thrift store, Bargain Books used book store, other knick-knacks for sale, and the administrative offices. The 360-member strong LVIS (of which none are men, although there are male volunteers who assist the ladies) has a volunteer corps of over 100 ladies coordinated by V.P. Mo Cohen. Within the LVIS are over 20 committees. A walk to the LVIS headquarters from Main Street is a pleasant one, and when you enter the historic home, one of the first things you see is the “Octagon” dollhouse constructed in 1892, which was a gift of Deborah Light. The 5’4” dollhouse is redecorated four times a year for the various seasons. It alone is worth a visit, but it’s not the only reason to stop by. There’s great treasure-hunting (books for one or two dollars, Brooks Brothers men’s blazers in mint condition for$30), as well as great les(continued on page 89)

Photo by S. Galardi

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sons in history. A long list of many famous Gardiners and other notables resided at the Gardiner Brown House. British Major John Andre of Benedict Arnold, West Point spy fame stayed at the home for a few weeks during the American Revolution. In fact, during the occupation of East Hampton, many British occupiers stayed in the house, including Sir Henry Clinton, Lord Percy and Governor William Tyron. Walking around the rooms you can feel the history. Today, the Gardiner Brown home is a symbol of civic pride where the women of East Hampton meet to maintain the beauty and heritage of one of the most historic villages in the United States. The LVIS doors are open Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friendly store volunteers accept cash, credit cards and personal checks. For more information, visit lvis.org, or call 631-324-1220.

Pleasure

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(continued from page 87)

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rockabilly, Americana or roots bands are playing at one end of the room. For each show, Lauro even culls from his video collection of 40,000 music performance clips — which he says could be the largest collection of its type in the world — showing some of them on the door of the barn as bands play. And don’t be surprised if you see go-go dancers there. “The barn is basically a live extension of what I do for a living,” Lauro said.

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What it comes down to, Lauro says, is that his shows at the Pleasure Lounge are all about showcasing great music. ‘You can go to Sunset Beach, have a $15 cocktail and be seen,” Lauro said. “No one cares about the music anymore. The challenge is getting people off their butts and out somewhere to be entertained by something real. Most people aren’t interested in bands. They’re just interested in their fabulous lives.” The next event at the Pleasure Lounge, on North Ferry Road, is a Boy Scouts fundraiser on July 8. Tickets are $25. The Lone Sharks, East River String Band and The Otis Brothers will be performing. You can contact The Lone Sharks (lonesharks.com) or any of the other bands performing to inquire about purchasing tickets for this event.

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late a four-bedroom house in the Hamptons. They are found on Craigslist, on the Village Voice website and many, many other places. You pay $1,500 a weekend and you get a fancy house in the Hamptons, a place to lay your head at night, all you can drink and whatever you bring home to eat (if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re willing to put your name on it when you put it in the refrigerator so everybody knows that foodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s taken). Thirty people a weekend can bring the guy organizing this business about $300,000 a month for a house heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s probably rented for $90,000. He gets to ride around in a Lamborghini. You get to roll over and accidentally put your finger in the eye of the girl whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s drunk and passed out next to you, who might wake up and by next year become your girlfriend. But hey, on the beach, millionaire or sharehouse slug, everybody looks the same. So who cares? The New York Post broke this story last Thursday, five days after the raid, and when they called up the owner of this property, who is Gerald Falcone, a New York real estate executive living on Manhattanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s West Side, he expressed amazement and outrage that this was going on at his house. He had no idea. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You completely blindsided me,â&#x20AC;? he told the Post reporter. He said he was shocked. He had no clue this was going on. He had rented this house to who he thought was an upstanding fellow with a Land Rover. Just that one person. It was for him and his family. A raid? He had not heard that there had been a raid. Did the reporter have the right address? If it is possible for you to find share-houses in the Hamptons by looking on Craigslist or the Village Voice or other places, be aware that not only can you do that, but so can the Southampton Town Police. In fact, their entire investigation to find and ticket share-house residents in that town can consist of just Googling â&#x20AC;&#x153;share-house Millstone Southampton,â&#x20AC;? or any other thought-provoking combination. The owner of the property can do this, too. Indeed, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s probably a good idea after somebody nods and says that, yes, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll pay you $90,000 to rent your house, to get a sense of what they had in mind to do there. The police intend to conduct more of these early Sunday morning raids on out-of-control share-houses. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got loads of summer interns sitting at computers, Googling addresses. They do drive-bys. Twenty cars in a driveway is a good clue. Given the price of real estate out here, nobody really objects to people renting out shares for places to stay in the summer in a reasonable and dignified fashion. It isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t legal, really. And if itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s done and if itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a four-bedroom house that has eight people sleeping in it and they behave themselves, whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s to know? A $40,000 boodle put together for such a thing could rent a small but otherwise nice house. But when you get up into the stratosphere with the uncontrollable desire to get the full Hamptons billionaire experience, it means wall-to-wall mattresses, and probably a date with the town police. â&#x20AC;˘

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 91 www.danshamptons.com

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(continued from page 78)

We are here to get whatever you need done. At Hamptons Angels you can actually purchase a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Girls Just Want to Have Funâ&#x20AC;? weekend package (with the choice of either the sun up or sun down package) full of shopping trips to East Hampton and Bridgehampton. Not to mention afternoon massages, a Yachtini or Hampton Angels Blue Angel Martini and take-

When you call for oil heating equipment service, you expect a trained and experienced serviceman to come to your home. And you should! Your oil heating equipment is one of the most complicated items in your home. For efficiency, it requires regular maintenance. If it fails, it should be worked on by a qualified technician. Anything less will mean money wasted and trouble in the future.

QUOGUE SINCLAIR FUEL, INC. home souvenirs. Hamptons Angels wants their clients to think of them as their personal assistant, their little â&#x20AC;&#x153;Angelâ&#x20AC;? that makes dinner reservations, arranges transportation details (yachts, limos, jets, etc.) and of course all nightlife and family fun activities. At Hamptons Concierge, services are available from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. and whether you want to go fishing or buy movie tickets, they offer their clients the very finest in first class service. David Gribin of Hampton Delivery Services, who offers more than just delivery, explains that heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s seen a change in the personal assisting business. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whether itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s special drink and food requests during a trip to the airport or a phone call from a client traveling in Spain requesting I make them a two oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; clock hair appointment for when they return â&#x20AC;&#x201D; needs are becoming more and more concierge by nature.â&#x20AC;? The key keeper is truly the jack of all trades â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the travel consultant, a personal and business expediter, a social advisor, a confidential secretary, handyman, aside from having developed a network of Hamptons acquaintances, friends and celebrities â&#x20AC;&#x201D; all willing to help you. Looks like time is finally on your side.

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0::<,:05;/,79,:0+,5;0(3,3,*;065Â&#x2039;Tuesday, July 8 ~ 7:30pm Guest Scholar: DR. DAVID SROLOVITZ, Dean, Yeshiva College â&#x20AC;&#x153;Science and Faith: Why is Science Important and Why Should We (Americans and Jews) Care?â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Scie !WT!)LP[4PKYHZO.\PKLK;L_[:[\K`Â&#x2039;!WT!*SHZZ+PZJ\ZZPVUÂ&#x2039;9LMYLZOTLU[Z

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DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 92 www.danshamptons.com

CELEBRATING

18 25

THE HAMPTON SYNAGOGUE 18TH ANNIVERSARY

RABBI MARC SCHNEIER 25 YEARS IN THE RABBINATE

SHABBAT JULY 4-5 INDEPENDENCE DAY WEEKEND Services conducted by Rabbi Marc Schneier and Cantor Dudu Fisher accompanied by The New York Synagogue Choir Izchak Haimov, Conductor Fri, July 4 Friday Night Lively (ages 2-7) 6:00pm Evening Services 7:00pm followed by Shabbat Dinner Reservations Required Guest Speaker: Rabbi Charles Klein President, New York Board of Rabbis Sat, July 5 Mishna 8:15am Morning Services 8:45am followed by Kiddush Bâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;nei Akiva Youth Groups & Super Soccer Stars 10:30am Sermon by Rabbi Marc Schneier 11:00am Kiddush Seminar with Rabbi Avraham Bronstein 1:00pm Bâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;nei Akiva Youth Groups 6:30pm Talmud For Your Life with Rabbi Yishai Hughes 6:30pm World of the Prophets with Reuben Ebrahimoff 6:30pm Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Chess 7:30pm Mincha 7:30pm followed by Seudah Shlishit & Maâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ariv Guest Speaker: June Walker Chairperson, Conference of Presidents of Major American Jewish Organizations Sun, July 6 Early Minyan 8:00am Morning Services 9:00am followed by breakfast Softball Intramurals 10:30am Evening Services 7:00pm Independence Day Weekend Concert with Israeli Grammy Award Winning Hip Hop Violinist Miri Ben Ari 7:30pm DAILY MINYAN Fri, July 4 Morning Services 9:00am Mon-Fri, Morning Services 7:45am July 7-11 followed by breakfast Sun-Thurs Evening Services 7:00pm

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JEWISH FILM FESTIVAL Monday, July 7 ~ 7:30pm â&#x20AC;&#x153;Meâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Ahorei Hasoragim (Behind the Walls)â&#x20AC;? Hampton Arts Cinema 2 Brook Road - across from the synagogue WOMENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S TEA LECTURE SERIES WITH RABBI MARC SCHNEIER â&#x20AC;&#x153;World Events and the Jewish Community: A Halachic Perspectiveâ&#x20AC;? Tuesday, July 8 ~3:00pm HAMPTON SYNAGOGUE-YESHIVA UNIVERSITY BEIT MIDRASH PROGRAM Issues in the Presidential Election Tuesday, July 8 ~ 7:30pm Guest Scholar: Dr. David Srolovitz Dean, Yeshiva College â&#x20AC;&#x153;Science and Faith: Why is Science Important and Why Should We (Americans and Jews) Care?â&#x20AC;? 7:30pm: Beit Midrash/Guided Text Study 8:15pm: Class/Discussion led by Dr. Srolovitz AUTHOR DISCUSSION SERIES Thursday, July 10 ~ 7:30pm with Brad Hirschfeld You Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Have to Wrong For Me to be Right: Finding Faith Without Fanaticism followed by Dessert Reception Day Camp registration now in progress Gan Ba Yam ~ ages 2-4 ~ 631.288.0534, ext. 10 Brookhaven ~ ages 5-12 ~ 631.924.4033 The Hampton Synagogue Summer Program Brochure www.thehamptonsynagogue.org RABBI MARC SCHNEIER, FOUNDING RABBI RABBI YISHAI HUGHES, ASSISTANT RABBI | RABBI AVRAHAM BRONSTEIN, ASSISTANT RABBI DUDU FISHER, CANTOR | NETANEL HERSHTIK, CANTOR Â&#x2039;www.thehamptonsynagogue.org 1142107

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(continued from page 68)

morning, but often in the afternoon as well, or later. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not one of those old people who gets tired at night.â&#x20AC;? There is a calm about him that seems to go with those rare cases of great talent meeting great success, of ambition satisfied. Asked why he thinks he is being honored with the lifetime achievement award, he said simply, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been in the art world a long time.â&#x20AC;? Barnetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s great heroes of art begin with Rembrandt and run through the ages to include Poussin, Watteau, Daumier and Chardin, and Chagall. Barnet describes his training as â&#x20AC;&#x153;classical.â&#x20AC;? He was first attracted to Rembrandtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s paintings, spending hours poring over art books in the public library in his hometown of Beverly, Massachusetts. He firmly believes that artists of all styles should learn drawing and other traditional disciplines of art. Even though much of his work is abstract, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m more classical than expressionistic. I was trained in drawing and seeing things in a very precise way. Discipline was an important part of it. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a fable that if you have academic training you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t express yourself. If you have it in you, the training would only give you substance.â&#x20AC;? He pointed to Picasso as an example. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He had very severe training. His father insisted upon it.â&#x20AC;? He added of the art world, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s contrary to whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going on now. If you have a new trick, it becomes an art form.â&#x20AC;? He admitted that cliques are part of the art world, a fact of life, and they can be good for sharing ideas, but there is also a negative. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sometimes the clique is more important than the work,â&#x20AC;? he said, not wanting to name certain 20th-century artists that he feels do not deserve their fame. â&#x20AC;&#x153; A person gets to know the right people, moving in a certain circle, and that makes them more important than their work. People these days are sometimes paying a million dollars for work and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not worth it.â&#x20AC;? Aside from talent, he said an artist has to have endurance. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A lot has to do with the ability to go through phases, and one has to recognize that time will take care of it. During the Depression, nobody sold anything.â&#x20AC;? Succeeding in art, he said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;is having a hard time. So many things happen that are not the best. And you survive and continue.â&#x20AC;? He said when he was young, sometimes he would begin a project, and if it wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t quite right, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d tear it up. I regret that now.â&#x20AC;? That sort of thing doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t happen much these days, he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am more thoughtful before I start now. I do a lot of drawing before I paint. And I use a lot of layers of paint, I build paintings up.â&#x20AC;? Talent, vision, recognition and persistence are vital elements in becoming a legend â&#x20AC;&#x201D; along with a touch of genius. Barnet acknowledged that hiding oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s light under a bushel does him little good, as an artist at least. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I showed a lot, I taught a lot, and my work was exposed.â&#x20AC;? But he wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the darling of any stars, he insisted. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a famous person behind me. I did it on my own.â&#x20AC;?

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 93 www.danshamptons.com

Starbucks

(continued from page 69))

would be there myself shortly after that, I decided just to go there. Worst case, I’d read by the side entrance that went to the parking lot. It would be fine. When I got there at 10:15, I was told that Pete had just left, and there was an assistant assistant manager in charge. They pointed at the barista. “The reading is at 11,” I said. “I’ll do it over there.” I pointed. He was making an espresso. He didn’t look up. “Everybody knows about this?” “Oh, yeah.” “OK.” There was a couple I knew, Kevin and Margaret Bodkin, at a table by a window, so I went over to them. It was 10:20. Forty minutes early was pretty impressive. We talked. I told them I was glad to see them. Then the husband looked at his watch. “We have to leave because we have an appointment in Southampton,” he said. “You’re not staying for the reading?” “What reading?” It was indeed advertised in the newspaper. Oh well, others would be coming, surely. I set up to do the reading. I brought in a stack of books and set them up on a table alongside the old bank safe around the side. There was a sofa and two easy chairs. The sofa was occupied at that time by three noisy children, a nanny, a stroller and lots of children’s toys. There was no Starbucks coffee anywhere about. I hoped they would leave. But everybody is welcome to do their thing at Starbucks, so I didn’t know what

to do. We would see. Within a few minutes, I had set up the microphone and amplifier I use for the readings. I also had this big three-by-four-foot framed photograph of the cover of the book. I put that a bit away from the kids, but near enough for the nanny to see. She didn’t get the message. It was now five minutes before reading time, and there was nobody. A few people had looked like they might be there for the reading, but when I asked them, they said they were just wondering what the hell I was doing. When I told them, they thanked me for telling them and walked away. I looked at my watch again. Exactly 11. Nobody. But then I saw this very tall, handsome man, maybe 6’ 5”, standing there and smiling at me. He was holding a copy of the book. “Here for the reading?” “Yup. And I just finished the book. Would you sign it afterwards?” “Sure.” I looked around. “Looks like it’s just you and me,” I said. “My wife’s next door at the library. She’s coming.” A thought was twirling around in my head. “Has she read the book, too?” “No.” “Good. I’ll be reading to at least SOMEBODY who hasn’t read the book.” The man picked up the picture. “I’m a good salesman,” he said. “I’ll go out front and get some people walking down the street. Be right back.” And before I could say anything, he was gone.

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And he stayed gone. Now, I thought, I’m back to nobody. And he took my picture. But no. He was back, although just with the picture. He was still smiling. “I’ll go get her,” he said, meaning his wife. And then he was gone again. But not quite. He had stopped by the line of people waiting to order their coffee. “Hey everybody, there’s a book reading that’s going to take place, right around the side there. Everybody come. It’s the book, In the Hamptons.” Then he was gone. When he came back, he introduced me to his wife and we shook hands. She was a handsome woman. And at that moment, an extremely beautiful and fashionably well-dressed young woman with shopping bags appeared, barged between us and marched over to the nanny and all the kids and toys. “Okay, we’re leaving,” she said to her crew. The nanny got up. The three kids, who were behaving quite well up until then, suddenly ran off in all directions, laughing and making squeaking noises. “Carolyn! Rebecca!” the woman shouted. “Angela!” But it didn’t do any good. The nanny began rounding the kids up. “Sorry” the woman said to me. The toys and shopping bags went into the stroller. Soon they were gone, too. And so I read, slowly and with feeling, to this couple who were now sitting in the two easy chairs. I read them the story about the banker (continued on page 107)

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Taiwain: A Place to Rest, Invest

Photos by Debbie Tuma

By Debbie Tuma The Euro is strong, the dollar is weak. Gas prices make the family trip across the country more expensive than flights to Brazil. So where can a traveler go to have an unusual yet exotic trip that won’t equal the down payment on a home in the Hamptons? How about Taiwan? From the seaport cities of Taipei and Kaoshung, to the seaside and lakeside resorts along the East Coast, Taiwan offers much diversity and undisturbed natural beauty that will impress even the most seasoned traveler. And for those interested in real estate investing, Taiwan could present another opportunity. Because of the relatively small size of this island, it is possible to see much of Taiwan in just two weeks. The country’s major airline, Eva Air, goes direct from Newark Airport, across the North Pole, stopping only an hour to refuel in Anchorage, and lands in the capital city of Taipei, in a total of about 18 hours.

The famous resort of Sun Moon Lake

Taipei, which has a population of about 2.6 million people, is a city on the rise, and getting more Westernized every day. During a visit 10 years ago, I found that few people spoke English, the downtown streets were overcrowded with cars and motor scooters, and there was a big pollution problem. On a recent visit, I found that most Taiwanese spoke

English, and that a modern, clean new subway system has alleviated much of the above ground traffic problems. Taipei has established an office of greenhouse gas reduction to help control pollution. With a real estate market that’s growing steadily, Taipei is now a fascinating combination of new skyscrapers and high-tech office buildings, mixed in with ancient temples, like the famous Longshan Temple built in 1738. Taipei has many fivestar hotels, among them the Grand Formosa Regent Taipei Hotel with its elegant Wellness Spa, and the Grand Hyatt Taipei, which is the largest Hyatt on the international profile. Blended into this modern luxury is the historic Grand Hotel, a classical-style Chinese palace that’s the former guesthouse of Madame Chiang Kaishek. Taipei boasts the world’s tallest building, called “Taipei 101,” which opened in 2004, and has 101 floors, including office space and many (continued on page 98)

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Whispers

(continued from page 77)

Rather, John Travolta, Jesse Jackson, Richard Dreyfus, Jay Leno and Ted Koppel, who will all be brought to life on Bay Streetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stage through the comedic genius of Darrell Hammond at 9 p.m. If you like to celebrate your independence with a five-star bang, then get on London Jewelersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; client list for a private July 4th party hosted by the Udell family, which kicks off with a sommelier experience by Robert Bohr of CRU restaurant, a dinner tasting with chef Tom Colicchio

         



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from Craft Restaurants and a big finale with a concert by Lionel Richie. Plus, be the first to preview The Hamptons Hublot Watch presented by Jean-Claude Biver. Sunday, July 6. Get on Peggy Siegalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s PR power list for a private invite to attend the premiere screening of the upcoming film, Hellboy II: The Golden Army, from visionary writer/director Guillermo del Toro (Panâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Labyrinth, Hellboy), hosted by Caryn and Jeff Zucker, Felicia Rosenfeld and David Linde. He may be red. He may be horned. He may be misunderstood. But when you need the job done right, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to call in Hellboy. VIP Guests will discuss the sequel over supper at CittaNuova. Until next week â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Life is short, you only live once, so party on! Entertainment & Feature Correspondent, Director, Writer and Executive Producer Gina Glickman can be seen on Tuesdays, Thursdays and weekends starring on News 12 Long Islandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hot in the Hamptons.â&#x20AC;? Log onto for more celebrity action with Gina, on her â&#x20AC;&#x153;Main Streetâ&#x20AC;? series.

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 96 www.danshamptons.com

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DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 97 www.danshamptons.com

Twentysomething…By David Lion Rattiner neither Tom nor I had I was totally pumped. ever heard of before. I “Sure, I’ll do it! When is immediately got it?” involved to try out. I’m “It’s on Monday and a huge fan of theater, Tuesday of this week.” especially the folks at I got really, really Springs Community bummed out. Monday Theater who are workand Tuesday are the ing hard to have my production days here at play, Main Beach the Dan’s Papers. If I took Musical, go up July 25, those days off in the 26 and 27 at East summertime, I’d look Hampton High School. like a complete boneKathy Rae’s parents. Tom and I got our pichead in the eyes of all tures taken, we filled out some forms, thanked my friends here, especially the people who count everybody, told them about the free coffee over on me to complete certain things so that they by the front entrance and were on our way. I are able to do their jobs, and vice a versa. “There picked up the Smart Car and brought it back to is no way I can do that with this short notice,” I the Dan’s Papers office. Within minutes every- gulped down the words as I said them. body at the office was freaking out about it. “Oh, no! We thought you would have been Especially Kathy Rae, my friend and Publisher great.” of Dan’s Papers and Hamptons Style. “You’ve got “Thanks anyway., I really want to do it. It’s to let me borrow it!” just a horrible time conflict.” How could I say no? “That’s okay, it happens. We also do casting for Kathy borrowed the car, then borrowed it ‘Law and Order.’ Would you want to do that again, and before I knew it, she came back to me sometime?” with the Smart Car and a picture of her parents “Hell yes, I would!” in it smiling ear to ear, which is the photo you “Okay, well, we’ll be in touch.” see in this column. She hung up the phone. Three days later I got a call from Central All I can think about is how freaked out Luke Casting: “Hi, Dave. We wanted to give you a part is going to be if I ever get cast on to the set of on ‘Gossip Girl.’ We are shooting a pool scene “Law And Order,” and he is sitting on his couch, and you have to dress up in all white. Do you still with a slight pain in his neck and doing a want to do it?” double-take. Photo by Kathy Rae

Gossip Girl When I went on vacation to Rio de Janeiro for Carnival last February, I met a guy named Luke whose neck I almost broke in a friendly wrestling match. We ended up in a Brazilian hospital, surrounded by Brazilian nurses, who nurtured Luke back to health by looking at him and asking in broken English, “Are you feeling better?” Luke told me on the first day that he met me that I looked like Vincent D’Onofrio from the television show “Law and Order.” We became great friends on that vacation. Luke lives in Virginia and works as an engineer. About three weeks ago, I was on my way to the Smart Car Center of Smithtown where the absolutely fabulous people at Smart Car decided that it would be a good idea to wrap my car with advertising displaying Smart Car of Smithtown, Dan’s Papers and Hamptons Style. You’ve probably seen it parked in front of the Dan’s Papers office. Just stay with me on this — I know I’m all over the place, but this is a crazy connect- thedots story. I was driving a Mercury Sable with my buddy Tom Scarpulla to the Smart Car dealership when Tom suddenly declared while driving that Pink Elephant had free Starbucks coffee, and that we had to stop. As we walked into Pink Elephant, we found our free coffee, and also a group of about 15 people from Central Casting, sitting or standing around, casting extras for “Gossip Girl,” which is a big television show that

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DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 98 www.danshamptons.com

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new retail stores. Located in the Shinyi financial district, it is built to look like a tall stalk of bamboo, in eight sections, which is a lucky and prosperous number in the Chinese culture. Real estate, particularly commercial, in Taipei as well as in the rest of Taiwan, is on the rise, especially with the main land Chinese looking to buy and invest there. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The real estate market is booming here, after our recent election of President Ma, last March,â&#x20AC;? said Michael Liu, a spokesman for Taipei 101. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our occupancy rate is 80 percent, after three years in operation. Our shopping mall is fully occupied and we have a long waiting list. In this building we also have the Taiwan Stock Exchange, and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve attracted many foreign companies, like ING Group of Poland, the biggest insurance group in the world, and KPMG, one of the top three accounting firms in the world, and also Bank of America.â&#x20AC;? Philip Chao, Deputy Director of Taiwanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s International Tourist Bureau, said that economically and politically, Taiwan had gone through some turmoil over the past decade, when for the first time in 50 years, the Kuomintang (KMT) Party was not in power. But with the recent election in 2008, the political power reverted back to the KMT, and â&#x20AC;&#x153;most people here think thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s good, and that the economic picture will improve,â&#x20AC;? said Chao, who added that tourism has risen steadily over the past five years. Now, Taiwanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tourism is about 30% from Japan, 14% from Hong Kong, 11% from the U.S., 5% from Europe and 5% from Korea. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In 2008 weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll open the door to Chinese businesses, which are booming, especially in the Coastal provinces,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We need this linkage with China, especially since the old hard(continued on page 109)

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 99 www.danshamptons.com

GORDIN’S VIEW BARRY GORDIN

Patrick McLaughlin, Tracey A. Lutz, Bill McCuddy

Photo Page Editor: Maria Tennariello

ARTISTS AGAINST ABUSE The Retreat, a leader in support for victims of domestic abuse, held their 13th Annual Artists Against Abuse "plate auction" gala at The Ross School in East Hampton.

Richard Demato, Donald G. McPherson

Tulla Booth, Barbara Olton

DIANNE REEVES @ WHBPAC

Kedakai & James Lipton

CEDAR POINT LIGHTHOUSE BENEFIT

Four-time Grammy Award winning jazz great Dianne Reeves performed at the Westhampton Beach Performing Arts Center and signed copies of her CDs in the lobby afterwards for her adoring fans. Harriet Sawyer, Daria Deshuk

Layout Design: Joel Rodney

Susan Galardi, Dianne Reeves, Claire Bisceglia

Dr. Jerry Brown, Lois Peltz, Terry Elkins

The Long Island Chapter of the US Lighthouse Society held a benefit to raise funds to restore the historic Cedar Point Lighthouse in the Northwest Harbor of East Hampton.

VERED AUCTION BENEFIT VERED Galllery in East Hampton hosted their 20th semi-annual silent auction preview party. The ‘Last Bid Party’ will be held Sunday July 6th from 5-7pm and 100% of designated lots sold will be to benefit Israel's Sderot Youth Trauma Treatment Theater Program. For more info go to www.veredart.com

Laura Kremin, Vered, Alyssia Kremin, Janet Lehr

Risa Levine, Pasquale Pagnotta

Arlene Bienenfeld, Gloria Kisch, Dorothy Copelan

Damien A. Roman, Krystal Lamiroult

Renate Pfleiderer, Stephen Zimmerman, Juliet Papa, Jackie Zimmerman

Renee Hunt Brown, Nicholas Hoyos, Amy Treitel

Larry Rich, Sarah Padob

"THE COMFORT TABLE" Katie Lee Joel signed copies of her new cookbook "The Comfort Table" at Yigal Azrouel boutique in Water Mill. Terry & Ira Goldstein

Barrett McInerney, Greg Grossman, Pablo Kozatch, Tati Esposito, Grace Gill

Katie Lee Joel, Yigal Azrouel

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 100 www.danshamptons.com

GORDINâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S VIEW

ANN LIGUORI FOUNDATION Ann Liguori hosted the annual Outback Steakhouse charity dinner dance at Duckwalk Vineyards in Water Mill for the Ann Liguori Foundation, which raises funds and awareness for cancer prevention on the East End of Long Island.

BARRY GORDIN

Anne Marie Haynes, Stephen Haynes

George & Robin Hallahan, Scott Vallary

Pamela Warshay, Jeff Bors

Kathy Rae (Publisher, Dan's Papers), Ann Liguori

Marla Schwenk, Cecilia Liguori, Mary Skillern

Daniel Rodriguez, Marla Kavanaugh

Jan & Rich Grim

BJ Carter, Dr. Richard Rivlin

Kristina Klug, Kathy Rae

Alex Domianos, Joan Beer

Karen Keating, Tom Muscatelo, Maria Tennariello

LORIN MARSH COCKTAIL PARTY Jack Lillywhite, Lady Elisabeth Lillywhite

gina banculli

Gil Hodges Jr.

Ann Ciardullo, Jeane Bilello, Liz Giordano

The committee of The Hampton Designer Showhouse and Lorin Marsh hosted a cocktail reception at the beautiful home of Lorraine Schacht and Sherri Mandel in East Hampton to announce the 2008 designers for this year's SHOWHOUSE, which benefits Southampton Hospital. Taittinger graciously provided Champagne.

Caryn Lee Schacht, Lorraine Schacht. Sherri Mandel

Jan Milne, Douglas Graneto

Lauren Ezersky, Dennis Basso

Jerome N. Jeandin, Tom Lampson

Jamie Drake, Jayne Sherman

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 101 www.danshamptons.com

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DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 102 www.danshamptons.com

ROARING TWENTIES GALA

Kat’s Eye

It was the Golden Age of Hollywood redux, as Hamptonites wore their flappers to the Roaring Twenties Gala to benefit the East End Hospice. If dancing to the 20’s era music was not your thing, there was also a casino to try your luck, all for a great cause. One of the activities of EEH is Camp Good Grief, a bereavement camp for children to help with their process of healing.

Vanessa Scott, Barbara Oram

Luke Schroeder, Lisa McEnery

Foster & Joanne Rignola, Debbie & George Vickers

Photo by: David Gribin

Photo by: David Gribin

Prudential’s Kent Rydberg, Jon Holderer, Jane Rydbers, Alan Piliro, Kevin Lanning

Photo by: David Gribin

Photo by: David Gribin

Photo by: David Gribin

Ellen Dioguardi, Kathy Rae, Jennifer L. Coughlin

Jake Foran, Kathy Rae (Publisher)

Dave Johnson, Christine Michne, Nancy Sander, Chairperson, Mary McNeirney Stephanie Albano, Paula Evans, Dottie Evans , Martha Belesis

Bernice & Pearl Berman

Honoree Philomene A. Gates

DENIM AND DIAMONDS BENEFIT This party was held at the appropriate venue, Water Mill’s Diamond Ranch for the benefit of the American Cancer Society. Hosted by Gina Glickman, Kelsey Grammar was there as were the stars of “The Real Housewives of New York City”. As you might expect, the Bravo camera crew followed behind, making D&D part of a Season Two episode.

Katlean, Emily Post, Gina Glickman

Kelsey & Camille Grammar

Brenda Scheider

Real Housewife – Bethany Frankel

Real Housewife – Jill Zarin

Real Housewife LuAnn de Lesseps with her mom

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 103 www.danshamptons.com

Dan’s Papers Goes To…

Hosts: Max, Shahab, Libby, Eskandar Karmely

Alex & Mary Kathryn Navab

Photos & Text: Lillian DeMarco

8TH ANNUAL BEACHES AND BAYS GALA The Nature Conservancy's 8th Annual Beaches and Bays Gala was held at East Hampton Karmely Estate, historic former home of Robert Lion Gardiner. Honoree, Christopher Browne, along with hundreds of generous sponsors, supporters, and guests were treated to a fabulous evening of cocktails, hors d'oeuvres, and dinner all meticulously planned by co-chairs, Leslie and Brian Brille, Mary Kathryn and Alex Navab. Adding to the ambience of this glorious evening was the dynamic dance music of the Paul Richards Band, of Hank Lane Music and Productions.

Andrew & Laurie Stein

Leslie & Brian Brille

Deana & Stephen Hansom

Paul Richards

MYSTERIES OF THE MIND

Jeff & Karen Hughes

Christopher Browne, Andrew Gordon

David Tobin, Emily Baker, Rachel & Maximiliano Alves de Lima

Photos Richard Lewin & Text: Jan Silver

WordTheatre, the nonprofit NY/LA/London troupe dedicated to oral storytelling, debuted Cedering Fox's new monologues, Mysteries of the Mind, at a benefit for the National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression (NARSAD) at Twin Oaks Farm, Sagaponack. The Deborah Lippmann jazz trio provided ideal accompaniment.

Zoe Barry, Charlie Rigby, Maddy Potvin

Christine Wasserstein, Dan Rattiner, Cedering Fox, Kiliaen Van Rensselaer

BIDE A WEE @ TIFFANY’S

Lora Fox, Hans van de Bovenkamp, Joan Caspi

Photos - Text: Richard Lewin

Tiffany held a “Keys For A Cause” event at their East Hampton location, to benefit Bidawee.

Nancy Taylor "Toby", "Deuce", Kristina Klug

"Emma", Heather Shapiro, "Toby"

Tara Allmen, MD, "Sadie”

Celia Cunningham, Suzanne Jamieson

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DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 106 www.danshamptons.com SUCCESSION RIGHT HAND RING – $SRP: FROM $9,000

This spectacular vase is one of only three pieces left in the entire world. The limited edition, by master glassblower Chuck Boux, is a sister to The

A perfect fit for that special occasion. A wave of Hearts On Fire diamonds shimmers from a diamond accented frame, signifying life’s passionate journey. The ring is available in 18kt white gold or platinum. Available at: Rose Jewelers 57 Main Street Southampton 631.283.5757 74 East Main Street Patchogue 631.475.1497

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Alhambria Vase that is on permanent display at the Smithsonian American Art Museum. The filigree design on the exterior of the Alhambria Vase is deep blue which appears to be floating on a base of frosted clear glass. It measures 32” at the largest part of its diameter and is approximately 22” tall which includes a 3” solid silver handcrafted base with a 22” diameter. The Vase is on display and silent auction and “Last Bid Party” July 6, 5 to 7pm at VERED Gallery, 68 Park Place, East Hampton – 631.324.3228.

Availability and information contact Laura Kremin, 631.398.3228.

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who took me into his office, heard me out, opened the drawer to his desk, pulled out a checkbook, filled it out and handed it to me. “‘You want me to sign anything?’ I had asked.’” “‘No. You gave me your word of honor,’ he said.’” As I read, I occasionally looked up. The man who had read the book was smiling and nodding as I read the funny parts he had already read. The woman seemed a bit like, “Here’s what he has dragged me into,” at first, but she soon warmed to the story. In the end, I thanked them for coming, we shook hands and they left. Then I bought a grande decaf cappuccino with whole milk and one Equal, and the management said it was on them, and I left, too. There were other readings this weekend. I read “Esther and Sarah and the Rolling Stones” at the Memory Motel in Montauk on Saturday. And I read a chapter called “Jackson Pollock” at the home of Jackson Pollack and his wife Lee Krasner, which is now a museum and study center, on Sunday. I had more adventures there. But I’ll write about those some other time. Next Saturday morning at 11 a.m., I will read “Bobby Van” in Bobby Van’s restaurant in Bridgehampton. In the Hamptons: My Fifty Years with Farmers, Fishermen, Artists, Billionaires and Celebrities is available wherever books or sold. To read more, go to the book’s website, which is danrattiner.com. * * * Since I wrote the above, The New York Times reviewed In the Hamptons. The review was written by Liesl Schillinger, it was in the Style section, and it is a knockout. Here it is. IN THE HAMPTONS: My Fifty Years with Farmers, Fishermen, Artist, Billionaires, and Celebrities DAN RATTINER loves to invent preposterous tales. In Dan’s Papers, the free newspaper he founded in Montauk in 1960, he occasionally runs a bogus story to see if anyone notices. In 1966, he reported on a sea serpent sighting in Bridgehampton (WCBS fell for it and sent out a helicopter). And in 1991, he made up a festival called Flight to Portugal, in which contestants raced cars off a cliff into the ocean by the Montauk Point Lighthouse: “The one who gets the farthest toward Portugal wins.” But nothing he’s ever written seems more far-fetched than one scene he describes in his memoir, In the Hamptons. Driving on a sunny June weekend through the “sleepy little villages of Westhampton, Hampton Bays, Southampton, Bridgehampton, East Hampton, and Amagansett,” he doesn’t get stuck in a single all-Range-Rover traffic jam or spot one herd of Calypso-clad weekenders grazing at overpriced brunch cafes. Each town he passes is “quiet as a mouse,” all the stores closed. This neutron-bomb tableau is not one of his hoaxes: it is 1956, on the day the author, then 16, first set foot in Montauk, before the philistines approached the hedgerow, before the Hamptons were “The Hamptons.” Mr. Rattiner pays tribute to the local figures, famous and obscure, who have weaved them-

selves into his personal mythology over the last 50 years. Each portrait is written in unassuming language, with emotional punch, telling detail and impressive recall. There’s the flawless young heiress who captivated Mr. Rattiner at 20, tearfully inviting him to a midnight tryst on the beach after her parents made her cancel a date (German shepherds barred the way to the mansion). There’s the artist Willem de Kooning, in his cups and off his chair at a restaurant, ranting in slurred words, “I’m the greatest living painter in the world.” (Mr. Rattiner helped drag him away from public scrutiny and into the back seat of his car.)

Less glamorous but no less compelling are the middle-aged hoteliers Esther and Sarah, who basked daily on aluminum lawn chairs in front of their Memory Motel, “tanned, heavily oiled,” and wearing “nearly identical jaguar bikinis”; and the smooth, good-natured Bing Crosby look-alike, Frank Tuma Jr., vice president of the Montauk Improvement Company, who let Dan’s Papers occupy the mezzanine of his building for free. Mr. Rattiner is a great appreciator of other people. To find as many memorable New York characters gathered between two covers, you’d have to look back to Joseph Mitchell’s “Up in the Old Hotel.” •

Richard Misrach (American, born 1949), Untitled #704-03, 2003, Chromogenic print mounted on plexiglass, 74 ¾ x 115 ¼ inches, Courtesy of the Artist, Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco, Marc Selwyn Fine Art, Los Angeles, and Pace/MacGill Gallery, NY

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Sand: Memory, Meaning, and Metaphor June 29–September 14 In a dazzling array of artwork, from 19th-century folk art to cutting-edge artists of today, this exhibition traces the ways in which artists have used the physical and metaphysical properties of sand in their creative process and includes work by: Anonymous French, 18th century Anonymous American, 19th century James Abbott McNeill Whistler (1834–1903) Winslow Homer (1836–1910) William Merritt Chase (1849–1916) Andrew Clemens (1857–1894) Arthur Dove (1880–1946) Pablo Picasso (1881–1973) Gino Severini (1883–1966) Milton Avery (1885–1965) Man Ray (1890–1976) André Masson (1896–1987) Dorothy Dehner (1901–1994) Joseph Cornell (1903–1972) Doris Emrick Lee (1905–1983) Julien Levy (1906–1981) David Smith (1906–1965) Fairfield Porter (1907–1975)

Perle Fine (1908–1988) Costantino Nivola (1911–1988) Jackson Pollock (1912–1956) Alfonso Ossorio (1916–1990) Maya Deren (1917–1961) Gonzalo Fonseca (1922–1997) Roy Lichtenstein (1923–1997) Alex Katz (b. 1927) Jasper Johns (b. 1930) Ed Ruscha (b. 1937) Vija Celmins (b. 1938) Richard Ehrlich (b. 1938) Dennis Oppenheim (b. 1938) Lynda Benglis (b. 1941) Alice Aycock (b. 1946) Billy Sullivan (b. 1946) Donald Lipski (b. 1947) Ana Mendieta (1948–1985)

Richard Misrach (b. 1949) Matt Mullican (b. 1951) Mike Solomon (b. 1956) Felix Gonzalez-Torres (1957–1996) Ashley Bickerton (b. 1959) Jochem Hendricks (b. 1959) Gabriel Orozco (b. 1962) Johan Creten (b. 1963) Mariko Mori (b. 1964) Ernesto Neto (b. 1964) Spencer Tunick (b. 1967) Jim Denevan (b. 1968) Manfredi Beninati (b. 1970) Alison Cornyn (b. 1970) Eric Wesley (b. 1973) Liset Castillo (b. 1974) Agathe Snow (b. 1976)

The Parrish Art Museum 25 Job’s Lane, Southampton, NY | 631-283-2118 | parrishart.org The presentation of Sand: Memory, Meaning, and Metaphor is made possible, in part, through generous support from Robert Lehman Foundation, The Peter Jay Sharp Foundation, Norman and Liliane Peck, Suffolk County, under the auspices of the Office of Cultural Affairs, Steve Levy, County Executive, Martha B. McLanahan, Jack and Helen Nash, Lisa and Ciaran O’Kelly, Jerome and Ellen Stern, James and Katherine Goodman, Galerie Lelong, James Cohan Gallery, and Nancy and Stanley Singer. Additional support is provided by the New York State Council on the Arts, a state agency. 1141977

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Taiwan

(continued from page 98)

Female tea-pickers in the country fields throughout Taiwan

line group has passed away, and China is now closer to capitalism.â&#x20AC;? Another boon to economic growth, as well as tourism, is the construction of the new 2009 World Games Stadium, in the East Coast seaport of Kaoshung that will seat up to 50,000 and will host sports from rugby to flying disc. Outside the metro areas, 65% of Taiwan is covered in trees. Since Taiwan is near the Tropic of Capricorn, there is a sub-tropical climate, with many beach resorts along the east and south coast, from Kentting National Tropical Park, with sailing, swimming and jet skis, to Touchen Beach, Fulone Beach, Chi-Jin Beach in Kaoshung, and Chi-Bon Hot Spring. Sun Moon Lake is among the top 10 tourist spots in China. For more information on traveling in Taiwan, call the Taiwan Tourist Bureau or check their website at go2taiwan.net.

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inda Batiancela was knowledgeable about the different Hampton townships, did ven before meeting Linda in person, she quickly understood exactly our likes and dislikes and what we were looking for in our ideal summer house. a great job showing us only product that reflected our preferences, and overall To meet Linda in person was a real pleasure; friendly, helpful, and a real guide ran a very professional and efficient process. My husband and I are thrilled with the to the insides of the Hamptons. She went literally the extra mile to show us around results. to familiarize us with the surroundings, as well as the beaches and attractions of the Sincerely, Maja different villages. We would certainly look for Linda to find us another house next summer. y experience with Linda Batiancela was amazing. She is the best ever...conWith warm regards, Gabriele and Luca stantly emailing me listings and did not rest until I found the perfect place. She is professional, knows the market and more inda is nothing short of professional, importantly got to know me and what I filled with a sense of willingness to wanted, and did not waste my time. find the perfect house for my friend and I. Best Regards, Giuliana There was never a sense of frustration or time being wasted. Simply put, stresswas very pleased with the quality of servfree! Soon, the conversations in the car ice given by Linda Batiancela. Linda and the houses turned to laughter and the always acted in a professional and courteday filled up with fun stories. It was a ous manner. She was knowledgeable and totally relaxing day, rather than a stressful helpful. I have recommended your agency one, which has been our case in years past to others and look forward to working with with other brokers. you in the future. What began as my blind email to a realSincerely, Patricia tor, turned into a friendship with an extremely professional and honorable perinda Batiancela, who was able to preson. pare an exhaustive list of rentals, Rich arrange a tour on very short notice (on

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Photo by S. Galardi

EH History

Southampton started heading east for more privacy. In fact, the Maidstone Club, featuring its golf course, was founded in 1891. The views of the course and the ocean have not changed much in the last 100+ years. It was the next year, 1895, when the East Hampton Ladies Village Improvement Society was established to actually fill the historic pond on the green with water. On this holiday weekend, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fitting to mention that the LVIS is responsible for the American flags that line Main Street on the 4th of July.

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was hauled from Bridgehampton to East Hampton and down Newtown Lane on a huge wagon pulled by oxen. It must have been a sight to see a steam locomotive on a wagon pulled by oxen make the right turn from Main Street onto Newtown Lane to the small patch of track that then existed. The train station in East Hampton is the original station that horses and buggies drove up to pick up or drop off passengers when it opened in 1895. It was during that time that the first millionaires that had already settled in

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Nick & Toni’s Anniversary, Benefit

Visit Brookhaven National Laboratory Summer Sundays, July 20 – August 17

East Hampton restaurant Nick & Toni’s will celebrate its 20th anniversary with the Great Chefs Dinner, which is also a benefit for The Hayground School’s Jeff Salaway Scholarship Fund, on July 13 from 6-10 p.m. Tickets for the event, which will be held in a tent outside Nick and Toni’s, are $350 for general admission, and $1,500 for VIP admission to a special dinner prepared by Nobu Restaurant, Eric Ripert and Laurent

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July 20 National Synchrotron Light Source See the brightest light on Long Island and one of the most intense sources of light in the world. Find out how synchrotron light is used to look into all kinds of materials, from moon rocks to computer chips.

July 27 Science Learning Center Play with science, no matter what your age. Have fun testing your hands-on science skills. Marvel at the tricks of a science magician.

August 3 National Weather Service Come to the weather-forecasting office for the entire New York metropolitan area. Track storms, big or small. Learn about hurricane-preparedness. Witness a 3:30 p.m. weather-balloon launch.

August 10 Center for Functional Nanomaterials Visit a new center where studies of the ultra-small may lead to ultra-big discoveries in areas from energy to electronics. See the high-tech tools used to explore the nanoscale.*

Brookhaven National Laboratory, home to six Nobel Prizes, invites you to explore a different scientific facility each week, witness the Whiz Bang Science Show, and try your hand at the “Brain Teasers” exhibit. During your fun-filled Summer Sunday, we hope that you discover your “inner scientist” and that our passion for discovery becomes yours!

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Tourondel. This year’s line-up includes: Gail Arnold, a private chef and culinary art instructor, Miche Bacher of Sacred Sweets, Josh Capon of Lure Fishbar, Tom Colicchio of Craft Restaurants and “Top Chef,” Claudia Fleming of The North Fork Table and Inn, Larry Forgione of An American Place Café NYC, Marc Meyer of Hundred Acres, Five Points and Cookshop, Alfred Portale of Gotham Bar and Grill, Joseph Realmuto of Nick & Toni’s Restaurants, Ripert of Le Berardin, Aaron Sanchez of Plaadar and Centrico Restaurants, Toshio Tomita of Nobu, Tourondel of BLT Restaurants, and Jonathan Waxman of Barbuto. Proceeds from this annual tribute to Jeff Salaway, restaurateur and a founder of Hayground School, will benefit the progressive school for children in nursery-8th grade. For more information, go to greatchefsdinner.com.

No reservations needed. Arrive any time between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. Visitors age 16 and over must bring a photo ID. Handicapped accessible. 1 !/2 miles north of LIE Exit 68

August 17 Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider Enter the underground tunnel that holds twin accelerators. Learn how gold ions are smashed together to recreate the temperature and energy density of the early universe.* *Appropriate for children over 10 years old.

Call (631) 344-2651 or visit www.bnl.gov

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Co-chairs this year are Mark W. Paviluk, Mitchell W. Karsch, Juliana Frei, Joel Isaacs and Alfredo Paredes. Back by popular demand is well-known New York City DJ Lady Bunny. The Tea Dance benefits the Empire State Pride Agenda, which trains community leaders, educates policymakers, researches and documents challenges facing the community, analyzes the impact of proposed public policy and legislation and works to enhance the social welfare and equality of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender New Yorkers. General admission is $100 in advance, and $125 at the door, if available. Sponsorships begin at $250. Sponsorships and individual tickets may be purchased online at prideagenda.org. For additional questions about ticket purchases, call 212-627-0305.

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 115 www.danshamptons.com

Go Green, Live Large with David Bach By Alison Caporimo Green. I know you’ve heard of it. Environmentalists shout about it, and product labels have shed their traditional shades for this hue. But what is green beside an intimidating abstraction? David Bach, author of Go Green, Live Rich and five New York Times bestsellers, offers explanation and a few simple ways that you can go green, spend less money, live healthier and help save a little thing called the planet. Bach, who is renting a house in Southampton this summer, has planned out a green lifestyle that every Hamptons native can lead. The first step is to begin in your home. If you adjust your thermostat up or down by just

energy-saving and long-lasting qualities will save you from expensive electric bills and numerous trips to the hardware store. We have taken our natural resources for granted. One of the most important resources is water. “As the Environmental Protection Agency points out, water is a finite resource. Even though 70 percent of the planet is covered by it, less than one percent is available for human use,” says Bach. How does this hit close to home? Bach states that, “The U.S. government

predicts water shortages in 36 states between now and 2013.” Daily habits, like leaving the (continued on page 120)

From the origins of nature to the originality of life

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three degrees, not only will you save about $114 on a 1,500-square-foot home, but you will also prevent two-and-a-half tons of carbon dioxide emission from going into the atmosphere. Unplugging electrical devices is another simple way to save the planet and your wallet. Even while your electrical devices are switched off, they still use up energy. Switched off, plugged-in equipment accounts for more than 27 million tons of CO2 emissions in the United States every year. Now, that’s a lot of energy spent on things you’re not using. Along with unplugging your electrical appliances, buy a smart power strip. They cost about $35 at any hardware store. Rather than giving yourself a gold star for your efforts, get a blue and white one. Look for the Energy Star label, Bach says, which the Environmental Protection Agency and the Department of Energy created to help consumers identify energy-efficient products. Saving energy is crucial to saving our planet, explains Bach. In his book, he states, “As your existing bulbs burn out, replace them with compact fluorescent bulbs, or CFLs. CFLs use 75 percent less electricity than traditional incandescent bulbs and last up to 10 times longer.” Even though these bulbs are slightly more expensive than the traditional ones, their

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 116 www.danshamptons.com

Southampton Trustees: Who Are These People? BY T.J. Clemente In the village of Southampton’s recently held elections for town trustees, Richard Yastrzemski and Bonnie Cannon handily won positions to join Nancy McGann and Paul Robinson along with Mayor Mark Epley to make up the five-member Board of Trustees. It is interesting to look into the background of these individuals, all of whom ran for office on the “Citizens with Integrity” ticket. Bonnie Cannon was a marketing manager of the telephone company Bell Atlantic for 20 years, and worked for Verizon. A single mother, Cannon was the first black woman to be elected Southampton Town Trustee in the village’s 348-year history. She was born and raised in

Southampton and has been a shining example of what is good about Southampton. Her reelection by a wide margin, with more votes than she had in the first go-round, has proven that her connections to the town’s electorate only grew stronger after she won her historic election two years ago. She is cost-conscious and protects the less fortunate. Newly elected trustee Richard Yastrzemski is another lifelong Southampton Village resident and distant cousin to the Hall of Fame ballplayer Carl Yastrzemski, who still holds many Suffolk County baseball and basketball records. Richard Yastrzemski is an employee of Merrill Lynch, where he holds a position as an assistant vice president with the firm.

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Yastrzemski garnered the most votes of any candidate in the most recent trustee election. His platform is fiscal responsibility, advocating the elimination of unnecessary spending. Trustee Nancy McGann is a 27-year veteran of the Southampton real estate scene who began her career with Allan Schneider and worked her way through the Corcoran takeover before assuming a managing partner role just this last month with Town and Country Real Estate. There she joins Judi Desiderio and Janet Hummel at the fast growing firm. McGann was very up front and center during the “bury the cables” fight with LIPA. Her famous remark is that in 27 years in real estate, she doesn’t remember a single client requesting “a home with a huge power line tower in front.” Active on Community Preservation Fund and Peconic Land Trust isuses, McGann has her eye on the future of Southampton’s development and how it will be done. She has been coming to Southampton since 1954, when her parents began vacationing there. Veteran trustee Paul Robinson has long roots in the Southampton community, beginning with his graduation from Southampton High School. With his wife Joan, he has two grown daughters, who also graduated from Southampton High. Robinson’s vast experience comes from a long career as a Social Services administrator, from which he is retired. Mayor Mark Epley has stood up against the tide on occasion, but mostly represents the will of the majority enough to have been re-elected mayor, and thus a Trustee. He was also on board for the LIPA fight from the get-go and has been in the forefront on confronting the realities of illegal immigration and jobs in his village. A former Naval Submarine Officer, he is presently the executive director and founder of the Seafield Center, which is dedicated to (continued on the next page)

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 117 www.danshamptons.com

Trustees

BREAKING NEWS

(continued from previous page)

Tankleff Acquitted: 20 Years Too Late?

sporadic, muffled clapping and sighs of relief, which the Honorable Doyle quickly silenced. After the four-minute hearing, facing a squadron of cameramen, Tankleff was finally asked the question heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d been waiting to answer when a journalist asked, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Marty, how does it feel to finally be a free man?â&#x20AC;? Tankleff, now a 36-year-old man with a receding hairline and a stout, muscular physique, answered, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Relief, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 20 years too late.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Daniel Simone

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Nancy McGann

treating addiction. These Trustees of Southampton are citizens from different backgrounds with one purpose: to tackle the issues of the Village and do what, in their judgment, is best. The collective wisdom of an African-American single mom working most of life in the telecommunications business, a financial man, a former naval officer who now manages a rehab center, a woman who is a long-time real estate professional, and a retired social services administrator represents an interesting combination of interests to represent the people of Southampton.

On June 30, 2008, one of Long Islandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most notorious murder cases bowed to a final disposition. Marty Tankleff was acquitted of murdering his parents after having served 17 years in a maximum-security state prison. He was 17 years old when the authorities accused him of barbarously killing his parents. The prosecutorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; principle evidence against Tankleff was a confession, which his attorneys have contested unremittingly for the past 20 years and deemed an act of coercion on the part of the investigators. The judicial luminaries who have followed the proceedings of this case have deemed them â&#x20AC;&#x153;a blinded execution of American Justice.â&#x20AC;? The Riverhead courtroom seats 118. But even if its capacity were three times that, it couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have seated Tankleffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s champions. The bailiff announced, â&#x20AC;&#x153;There will be no outburst of any kind in this courtroom, regardless of the outcome. All rise for The Honorable Judge Robert Doyle.â&#x20AC;? The room became silent as court was in session. Judge Doyle said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d liked to hear from the prosecutors first.â&#x20AC;? Assistant Attorney General Benjamin Rosenberg rose and said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Your Honor, my office has reviewed this case. Our findings noted that thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s insufficient evidence against Defendant Tankleff. Therefore, The State moves to dismiss the indictment.â&#x20AC;? It incited

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DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 118 www.danshamptons.com

ADVERTORIAL Island people are different. Long Island, Manhattan, Vancouver Island; problem solving and inventing seem more developed in island societies. There seem to be more people who ask why is it this way. Is it an intellectual version of the Galapagos effect? Does necessity really breed invention? Vancouver island is about as far away from Long Island as you can get in North America but an invention hatched there has the ability to make summer pool life in New York more pleasant, more convenient and less expensive while allowing pool owners to feel less guilty about their effect on the environment. 17 years ago, in the back yard, using a tiny amount of capital, father and son team Dr. Robert Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien and Dan Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien started )OH[LEOH6ROXWLRQVDFRPSDQ\GHGLFDWHGWRVDYLQJHQHUJ\DQGZDWHU7KHLUĂ&#x20AC;UVWSURGXFW+HDWVDYUZDVGHVLJQHGIRUFRPPHUFLDO pools and water parks. It saves 40% of the water lost through evaporation and 40% of the energy used to keep the water warm. The key is a mixture of safe, renewably based ingredients that form a nano-scale transparent layer on top of water that reforms after a swimmer passes and keeps water from evaporating. Evaporation causes 80% of the heat loss from pools. Sales were good but the price of automatic injectors or the inconvenience of application by hand prevented wide use in the private pool market. \HDUVDJR'DQ2¡%ULHQKDGWKH´(XUHNDÂľPRPHQW:KDWLIRXUOLTXLGFRXOGEHFRQWDLQHGLQDEDJWKDWUHOHDVHG+HDWVDYUDW the same speed as it biodegrades from the pool? What if the bag was attractive and fun? Better yet, how low can we get the price VRWKDWHYHU\RQHFDQKDYHWKHEHQHĂ&#x20AC;WRIDQDXWRPDWLFSRROFRYHU"7KHUHVXOWRIWKHVHTXHVWLRQVZDV(FRVDYUVKDSHGDQGFRORUHG OLNHDĂ&#x20AC;VKIURPWKHWURSLFVLWKDVDVSHFLDOYDOYHLQLWVGRUVDOĂ&#x20AC;QWKDWHPLWVWKHSRROFRYHUOLTXLGIRUDPRQWK,WVHOOVIRUDIHZ dollars and pays for itself many times over. Even if a pool is not heated Ecosavr is the answer. It is transparent to sunlight that shines through and is trapped in the pool as heat. When the sun goes down, the same layer reduces the amount of water that can evaporate with the net result that unheated pools warm up faster in the spring, stay warmer in the summer and are still warm enough to enjoy after Labor Day. What does Ecosavr solve? The hassle of using a solid pool blanket [or the frustration of trying to get your children to use it]. And if your pool is free-form and an aesthetic feature of your home, only a transparent cover lets you be ecologically conscious by saving energy and water. Ecosavr has credibility. Years of arms length effectiveness and safety testing make Ecosavr one of the few products in the pool industry that walks the walk. The amount and quality of data on their website is very convincing. Your pets and children are safer with Ecosavr than any other type of pool cover. The Company sells in all of North America, Europe, Australia and the middle east with some customers interested most in water savings while others want warmer water or lower heating bills. Of course it wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just as simple as having an idea. The Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Briens had to develop new tools and equipment to make Ecosavr. &KULVWPDVZDVVSHQWUHZLULQJDZHOGHUWKDWZDVQRWGHVLJQHGIRUZKDW'DQWULHGWRGRZLWKLWVRWKDWRUGHUVFRXOGEHĂ&#x20AC;OOHG LQ-DQXDU\*URZWKEURXJKWSUREOHPVWRR&DSLWDOZDVSURYLGHGE\IULHQGVDQGIDPLO\Ă&#x20AC;UVWWKHQE\OLVWLQJRQWKHSXEOLFPDUNHW 7KHIDFWRU\KDGWREHPRYHGIURPEDFN\DUGWRDQLQGXVWULDO]RQHDQGWKHQĂ&#x20AC;QDOO\RIILVODQGWRNHHSVKLSSLQJFRVWVUHDVRQDEOH 9LFWRULDDQGWKHUHVWRI9DQFRXYHU,VODQGKDYHQRURDGOLQNZLWK1RUWK$PHULFDVRDOOWUDIĂ&#x20AC;FLVE\DLUDQGVKLS  2WKHUSUREOHPV came from success; trademark and patent battles along with pirate copies out of the Far East. But Flexible Solutions survived, grew and added new products. :KDWHOVHLV)OH[LEOH6ROXWLRQVVROYLQJ"7KH\KDYHPRGLĂ&#x20AC;HGWKHDFWLYHLQJUHGLHQWVRI(FRVDYULQWRDIRRGVDIHSRZGHUWKDWFDQ slow evaporation from reservoirs and increase available fresh water. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s already in use in Australia with trials occurring in many other drought stricken countries. Another division takes sugar and through a series of biological steps makes poly-aspartic acid [TPA], a biodegradable amino acid that occurs in all animals. The TPA is used to prevent clogging in oil well pipes, to replace non-biodegradable ingredients in detergent and, in a unique positive feedback loop, increases crop yield when combined with phosphate fertilizer. Sugar to TPA and back to grow more sugar or corn or riceâ&#x20AC;Ś When he started in business, Dan Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien promised himself that it was not just about the money. Every product had to help the environment and the company had to take care of its loyal employees. So far the promise has been kept. For more information SOHDVHYLVLWĂ H[LEOHVROXWLRQVFRP

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DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 119 www.danshamptons.com

Fourfold Increase in Traffic Congestion by Dan Rattiner There was a sudden increase in the traffic on our highways a few weeks ago, and though it dropped off dramatically last week, there is considerable fear that it will come back. The increase was 300% greater than the record peak in traffic in the last 20 years. And it caused tie-ups in three separate locations, all in East Hampton. On Monday traffic came to a halt on Three Mile Harbor Road, on Wednesday the problem was up on Floyd Street, and on Thursday the police had to untangle a problem on Grassy Hollow Road. Prior to a few weeks ago, the record for traffic tieups by steers escaping from pastures was in 1994, when one steer got out of a pen in Riverhead and spent considerable time on West Main Street, and then three days later, when he got out again and wound up on North Road, at the Entenmann farm. That was two steers in one year for the East End. After that, for the next 12 years, there was not even one steer on the roads anywhere.

And now this. The six steers on the highway a few weeks ago were actually two that got out three different times on three different days. The sightings resulted in lots of startled people, many of whom were surprised to see the steers just outside their windows. The steers had long horns.

“The steers are quite gentle,” said John Faulhaber, who manages Cagramar Farm on Oakdale Avenue in East Hampton. “They’re just looking for something to eat, perhaps a little adventure, perhaps a way back home. If this happens again, just call me.” East Hampton Police Chief Todd Sarris said that when the steers were first seen trotting up Three Mile Harbor Road, they tried trapping them. But that didn’t work out. “We’d bring two police cars in and they’d just walk around them,” he said. “We finally took to herding them. If we walked at them and banged a stick on the asphalt, they’d move along. When we got them near to the pasture, they broke into a trot.” The pasture fence has been tightened up, and the result has been a good one. The steers stay in the pasture. We’ve had a report that the tie-ups on Floyd Street and Three Mile Harbor Road were reported by the WINS Helicopter Traffic Report, but we’ve been unable to confirm this.

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DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 120 www.danshamptons.com

Bach

(continued from page 115)

faucet running as you brush your teeth or keeping garden sprinklers on all day, contribute to our progressive water deficiency. Therefore, along with turning off the faucet when you brush, grow a green lawn. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Leave grass three to four inches long,â&#x20AC;? Bach suggests in his book. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Water early in the morning, and leave some lawn clippings in place after mowing. These simple tasks will prevent evaporation and ensure that your lawn gets a long, healthy drink. If you are thinking about or are in the process of building a house in the Hamptons, build green! Buy environmentally friendly paint. Bach recommends â&#x20AC;&#x153;low-VOC paint, which cuts down on volatile organic compounds, ingredients that can cause health problems, including cancer.â&#x20AC;? Going green is not only healthy for the planet, but it is healthier for your family, as well. Bach personally experienced the green health phenomenon after moving into a green apartment in Manhattan. After spending a few weeks in the new Solaire apartment, Bachâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s persistent allergies disappeared. Even his sonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s asthma vanished. Along with the buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s built-in green hardware (eco-friendly paint, flooring, insulation, etc.), Bach decided to green his life. He changed to green cleaning products and started to use a green dry cleaner. Bach even got rid of his car and bought a hybrid Toyota Prius.

David Bach

After his experience with the beneficial green lifestyle, Bach investigated the various pros of an eco-friendly diet. One way to save the planet and lower your cholesterol is to eat

less meat. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Methane from captive livestock accounts for nearly a fifth of all greenhouse gas emissions caused by humans,â&#x20AC;? Bach explains. Switching from the average American diet to a vegetarian one actually helps reduce global warming more than replacing your truck with a hybrid car. Along with eating green, cleaning green promotes a healthier lifestyle. Bachâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s book explains that cleaning chemicals possess toxins that are more harmful than most of the bacteria in your home. These toxins can cause cancer and asthma. Bach suggests that you clean your house with nontoxic, inexpensive ingredients like baking soda, club soda, vinegar and salt. Now that you have the tools to live greener, you might be wondering why green is so important. Bachâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s book states that, earlier this year, the UN-sponsored Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change concluded that the â&#x20AC;&#x153;greenhouse gas emissions from human activity rose by 70 percent from 1970 to 2004â&#x20AC;? and is continuing to rise at a frightening pace. What will the increase in this greenhouse gas do to our planet? It will cause extreme weather events and decrease the availability of fresh water. We can also look forward to intense heat waves and serious food-supply shortages. Global warming is a serious issue that only we can fix. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ask yourself, what I am doing today that could be greener?â&#x20AC;? Bach suggests. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wait. Live green, now.

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DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 121 www.danshamptons.com

Arts & Entertainment Kate Burton “Shares” in Durang’s Beyond Therapy excitement and pressure of working in that space, and what she learned there. “I realized on the subway that my work at the Cabaret was my genesis as a comic actress,” she said. “Somehow, working on my lines for Beyond brought me back 25 years to that awareness.” Burton described working on the play as “very thrilling, very exciting,” for several reasons. First, with Durang and director Alex Timber both from Yale, Burton said it felt like “coming home.” In addition, she is excited to be working with the cast. “This is a beautiful thing, this association of Bay Street and Williamstown,” she said. “You work with the top actors in the world.” The cast for Beyond includes Katie Finneran, whom Burton describes as a “brilliant comic actress,” as well as Matt McGrath, Darren Goldstein, Bryce Pinkham, and Darrell Hammond from “Saturday Night Live.” For part of the run in Williamstown, Burton was with her two children, 10-year old daughter Charlotte and 20-year old son Morgan. “My daughter is a backstage child,” she said. “Morgan is at Williamstown now as an actor, but he is also a budding playwright. He goes to Brown [her alma mater] and recently had that great moment of being passionate about theater.” Burton seemed tickled that her son is possibly developing into a writer. She readily admits she did not have that calling, T. Charles Erickson

By Susan M. Galardi Following its roiling success at the Williamstown Theatre Festival, Christopher Durang’s Beyond Therapy will continue its run – at a new location. On July 8, the play will open at the Bay Street Theatre in Sag Harbor. Beyond Therapy, which opened on Broadway in 1982, is an absurd excursion into the “me generation” of the self obsessed ‘80s, where (in New York at least) type A-personality adults were more likely to have therapists than significant others. It’s the story of Bruce and Prudence, who meet through a personal ad, and try with the help of their therapists to make a go of it. But their short path is rocky, ludicrous and entirely entertaining, at least for the audience. In the true sentiment of the ‘80s, when tell-all television shows and true confessions reached new heights, Bruce’s therapist, Dr. Charlotte Wallace, advocates expressing feelings at all costs, as she speaks to her clients through a Snoopy doll. That role will be played by Kate Burton, a three-time Tony Award nominee and Emmy Award-winning actress who portrayed Dr. Ellis Grey on the ABC hit, “Grey’s Anatomy.” “Is my character in Beyond over the top? It’s impossible for me to judge her since I play her. She is larger than life,” said Burton in a phone interview from her home in Los Angeles, where she was beginning a much-needed 10-day reprieve between productions. “I found something new in every performance,” she said, speaking of the Williamstown run. “I work from the outside in with a character, making big choices. But the more I did the play, I found that the easier I am with Charlotte, the more successful I am with her.” Many people wouldn’t associate Burton, the daughter of Richard Burton and Bay Street Theater Artistic Director Sybil Christopher, with comedies, but she, in fact, made her mark on Broadway in a 1982 production of Noel Coward’s Present Laughter, directed by George C. Scott, followed by a turn in Gary Trudeau’s Doonesbury. Then came heavier roles in Wendy Wasserstein’s An American Daughter and Martin McDonagh’s The Beauty Queen of Leenane. In 2002, she was nominated for Best Featured Actress in a Play in the revival of The Elephant Man, and the same year, for Best Actress in the title role of Henrik Ibsen’s Hedda Gabler. “It’s interesting, after having done so much Chekov, to do Durang,” said Burton, in her rich voice with elegant diction. “He’s very particular, incredibly witty, passionate. His plays are inhabited by characters who are vulnerable. They wear their emotions on their sleeves.” As with any character, it took some searching for Burton to arrive at an approach for Charlotte, and it came unexpectedly. The cast for Beyond rehearsed in New York, which Burton called “a pain in the bum because in Williamstown there are no distractions.” But ironically, she had a revelation about Charlotte in the most New York of places: the subway. “I was sitting on the subway – I’ve done my best work there, that’s the beauty of New York – when I had a visceral memory and something clicked.” Burton went on to describe her experience working with her classmates (including Frances McDormand, Melissa Smith, Warren Keith) doing “crazy nutty plays” at the Yale Cabaret, which featured student performances of more off-beat works. According to Burton, the Cabaret was “where we all learned what we really needed to know.” She remembered the

although there was a hope on the part of her father, Richard Burton, that she would. “My father was a voracious reader, a closet writer, and he wanted me to be a writer,” she said. “In fact, one of the reasons my parents named me Kate was because they thought ‘Kate Burton’ would look great on a book jacket cover.” Born in Geneva and raised in New York, Burton lives in California with her husband, Michael Ritchie, artistic director of the Center Theatre Group in Los Angeles and a producer of the Broadway musicals The Drowsy Chaperone and Curtains. In just a few days, she will be heading east again, for round two of Beyond. Considering it was written more than 25 years ago, the question arises of its relevance in 2008. “Beyond had its Broadway debut the year I started my professional career, 1982. It totally resonates today. All the things the lead characters go through are still going on. It’s just two people trying to figure out how to get a relationship going,” she said. In addition to the successful cast, for which Burton is very grateful, she is also delighted to be a part of a play that is a solid literary work. “I’ve come to realize that structure is one of the most important elements in a play,” she said. “Beauty Queen and Hedda Gabler are perfectly structured plays, and Beyond is perfectly structured. Having done this for 25 years, you know when the play works.”

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DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 122 www.danshamptons.com

Performing Arts

theater review/gordin & christiano

review... les liaisons dangereuses Film star Laura Linney is returning to the Broadway stage in the Roundabout Theatre Company’s stylish revival of Christopher Hampton’s brilliant Les Liaisons Dangereuses. The British actor Ben Daniels stars opposite her as one half of the depraved duo that will wreak havoc with others’ lives in pursuit of their own selfish pleasures. The dark comedy, a scathing dissection of the cynicism and decadence of the pre-Revolutionary French aristocracy, is handsomely staged by director Rufus Norris. His solid production is an excellent reminder of the malicious delights of Hampton’s take on the decay of French society. The play is based on the 1782 novel by Choderlos de Laelos and is told as the ultimate battle of the

sexes. The story centers on a wager between the manipulative La Marquise de Merteuil (Laura Linney) and her occasional lover Le Vicomte de Valmont (Ben Daniels), a serial womanizer. The Marquise has agreed to grant Valmont a single night of passionate love making, if he is able to seduce the married and virtuous La Presidente de Tourvel (Jessica Collins). The dark comedy is played out as an elaborate game of chess, where humans are used as pawns by the former lovers. Their deadly game will stir illicit passions, including seductions and betrayals, before ending in an unfortunate checkmate, when Valmont unexpectedly falls in love with his prey. Following her Academy Award-nominated per-

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formance in The Savages, Linney, who specializes in warm vulnerable characters, does an admirable job of squelching her emotional luminosity to essay the cold deceitful Marquise. She is a gifted actress, who frequently returns to the stage to hone her skills. And here, playing against type, she is a stunning ice cold beauty without an ounce of heart. Daniels, in a Tony-nominated performance, is lusty as the incorrigible Valmont, intent on ruining as many women as possible. His postured portrayal, although immensely entertaining, unfortunately feels centered in his crotch. While the two leads work nicely together, especially during their carnal gamesmanship, they lack the deep emotional connection that would make the evening truly chilling. Mamie Gummer, the daughter of Meryl Streep, is making quite a name for herself. As Cecile Volanges, a convent girl who is deflowered, she turns in another outstanding performance. She has recently appeared in various works around town, demonstrating her excellent craftsmanship and varied gifts. Norris keeps the intricate plot lines moving rather nicely. The long first act feels a bit slow, but picks up briskly in the better second act. The staging, with flowing silks and plush mirrored salons, is a beautiful juxtaposition to the cruel games. Katrina Lindsay won both the Tony Award and the Drama Desk Award for her elaborately detailed costumes that capture the period’s extravagance perfectly. First seen on Broadway in a 1987 production with Lindsay Duncan and Alan Rickman, which many considered definitive, the play has inspired two films, as well, with Glenn Close and Annette Bening as the monstrous Marquise. The current revival is an elegant reminder of what devilish good fun naughty characters can be. Les Liaisons Dangereuses is playing on Broadway at the American Airlines Theatre, 227 West 42nd Street, in New York. Tickets are available by calling Roundabout ticket services at 212-719-1300, online at roundaboutheatre.org or at the box office. Theater critics Barry Gordin and Patrick Christiano are members of the Drama Desk. Barry is an internationally renowned photographer and Patrick is artistic director of SilvaRoad Productions. Visit their website at theaterlife.com.

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 123 www.danshamptons.com

Performing Arts

Take Five 2007

MUSIC Westhampton Beach Performing Arts Center presents West Point’s Jazz Knights in a free concert tonight, 7 p.m., as a gift to the local community. Tickets are limited to four per family and available only at the box office in person (no telephone or Internet reservations). On Saturday, the Neville

Brothers, New Orleans’ first musical Theatre Company for two performfamily of funk/blues/R&B, perform at ances of “Food of Love,” a light-heart8:30 p.m. ($75-125), and on Sunday, ed look at Shakespeare’s romantic Grammy Award winner Boz Scaggs scenes, songs and poems. The first sings from his rock/jazz/R&B reperperformance is next Thursday at tory ($145-225). PAC tickets are sold Fort Pond House, Second House Rd., at the box office (631-288-1500) or Montauk, rain or shine. Gates open online at whbpac.org. at 6 p.m. (bring seating, a sweater Pop music impresario Russell and a picnic dinner); tickets are a Simmons and his good friend Rabbi suggested $15 donation for adults, Marc Schneier present Grammy $5 for children. Award-winning hip-hop violinist SPEAKERS Miri Ben-Ari at The Hampton (no admission charge unless Synagogue, Westhampton Beach, on noted) Sunday, 7:30 p.m. (free!). On Monday If you read this on July 3, the Hon. at 5 p.m., Pianofest artists play a Madeleine Kunin, three-time weekly recital in the Avram Theater, Darrell Hammond at Bay Street Vermont governor and former U.S. Stony Brook Southampton ($12 Ambassador to Switzerland, will Theatre, Fri. & Sat. adults, no charge for students), and speak at The Hampton Synagogue, next Thursday, Stony Brook vocal students and Westhampton Beach, 7:30 p.m., about her new book Pianofest artists perform jointly in the Avram Pearls, Politics, and Power. Theater at 8 p.m. (see Highlights). On Tuesday, July Dan Rattiner reads from his popular memoir In 8, the Otis Brothers, the East River String Band and the Hamptons on Saturday, 11 a.m., at Bobby Van’s the Lone Sharks present “An Evening of American Restaurant, Bridgehampton. Acclaimed foreign Roots Music” at Pleasure Lounge, Shelter Island, at intrigue novelist Alan Furst reads from his newest, 7:30 p.m. ($25, reserve at 631-767-8838). Spies of Warsaw, on Saturday, 6 p.m., at Canio’s Recommended music at local clubs and Books, Upper Main St., Sag Harbor. The restaurants: Montauk–live band Sat. at Surf Southampton Historical Society begins its Beach Lodge; Nancy Atlas Project 6 p.m. Sun. at Gosman’s Chair Poetry series next Thurs., July 10, with Anne Dock (rain date Mon.), comedy Wed. at Gurney’s Inn; Porter, Kay Kidde, Dan Giancola and Jackie Moss Amagansett–live music weekends at Surf Shack, at reading at the historic Rogers Mansion, Meeting the Stephen Talkhouse on Fri., Shelby Lynne covers House Lane, 5 p.m. On Sunday, author Tim Weiner Dusty Springfield then reggae’s Winston Irie; on Sat., will speak about Legacy of Ashes: The History of the singer/songwriter Dave Mason then alt. rock Little CIA, 5 p.m. at the Quogue library ($20). Head Thinks; on Sun., Southside Johnny & the Asbury Jukes; next Tues., southern rock/blues with FILMS Sonny Landreth; on Thurs., Jamaican phenom EekGuild Hall, East Hampton, continues its summer A-Mouse; East Hampton – Mambo Loco on Sat. at world cinema series “Film Gems from the Janus Fiddler’s Cove, Mamalee Rose & friends at Turtle Collection” next Tuesday, 7:30 p.m., with Luis Crossing on Thurs.; reggae Sun. 6 to 9 p.m. at East Bunuel’s classic film Viridiana (Spain, 1961) which Hampton Point; Sagaponack – wine & jazz Thurs. won the top prize at the Cannes Film Festival that at Wölffer Estate; Bridgehampton – light jazz with year. Westhampton Beach Performing Arts Center Jody Carlson on Tues. at Pierre’s, singer Monica screens the critically lauded The Grocer’s Son Hughes at One Ocean on Thurs.; Sag Harbor – live (France, 2008) at 8 p.m. next Tuesday through music Thurs. at Bay Burger; Water Mill – Thursday evenings as its world cinema feature. singer/guitarist Steve Fredericks on Thurs. at Muse; Southampton – Phil Gotthelf on Sat. at Southampton Inn, live music weekends at 75 Main and Regulars (new café on North Sea Rd.), Sunnyland Jazz Band at Le Chef on Thurs., Hampton Bays – live music Fri. at Buckley’s; Westhampton Beach – live music Fri. at Annona, live music Thurs. to Sat. at The Patio, live music weekends at Westhampton Steakhouse (Swingset Quartet on Thurs.), live music weekends at Artful Dodger, live music Thurs. to Sun. at Starr Boggs; East Quogue – at Dockers Waterside on Fri., Dave Tyler, and Sun., Paul Mahos; Riverhead – live music weekends at Tweed’s and Eastenders Coffee House.

THEATER and COMEDY Bay Street Theatre’s Comedy Club presents Darrell Hammond of television’s “Saturday Night Live” this Friday and Saturday at 9 p.m. ($60). Starting Tuesday at 8 p.m., Bay Street begins previews of Chris Durang’s black comedy Beyond Therapy (Tues. is pay-what-you-can for two tickets at the Sag Harbor box office at 11 a.m.) The cast is headed by Broadway stars Kate Burton and Katie Finneran, and the show plays Tuesdays through Sundays until July 27. Tickets ($50-65) at sold at the box office (631-725-9500) or online at baystreet.org. The Hamptons Shakespeare Festival, which is on hiatus since its outdoor theater and staff housing are under renovation, is joining with the touring Spitfire

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HIGHLIGHTS For the past few years, Fourth of July weekend offered a relatively quiet family-and-friends interlude amid summer activity – but not this year! “Saturday Night Live” comic Darrell Hammond is onstage at Bay Street Theatre’s Comedy Club (Fri. & Sat.). The U.S. Military Academy’s Jazz Knights (Fri.), the Neville Brothers (Sat.) and Boz Scaggs (Sun.) perform at Westhampton Beach Performing Arts Center, and Grammy Award-winning hip-hop violinist Miri Ben-Ari plays at The Hampton Synagogue (Sun.). Starting tonight, musical visitors to Amagansett’s Talkhouse this week are Shelby Lynn, Dave Mason, Southside Johnny and the Asbury Jukes, Sonny Landreth and Eek-A-Mouse. On Friday morning, Long Island marching bands (and perhaps a few Shinnecock Nation members) convene on Main St., Southampton, at 10 a.m. for the annual Independence Day Parade. Each village holds fireworks celebrations on different evenings (check your local newspapers and chambers of commerce), and the North Sea Fire Department welcomes all to its popular carnival on Noyac Rd. this Thursday through Sunday. Several critically acclaimed authors read from their new books on Saturday including Dan’s Papers’ founder Dan Rattiner and international spy novelist Alan Furst. Itzhak and Toby Perlman’s Perlman Music Program for musically-gifted students presents informal works-in-progress concerts at its Shelter Island campus Friday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m., and a children’s concert Sunday at 11:30 a.m. (free admission). Stony Brook Southampton begins its Sustainable Pleasures summer concerts next Thursday, July 10, with Brahms’ Liebeslieder Waltzes performed by a quintet of classically-trained singers accompanied by Pianofest artists (8 p.m., Avram Theater, $40 adults, $25 seniors and Stony Brook alums, $15 students). Next Tuesday evening, Bay Street Theatre previews Christopher Durang’s black comedy Beyond Therapy, starring Kate Burton, Katie Finneran and Darrell Hammond, and the Hamptons Shakespeare Festival teams up with Spitfire Theatre Company to present scenes from Shakespeare’s romantic comedies next Thursday and Sunday. Also next Thursday, July 10, the ecologicallyminded networking group Hamptons Green Drinks Gatherings begins its summer get-togethers with a cocktail party at the Southampton Inn and an ecofashion show (6-9 p.m., $15). There’s a fine arts festival at Amagansett’s American Legion running this Friday through Sunday and the Artists Alliance of East Hampton begins its 23rd annual studio tour next Thursday (call 631-324-1922 or online artiststudiotour.org). ART Hamptons also opens next Thursday, 6 p.m., at the Bridgehampton Historical Society, with a benefit preview for the American Heart Association ($125 at the door). Other local organizations holding benefits this weekend: Southampton’s Fresh Air Home (American Family Picnic and Grucci fireworks, Fri., 7 p.m., tickets $75-$250, 631-283-5847); Sag Harbor’s Cormaria Retreat House, (Sat., 6:30 p.m., dinner dance, auction, fireworks; $300, 631-7254206).

with Jan Silver

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 124 www.danshamptons.com

Performing Arts

The Visitor With all the summer blockbusters rolling through the megaplex like hot weather thunderstorms, sometimes a bright sun shower of a movie can be a nice change. The Visitor is one of those – a sweet and satisfying diversion. It’s also refreshing because it gives a rare opportunity for an instantly recognizable actor a chance to lead – Richard Jenkins is the star – you may not know the name, but you absolutely will place the face. Usually playing a detective, a doctor or a father, this super-seasoned talent finally gets his due. He plays Professor Walter Vale, an aging Connecticut college instructor who has lost everything, from his beloved wife to his interest in his work. Aimlessly staring out the window, he watches students revel in their youth with a stoic face that belies an obvious longing for the spark those kids have. His boredom is so complete that when his superiors tear him away from whiting out the date on last year’s syllabus to recycle it for this years students, it hits him like a hammer. Yet, they insist he present a paper at a conference in Manhattan, where the prof used to live with his wife in an apartment he still owns. So he painfully heads off, keys in hand to a door he hasn’t opened in many years, so many years in fact that crooked landlords have been secretly renting it out – a fact he discovers upon entry. The current squatters – Muslim couple Tarek (Haaz Sleiman) and Zainab (Danai Gurira) – have no idea they’ve been duped, so they quickly depart. But Walter is very curious about them, and when he sees they have nowhere to go, he offers to let them stay until they can scare up new digs. Vale is especially drawn to Tarek, admiring the African drum he plays in jazz clubs. Before long, the two men are spiriting around town, taking in street musicians in the subways and parks. But, unfortunately for the young Middle Eastern drummer, a glitch in a turnstile and some profiling by transit cops ends up landing him in jail. It turns out Tarek is an illegal alien, brought here by his mother, and has been living as an American for many years. But in a post-9-11 NYC, he finds himself victim of a system

Hiam Abbass), arrives looking for the son who stopped calling. This tough yet tender lady shoots Cupid’s arrow directly into Professor Vale’s atrophied heart, and he is, simply put, reborn. With his jailed friend’s life in shambles, Walter is once again ready to live again, ready to love again, and ready to fight. But is it in time? There has been a bit of a political backlash concerning this film’s harsh take on both the U.S. government’s treatment of illegal aliens and people of Middle Eastern descent, contending with perceived profiling and government bureaucracy. And whether or not these things actually happen as portrayed in this movie, it’s really just a device and, in this story, is no more political than Darth Vader or the bad guy in the black cowboy hat. No, this is a story of redemption, of a man whose obvious wonderful-ness was squashed when he lost the light of his life. But exposed to other’s peril, even that of complete strangers, he is snapped back into reality when given a chance to care about someone else, which is a similar happenstance of director Thomas McCarthy’s last lovely little pic The Station Agent. In that film, a reclusive Peter Dinklage is forced to reconcile with his stymied sensitive nature when he’s suddenly thrust into the life of a grieving Patricia Clarkson. In kind, Jenkins’ Walter Vale is given a new lease on life, and it’s really uplifting to see both the actor and the lead character in this movie receive a new and very big chance to shine. As Agent did for Dinklage, hopefully this nuanced turn will open new doors for Richard Jenkins as well. that shows no mercy. His wife is an illegal too, thusly unable to visit her beloved as he sits and stews in a Queens holding pen. Meanwhile, Walter, rejuvenated by the appearance of these two in his life, uses his resources to try and free Tarek. His efforts are frustrated by the legal process, and he seems almost ready to give up – heading back to the lonely and unencumbered life he’s been living – until his own personal miracle happens: Tarek’s mom, Mouna (the warm and radiant

Ian Stark is a frequent TV and radio commentator on the film industry, and consults with private organizations on their collections. He is widely published on film and other arts/culture topics. Great for Grown-Ups Heartwarming The Power of Love

MOVIES Schedule for the week of Friday, July 4 to Thursday, July 10. Movie schedules are subject to change. Always call to confirm shows and times.

GREENPORT THEATER (631-477-8600) Call for movies and show times.

GUILD HALL (631-288-324-4050) Viridiana – Tues. 7:30 p.m.

HAMPTON ARTS (+) (631-288-2600) Wall-E – Fri.-Sun. 1:30, 3:45, 6:15, 8:30 Mon. 4:30, 9:15 Tues.-Thurs. 3:45, 6:15, 8:30 Hancock – Fri.-Sun. 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 Mon.-Thurs. 4, 7, 9 Jewish Film Festival: Behind the Walls – Mon. 7:30

MATTITUCK CINEMAS (+) (631-298-SHOW) Call for show times. Kung Fu Panda, Wanted, Hancock, Wall-E, Get Smart, The Incredible Hulk, Kit Kitteredge

MONTAUK MOVIE (+) (631-668-2393) Hancock – Fr.-Sat. 3:30, 7, 9 Sun.-Thurs. 7, 9

SAG HARBOR CINEMA (+) (631-725-0010) Call for Rainy Day Matinee Mongol – Fri.-Thurs. 4:30, 6:50, 9

UA EAST HAMPTON (+) Call for movies and show times.

UA HAMPTON BAYS (+) (631-728-8535)

Hancock – Fri.- Sun. 10, 12:15, 2:30, 5, 7:30, 10 Mon.-Thurs. 12:15, 2:30, 5, 7:30, 10 Kung Fu Panda – Fri.-Sun. 9:40, 12:10, 2:45, 5:10, 7:40, 10:30 Mon.-Thurs. 12:10, 2:45, 5:10, 7:40, 10:30 Wall-E – Fri.- Sun. 9:30, 12, 2:20, 4:45, 7:15, 9:50 Mon.-Thurs. 12, 2:20, 4:45, 7:15, 9:50 Wanted – Fri.-Sat. 9:40, 12:20, 3, 5:30, 8, 10:45 Mon.-Thurs. 12:20, 3, 5:30, 8, 10:45 Get Smart – Fri.-Sun. 9:35, 12:05, 2:40, 5:25, 8:10, 10:40 Mon.-Thurs. 12:05, 2:40, 5:25, 8:10, 10:40

UA SOUTHAMPTON (+) (631-287-2774) Love Guru – Fri.-Thurs. 12:30, 5:15, 9:50 Hancock – Fri.-Thurs. 12:15, 2:30, 5, 7:30, 10 You Don’t Mess with the Zohan – Fri.-Thurs. 2:40, 7:20 Wanted – Fri.-Thurs. 1, 4:15, 7:40, 10:15 Kit Kitteredge – Fri.-Thurs. 12, 2:15, 4:30, 7, 9:30 Meet Dave – Thurs. 12:01

WESTHAMPTON BEACH PEFORMING ARTS CENTER (631-288-2350) The Fall – Tues.-Thurs. 8 The sign (+) when following the name of a theatre indicates that a show has an infrared assistive listening device. Please confirm with the theatre before arriving to make sure they are available.

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 125 www.danshamptons.com

Performing Arts

Tiffany Razzano’s

Quick Takes

Kit Kitteredge: An American Girl (G) Like all Americans at the time, nine-year-old Kit Kitteredge’s (Abigail Breslin) parents (Chris O’Donnell, Julia Ormond) are hit hard by the Great Depression. While they rent rooms to a quirky group of tenants to make some extra money, Kitteredge solves a mystery that saves her parents’ home. Kung Fu Panda (PG) Jack Black lends his voice to Po, a slacker panda and kung fu fanatic who becomes an unlikely hero when he is unexpectedly chosen to fulfill an ancient prophecy and become a kung fu master. And when the evil snow leopard Tai Lung escapes from prison, Po must step up to save the day. Also starring Dustin Hoffman, Angelina Jolie, Jackie Chan, Lucy Liu, Seth Rogen and David Cross. Meet Dave (PG) A crew of miniature aliens operates a spaceship

that has a human form. The crew encounters problems when the ship, or Dave Ming Chang (Eddie Murphy), as he’s called, becomes smitten with an earth woman (Elizabeth Banks). Mongol (R) This is the historically epic story of Genghis Khan, focusing on how events from his early life shaped who he would become – a great warrior and world conqueror. WALL-E (G) Pixar is back with the story of Wall-E, the lonely, last robot on Earth, left on the planet after it was evacuated because it was covered in trash. When

he’s discovered by EVE, a search robot, she realizes Wall-E might have accidentally found the key to making Earth liveable again. When she rushes back to tell the humans, WALL-E goes on an adventure, following her across the galaxy. Wanted (R) A twenty-something slacker, Wesley Gibson discovers that his long-lost father was an assassin and has been murdered. Wesley is then recruited by the secret organization his father worked for to follow in his footsteps. And with the help of a fellow assassin, Fox (Angelina Jolie), and the group’s leader, Sloan (Morgan Freeman), he’s able to transform his life.

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The Fall (R) Recuperating in a 1920s Los Angeles hospital after falling from a horse during a movie stunt and with a broken heart, Roy Walker (Lee Pace) blurs reality and fiction as he concocts a tale to entertain a fellow hospital patient, 5-year-old Alexandria, as he tries to woo her into stealing a fatal dose of morphine pills for him. Get Smart (PG-13) A remake of the classic ‘60s TV show Get Smart, starring Steve Carrell as the bumbling secret agent Maxwell Smart and Anne Hathaway as his partner and love interest. Hancock (PG-13) Will Smith plays Hancock, an alcoholic superhero who’s hated by the public. When he saves the life of a PR executive, Ray Embry (Jason Bateman), Ray starts a PR campaign to improve the public image of Hancock, who winds up having an affair with his wife (Charlize Theron). The Incredible Hulk (PG-13) Edward Norton stars as scientist Bruce Banner and his rage-induced alter ego The Hulk. Cut off from his old life and the woman he loves (played by Liv Tyler), Banner is hunting for the cure that will quell the fury that brings out The Hulk. Meanwhile, the military is hunting for him in order to exploit his power. Love Guru (PG-13) An American left at the gates of an ashram in India as a child, Maurice Pitka (Mike Myers) returns to America as a self-help guru seeking fame and fortune. He takes on the job of trying to reunite a star hockey player from the Toronto Maple Leafs and his estranged wife so that the team can win the Stanley Cup. Also starring Jessica Alba and Justin Timberlake.

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 126 www.danshamptons.com

ack v eat tv

Performing Arts

By Tiffany Razzano

Inda Eaton Gets to the Song’s Essence Wednesdays are the new Saturdays. At least they are according to Inda Eaton, an Amagansett-based singer-songwriter, as she forges ahead with what will hopefully become a monthly Wednesday series at The Stephen Talkhouse, also in Amagansett. But she’s certainly not the only one who feels that way. Her gigs have gained steam with each month, more than doubling their draw since she started them in May, growing primarily by word of mouth. Now, Eaton is hoping to draw her largest crowd yet to the Talkhouse on July 16. “No one’s out there in chicken suits. No one’s wearing sandwich boards. There aren’t

any crop dusters with a banner behind them,” she said. “It’s all word of mouth.” And while she hopes more and more people will continue to show up, she’s more concerned with putting on a good show. “The concept is to have an acoustic and intimate event,” Eaton said. These shows, she says, are all about getting back to the essence of her songs. “It’s as raw and essential as you can get. These authentic evenings are giving me my soul back.” Eaton’s outlook on her music changed two years ago, after she got into a car accident that found her needing hip surgery. Amagansett had already been

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her home base for two years, but she spent most of her time on the road, touring with her band. After the accident, she moved back to the East End on a full-time basis, while she attended physical therapy. This move afforded her more time to nurture her creative side, rather than focus on the business aspect of her music. “My head has opened up,” she said. “My music is flowing from a more creative space.” Basically, she no longer focuses on her music solely as a commodity – which she says is “the biggest suffering of the artist.” Originally from Wyoming, Eaton has lived a colorful life. After graduating from Boston University, where she studied journalism, she worked as a United States government bartender, serving American troops while living in the Alps. She later traveled around Africa, where she contracted malaria. Getting sick would ultimately compel her to pursue music as a full-time career. After days of having a temperature of 106 degrees, she said, “I was really aware of the near-death experience. Afterwards, I thought, ‘Life is too short, go make your CD.’ That was my neardeath epiphany.” This put her on her path of making creating and performing music her life’s goal. Recovering back home in Wyoming, she met her mentor, bluesman Spencer Bohren, who would later produce her first album. “I did the full troubadour thing, doing the NPR tour out of the back of the car,” Eaton said. She’s toured the country with her band and has opened for the likes of John Hiatt, Blues Traveller, Earl Scraggs, LeAnn Rimes and Hootie and the Blowfish. She even went back overseas to perform for the troops. “It was kind of like Bob Hope, but without Bob Hope,” she said. So far, she’s released six independent albums, including her most recent, Inda Live in Casper! a live album recorded in Wyoming. And she’s been keeping busy since her car accident. She produced an album for Julie Andrew, co-writing the song Andrews sang at the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. She’s also the voice of the Children’s Museum of the East End and the soon-to-be voice of the Hampton Jitney. So far, her monthly series at the Talkhouse is set to end August 6, but who knows what could happen with the series in the fall. Each show will feature the percussionist from her band, Jeffrey Smith, as well as other miscellaneous local guest musicians. Tickets for her upcoming July 16 show, which will also feature Rose and lee Lawler as guests, cost $10 and can be purchased at stephentalkhouse.com or at the door the night of the show. For more information about Eaton, go to indaeaton.com. If you’re a band or musician interested in our new music column, email tiffany@danspapers.com.

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 127 www.danshamptons.com

Performing Arts

Blast from the Past, the Zombies are There By Tiffany Razzano Celebrating the 40th anniversary of their classic album Odessey and the Oracle – which weighs in at number 80 on “Rolling Stone’s” list of top 500 albums of all time – England’s The Zombies will be making a stop at the Westhampton Beach Performing Arts Center on July 13 as it tours across America. Of course, there are only two original members of the band left in the group. But, the instantly recognizable vocals of singer Colin Blunstone, and keyboardist, as well as one of the original songwriters, Rod Argent, are more than enough for The Zombies to retain their original sound. However, all four remaining members of the group did grace the stage together for the first time in years in London this past May, performing Odessey and the Oracle in its entirety, from start to finish, as Blunstone and Argent will do backed by their version of The Zombies at the PAC. “It was very interesting to play all of Odessey and the Oracle, beginning to end, in the order on the album, as it’s never been done before,” Blunstone said. “The band split up before it was originally released. We’ve never played these songs, except in the studio.” The Zombies, known for such hits as “Tell Her No” and “She’s Not There,” came over to America in the ‘60s, and were considered to be a part of the British Invasion, heralded by The Beatles. “We weren’t aware we were part of that movement,” Blunstone said. “But the media was very aware and that made our careers

much stronger in America.” They didn’t get to enjoy the initial success of Odessey, as they had already broken because of financial troubles due to mismanagement. Still, at the time, the record’s major single, “Time of the Season,” became a huge hit in America, hitting number 3 on the Billboard charts. “It’s really, really exciting,” Blunsworth said of the album’s anniversary, as well as its continued relevance to today’s fans of classic rock music. “At the time, it did get some very good critical acclaim, but it wasn’t the commercial success we had hoped for. The band ended in quite a sad way, really. We hadn’t achieved anything we’d hoped for.

Over the years, interest in Odessey grew stronger and stronger. It validates what we were doing. We did have doubts about whether we had made the right choices in our career. Now we see we have done the right thing. We have done a good job.” Ironically, what were hits for The Zombies in America, didn’t make as much of an impression in the United Kingdom. Eventually, after the group broke up, several of its members slowly got back into the music business – Blunstone even worked an ordinary 9-5 job for a year after the split – performing as solo artists or forming new bands. Some of the songs by these later outfits became hits in England and Europe, more so than their work that’s more popular in America. “’Time of the Season,’ our big hit, was never a hit in the UK,” Blunstone said. “Quite perversely, my first solo single was big in the UK, but ‘Say You Don’t Mind’ never sold a copy in America.” This means that when The Zombies come to Westhampton, they’ll tweak their set list to reflect the taste of American fans. “The backbone of what we’ll be playing is from The Zombies repertoire,” Blunstone said. “Though we’ll try to give some kind of representation of some of our other projects from over the years.” The Zombies will take the stage at 8:30 p.m. on July 13. Tickets cost $75, $65 and $55 and can be purchased at whbpac.org or by calling the box office at 631-288-1500.

Red apples, white wines, blue herons, purple mountains, pink roses, green acres. And then there’s the scenic route.

A literate,, movingg talee off lovee n Eastern n Longg Island andd atonementt on

There’s so much to do in the heart of Hudson Valley, you don’t need to book a flight for your next vacation. Just book a hotel (or a Victorian cottage or a mansion or even a farm) and then discover the treasures that await you – closer than you think. STANFORDVILLE

Metro North One-Day Getaways. Take the train to apple orchards, strawberry fields or whatever farm fresh crops are ready for picking. Then pick a quaint town to explore. It's another perfect day in Dutchess County. STAATSBURG

MILLBROOK

Innisfree is a magical place where giant lotus flowers spring from a glacial lake. Water falls, sculptures rock, and hidden Chinese gardens reveal a surprise at every turn. Hike, picnic, reflect.

HYDE PARK

At Hyde Park, your toughest decision is lunch or dinner at The Culinary Institute of America. Within 2 miles are three historic homes, a presidential library, a quaint hamlet and Dinsmore golf course.

Antique your way to Millbrook for vineyards and wineries. Here, things get better with age. Sample world class wines, find an instant heirloom, and don’t miss Wing’s Castle.

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DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 128 www.danshamptons.com

Performing Arts

The Fab Faux – Beatles Redux, plus One By Debbie Tuma Buckle your seatbelts Beatles fans, the Fab Faux band, coming to the Westhampton Beach Performing Arts Center (WHBPAC) on July 12, promises to be a fun ride back in time. The five members of this famous Beatles tribute band, of New York City, got together and formed The Fab Faux in 1998. Since then, they have been on the road performing everywhere from the David Letterman and Howard Stern shows, last year, to a variety of venues in the New York area, including The Bottom Line, The China Club, The Bowery Ballroom, Irving Plaza and Webster Hall. This group has also performed many times in Liverpool, England, where they played three shows each year from 1999 to 2005 for that city’s annual Beatle Week festivities, including outdoor concerts for over 35,000 people on the Apple-sponsored “Yellow Submarine” and “Let It Be” stages. They also participated in a CD of original material by Beatles tribute bands, recorded in London by Abbey Road Studios. People might ask, “Why five Beatles?” To this the band says that they’re not trying to copy the Beatles exactly. In fact, they don’t even dress or act like the group. They formed The Fab Faux because of their love for this music, and they mostly enjoy playing the Beatles’ later music because its more complex and challenging. For this, they have even added a string and horn section to their group, called the “Hogshead Horns” and the “Crème Tangerine Strings,” which

will also be at the July 12 show. What also makes this group unique is that they have some star-studded musicians with some impressive credits to their names. They are full-time musicians and singers who remain active in the music industry. The group features Grammy Awardwinning Will Lee, a 20-year veteran bassist for “Late Show With David Letterman,” as vocalist and bassist. Jimmy Vivino, who does vocals, guitar and keyboard, is also high profile, with his career as guitarist/arranger for the Max Weinberg Seven on “Late Night With Conan O’Brien. Frank Agnello, on guitar and vocals, is an accomplished songwriter, and has toured as a guitarist for a European production of the musical Hair, performed in the Self-Righteous Brothers with Jimmy V. and Al Kooper, and appeared on “The Beat Goes On” series, as a featured performer and band member, supporting such artists as Marshall Crenshaw, Phoebe Snow, Jackie DeShannon, and Jack

Petruzzelli, on guitar, keyboard and vocals, is also a member of the Joan Osborne Band, where he plays guitar and keyboard, and his songwriting and performances are featured on her Righteous Love CD. Rich Pagano, on drums and vocals, is the co-founder of The Fab Faux, and owns his own production studio, New Calcutta Recordings NYC, where he develops new talent. What also makes The Fab Faux so special is that these talented and experienced musicians perform the music of the Beatles in complete partperfect renditions, in such complex songs as “Strawberry Fields Forever” and “I Am the Walrus.” They also perform such harmony-driven songs as “Nowhere Man,” “Paperback Writer” and “Because,” with note-for-note perfection, and even with extra vocalists to achieve a double-tracked effect. The Fab Faux focuses on the later Beatles material, which they explain is harder to perform. For example, because the Beatles stopped playing before the band recorded Sergeant Pepper, they never had the chance to perform their most carefully crafted music live. So in a sense, The Fab Faux makes it possible to hear what could have been. So, for a real treat, come see for yourself The Fab Faux’s commitment to impeccable reproductions of Beatles’ songs, and experience their painstakingly perfect recreations of these songs we all know and love. On July 12, there will be two shows at WBPAC – at 7:30 and 10 p.m. For tickets and information, call 631-288-2350, or check their Web site at whbpac.org.

GUARANTEED! YOUR AIR CONDITIONER WON’T BREAK DOWN THIS SUMMER…

You can have your air conditioning unit rejuvenated to Factory Fresh Condition and it won’t cost you a penny! Dear Neighbor, During the year your air conditioner gets dirty, out of alignment and less efficient with age. What you probably don’t know is that without proper seasonal maintenance, this happens twice as fast as it should. In fact, most air conditioners use up to 50% more electricity than they need to effectively cool your home, and most die in “Middle Age”, which makes the monopolistic utility company very happy. After many years of analysis, we’ve discovered that 60% broke down primarily due to a lack of maintenance. To combat this trend, I have developed 18 comprehensive procedures to eliminate problems and boost efficiency to almost new! This will prevent untimely breakdowns, costly repairs and save energy dollars (keeping the utility company out of your pocket). I Call It My Air & Utility Defense Plan We are presently in a position to accept new customers into our ongoing annual maintenance program, which is why I am willing to make this generous offer. However, I’m only going to make this offer available for a limited time and to a limited number of people. This offer will absolutely end July 15, 2008 or after the first 81 customers sign up. Remember… You are under no obligation to purchase a maintenance plan as an upgrade to our Air & Utility Defense Plan offer below.

AIR & UTILITY DEFENSE PLAN $198.00 WORTH OF SERVICES 1. A complete professional cleaning of your outdoor unit coil to get rid of dirt, grass clippings, and plant debris that get sucked into it during the year. Dirt is the #1 cause of breakdowns. This prevents corrosion, premature equipment failure, and lost comfort capacity and efficiency. 2. An 18 point precision tune-up of your home’s central air conditioning system, which will minimize your repair costs, extend equipment life and save energy dollars. 3. A visual inspection of the indoor coil and fan section to insure system is in safe working order. We will also inspect your duct system and verify its adequacy. 4. Install a high capacity air filter that is more efficient than any you can buy at a local store to ensure proper equipment protection and healthy air all summer. 5. Verify that your equipment refrigerant charge meets manufacturer’s specifications to guarantee maximum efficiency and comfort. MONEY BACK GUARANTEE 1. If your air conditioner breaks down this summer for any reason, I will credit the entire $89 towards the repair 2. If my plan doesn’t save you $89 on your utility bill I’ll refund the entire amount with no hard feelings.

Only $89 Reg. $120

CALL: 631-727-2760 P.S. Call to order your Air & Utility Defense Plan before our July 15, 2008 deadline and I’ll include a free rust proofing of your outdoor unit. This added protection can avoid your having to replace the outdoor unity before you need to! Yours for a comfortable and cool summer, Doug Matz, Owner

©2008 HVAC Sellutions

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DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 129 www.danshamptons.com

Boz Scaggs

The Zombies

Southern Soul Man of the First Degree...

The British are Coming...Back!

Sunday, July 6, 8:30pm

Sunday, July 13, 8:30pm

Sunday, July 20, 8:30pm

Scottish Musical Phenom...

Friday, Aug 1, 8:30pm

Saturday, Aug 2, 8:30pm

Sunday, Aug 3, 8:30pm

Bruce Hornsby

Sharon Jones

Herbie Hancock

Sunday, July 27, 8:30pm

& Bamada

Christine Ebersole & James Naughton

andThat’s TheJustNoisemakers the Way It Is...

and The Dap-Kings

Sunday, Aug 10, 8:30pm

Sunday, Aug 16, 8:30pm

Two of Braodway’s Best..

New York City Opera

Saturday, July 19, 8:30pm

A Ball of Comedic Energy...

There’s Hendrix, Stevie Ray & Now Habib...

Generously sponsored, in part, by Mary & Frank Skillern

We Love Brad...

KT Tunstall

Habib Koité

Saturday, Aug 9, 8:30pm

Voices of Our Time...

Wanda Sykes

Donna Summer “Stamp Your Feet” Tour... Generously sponsored by Donna & Marvin Schwartz.

Brad Garrett

Generously sponsored, in part, by The WHBPAC Advisory Council

Generously sponsored, in part, by Pat & Eli Rousso and Judy Spiegel.

10th Anniversary Celebration!

Kathleen Battle One of the Most Acclaimed

Soul Excitement...

Generously sponsored, in part, by Capital One Bank

Returning to His Musical Roots..

As Entertaining & Surprising as Ever...

Saturday, Aug 23, 8:30pm

Sunday, Aug 24, 8:30pm

Saturday, Aug 30, 8:30pm

Generously sponsored by The Morris and Alma Schapiro Fund.

Generously sponsored in part by The Mark Family & The Numeroff Family.

Generously sponsored by Maggie Gilliam

Fresh & Vibrant as Ever...

3 Ways to Purchase Tickets

www.whbpac.org BOX OFFICE: 76 Main St. WHB

River of Possibilities Tour...

Sunday, Aug 17, 8:30pm Generously sponsored, in part, by The Cooney Family and Peggy & Stan Zinberg.

Chris Isaak

Pilobolus

Marc Cohn

Generously sponsored, in part, by Cynthia & Neal Hochman

A Voice That Can Break Your Heart..

Sunday, Aug 31, 8:30pm

We Thank Our Media Sponsors

Main Stage Sponsor

ONLINE:

1142674

PHONE:

631.288.15OO

Funding provided, in part, by Suffolk County, under the auspices of The Office of Cultural Affairs, Steve Levy, County Executive.

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 130 www.danshamptons.com

Fine Arts/Books

Art Commentary “Inspired by the Light” at Guild Hall Captures the Moments

Photo by M.W. Weiss

By Marion Wolberg Weiss A term used to describe Jane Freilicher’s work, now at Guild Hall, is appropriate for exhibitors Jane Wilson and April Gornik as well: “She captures the ‘moment of the moment.’” “Capturing the moment” is a high compliment, indeed, if a work is to be called art. Such a phenomenon is a dual experience, shared by both artist and spectator alike. It’s mysterious and ultimately unexplainable. Even so, the term’s denotation is clear enough. Not only is any phenomenon an observable fact or event, but also “any object known through the senses.” There’s no doubt that the essential quality signifying Freilicher’s, Wilson’s and Gornik’s work evokes the senses. At this point, one wonders if the notion that they are all women has anything to do with such an observation. Simply put, is the celebration of the senses gender based? It’s a question that has been explored in the past, but may be considered again at another time and place. That being said, we still can’t ignore that these women feel great passion toward both their subjects and their techniques. We still can’t ignore that they can communicate this passion with clarity and feeling to both male and female viewers. We still can’t ignore that we see their hearts and minds in every majestic brushstroke, color vista and intense composition. In a nutshell, the paintings involve us in an unusual sensual experience – not only can we see their skies, fields and waves, we can smell the air, hear the birds, taste the water, and touch the flowers. While this may be an obvious way to describe the experiential elements of these artists’ work, it still

Work by April Gornik suggests a story with her lowered yellow horizon conseems appropriate. There’s another aesthetic aspect of veying peace, her choppy green waves connoting possible the artists’ paintings relating to the senses – the tone or danger. Finally, Freilicher’s “Pierrot and Peonies” celeambience created by the work. All three women are brates childhood memories with longing which we can especially effective at establishing a mood or frame of all cherish. mind. Consider Gornik’s “Storm Sea,” an overpowering “Inspired by the Light” will be on view at Guild Hall image of waves crashing on the beach. It’s a disconcerting setting, one that is potent and complex. It’s also quite until July 27. different from what we’ve come to expect from Gornik, where her skies and clouds convey a narrative that is Marion Wolberg Weiss will give a lecture on open-ended, her subjects disappearing into the cosmos. “Films as Abstract Art” at The Fireplace In this painting, the “story” takes place on the ground, Project, 851 Springs-Fireplace Rd., East confined to strict boundaries, confronting the viewer Hampton, at 5 p.m. on July 6. with mighty implications. Wilson’s “Sun and Rain” also

Honoring the Artist: Peter Max A: Charities involved in animal rights. I have been committed to this for a long time. Animals are like us; they have feelings, and we treat them terribly. We use animals like silverware. Q: Where did your love of animals come from? Did you have pets when you were growing up? A: Yes I did. I have a cat named Gigi now. When I get up in the morning, there she is, looking at me. She’s just a sweetheart. Q: What else do you care about? A: Astronomy. I am a great fan of astronomical information. Did you know that there are 100 million suns in our galaxy? It’s mind-boggling. Q: How did you get involved in this? Did it start when you were young? A: My parents took a place in Tibet for seven months when I was six or seven years old. There was an old man who would talk to me about astronomy everyday. Q: It was fate that you met him. A: It was beyond belief. Q: What advice would you give to young artists? A: I am always willing to give information to artists. I would tell them to be relaxed about their work. The more relaxed, the faster you grow. – Marion Wolberg Weiss

Via Max Inc.

The work of this week’s cover artist, Peter Max, is particularly suited to the July 4 holiday. Who can forget his previous colorful limited editions featuring close-ups of the Statute of Liberty and the American flag? No matter what our political persuasion, the images are joyful and upbeat. The same holds true for Max’s other iconic works, like the Mona Lisa, and his posters for the “Summer of Love” featured in a recent exhibit at the Whitney Museum. The later work recalls Art Nouveau design, while other pieces he has created through the years have been called Pop Art and Neo-expressionism. Max’s diversity is also reflected in his use of media, which has included watercolor, video, etchings, serigraphs, ceramics, sculpture and anything else that’s possible. Such variety and energetic creativity define Max as the following conversation proves. Q: What did you do today? A: I usually come into work late, around 12 or 1 p.m. I came in closer to one today. I then painted for almost three hours. Then I met my wife who wanted me to see something. Then people showed up who had donated money to a favorite charity. Q: I take it this is a pretty typical day. Do you paint everyday? A: Yes. I work on multiples, limited editions, or completely new things which are spontaneous. Sometimes people are watching me paint. I have a huge workspace – 25,000 square feet. I also have

Peter Max in 2007 150 people working for me. Q: You have said these works are spontaneous. A: Yes, but I don’t want to know how they will turn out. Q: Let’s get back to the favorite charity. What is it?

Max’s work can be seen on a variety of websites including galleries.absolutearts.com Dan’s Papers covers curated by Dan Rattiner and designed by Kelly Merritt and Dan Rattiner.

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 131 www.danshamptons.com

Fine Arts/Books

Art Openings & Galleries COMING UP Upcoming events can be seen in the following sections:

Art Events – pg. 131 Benefits – pg. 188 Day by Day – pg. 188 Kids’ Events – pg. 166 Movies – pg. 124 Nightlife – pg. 131

OPENING RECEPTIONS EAST HAMPTON FINE ARTS FESTIVAL – 7/4-6 – At the American Legion, 15 Montauk Hwy., Amagansett. 631-241-1590. HAMPTON BARN – 7/4 – 6-9 p.m. “Buy Me,” photography by Rafael Herrera-Lasso. Located at 341 Pantigo Rd., East Hampton. 631-604-2043. LABL – 7/4 – 6-8 p.m. Arts 4 & Friends. Located at 78 Main St., Sag Harbor. ELIE TAHARI – 7/5 – 5-8 p.m. “More Than This.” A portion of the opening will benefit the Scope Foundation. Located at 1 Main St., East Hampton. GALLERY SAG HARBOR – 7/5 – 5-8 p.m. The work of Michelle Suna. Open 12-5 p.m., Thurs.-Sun. or by appointment. Located at 125 Main St., Sag Harbor. 631-725-7707. SYLVESTER & CO. AT HOME – 7/5 – 5-8 p.m. “No Picnic” by Dalton Portella. Located at 154 Main St., Amagansett. 631-267-9777. CHRYSALIS GALLERY – 7/5 – 6-9 p.m. “Light of Summer,” on display through July 25. Located at 2 Main St., Southampton. 631-287-1883. DeCORDOVA GALLERY – 7/5 – 6-8 p.m. “Thirteen.” Open Fri. from 3-7 p.m., Sat. and Sun. from 12-6 p.m. and also by appointment. Located at 538 Main St., Greenport. 631-477-0620. EAST END BOOKS – 7/5 – 6-7:30 p.m. “Wild Birds of the American Wetlands,” by Rosalie Winard. Located at 53 The Circle, East Hampton. 631-324-8680.

ARTISTS GALLERY – Haitian art. ESSES STUDIO – 7/5 – 6 p.m. Work from The Grafitti 1980 Studio. PICK OF THEWEEK Located at 403 Main St. Greenport. Located at 40 Madison St., Sag ARTHAMPTONS – 7/10-13 631-477-8555. ASHAWAGH HALL – “Metal at Harbor. 631-255-7704. – Opening 7/10, 6-9 p.m. Ashawagh,” metal sculptures. 12-5 p.m. KESZLER GALLERY – 7/5 – 6-9 International fine art fair, p.m. Russell Young, “Fame + Shame.” drawing 55 galleries from the U.S. and daily. Located at Springs Fireplace Rd., The artist will produce several origi- Europe. Held on the grounds of the East Hampton, NY. 631-726-6835. ATELIER GALLERY – Works by nal silkscreen prints. Located at 45 Bridgehampton Historical Society, 2368 Main St., Southampton. 631-204- Montauk Highway, Bridgehampton. Vincent Quatroche Sr.. Located at 308A Main St., Greenport. 631-495-4268. 0353. Arthamptons.com or 631-283-5505. BASEMENT GALLERY – “A SIRENS’ SONG GALLERY – 7/5 Tribute to Rose Graubart Ignatow,” – 6-8 p.m. Women artists assessing drawings and paintings from the 1930s-1990s. Open Sat. themselves in myth and reality. Located at 516 Main St., and Sun. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. or by appointment. Located 9 Greenport. sirensongallery.com. 631-477-1021. Albertines Ln., East Hampton. 631-329-2927. EZAIR GALLERY – “Destiny and Vision II.” Located at BIRNAM WOOD GALLERIES – Featuring paintings, 136 Main St., Southampton. 212-204-0442. fine prints and works on paper of the 20th century through ART SITES GALLERY – 7/6 – 5-7 p.m. “Tactile Vision.” contemporary. Located at 52 Park Pl., East Hampton. 631Open Thurs. to Sun. 12-5 p.m. Located at 651 West Main 324-6010. St., Riverhead. 631-591-2401. BOLTAX GALLERY – “Hot Box,” a multi-media instalCANIO’S BOOKS – 7/6 – 5-7 p.m. “Miniseries,” by Lew lation by Sylvia Hommert. Located at 21 North Ferry Rd. Zacks. Located at 290 Main St., Sag Harbor. 631-725-4926. (Route 114), Shelter Island. 631-749-4062. GOOD CONSCIENCE GALLERY 848 – 7/6 – 5-7 p.m. BRAVURA ART AND OBJECTS GALLERY – Lynne Heffner is the featured artist. Open Mon.-Fri., 9 American, European, tribal, Murano glass, jewelry, textiles, a.m.-5 p.m. and by appointment. Located at 848 North Sea home furnishings and eclectic objects. Open by appointRd., Southampton. 631-726-4663. ment. Located at 261 N. Main St., Southampton. 631-377ARTHAMPTONS – 7/10-13 – Opening 7/10, 6-9 p.m. 3355. International fine art fair.. At the Bridgehampton BRIDGEHAMPTON HISTORICAL SOCIETY Historical Society, 2368 Montauk Highway, GALLERY – “In Our Own Images: A Celebration of Local Bridgehampton. Arthamptons.com or 631-283-5505. Black Culture.” Located at 2638 Montauk Hwy, ARTISTS ALLIANCE OF EAST HAMPTON STUBridgehampton. 631-537-1088. DIO TOUR – 7/10-12 – Hamptons artists open their stuBUTLER’S FINE ART – “20th and 21st Century dios to the public. $55 for the three-day pass. aaeh.org. Painting and Sculpture.” Located at 50 Park Pl., East Preview of the show at Walk Tall Gallery in East Hampton Hampton. 631-267-0193. through July 13. CANIO’S GALLERY – “Water – Land – Water,” by painters Anne Seelbach and Christine Chew Smith. GALLERIES Located at 290 Main St., Sag Harbor. 631-725-4926. ANNYX – The work of Fay Sciarra, through the end of July. Located at 150 Main St., Sag Harbor. 631-725-9064. (continued on the next page)

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Art Openings & Galleries continued CELADON GALLERY – “Serving Art.” Open Sat. and Sun., 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Located at 41 Old Mill Rd., Water Mill. 631-726-2547. CRAZY MONKEY GALLERY – “Vanishing Landscapes.” Located at 136 Main St., East Hampton. 631267-3627. D’AMICO INSTITUTE – The former residence of Victor D’Amico, founding director of the Museum of Modern Art, featuring early modernist furnishings and found objects. Also enjoy the archive hut, gardens and outside sculptures. By appointment. Lazy Point, Amagansett. 631-267-3172. THE DAN FLAVIN ART INSTITUTE – Nine fluorescent light works by Dan Flavin and “Knife Cuts” by Imi Knoebel. Open Fri. and Sat. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Located on Corwith Ave. off Main St., Bridgehampton. 631-537-1476. THE DESIGN STUDIO – “Through a Contemporary Lense – Transcending the Ordinary landscape,” photography by John Deng. Open daily. 2393 Main St., Bridgehampton. 631-537-1999. THE DRAWING ROOM – “Yard Sales,” photography by Adam Bartos, on display through July 7. Open Mon., Fri. and Sat. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sun. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Located at 16R Newtown Ln., East Hampton. 631-324-5016. EAST END ARTS COUNCIL – “The Face,” an EEAC painting and drawing show. On display through July 11. Located at 133 East Main St., Riverhead. 631-727-0900. ELAINE BENSON GALLERY – “Legacy.” At the Southampton Inn, 91 Hill St., Southampton. 631-537-3233. GRENNING GALLERY – Work by Ben Feske. Open Sun.–Thurs., 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Fri. and Sat. from 10 a.m. – 7 p.m. Located at 90 Main St., Sag Harbor. 631-767-5302. GUILD HALL GALLERY – “Inspired by the Light: Landscapes by East End Masters,” through July 27. Guild Hall, located at 158 Main St., East Hampton. 631-3240806. HAMPTON ROAD GALLERY – David Slater, “A Retrospect.” Located at 36 Hampton Rd., Southampton. 631-204-9704. KAPELL GALLERY – Sculptures and drawings by Owen Morrel. Located at 400 Front St., Greenport, 631477-0100. LANA SANTORELLI GALLERY – “Summer Nudes,”

through August 29. Sun. to Thurs. 11 a.m.-6 p.m., Frid. and Sat. 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Located at 77 Jobs Ln., Southampton. 631-283-6308. LEVITAS CENTER FOR THE ARTS – Photographs by Kenneth Van Sickle. At the Southampton Cultural Center, 25 Pond Ln., Southampton. 631-287-4377. LONGHOUSE RESERVE – Located at 133 Hands Creek Rd., East Hampton. 631-329-3568. L’ORANGERIE FINE ART GALLERY – “Eastern Illumination,” paintings by Carolyn Francis on display through July 15. Located at 633 First St., Greenport. 631477-2633. MICHAEL PEREZ POP ART GALLERY – Featuring original works by artist/gallery owner Michael Perez. Located at 59 Main St., Southampton. 631-259-2424. MOSQUITO HAWK GALLERY – “Beleza,” an exhibition of photography from Brazil. At 24 North Ferry Rd., Shelter Island. 631-905-4998. PARASKEVAS GALLERY – Showing Michael Paraskevas’ work and children’s book illustrations. Open by appointment. Located at 83 Main St., Westhampton Beach. 631-287-1665. THE PARRISH ART MUSEUM – “Sand: Memory, Meaning and Metaphor.” The gallery is open Fri.-Sun., 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Located at 25 Job’s Ln., Southampton. 631-2832118. PRITAM AND EAMES – “The Furniture of Duncan Gowdy.” Open Mon. – Sat. 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Sun. 12 – 4 p.m. Closed Wed. Located at 27-29 Race Ln., East Hampton. 631324-7111. RATIO GALLERY – “Open Air Painting,” by Maddine Insalaco, through July 20. Open Fri. 1-5 p.m., Sat. 11 a.m.5 p.m. and by appointment. Located at 10 Bell St., Bellport. 631-286-4020. Ratiogallery.com. REMSENBURG ACADEMY – A variety of media by “The Studio Group,” on display through July 6. Located at 25 Ring Neck Rd., Remsenburg. 917-865-9997. ROMANY KRAMORIS GALLERY – Jill Morris’ “Dreams & Memories.” Located at 41 Main St., Sag Harbor. 631-725-2499. RVS FINE ART – Jeff Muhs “Collection 2008.” Open Friday to Sunday 12-5 p.m. and by appointment. Located at

20 Jobs Lane, Southampton. 631-838-4843. SALOMON CONTEMPORARY WAREHOUSE – “Sands/Fans,” by Alice Aycock. On display July 6, 12-13 and 19-20. Located at 6 Plank Rd., Unit 3, East Hampton. 917617-0828. SARA NIGHTINGALE GALLERY – “Rainbow Canine Architect,” by Malin Abrahamsson. Located at 688 Montauk Highway, Water Mill. 631-793-2256 or 631-726-0076. SNITZER ARREGUI PROJECT – “Miami comes to the Hamptons.” Located at 720 Montauk Hwy., Water Mill. 305448-8976. SOUTHOLD HISTORICAL SOCIETY – “Crafted in the Country: North Fork Artisans and Objects.” On display through August 31. Located in the Ann Currie-Bell House at the Museum Complex on the corner of Maple Lane and Main Road, Southold. 631-765-5500. SOUTH STREET GALLERY – Plein Air Peconic Artist Exhibition. Through July 21. Located at 18 South Street, Greenport. 631-477-0021. SPANIERMAN GALLERY AT EAST HAMPTON – Work by Paige Peterson on display through July 21. Located at 68 Newtown Ln., East Hampton. SURFACE LIBRARY GALLERY – “Dimension.” Open Thurs.-Sun. from 1-7 p.m. and by appointment. Located at 845 Springs Fireplace Rd., East Hampton. 631-291-9061. SYLVESTER & CO. GALLERY – Photography by Joe Pintauro. Located at 103 Main Street, Sag Harbor. 631-7255012. TULLA BOOTH GALLERY – “Water,” a photography exhibit. Through July 7. Sat. through Mon., 12:30-7 p.m. At 66 Main St., Sag Harbor. 631-725-3100. UBER HOUSE GALLERY – “Phoenix,” a photo presentation by GEIR. Located at 80 Main Street, Sag Harbor. 631-725-0909. VERED GALLERY – “Polaroid – An exhibition of unique photographs” by Steven Klein. Open Sun. to Fri. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. and Sat. 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Located at 68 Park Pl., East Hampton. 631-324-3303. THE WINTER TREE GALLERY – The work of Cuca Romley and Yoko Shiraishi, through July 17. Open daily from 12-8 p.m. Closed Tues.. Located at 125 Main Street, Sag Harbor. 631-725-0097.

MICHELLE SUNA Paintings

“7 am”

GRAND OPENING BEST BEST OF THE

2007

Saturday July 5, 2008 5-8pm

BEST BEST

at

OF THE

2007

THE GALLERY SAG HARBOR 125 Main Street Ground Floor

631.725.7707

Buffet catered by Turtle Crossing

1146309

www.thegallerysagharbor.com 1143274

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 133 www.danshamptons.com

Fine Arts/Books

Investing in Liquid Assets By Jim Marquardt Investing in Liquid Assets is not the kind of book about wine tasting where you might pick up goofy comments like, “It’s a little young, but I’m amused at its audacity.” Instead, it’s a serious reference about selecting wines that will compliment your investment portfolio. If you have ever thought of taking the plunge, you should keep a copy of this well-written book close at hand. Author David Sokolin is a third-generation wine merchant who runs a wine sales and storage facility in Bridgehampton. He says, “While most of my friends were taking their first sip of beer from Dad’s mug, I was sampling my father’s 1961 Petrus…You may be surprised to know that returns on IGW (Investment Grade Wines) have dependably outperformed blue-chip stocks over the past 50 years…Fine wines have become very easy to trade on line and you don’t even need your own cellar to store them. Despite rising prices, IGW are still among the least expensive, easily tradable, and most profitable investment opportunities around.” That “least expensive” remark may be debatable, but potential for profit seems to be very real. Sokolin explains that the global growth of wealth, especially in Russia, China and Latin America, has spawned an unprecedented interest in wine among investors and consumers. Demand is outstripping supply and most high-quality vineyards have little room for expansion. The LIV-EX 100, an index of the most widely traded fine wines, primarily from Bordeaux, can be found on Bloomberg.com, along with other economic indicators. At the beginning of June 2008, the LIV-EX 100 was up 7.4% for the year – modest compared to other years, but the S&P 500

was down 14.7% in this tough economy. Sokolin recommends six criteria for choosing wines as an asset. They should have scores of 90 to 100 from one of four reviewers, with Robert Parker being the most influential. They should be great vintage years. They should age well over a long period of time. They should have good pedigree from estates with the most cachet, and trading histories for back-vintage wines (anything older than the current year) should be trending up. The New York Times Book Review recently covered three books about wine and called Thomas Jefferson “America’s first famous wine geek.” Jefferson’s records from 1788 reveal that “he ordered 125 bottles of Chateau Haut-Brion for Monticello.” In his book, Sokolin lists today’s Haut Brion as one of 11, first-tier Bordeaux IGW. How’s that for staying power? The book predicts prices five and 10 years out for three tiers of Bordeaux wines. In fact, he does the same for every IGW wine region. Super second-tier wines, he says, represent good potential for investors because there’s room for significant appreciation as they get pulled along by soaring first-tier wines. Storage of an IGW is critical, and it may be wise to use a professional facility that runs $15 to $20 yearly per case, plus up to two percent of the

collection value for insurance. Rhone wines also have good investment possibilities since they trade at more affordable prices, and Robert Parker is particularly fond of them. Champagne, says Sokolin, is a tricky market that should be left to connoisseurs. Most Italian wines “don’t age very well” and you must stick with the 97 to 100point Super Tuscans and Piedmonts. The downside of highscoring Australian wines is their high entry prices and inability to age long-term. Winemaking technologies developed in California are now used across France, Italy and Spain, yet California wines make up less than one percent of IGW, and Sokolin isn’t bullish about them. He says they tend to be expensive cult-wines and are tough to buy early unless you’re able to get on elite mailing lists. In his “Through The Grapevine” column in the May 23 issue of Dan’s Papers, Christopher S. Miller agreed with Sokolin in endorsing wine over stocks as an investment, and said that unlike equities, IGW wines get consumed, supply is thus lowered and the value of the wine goes up. And both wine writers say that when buying Bordeaux from first and second-growth Chateaux, “the sooner the wines are bought, the better the price” – and the greater the appreciation.

By the Book By Tricia Rayburn

The Art of Reading at Glenn Horowitz Bookseller gallery and bookstore,” said Sanders. The gallery’s contemporary art and related books are showcased in the same manner as its highlow literature pairings. “The most interesting artists in the last 60 years have been influenced by music, politics and literary movements,” said Sanders. “Because we’re a gallery and so many artists are playing off media and culture, we make choices that inform that work. The books are interesting, but they really resonate when they relate to the artwork hanging on walls.” Sanders feels that this also firmly grounds the art in a cultural context, making it more accessible and relevant to everyone. This contemporary focus is the current stage of what seems to have been a natural evolution for Glenn Horowitz. After opening in 1992, then-director Andrew Roth devoted the space to photography and exhibitions of vintage photographs and some of the most artistically successful photography books of the 20th century. When John McWhinnie took over, he expanded the focus to include art and design, specializing in mid-century culture from Bauhaus to punk. Sanders assumed directorship 14 months ago, and through a unique selection of books, artwork and special events, has been striving to blend the East End and greater contempoTricia Rayburn

By Tricia Rayburn Jeremy Sanders, director of Glenn Horowitz Bookseller in East Hampton, says it’s not often that people walk in off the street and drop $25,000 on a book – but it’s definitely possible. The beach read that could cost you as much as a new car or one-month South Fork summer rental? A first edition copy of The Catcher in the Rye, complete with a note announcing the book’s release from the author to his former girlfriend’s father on The New Yorker stationery, and signed “Jerry Salinger.” This literary collectible, along with others, like Nabakov’s memoir with a small butterfly doodled by the novelist himself (an avid butterfly enthusiast who actually wrote Lolita during butterfly-collecting trips in the western United States) is on display alongside $50 copies of the likes of Wrestling with Gay Guys and Cycle Sluts. “I like to show the high and low,” said Sanders. “It deflates the high-culture feeling and also inflates the anonymous vernacular of pop culture, making it a valid expression of human behavior. Each is interesting, but they’re more interesting together.” In addition to collectible classics, Glenn Horowitz features a large revolving selection of contemporary art and photography books, dating from the pop culture advent of the 1960s to now, and including those designed by artists. Sanders believes books as an art medium is underestimated, and claims many people still have difficulty accepting that some artists actually create and consider books themselves to be works of art. To that end, “To me, there’s no strict delineation between the

rary art communities. The gallery’s current exhibition, “Matthew Cusick: From What I’ve Read,” features work bound to the artist’s personal history, specifically the historical, literary and religious texts of his parochial school education. On July 19, the gallery will host a book release party for Wives, Wheels and Weapons, which includes excerpts from James Frey’s latest novel, Bright Shiny Morning, photographs by Terry Richardson and a dust jacket designed by Richard Prince. Exhibitions and events will continue through the fall and winter. “I’m really trying to turn this into a year-round space, and make it more locally oriented,” said Sanders. “The area is filled with talent. It would be a shame to not have a local focus. It’s nice to always refer to the greats, to Warhol and de Kooning — but let’s also look at all the great people who are out here now.” Glenn Horowitz Bookseller is located at 87 Newtown Lane in East Hampton. For more information, call 631-324-5511 or visit ghbookseller.com. Store hours are Monday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., and Sunday, 12-4 p.m. Tricia Rayburn is the author of The Melting of Maggie Bean (Simon and Schuster, 2007) and Maggie Bean Stays Afloat (Simon and Schuster, 2008). Thoughts? Ideas? tricia@danspapers.com.

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 134 www.danshamptons.com

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Fine Arts/Books

Flash Fiction: Literary Standard or Flash in the Pan? By Melanie Griffith Now that summer is here, most avid beach goers will be asking themselves which paperback to pick up to compliment a day on the sand. But now there’s a new trend in the literary world that may influence what you throw in the beach bag: flash fiction. Think of flash fiction as an extremely short story that, when executed correctly, packs a major punch. In usually no more than 500 to 700 words, a writer must construct a memorable flash that doesn’t leave the reader feeling like they’ve been cheated. Flash fiction is also referred to as sudden fiction, postcard fiction, micro-fiction or a short-short. While the unofficial maximum word count is set around 500 words, there is no minimum. Some online journals specialize in stories that are literally one sentence long. On the other hand, prose poems, according to local poet Julie Sheehan, “are first cousins of flash fiction.” Prose poems use traditional narrative techniques, but maintain the heightened imagery, symbolism and metaphorical language of poetry. Sheehan said prose poetry and flash fiction “are bleeding toward each other, or groping toward each other, or swerving at each other.” Prose poetry and flash fiction are not for the faint-of-heart reader. According to Sheehan, one of the hallmarks of a prose poem is the same sort of language you’d find in a flash fiction but with emphasis on concise, and sometimes bizarre, imagery. Prose poetry and flash fiction are gaining popularity in the 21st century, but writers have been experi-

uploaded her new additions to a website, and users eventually voted her cell-novel as their favorite. Publishers took notice and published Rin’s novel If You, which went on to become the number five top selling book of 2007. It’s not easy for a reader to branch out from the comfortable, familiar structure of the novel. After all, the novel has been good to us. But innovations like the prose poem and micro-fiction could turn any experimental reader into a believer. The flash and the prose poem have staying power. They are memorable for their brevity and their impact. In recalling most novels, plot details get fuzzy, minor characters fall through the cracks and carefully composed sentences becomes nothing more than mental compost once the book leaves the reader’s hand. But flash fiction and prose poems come out of nowhere and are over as soon as they begin. Their crisp, concise power, however, engraves itself in your memory. What would have deteriorated into a vague memory becomes fodder for

your mental cannon. As Sheehan put it, “Heads roll in this genre.” Read the first sentence of a good flash, and you’re hooked. For your maiden excursion in the world of flash fiction, look for an anthology like Flash Fiction Forward that includes stories by Amy Hempel, Dave Eggers, Lydia Davis, A.M. Homes and many more. For prose poems, David Lehman compiled a great anthology entitled Great American Prose Poems: From Poe to the Present, which eases the reader into the genre by including prose poems by classic writers like Edgar Allen Poe, Allen Ginsberg, Gertrude Stein and E.E. Cummings alongside contemporary writers like Robert Bly, Rosmarie Waldrop, and Anne Carson. No noisy sea gull or crowded subway car will be able to distract you from a well-written micro-fiction or prose poem. Once you’ve demolished two pages or so, you’ll wish there was more. And what have you got to lose? It’s not like I’m suggesting you read a novel written on a cell phone…

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menting with both genres for many years. O. Henry, arguably the king of short fiction, wrote stories that fit within the flash length, as did Franz Kafka, Ray Bradbury and Anton Chekhov. Ernest Hemmingway wrote one of the most famous flash fictions of all time in only six words: For Sale: Baby shoes, never worn. Flash fiction is becoming a more mainstream genre because of its ability to fit seamlessly into the busy, bustling, electronic 21st century lifestyle. Online literary journals, or e-zines, can easily sort through, edit and publish dozens of flash fictions daily. In China, people write flash fictions, or what they call pocketsize or minute-long stories, on their cell phones. Flash fiction is perfectly suited for any commuter who knows that sometimes it’s hard to focus on the intricate plot of a novel that you pick up and put down at irregular and easily disrupted intervals. The fact is, the literary world is changing to suit the new millennium. Outside the world of flash fiction, and outside North America, novels written on cell phones are beginning to be reprinted in book form and are flying off the shelves. A 21-year-old Japanese woman named Rin wrote a novel on her cell phone while commuting by train to her part-time job. She

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Dining and Nightlife

Photos by Tiffany Razzano

What’s Best to Pick When You Pick Organic

Dale Haubrich, co-owner of Under the Willow.

because it’s difficult to grow organically,” she said. “And if it’s riddled with little wormholes it’s cosmetically unappealing to people who want their perfect little ear of corn.” She also says that when it comes to pesticide levels in vegetables, you can usually “differentiate between what grows above ground and what grows below ground,” adding “often things in the ground don’t require as many pesticides.” And much like there are fruits and vegetables that will likely have a higher level of pesticides, there are also those that are safer to buy non-organic, that are more impervious to these toxic pesticides. Basically, anything with a thick skin, which keeps the toxins from being absorbed and are peeled and then eaten, are safe to buy non-organically. Likewise, vegetables that face less of a threat from pests – and are therefore sprayed less – are safe to buy non-organically. These safe fruits and veggies include: onions, avocadoes, bananas, pineapples, mangos, asparagus, cucumbers and cabbage, though obviously, they should still be washed upon purchase. There are a number of local farms and farm stands where you can find organic produce. In addition to

Sang Lee and Garden of Eve, other completely organic farms on the East End include Green Thumb Organic Farm in Water Mill, Biophilia Organic Farm in Jamesport and Golden Earthworm Organic Farm in Jamesport. There are also local farms that offer certain types of produce organically, such as Krupski’s Pumpkin Farm in Peconic, The Farm in Southold, Balsam Farms in Amagansett, Regina’s Farm Stand in East Hampton and Under the Willow in Sag Harbor. The Farmer’s Market of Westhampton Beach features local fruits and vegetables that are all grown organically. If you’re shopping at local farms and the farm isn’t certified organic, double check with the farmer to see how much pesticide spray he uses, if any. Often, because it’s so expensive for small farms to apply to be certified organic, they’ll simply call their produce “pesticide-free.” Local supermarkets will also often have an organic produce section, most notably King Kullen in Bridgehampton and Wild by Nature in Hampton Bays, as well as Provisions in Sag Harbor and The Market in Greenport. For more information about how safe specific fruits and vegetables are, go to foodnews.org.

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By Tiffany Razzano In an ideal world, all of the produce you purchase would be organic. But as the cost of living continues to rise, it’s becoming more and more difficult for most families to afford expensive organic produce. However, no matter what the cost, there are certain organic fruits and veggies that are a must for every refrigerator and fruit bowl. Certain types of produce have higher levels of pesticides – which linger even after being washed - making them more of a health risk for you and your family. Scientists are still learning about many of the pesticides that are used to protect different crops from bugs, rodents, weeds, etc. So there’s no telling what effect the exposure to these chemicals can have on your body over time. And it’s already been discovered that many of them are very toxic, especially to children. Some have even been known to cause cancer. Even exposure to small doses of pesticide-laden produce can have detrimental effects during critical periods of development in children. “It’s been proven that these vegetables have residue from toxic chemicals on them at the time they’re being purchased,” said Eve Kaplan-Walbrecht, who co-owns the Garden of Eve in Aquebogue with her husband Chris. “And they’ve already been washed. It’s not likely that more preparation will remove those residues. You don’t want to be the one bringing them into your body and probably don’t want to bring them to your kids and family either.” According to the Environmental Working Group, peaches top the list of produce with high amounts of pesticides. Their results are based on 43,000 tests for pesticides on produce collected by the United States Department of Agriculture between 2000 and 2004. Following peaches, the dirty dozen is rounded out by apples, sweet bell peppers, celery, nectarines, strawberries, cherries, lettuce, imported grapes, pears, spinach and potatoes. Therefore, it’s imperative that these fruits and vegetables are bought organic. The more porous fruits are the ones most likely to have the highest pesticide rate. Because of their porous skins, they can absorb high levels of toxins when sprayed with pesticides. For vegetables, those that are most often plagued by pests have the highest level of toxins. “If they’re very susceptible to damage, they get sprayed more often,” Kaplan-Walbrecht said. Karen Lee, who co-owns Sang Lee Farms in Peconic with her husband Fred, says lettuce and other leafy greens are critical when it comes to shopping for organic produce. She also says that corn, which didn’t make EWG’s list of 43 fruits and veggies to buy organically, is something that should be purchased organic because it’s actually highly sprayed. “We don’t grow it

Organic produce at Provisions in Sag Harbor

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 138 www.danshamptons.com

Dining and Nightlife

East End Specialty Shops Cheese It Up

Tiffany Razzano

By Silvia Lehrer Mattituck in 2003, Karen and Dr. The vast variety of cheeses available Michael Catapano entered the American today is staggering and consumers Cheese Society’s annual competition in may find it both educational and exhilLouisville, Kentucky in 2005. Their soft, arating when exploring new cheese fresh chevre was entered in the goat cattastes. I enjoyed such an experience egory and to their joy, won first place. when I visited and interviewed several The thought process, the care, the feedof our local cheese shops and cheese ing and their immaculate work condimakers. The level of passion from the tions won them the competition. Dr. proprietors will inspire you to make Catapano, an urgent care physician with informed and delectable choices. a new facility in Cutchogue, was drawn Rosemary and Adam Batcheller to the land because of his medical backopened the Village Cheese store in ground and scientific understanding of 1972, selling a wide variety of importthe chemistry behind artisan cheeses. ed and American hand-crafted cheeses, The Catapano’s goat cheese feta, whole along with a popular take-out sandgoat milk ricotta – a new favorite among wich and salad business. Recognizing local chefs – and the light, lemony goat the growth of the wineries on the yogurt milk are all full flavored and rich North Fork, Rosemary focused her tasting cheeses. Karen spoke of the deliattention on the store they opened in cate composition of yogurt milk, making Mattituck in 2001. The marked differit ideal for the lactose intolerant. Hot off ence in the Southampton store is the the press for the Catapano’s is their café within the shop where cheese and brand new blue cheese being released as Michael Cavaniola at his specialty cheese shop in Sag Harbor. wine functions are held. Wine, served Peconic Blue, a 3-month-aged cheese. Blue flavor, and Tetilla, a creamy textured cheese with a by the glass or bottle, charcuterie and cheese plates, cheese lovers will be among the first to try it. mild and tangy flavor. Their Italian Collection fondue and raclette is the heart and soul of the Lucy’s Whey, a unique cheese retailer specializing in includes Tallegio, cow’s milk cheese with a meaty, Mattituck store. For the plates, choices can be made American artisanal cheeses ,opened in East Hampton slightly salty flavor and cheesy aroma, aged Asiago, an from the French Collection with offerings like Brie, St. in January of this year. The original striped barber unpasteurized cheese with different levels of sharpMcaire, a semi-firm cow’s milk cheese and Bleu shop pole is the landmark for the charming doubleness according to its age, and Gorgonzola, a pasteurD’auvergne, a rindless cheese with liberal blue veinwindowed corner space decorated in red, white and ized cows milk cheese with a spicy, earthy flavor. ing. The Spanish Collection plates up Manchego, pasyellow. The small, country-town feel continues inside Cheese plate offerings can change due to availability. teurized sheep’s milk cheese with a nutty flavor, with red framed cheese related cartoons from New Starting with just a one-acre farm and 18 goats in Cabrales, a blue-veined cheese with a rich and intense (continued on next page)

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Dining and Nightlife (continued from previous page)

Alison Caporimo

Yorker magazine that adorn the yellow paneled walls. Catherine Bodziner has a passion for cheese and started out selling cheese at farmers markets. She found in business partner Lucy Kazickas a common goal to introduce high quality artisanal cheeses to cheese-lovers throughout the country. In the short time I visited, customers (who already appear to be regulars) came by for their favorites, one of which was Fiscalini cheddar, an award winning raw milk cheese, nutty with a slightly smoky note, from Modesto, California. Some other delicious tastings during my visit included Midnight Moon, a sweet and

A sampling from Village Cheese, Southampton. nutty goat milk cheese from California, Ewes Blue sheep’s milk cheese from Old Chatham in Chatham, Vermont and Pleasant Ridge Reserve, a mild but nutty cow’s milk cheese from Wisconsin. Customers were also lured to the basket of crusty rosemary baguettes that arrive daily from Tom Cat bakery in Long Island City. Shelves in the shop are lined with a multitude of fine oils, vinegars, chutneys, olives and dipping sauces out of respect from the proprietor’s value for quality,

non-processed foods. Catherine was asked to be on the planning board of Quail Hill Farm in Amagansett and the Peconic Land Trust. She is delighted with this association, having long supported the premise of local farms and vineyards. Lucy’s Whey donated their 18month-old bandage wrapped Fiscalini cheese for the farm’s annual dinner. Tucked a little back from Division Street in Sag Harbor is Cavaniola’s. On a recent visit customers were lined up to the front door as Michael, his wife and two assistants provided tastings as they busily wrapped purchases. Some of the more popular requests were a flavorful Swiss Alps, raw aged cow’s milk, fresh chevre goat cheese from Westfield, Massachusetts, a raw milk unpasteurized Reblochon – Cavaniola’s is the only cheese store on the East Coast to carry this brie-like sweet nutty cheese – and Abbay De Bellocq, a delicious cheese with a milky finish made at a Benedictine monastery. Try it with fresh figs. When I asked Michael about fat content in cheese he suggested their Tomme de Savoie with only 25% butterfat but a mild and savory flavor. The shop’s focus is on hard to find artisan cheese from small producers all over the world. This idea flowed over to their brand new wine shop next door to the cheese shop where you will find limited production esoteric wines from Long Island as well as the Old World. There is great synergy of wine and cheese and the Cavaniolas plan to have tastings on weekends S. Galardi

Cheese

working with a small group of importers who share their passion for unique artisanal wines. Wherever I went retailers praised Art Ludlow’s Atlantic Mist, a raw milk camembert-style packaged in the round, as well as Shawondasee, a semi-hard cheese with a protective natural rind and subtle flavors that pair nicely with fruit, and Mecox Sunrise, a washed rind semi-hard cheese aged 2-4 months that was awarded second place in its category in a 2004 American Cheese Society competition. From the earliest times cheese has been made in stock-rearing countries to use up surplus milk. This is exactly what turned Art Ludlow into a professional cheese maker. Since 2003, Art, his wife Stacy and sons, Peter and John, have produced farmstead artisan cheeses from their small herd of Jersey cows at their Mecox Bay Dairy in Bridgehampton. It all began with Stacey’s lone cow that produced more milk than the family could drink. “Besides being a great tasting product, cheese is a good way to store the nutrients of milk,” said Art. In 2007 Cheddar – and Sigit (in honor of his mother’s nickname) were added to their roster of cheeses. Cheddar is made in the British style yet a bit sweeter, and Sigit in the Emmental style is aged about 18 months, has lots of character and a flavor reminiscent of butterscotch. Mecox Bay Dairy’s artisanal cheeses are sold at local markets and Fairview, the farmstand next to the dairy. (continued on page 145)

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Dining and Nightlife marinated pineapple, mango and a carafe of fresh squeezed juices. And don’t forget the bucket of ice on the side. If the punch isn’t to your liking, you can indulge in any of the other cocktails made by master mixologist David Wondrich. With fun drinks like the Pre-Prohibition (pot-stilled gin and dry Vermouth); Martini Criollo (an Art Deco era variation from South America with gin, sweet vermouth and yellow Chartreuse); Grey Flannel (‘50s style with hardly any Vermouth), you are bound to find a fruity favorite. Personally, I’d recommend abstaining from large meals a few days before you visit the Kobe Beach Club. Once things get started, you’ll find yourself sending every plate back to the kitchen – clean. The main dining room seats 70, but my dining adventurer and I decided to sit in the outdoor patio garden. Our server Noelle, host Franco and Manager Azdine Sallem guided us through the meal. We began our journey with a few appetizers, namely the American “Kobe” Beef Cheek Ravioli served in truffle broth. Chewing is not required. The sweet broth and tender meat stuffed ravioli dissolved on the tongue. Or how about the Crab Cake “Double Stuffer?” Paired with garlic and ginger aioli, this wasn’t your average lump. This dish was composed of a crab cake sandwich with a fine, edgy crust and creamy center. But what would a true Kobe Beach Club appetizer be without their famous bacon? No, we’re not talking about your average store bought bacon. This slow roasted Applewood Bacon had a Hampton Style Magazine thickness and was covered in a black truffle ticker tape parade. A little strong, and perhaps a little sobering, my dining partner and I felt like this would be the hottest item if there were a brunch menu.

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© HCC. Photo by Charles Schmidt (soleiart.com).

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By Victoria L. Cooper Three little flags said it all. Shogun’s Flight, an entrée comprised of 4 oz. each of American, Australian and Japanese Wagyu filet and a 6 oz. American Prime strip loin stood side by side, juiced and ready for take off. The meat – super-fatty, succulent and red – is Kobe Beach Club’s flagship dish, literally. Adorned with the respective flags of each country, this meal for two is definitely not for the unadventurous eater. At Kobe Beach Club, the food has a rhyme, a reason and an energy all its own. Even though Kobe Beach Club is the new kid on the block this summer season, its freshman status certainly has no reflection on the caliber of the dining experience. Restaurateur Jeffrey Chodorow of China Grill Management and entertainment executive Charlie Walk, have made three’s company with their latest Kobe Club outpost, Kobe Beach Club in East Hampton. A nice change of pace for Kobe Club lovers, this location has indoor and outdoor seating, a late-night lounge menu and local fresh seafood. The restaurant shares a building with new hotspot nightclub Lily Pond and both venues have been attracting long lines of curious diners and dancers. Kobe Beach Club’s décor screams drama while whispering shabby chic. Deep purples and charcoals offset the backdrop of white tiles and creamy leather accents. A diner might feel at ease, that’s until they look up to the signature Kobe Club aesthetic – samurai sword chandeliers. Under the eye of Chris Kofitsas of New World Design Builders, six custom samurai chandeliers loom famously and dot the ceilings. Enveloped in artistic stimulation, diners sip on the Kobe Punch, which is infused with Grey Goose vodka and served in a punch bowl with

Kobe Beach Club East Hampton

call ahead on your way to the beach!

Espresso Bar ~ Bakery ~ Juice Bar ~ Coffee Roastery Full-Service Café Outdoor Seating 194 Mill Road

869 Montauk Highway

:HVWKDPSWRQ%HDFK‡288-4480 :DWHU0LOO‡726-2633 (on the Six Corners Roundabout) (next to The Green Thumb) www.hamptoncoffeecompany.com 1142880

690 Commack Road, Commack 631-462-1432

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DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 141 www.danshamptons.com

Dining and Nightlife (continued from previous page)

To cleanse the palate, we ordered the fresh seared wild salmon summer salad. Perfect for hot days of July and August, this dish was tossed in blood orange vinaigrette, topped with organic greens, shaved fennel and fresh herbs. Just to revisit the Shogun’s Flight for a moment, there’s an important dining tip I must share. The meat is served side by side and in successive order with the quality of marbling, color, luster and texture increasing with each filet. As you may or may not know, Kobe (Wagyu) Beef is the

that’s been pleasing happy bar bunnies on Wednesday nights, 6-10 p.m. and Friday and Saturday, 11 p.m. – 2 a.m. But who is the mastermind behind all these gourmet creations? Formerly of Sweetwater, English is Italian and Borough Food & Drink, Executive Chef Paul Williams is the culinary genius responsible for Kobe’s dining delight. He explains, “great cooking is all about quality ingredients. I like to keep things simple. If you get the best of the best materials, the food will speak for itself.”

Photos by Deana Camerlingo

Kobe

foie gras of beef, the crème de la crème, and it only comes from one place in the world – Kobe, Japan. The cattle are fed special diets of sake and beer and Wagyu beef cashes in at about $100-$150 per pound. With this dish before you, it’s essential that you do not eat the pieces in random order. Start off first with the American Prime strip loin, then move to the American filet, then the Australian cut and finally end with Japanese Wagyu. Although not light on the wallet, this will be a plate you won’t forget. And you can mix and match any of Kobe Beach Club’s meats with lobster, King Crab or shrimp to make your own surf and turf. Holy Truffle oil! Truffles and truffle oil coats every dish in some way. When you visit, don’t neglect the side dishes or the late night menu. The Sake White Truffle Creamed Corn is addictive. The Kobe Beach Club staffers couldn’t stop talking about how it’s their favorite dish and with the addition of White Truffle, this new spin on the old homey comfort food is a necessary choice. And that’s not even to mention the popular Kobe Hot Dog on their late night menu

Beautiful Villa Fabbroni

Spend an idyllic week in a stunning castle high on a hill in the beautiful Chianti region of Tuscany. Your hosts Sergio & Stefano are wonderful chefs and teachers of the traditional Tuscan fare known as “Cucina Povera” (country peoples cooking). Visit beautiful neighboring village and towns like Sienna, San Gimignano and of course Florence. Please visit our website www.holidayintoscana.com/cookinglessons.htm or call Eva Fabo @ 516.978.7669 for more information.

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One Week Cooking Course Holiday

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 142 www.danshamptons.com

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DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 143 www.danshamptons.com

Simple Art of Cooking Silvia Lehrer

Dining and Nightlife

Time to Celebrate, with Steak on the Grill We have had ample time now to clean up the grill and test our mettle for wonderful days of barbecue in the months ahead. And in time to celebrate the birth of our country on the Fourth of July. I remember tasting chimichurri, the national steak sauce of Argentina, in an Argentinean restaurant in Miami Beach a number of years ago. I’ve learned there are many variations of this piquant sauce, which basically consists of garlic, spices, vinegar, and tons of fresh Italian parsley. The acidic herbal taste of the sauce served over grilled skirt steak haunts me to this day. As I fantasize over the flavor of chimichurri, skirt steak will be my choice of meat to grill for the holiday. To cook the steak I take my cue from the grilling chart in Steven Raichlin’s Barbecue Bible, Workman Publishing, 1998. Skirt steak is a long narrow strip of meat shaped like a belt and is of uneven thickness. The cooking time therefore, is quick, 2-4 minutes per side, depending on thickness. Allow the meat to rest 4-5 minutes after grilling then slice the meat on the bias across the grain for serving. Wheat berry salad with sugar snap peas and cherry tomatoes is a colorful grain salad that can be prepared ahead to serve at a barbecue buffet.

chewy the chew adds texture to this juicy and flavorful cut. Serves 4 - 6

3 pounds skirt steak, trimmed of excess fat Coarse grained kosher or sea salt Coarsely ground pepper Extra-virgin olive oil to coat 1. Build a fire in your grill until coals are ashen hot or heat a gas grill to medium high. Brush the grill grate with vegetable oil.

This high protein salad is a delicious do-ahead treat. Lots of cut up fresh melons and watermelon chunks make a fine and simple finish to a happy Fourth celebration. These are just a few ideas to toss around to help with summer grilling and entertaining plans. SKIRT STEAK ON THE GRILL Skirt steak, shaped like a belt is a long narrow cut from the diaphragm muscle. Although a bit

2. Cut steaks into 3-4 inch sections. Put the pieces on the grill and cook about two minute per side for the thinner steaks and up to four minutes a side for the thicker steaks to acheive medium rare. Skirt steak does not respond well to overcooking. 3. Allow meat to rest for several minutes then serve with the chimichurri sauce. CHIMICHURRI SAUCE Chimichurri, the national steak sauce of Argentina with its vinegary tang, is served as a condiment with grilled skirt steak. Yield about 1/2 cup (continued on page 145)

Matsulin asian n cuisine Chinese e • Japanese e • Malaysian Thaii • Vietnamese

Lunch h • Dinnerr • Sushii & Sake e Bar

exáàtâÜtÇà 9 TÖâtà|v _ÉâÇzx

Lunch h Specialss & Takeoutt Available 1311 Westt Montauk k Highway y n Bays,, New w York k 11946 Hampton

Voted Top 20 Restaurants on Long Island By Newsday 2007

1045316

726-2606 WATERMILL SQUARE SUITE 5A 760 MONTAULK HIGHWAY

631-728-8838

FOOD DECOR SERVICE

Zagatt Survey y 2006/08 25

1142841

20 22 Mon.. - Sat.. from m 11:30am y From m 12:00pm Sunday www.matsulin.com

1142672

canal cafe OPEN FOR DINNER

Waterfront Dining 44 Newtown Road, Hampton Bays on Shinnecock Canal

631-723-2155

631.726.4444 www.mirkosrestaurant.com

1142831

WATER MILL SQUARE, 670 MONTAUK HWY

Open for lunch & dinner Closed Tuesday 1141921

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DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 144 www.danshamptons.com

Dining and Nightlife

Side Dish Turtle Crossing in East Hampton will be open for lunch on Friday, July 4 starting at 12 p.m. Turtle Crossing is now open seven days a week. They will be open Monday – Thursday from 5 – 10 p.m.; Friday from 5 – 11 p.m.; Saturday 12 – 11 p.m.; and Sunday 12 – 10 p.m. For more information call Turtle Crossing at 631-324-7166. Sunset Café in Westhampton Beach is now offering a new tapas menu. Tapas are small flavorful dishes that are popular in Spain’s social and cultural lifestyle. Menu items include: cheese and fruit board with three or four cheeses; meat platter with sopressata, mortadella, and prosciutto; meat and cheese platter; marinated olives; filet mignon panini with arugula, tomato, and horseradish; and mousse truffle plate. Sunset Café will now be open late, Fri. and Sat. for the summer. Monday through Thursday they will be open from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday and Saturday they will open at 7 a.m. and close at 11 p.m. Sunday Sunset opens at 7 a.m. and closes at 6 p.m. For more information call the Sunset Café at (631) 288-3010. Harbor Bistro in East Hampton is now open seven days a week for the summer season. The restaurant will serve dinner from 5 to 10 p.m. Sunday through Thursday, and until 11 p.m. on Friday and Saturday.

Aji Jones

For reservations or further information on the restaurant, call Harbor Bistro at (631) 324-7300. Surf Shack in Amagansett is partnering up with Wafels & Dinges, a venture created by Belgium native Thomas DeGeest. Wafels & Dinges is a mobile food truck that roams the streets of New York City serving authentic Belgian waffles and toppings. The Surf Shack will own their very own Wafels & Dinges truck which will be available to rent out for catering special events. Wafels will be served inside the restaurant on a daily basis. The Surf Shack will serve lunch and dinner daily with the bar open until closing. For further information call The Surf Shack at (631) 267-6980. Stonewalls Restaurant in Riverhead now offers a summer prix fixe menu. The special is available every night beginning at 5 p.m. except on Tuesdays. Cost of the dinner is $25 per person. Menu items may include: baby spinach salad with prosciutto, sweet gorgonzola, and hazelnut; jumbo lump crab cake with red pepper coulis; Idaho brook trout sauté almondine with chives whipped potato and vegetable of the day; duck breast of Long Island; and warm chocolate tarte crème chantilly. For reservations or further information please contact Stonewalls Restaurant at (631) 506-0777. Jedediah’s in Jamesport located within Jedediah Hawkins Inn is replacing the traditional high tea with

Waterfront Restaurant and Bar 3253 Noyac Rd., Sag Harbor • www.oasishamptons.com

725-7110

Available for private parties

1143261

Zagat says: "Modern tropical interiors and wonderful sunset views. Seasonal cuisine that is delicious and delightful and service that is always gracious if not perfect. This off the beaten path charmer is deemed a real find." Serving Dinner Nightly from 5:30p.m.

Turtle Crossing

high cheese. The mid-day treat can be enjoyed in the parlor or in the garden and is offered daily. The cheese platter features American brie, Mecox Sunrise, Grand canaria from Wisconsin and goat cheese. It is accompanied with merlot jelly, berries, homemade bread, and a glass of wine. The cost is $19.95 per person. For further information or reservations call Jedediah’s at (631) 722-2900. MUSE Restaurant & Aquatic Lounge in Water Mill now offers private cooking classes with chefowner Matthew Guiffrida, one of the International Who’s Who of Chefs Top 3000 chefs in the world. Chef Guiffrida will come to your home or welcome you into the restaurant’s kitchen. He will then create a menu based on a topic that the customer chooses. The menu also includes wines paired by Southampton Wines. Prices vary depending on the menu and start at $100 per person for the restaurant class and $150 per person for the home class. There is an eight-person minimum. Classes are offered on Tuesdays only and appointments are required. For more information about MUSE Restaurant & Aquatic Lounge call (631) 726-2606. The Beacon in Sag Harbor is now open for dinner seven nights a week. This is in addition to extended lunch hours, Thursday through Monday, 11:30 – 2:30 p.m. Menu items include: tuna tartare with capers, whole grain mustard, cucumber, red curry paste and mixed greens; steamed mussels Beacon-style with garlic, white wine, fresh lemon-thyme, cream and tomatoes; oven-roasted chicken with julienne carrots, braised shallots and smoked bacon-pecorino risotto; and sesame crusted tuna with Napa cabbage-jicama slaw and Asian glaze. For more information, call The Beacon at (631) 725-7088. ENJOY

THE

BEST WATERFRONT

DINING IN THE

HAMPTONS

The menu is inspired by the abundance of local produce and seafood

New York Times - "Very Good" Newsday - "New England in the Hamptons"

Ribs! Wraps! ‘Ritas! “Islands s Best t BBQ.”” NY Y Times

Eat IN

Catering

take out

have the turtle cater your next... • wedding • rehearsal dinner • BAckyard bbq or kiddie birthday party dinner every night lunch saturday & sunday

join us for purple turtle tuesday’s friday night live music happy hour from 6-8

324-7166

fax 324-7253

www.turtlecrossing.com

1146409

1142116

221 Pantigo Road (Rt 27) East hampton

Arrive by boat, reserve a slip when you book your dinner reservation OPEN 7 NIGHTS

FROM

5PM

THE INN SPOT ON THE BAY 32 Lighthouse Rd Hampton Bays 728-1200 1142096

SAVANNA’S Dinner Daily from 5:30 PM

1142115

2 6 8 E L M S T R E E T S O U T H A M P TO N (Across from the Railroad Station, Reservations Recommended) 1145154

631-283-0202

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DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 145 www.danshamptons.com

Dining and Nightlife

Silvia

(continued from page 143)

2 large cloves garlic, chopped coarsely 1 tightly packed cup flat-leaf Italian parsley leaves 1 teaspoon paprika 3/4 teaspoon ground cumin 1/2 teaspoon coarse (kosher) salt Dash or two cayenne 2-3 teaspoons red wine vinegar 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil 1. Place garlic in the work bowl of a food processor fitted with steel knife and process until finely chopped. Add parsley, paprika, cumin, salt, cayenne and vinegar. Pulse machine a couple of times to mix ingredients. Gradually pour oil through feed tube until mixture is homogenous. Taste to adjust seasonings as necessary. Pour into a screw top jar, cover and refrigerate until ready to use. WHEATBERRY SALAD WITH SUGAR SNAP PEAS AND CHERRY TOMATOES I love the wholesome crunch and texture of wheat berries in salads. This marvelous grain is best purchased in natural food stores or specialty markets. Note the recipe calls for the wheat berries to soak for one hour before cooking. Serves 6-8 For the wheat berries 1 cup whole wheat berries 2 1/2 cups water Coarse (kosher) or sea salt to taste For the salad 4 large scallions, trimmed and thinly sliced 2 tablespoons snipped chives 2 tablespoons chopped flat-leaf Italian parsley 2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro 2 ounces or about 3/4 cup sugar snap peas, stemmed and cut into thirds 6-8 cherry tomatoes, rinsed and halved Coarse (kosher) salt and freshly ground pepper 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 1 tablespoon high-quality balsamic vinegar Boston lettuce leaves, for serving, (optional) 1. Toast the wheat berries in a skillet over medium heat about 5 minutes, gently shaking pan occasionally until they give off a pleasant aroma. Transfer to a strainer and rinse under cold running water. Put the wheat berries in a saucepan with the water and let sit at room temperature for 1 hour. Place the pan containing the wheat berries and water over high heat, add salt, cover pan and bring to a boil. Adjust heat to a brisk simmer and cook for 1 hour or longer just until grains are tender. Check the water level near the end of their cooking time to be certain the water doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t evaporate before the berries are done. Add more water as necessary. When done remove from heat, let rest for a few minutes then turn out into a large strainer to cool. Transfer to a salad bowl. 2. Add the salad ingredients to the wheat berries in their order finishing with the oil and vinegar. Toss gently to mix and taste to adjust seasoning as necessary. The salad may be prepared up to one day ahead and refrigerated covered. When ready to serve bring to room temperature. If desired, arrange washed and dried whole leaves of lettuce on serving plates and spoon equal amounts of salad over the leaves.

Cheese

(continued from page 139)

The cheese world wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be complete without mention of Roquefort; an intensely flavored cheese protected by the Roquefort Association and in a class all its own. I have a personal affinity to Parmigiano Reggiano from Parma Italy, Pecorino Romano from Lazio, Italy and Southern Italyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mozzarella. Pasquale Langella, Mozzarella cheese maker extraordinaire, holds court every Friday, Saturday and Sunday at Tutto Italiano, a Citarella store in East Hampton, where he makes fresh mozzarella. From start to finish, Pasqualeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hands are poetry in motion as he works the special curd in several additions of hot, (140 degree) water until the curds melt into supple sheets of what appears to be voluminous white velvet stretched over a

Goldbergâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Famous %&-*3&45"63"/5

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stainless steel paddle. Pasqualeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hands worked the melting curd into the familiar mozzarella shape and a dip in cold water makes the shape stick. Pasquale handed me a tasting directly from the cold water receptacle. Still slightly warm but creamy and smooth, the small bites just slid down my throat, leaving a rich, slightly salty aftertaste. It was heaven in a bite! In todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s diet-conscious world, cheese has almost become forbidden food. Fortunately, high quality cheese ensures that a little goes a long way, making it a perfect dessert indulgence. Pair it with ripe fruit and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s much leaner than crème brulee. Look for artisanal varieties from a reputable source. We have many great choices right here on the East End.

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THE HISTORY OF GOLDBERGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S FAMOUS In 1920, Izzy Goldberg ďŹ&#x201A;ed Poland to come to America. With only the clothing on his back and a little black notebook containing his fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s secret bagel recipes, Izzy set out to carry on his familyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s legacy. In 1928 Izzy met Helen Fetner and they were married. Living in Brooklyn, Izzy began his ďŹ rst Bagel Bakery in the Bronx, baking in a brick oven using a wooden plank. Bagels were the size of todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s minis and were only baked in plain and salt, selling at a penny a bagel. Izzy and Helen had four sons, Artie, Al, Jerry, and Marty. As their boys grew, so did their Bagel Bakery. As each son became old enough they began working in the bagel bakery and in 1949 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Goldbergâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Famousâ&#x20AC;? was born. Artie, Al, Jerry, and Marty branched out to Brooklyn, the Bronx and later Bagel Chateau in Manhattan and New Jersey; becoming pioneers in the bagel restaurant concept within New Jersey. In 1998 Uncle Marty and Artieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s son Marc brought Goldbergâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Famous to the Hamptons, starting in Southampton and then together in East Hampton. Today, Martyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s son Jacob along with his childhood friend Chris have expanded the business even further, opening the newest location right here in Westhampton Beach. Together they are adding many more varieties of delicious mouth watering appetizing and delicatessen to the menu using Izzyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s secret recipes to carry on their tradition of serving the best Bagels and Deli around.

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DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 146 www.danshamptons.com

Daily Specials

Dining and Nightlife 75 MAIN RESTAURANT – Lunch and dinner seven days and Daily Prix Fixe. Tues. is Local Night, Wed. is Prime Rib Night, and Thurs. is Clambake Night. 75 Main Street, Southampton, 631-283-7575. ALISON AT THE MAIDSTONE INN AND TAVERN – Alison Becker and Chef Robert Gurvich are now serving in the main dining room of the Alison Restaurant in the Maidstone Arms Inn. The restaurant is open Wednesday through Sunday for dinner from 5:30-10.30 p.m. Sunday Brunch 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. There is a new tavern menu and the same hours. www.alisonrestaurant.com/www.maidstonearms.com. 207 Main Street, East Hampton. 631-324-5440. ALMOND – A classic French bistro offering unpretentious French fare at affordable prices. Open Thurs.-Tues from 6 p.m. and closed on Wednesday. Located at 1970 Montauk Highway, Bridgehampton. 631-537-8885. B. SMITH’S – Best waterfront location in the Hamptons serving the finest lobster salad, watermelon margaritas and steaks on the East End. Open for lunch, dinner and brunch. Located on Long Wharf at Bay Street, Sag Harbor. 631-725-5858 bsmith.com. BIRCHWOOD ON THE PARK – International pub right in the heart of Southampton. Open 7 days a week 119 p.m. with a late night menu Fri. and Sat. until 12:30 a.m. Happy hour everyday 5-7 p.m. with 1/2 price apps at the bar on Fri. and free apps on Sat. Lunch and Dinner specials everyday. Mon. Employee night, Tues. Two For’s, Wed. All you can eat seafood, Thurs. Ladies night. Late night wing night and Beer Pong for $15 starting at 9 p.m., with outdoor bar and patio. Located at 76C Jobs Lane, Southampton. 631-283-4316. BEFORE THE BRIDGE RESTAURANT – Voted as one of the Best of the Best Seafood Restaurants by Dan’s Papers readers. Open for dinner from 4 p.m., seven nights a week, closed Tuesday until June 17 and then will be open seven nights. Daily $25, 4-course Prix Fixe SundayThursday. Crab feast, Shrimp feast, Seafood platter special. Serving lunch Fri-Sun from 12-4 p.m. Sunday Brunch 12-3 p.m. Located at 78 Foster Avenue, Hampton Bays, behind Tully’s Seafood Market. 631-728-9111. BOBBY VAN’S – Specializing in steakhouse classics and fresh fish. Lunch and dinner 7 days. Open 363 days a year for lunch, dinner and weekend brunch. Kitchen open Fri. & Sat. till 11 p.m. Located at Main Street, Bridgehampton. 631-537-0590. BUOY ONE – Fresh seafood market, dining room and take-out. Voted “Best of the Best Seafood” in 2005 and 2006. Open Mon.-Thurs. 10 a.m.-10 p.m., Fri.-Sat. 10 a.m.11 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.-10 p.m. Located at 1175 West Main Street, Riverhead. 631-208-9737. CAFFE MONTE AT GURNEY’S – Serving breakfast daily from 7:30-10 a.m. From 12-3 p.m., the caffe serves a casual, economically priced Italian-style menu. La

Spanish Mediterranean Cuisine

*July 4 Weekend Explosion Party* After Dinner, Dance, Drink and Let Loose!! 1/2 off Kamakazi Dynamite Shots all Night

*July 5 Brazilian Cocktail Fest* 9-11:30pm Hosted by Cabana (Cachaca Brazilian Rum) Mixed Drinks Ser ved by their own Cabana Girl

DJ FAZE

Spins All Weekend Long 9:00 pm - 3:30 am

BRING IN YOUR FERRY TICKET 1/2 Carafe (Reg & Non-Alcoholic) FREE!!

BRUNCH: Sunday 11:00 am LUNCH: Tues-Sat 12:00 pm DINNER: Tues-Sun 6:00 pm LATE NIGHT MENU AVAILABLE AFTER 11:00 PM 85 N. Ferry Road, Shelter Island, NY 11964

631.749.5091

All Major Credit Cards Accepted

1144960

Paticceria serves light fare from 7 a.m.-9 p.m. Located at 290 Old Montauk Highway, Montauk. 631-668-2660. CANAL CAFÉ – Fresh seafood and scenic waterfront dining. Savor the view as well as our food. Lunch and dinner. On Shinnecock Canal (Hampton Watercraft Marine), 44 Newtown RD, Hampton Bays. Closed Tuesdays. 631723-2155. CASA BASSO – A Hamptons landmark providing a unique Mediterranean dining experience for over 80 years. Three course prix fixe for $25 every night. Waterfront dining available. Open Tuesday-Sunday at 5pm. Located at 59 Montauk Highway, Westhampton (Next to the Castle and Swordsmen). www.casabasso.net. 631-288-1841. COUNTRY HOUSE RESTAURANT – (Circa 1710) Open 7 days a week for lunch and dinner. Voted Most Romantic Restaurant by AOL City Guide. Zagat Rated. Located on Route 25A on the corner of Main Street, “Old” Stony Brook. www.countryhouserestaurant.com 631-7513332. Reservations suggested. CROMER’S MARKERT – Custom Butcher Shop, Fresh Produce, Our famous fried chicken, full deli & appetizers, carry out catering. Open Mon. thru Sat. 8 a.m.-7 p.m., Sundays 8 a.m.-5 p.m. 805 Montauk Hwy, Montauk. 6687500. HAMPTON COFFEE COMPANY – Featuring espresso bar, bakery, coffee roastery, full-service café serving breakfast, lunch and desserts, and outdoor garden seating. Open Monday-Thursday, Sunday 6 a.m.-7 p.m., Friday & Saturday 6 a.m.-8 p.m. Located at 869 Montauk Highway in Water Mill & 194 Mill Road in Westhampton Beach. www.hamptoncoffeecompany.com 631-726-COFE. THE INN SPOT ON THE BAY – A true “foodies delight” featuring the freshest seafood and local produce available. Platinum Chef winner Cheffe Colette creates an inventive menu with some pleasant surprises. Dine outside on the waterfront verandah and enjoy the best sunsets in the Hamptons, at The Inn Spot On The Bay, 32 Lighthouse Rd Hampton Bays. 631-728-1200. THE JAMESPORT MANOR INN – Experience North Fork History and unprecedented local cuisine in the magnificently reconstructed 1850s mansion. New American Cuisine with a Mediterranean flair. Serving Lunch and Dinner daily closed Tuesday. Private parties accommodated. Located at 370 Manor Lane, Jamesport. Call 631-7220500, email inn@jamesportmanor.com or visit www.jamesportmanor.com LIGHTHOUSE GRILL & PATIO – An upscale, yet unpretentious setting, Dine where historical magnates J.P. Morgan Jr., Astor and Doubleday overlooked the famed docks and waterside views. Enjoy Chef Jared Potter’s signature “Jaker Crab Cake”& “Yacht Chowder.” Monthly Artists Wine Dinners Series – last Thurs. monthly thru Oct. Reservations suggested. Dinner. 631-668-3100, Ext. 1172. 32 Star Island Road, Montauk. LE SOIR RESTAURANT – Serving the finest French cuisine for over 25 years, rated in Zagat Survey of Distinction 2006-2007 and recognized as among the best on Long Island for delicious quality food, value and attentive staff. Nightly specials, homemade on premises desserts. Located at 825 W. Montauk Highway, Bayport. 631-4729090. MATTO RESTAURANT– Matto, Italian for “crazy,” features a menu bursting with Italian specialties and handcrafted, thin-crust pizzas. Chic yet casual. Serving dinner Monday - Friday from 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday beginning at 12 noon for lunch and continuing into dinner beginning at 5 p.m. Weeknight bar special of complimentary amuse bouche with cocktails at the bar, Monday,Tuesday and Wednesday. Takeout is available. Located at 104 North Main Street, East Hampton, 631-329-0200 mattoresturant.com. MATSULIN – This cozy Pan Asian restaurant has a menu with varied cuisines from fresh cut sashimi to savory Kari Ayam. Open 7 days from 12 p.m. Located at 131 W. Montauk Highway, Hampton Bays. 631-728-8838. MUSE – Restaurant and aquatic lounge open for dinner 6 days a week, serving brunch on Sundays. Live entertainment with Steve Frederick Thursday from 7 to 10 p.m. Located in the Water Mill Square, 760 Montauk Highway, Water Mill. 631-726-2606. OAKLAND’S RESTAURANT & MARINA – Located on Dune Road at the Shinnecock Inlet in Hampton Bays is serving lunch & dinner seven days a week beginning at noon. Monday and Tuesday nights Oakland’s offers a lobster bash, Friday night Happy Hour 5-7 p.m. and Sunday Brunch 12-3 p.m. The regular menu is available during these specials. Live music on our deck weekends weather permitting. Visit oaklandsresturant.com for more informa-

tion. 631-728-6900. OASIS WATERFRONT RESTAURANT - Zagat says “Modern tropical interiors and wonderful sunset views. Seasonal cuisine that is delicious and delightful and service that is always gracious if not perfect. This off the beaten path charmer is deemed a real find.” Open Wed.-Sun. from 5:30 p.m. Located at 3253 Noyac Road. Sag Harbor. oasishamptons.com. 631-725-7110. ONE OCEAN – An elegant restaurant with a casual atmosphere. Prix fixe $23 available all night Sun., Tues & Thurs. and until 7 p.m. Fri. & Sat. Enjoy shrimp night on Wednesdays and the dazzling vocals of Monica Hughes on Thursday nights from 8 to 11 p.m. Open for brunch Fri.Sun. from 11:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Located on the corner of Ocean Road and Montauk Highway, Bridgehampton. 631537-5665. OSO AT SOUTHAMPTON INN – Featuring steaks, seafood and locally grown produce, prepared by four-star chef Peter Dunlop, in a Mediterranean atmosphere. Serving dinner, lunch, breakfast. Outdoor dining and bar/lounge. Restaurant reservations, call 631-283-1166. Located at 91 Hill St., Southampton. www.southamptoninn.com PARTO’S – Italian restaurant, pizzeria, caféé. Frank Spatola invites you to enjoy a real taste of Italy. Old-style, rural Tuscan atmosphere. Open Mon.-Thurs. 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Fri.-Sat. 11 a.m.-10:30 p.m. Sun. 12-9 p.m. Visit www.partosrestaurant.com. Located at 12 West Main Street, 100 yards west of Atlantis Marine World, Riverhead. 631-727-4828. THE PATIO AT 54 MAIN – New American Cuisine featuring prime aged steaks and fresh seafood. Three course Chef ’s tastings available seven days a week for $30. Live entertainment Fri. & Sat. Friday Night Happy Hour in our Grill Room. Open 7 days a week, 4-10 p.m. Sun.-Thurs. and 4-11 p.m. Fri. and Sat. Located at 54 Main Street, Westhampton Beach. 631-288-0100. PIERRE’S – Euro-chic but casual restaurant and bar. Late dinner and bar on weekdays. Open 7 days. Brunch Fri. - Sun. from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. near the fireplace. Located at 2468 Main Street, Bridgehampton. 631-537-5110. www.pierresbridgehampton.com. PREMIER DINER – Enjoy spectacular food, dinner specials and easy-going atmosphere. Open 24 hours, weekends. Located at 690 Commack Road, Commack, 200 ft. North of Expressway (going east Exit 52, going west Exit 53) 631-462-1432. THE REGULARS MUSIC CAFÉ – Live music. Great food. Lunch. Dinner. Happy Hour, half priced drinks 5-7 p.m. 631 . 287 . 2900 RegularsMusicCafe.com 1271 North Sea Rd, Southampton. THE SALTWATER GRILL – Located on the Atlantic Ocean in Westhampton Beach, Serving amazing ocean views, friendly service, and classic, simply grilled seafood and steaks. Lunch/Dinner/Drinks/Live Music. 631 2881485. Located 379 Dune Road Westhampton Beach. SARACEN – A Mediterranean culinary experience, Saracen boasts a modern Italian menu, comfortable atmosphere and excellent European service. Reservations recommended. Located at 108 Montauk Highway, Wainscott. 631537-6255. SAVANNA’S – Serving dinner daily from 5:30 p.m. Happy hour Monday-Friday 5:30-7 p.m. Gracious dining indoors in our historic dining room and outside the rose garden. Located at 268 Elm St. Southampton. 631-2830202. SEA GRILLE AT GURNEY’S – Overlooking the Atlantic Ocean. Located at 290 Old Montauk Highway, Montauk. 631-668-2660. SUNSET CAFÉ – Organic cafe by day, wine and martini bar by night. Offering organic coffee, wraps, sandwiches, soup, salads and baked goods. Located at 49 Sunset Ave, Westhampton Beach. (631) 288-3010, sunsetcafewhb.com TUSCAN HOUSE – Regional Italian Cuisine, seafood, pastas, meat and poultry, you feel that you have been transported to Italy the moment you arrive. Dan’s Papers “Best of the Best” Italian Food. Open year round. 10 Windmill Lane, Southampton, 631-287-8703 TURTLE CROSSING – Serving authentic regional food in an old Southwestern technique. Ribs, wraps, ‘ritas! Dinner every night. Lunch Sat. & Sun. Located at 21 Panitgo Road, East Hampton. 631-324-7166. WESTHAMPTON STEAKHOUSE – Seafood, pasta, prime-aged steaks, lobster dinners. Prix-fixe available every night until 7 p.m. Thursday and Sundays. Lobster dinner $17, Prime Rib $21.95 or Prime Rib and Lobster $36. Live music in the dining room Thursday, Friday and Saturday.

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 147 www.danshamptons.com

Dining and Nightlife

Fireworks! Live Music! Food! Drink! Rock the Harbor!!

S. Galardi

At first, there was “The Hamptons,” and it was good. Then there was “The Unhamptons,” and it was good too. Then there were “The Benefits,” and sometimes they were good. And now, there are “The Un-benefits,” called “Rock the Hamptons” and they are very, very good. Benefits in the Hamptons are a chance to dress up, see and be seen, and maybe rub elbows (or at least exchange glances) with a few celebs. But let’s be honest, at some benefits you find yourself in the corner by the bar, looking at a group of strangers, thinking “I wish this were benefiting me.” Not all benefits are created equal. While every cause is surely worthwhile, some benefits are just a lot more fun than others. Rock the Harbor, July 12, and its sister act, Rock the Farm, on August 16, are two “un-benefits” where you don’t have to dress up, will most likely run into real friends, and will be on your feet dancing to a great live band rather than lurking on the sidelines. Oh, and at the former, you’ll have a harbor side seat to watch Grucci fireworks explode over the bay. The Rock events are the brainchildren of two guys who really know how to make their own fun, and take along hundreds of people for the ride. Rob Kaimowitz and Nick Kraus, both partners at The Stephen Talkhouse, have taken their Giving Tree Band events for the Wounded Warriors project out of the club and into the great wide open. According to Kraus, “The two events are the perfect combination for us. We like to have fun.” Kraus, an East End native, wanted Rock the Harbor to continue the almost 30-year tradition of the summer fundraiser at Boy’s Harbor. “It’s the same audience, same property, but a new generation,” he said. “We’re going for the fun, a traditional American festival. It’s definitely kid-friendly, too.” Kaimowitz, finance consultant by day and Giving Tree band drummer by night, said he and Kraus were of one let’s-party mind in creating a different kind of event. “I can’t stand those red carpet events,” he said. “We wanted to do something that’s not pretentious, that’s an extension of the feeling and the people who go to the Talkhouse.” “Not to sound cliché,” added Krause, “But we’re keeping it real. Rock the Harbor really is Boy’s Harbor revisited: fun, food and fireworks – and cool, danceable rock by the Giving Tree band – on the Duke Estate. Rock the Farm, at a horse farm in East Hampton, is more of an adult event for those who love great music and missed Woodstock. “You can dress up a little if you want, but it’s still low key” said Kraus, who’s offering up the family version of Yasger farm in East Hampton for this August event. The other aspect of the Rock events that’s different from many East End benefits is the price. “If you go out to dinner in the Hamptons, two hours and $150 dollars later, it’s over,” said Kaimowitz. “Rock the Harbor is a five-hour event, from 6-11 pm. For $75 (if you buy tickets online to both events) you get great food catered by the Seafood Shop, open bar all night, live music with special guests, dancing and Grucci fireworks. It’s the best thing you can do this summer – twice.” The first Rock event happened last year at the

farm. The Giving Tree Band, which donates its proceeds to charities chosen by band members, had finished its fundraiser at the Talkhouse in July. “We had a month off, so I said to Nick, let’s figure out something to do,” said Kaimowitz. “Nick said, let’s do something at my farm and make it a charity.” For this round, the team had a year to plan it all out. Last summer they pulled it together in much less time. “We prefer three weeks to get it done,” said Kraus, “We put together the whole thing, catering, liquor, sponsors, advertising. It was fun, successful, and generated money for the charities.

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For Kraus and Kaimowitz, they’re just doing their thing on a larger level – Kraus producing music events and Kaimowitz doing fund raisers with Giving Tree, which has played sold out shows in the Hamptons and New York. Although members of the group have been jamming together and performing in other bands for years, the Giving Tree itself has been doing shows at the Talkhouse and city venues from the Bitter End to Cipriani for two years. “We did a Wounded Warrior event – a black tie dinner – at Cipriani and raised a lot of money,” said Kaimowitz. “And we didn’t have to pay a band.” “Yeah, Rob played in his own band, and bought two tables,” quipped Kraus. “If you’re a gambler, the term is ‘the swing.’ It was very much in his favor.” And as the song goes – it don’t mean a thing if it ain’t got that swing. These events will have plenty of it, from the sponsors to the crowd to the band itself. The name Giving Tree, by the way, is based on the very un-childlike children’s book of the same name by Shel Silverstein. A tree gives everything – food, shelter and recreation – through its leaves, branches, and very trunk to a little boy as he grows to old age. The boy is always unfulfilled because he is always wanting. The tree is always happy because she is always giving. The message, of course, is that happiness comes, in part, from making others happy. It’s a great name for this band, which is known for its high energy shows that get people off their feet, dancing, having a great time. When you go to Rock the Hamptons events, get ready to get happy. Rock the Harbor is scheduled for Saturday, July 12, on the Duke Estate in East Hampton. Rock the Farm happens August 16 at John’s Lane farm, East Hampton. For more information and ticket purchases: rockthehamptons.org.

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DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 148 www.danshamptons.com

Dining and Nightlife

Sugar Shack Shakes Up Montauk

Photos by Dizzy Swank

By Tiffany Razzano Is the East End ready for burlesque? Runaround Sue, producer of Sugar Shack Burlesque based in New York City, seems to think so. If not, she hopes to shake things up, as she prepares for her groupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first show at SolĂŠ East in Montauk. Along with two other girls â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Legs Malone and Rubie Fizz â&#x20AC;&#x201C; sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be performing at the hotel for free every other Saturday night through September. Their first show is July 5, at 11 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m excited. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s definitely new [for the East End,]â&#x20AC;? said Runaround Sue, whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been waiting tables at the hotel for just under a month. Hanging up fliers around town, sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s seen nothing but interest from the locals. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The older generation knows about burlesque and the younger generation is like, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s that?â&#x20AC;&#x2122; It should be a unifying experience. I think weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll get a good cross section of a lot of different people.â&#x20AC;? She added, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Burlesque is not really threatening to people. It features all different types of girls, all different body types. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nothing elitist about it. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just not threatening.â&#x20AC;? What you can expect July 5 is a classic burlesque show. Runaround Sueâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s specialties are fan dancing and balloon dancing. Legs Maloneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s portion of the

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show is punctuated by her wry, native-New Yorker sense of humor and Rubie Fizz is a real show girl, a costume designer by day, Runaround Sue says. And each show will feature a different sideshow performer. Their first will be hosted by Nelson Luga, a graduate of the Coney Island Side Show School, trained in skills such as sword swallowing and glass eating. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll also perform. And those who consider burlesque dancing to be

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akin to stripping, think again. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s actually an incredibly artistic and creative medium. The girls have to create all of their own costumes, often from random scraps of fabric, and also choreograph their own performances. Runaround Sue, who moved to New York City from Virginia in 2000, later attending the New York School of Burlesque, has only been doing burlesque for two years. But for years before that, she had attended shows on a regular basis. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It encourages you to scream, hoot, holler and cheer. Kind of like when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re 16 and at a school pep rally,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When (continued on next page)

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 149 www.danshamptons.com

Dining and Nightlife

Sugar

(continued from previous page)

I’m at a show, all I want to do is dance. It makes me feel so good.” Burlesque has deep roots in the history of the entertainment in our country, especially New York City, though over the past couple of decades, it’s seen a decline. Runaround Sue estimates there are only 150 burlesque performers in New York City these days. But because the burlesque community is so tiny, it creates a sense of kinship amongst the performers,

plished much, starting her own production company, performing regularly in the Berkshires and New York City – including a residency at Shaken and Stirred at Niagara, the only burlesque dance party in the city. In fact, she’s close to making burlesque a full-time gig. Now she can add Montauk to her list of regular shows. And remember, the show is free. “We’re working for love and tips,” she said. “So feel free to tip.” For more information, go to soleeast.com or myspace.com/sugarshackburlesque.

Photos by Johannes Graf

despite the fact that burlesque girls don’t know each other’s real names, usually. They know each other only by their stage names, as do their fans, in order to perpetuate the characters they create. But the girls are still incredibly close. “You get all these women together, you think they’ll be catty, but they’re not,” Runaround Sue said. She said the other girls often help each other prepare for shows, helping by tying corsets and helping other dancers figure out what they should wear. For such a short career, Runaround Sue has accom-

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DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 150 www.danshamptons.com

Nightlife

Dining and Nightlife FRIDAY, JULY 4 75 MAIN – DJ and dancing. No cover. Clara Rose 5-7 p.m. Located at 75 Main Street in Southampton. 631-2837575. ANNONA RESTAURANT – Live music, 6-9 p.m. Happy Hour, 5- 7:30 p.m., music and 2-for-1 drinks. Located at 112 Riverhead Road, Westhampton Beach. 631-288-7766. THE ARTFUL DODGER – The Sun Gets Down. No cover. 10 p.m. Located at 113 Main St., Westhampton Beach. 631-288-2885. BEACH BAR – TGIF Weekend Kickoff Party, 8 p.m. $2.50 domestic bottles. Hosted by DJ Doug O’Mara and level Vodka. Located at 58 Foster Avenue, Hampton Bays. 631-723-3100. CIGAR BAR – Latino Night. Located at 2 Main Street, Sag Harbor. 631-725-2575. DOCKERS – Dave Tyler. Located at 94 Dune Road, East Quogue. 631-653-0653. THE DORY RESTAURANT – Rebecca Dorsey, 6 and 8 p.m. Located at 185 North Ferry Rd., Shelter Island. 631749-4300. DUNE – Open Friday and Saturday night and Sundays of holiday weekends from 10 p.m.-4 a.m. Located at 1181 North Sea Road, Southampton. 631-283-0808. FIDDLERS COVE – Karaoke. Located at 367 Three Mile Harbor Road, East Hampton. 631-329-7577. GURNEY’S INN – Dance with DJ Des and DJ Linda every Friday and Saturday night. Located at 290 Old Montauk Highway, Montauk. 631-668-2345. LA PLAYA – Open late night Friday and Saturday for dinner and drinks. Located at 125 Tuckahoe Rd., Southampton. 631-251-6292. THE LODGE BAR & GRILL –Happy Hour, 5-7 p.m., free food at the bar. Outdoor patio. Located at 31 Race Lane, East Hampton. 631-324-5022. MOMENTOS – Mambo Loco Quartet, 10:30 p.m. Located at 194 E. Montauk Highway, Hampton Bays. 631594-2961. THE PATIO AT 54 MAIN – Howie Seagull. Located at 54 Main Street, Westhampton Beach. 631-288-0100. SOUTHAMPTON PUBLICK HOUSE – Happy Hour, 4 p.m.-12 a.m. DJ Dory. Located at 40 Bowden Sq., Southampton. 631-283-2800. THE STEPHEN TALKHOUSE – Shelby Lynn, 8 p.m., $70/$85. Winston Irie, 10 p.m., $25. Located at 161 Main Street, Amagansett. 631-267-3117. SUNSET CAFE – Spanish Night Fiesta, featuring live Spanish music. Located at 49 Sunset Ave., Westhampton Beach. 631-288-3010. SURF SHACK – Hot Lava, The Giving Tree, 7 p.m. Located at 2095 Montauk Highway, Amagansett. 631-2676980. TOM McBRIEN’S – Nip and Shuck Happy Hour every day from 3 to 7 p.m. Featuring bucket of Coors Light nips with clams $13, or Oysters $15. 2-for-1 drinks. Located at 174 East Montauk Highway, Hampton Bays. 631-728-7137. TURTLE CROSSING –Mama Lee & Friends, 5:30- 8 p.m. Located at 221 Pantigo Rd., East Hampton. 631-3247166. WESTHAMPTON STEAKHOUSE – Reopening of The Loft with DJ Dollar Bill. Three levels of dancing and bars. Located at 142 Mill Road, Westhampton. 631-288-7161.

SATURDAY, JULY 5 75 MAIN – Big River Ransom Band, 10 p.m. No cover. Located at 75 Main Street in Southampton. 631-283-7575. ALMONCELLO – Karaoke, 10:30 p.m. Located at 290 Montauk Highway, East Hampton. 631-329-6700. ANNONA RESTAURANT – Live music, 9 p.m.-12 a.m. Happy Hour, 5-7:30 p.m. Music and 2-for-1 drinks. Located at 112 Riverhead Road, Westhampton Beach. 631-288-7766. THE ARTFUL DODGER – Talk of the Town, 10 p.m. No cover. Located at 113 Main St., Westhampton Beach. 631288-2885. ATLANTICA RESTAURANT – The Mambo Loco Quartet, 7-11 p.m. Located at 231 Dune Road, Westhampton Beach. 631-288-2700. BEACH BAR – Happy Hour, 2 p.m. Ladies Night, $10. DJ Brad and DJ Joey Jammz. Located at 58 Foster Avenue, Hampton Bays. 631-723-3100. CIGAR BAR – DJ Sam. Located at 2 Main Street, Sag Harbor. 631-725-2575. DOCKERS – Noiz and others. Located at 94 Dune Road, East Quogue. 631-653-0653. FIDDLERS COVE – Second Shift. Located at 367 Three Mile Harbor Road, East Hampton. 631-329-7577. NICK’S ON THE BEACH – Blaggards. 3-7 p.m. 148 S.

FIREWORKS SOUTHAMPTON – 7/4 – 7-10 p.m. As part of the Southampton Fresh Air Home benefit at 1030 Mewdow Lane. $250 per adult, $100 for ages 20-30, and $75 for those 19 and under. 631-283-5847. SAG HARBOR – 7/4 – As part of a benefit for the Cormaria Center for Spiritual and Human Growth on Bay Street. Tickets are $300. 631-725-4206. AMAGANSETT – 7/5 – Fireworks will be at the Devon Yacht Club on Devon Road. 631-267-6340. RIVERHEAD – 7/5 – 8:30 p.m. At the Riverhead Raceway, on County Road 58, 1 mile beyond the last exit on the LIE. 631-842-7223. RIVERHEAD – 7/5 – On the Peconic Waterfront, behind Atlantis Marine World. 631-727-0048. SAG HARBOR – 7/5 – 9:30 p.m. At the public Marine Park waterfront area. NORTH SEA – 7/6 – 7-11 p.m. The North Sea Fire Department is having a carnival and fireworks display at Firemen’s Field in North Sea. 631-2830402.

PARADES SOUTHAMPTON – 7/4 – Starting at 10 a.m. at Railroad Plaza in Southampton. All veterans are invited to ride in cars., which will be provided. 631725-0450 or 631-728-7601. SOUTHOLD – 7/4 – 11 a.m. on the Main Road in Southold. Balloons and flags will be handed out. 631-765-4100. Emerson Ave., Montauk. 631-668-4800. OSO – Phillip Gotthelf, 9-11:30 p.m. Located at 91 Hill St., Southampton. 631-283-1166. THE PATIO AT 54 MAIN – Frank Anthony trio. Located at 54 Main Street, Westhampton Beach. 631-2880100. SOLÉ EAST – Sugar Shack Burlesque, 11 p.m. Located at 90 Second House Rd., Montauk. 631-668-9739. SOUTHAMPTON PUBLICK HOUSE– DJ Dome, 10 p.m. Southampton Ales & Lagers Secret Ale bottles for $2.50. Located at 40 Bowden Sq., Southampton. 631-2832800. SUNSET CAFÉ – Kenn Morr, 8-10 p.m. Located at 49 Sunset Ave., Westhampton Beach. 631-288-3010. THE STEPHEN TALKHOUSE – Dave Mason, 8 p.m., $100/$115. Little Head Thinks, 10 p.m., $25. Located at 161 Main Street, Amagansett. 631-267-3117. WESTHAMPTON STEAKHOUSE – Reopening of The Loft. DJ Dollar Bill. Three levels of dancing and bars. Ladies drink free, 9-11 p.m. Located at 142 Mill Road, Westhampton. 631-288-7161. WHITE HOUSE – Doors at 10 p.m. Located at 39 East Montauk Highway, Hampton Bays. 631-728-4121.

SUNDAY, JULY 6 75 MAIN – Hambonians, 10 p.m. No cover. Located at 75 Main Street in Southampton. 631-283-7575. BAMBOO – 2-for-1-sushi and drink specials. Located at 47 Montauk Highway, East Hampton. 631-329-9821. BEACH BAR – Happy Hour, 2 p.m. Located at 58 Foster Avenue, Hampton Bays. 631-723-3100. DOCKERS – Happy Hour. 2-for-1 drinks. Paul Mahas Band, 1-4 p.m. and the lobster bake special. Located at 94 Dune Road, East Quogue. 631-653-0653. HAVANA BEACH CLUB – Mambo Loco Quartet. Located at 448 W. Lake Dr., Montauk. 866-377-8132. THE STEPHEN TALKHOUSE – Southside Johnny and the Asbury Jukes, 8 p.m., $120/$135. Mystic Bowie, 10 p.m., $10. Located at 161 Main Street, Amagansett. 631267-3117.

MONDAY, JULY 7 THE ARTFUL DODGER – Guitar Hero III Legends of Rock night. Located at 113 Main St., Westhampton Beach. 631-288-2885. ATLANTICA RESTAURANT – The Mambo Loco Quartet, 6 p.m. Located at 231 Dune Road, Westhampton Beach. 631-288-2700. THE STEPHEN TALKHOUSE – The Band band, 8 p.m., $20. Open Jam, 11 p.m., no cover. Located at 161 Main Street, Amagansett. 631-267-3117.

TUESDAY, JULY 8 THE ARTFUL DODGER – All you can drink Coors Light, 8 p.m.-12 a.m. $15. Located at 113 Main St., Westhampton Beach. 631-288-2885. BEACH BAR – Employees Night. DJ Dollar Bill and guest DJs. Free admission, cab ride and midnight BBQ for East End employees. Located at 58 Foster Avenue, Hampton Bays. 631-723-3100. DOCKERS – Lobster bake special. Paul Mahas, 6 p.m. Located at 94 Dune Road, East Quogue. 631-653-0653. MARGARITA GRILLE – Mambo Loco Quartet. Located at 83 Main St., Westhampton. 631-288-5252. PIERRE’S – Jody Carlson and her band, 6:30- 9:30 p.m. Located at 2468 Main Street, Bridgehampton. 631-5375110. THE STEPHEN TALKHOUSE – Sonny Landreth, 8 p.m., $40/$55. The Creamsicles, 11 p.m., $10. Located at 161 Main Street, Amagansett. 631-267-3117.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 9 THE ARTFUL DODGER – Special for guys, 8-10 p.m. Beer and a shot for $5. Located at 113 Main St., Westhampton Beach. 631-288-2885. BEACH HUT – The Mambo Loco Quartet, 6 p.m. At Meschutt Beach, 1 Canal Rd., Hampton Bays. BUCKLEY’S INN BETEEN – Karaoke, 9 p.m.–1 a.m. Located at 139 West Montauk Highway, Hampton Bays. 631-728-7197. DOCKERS – Annie Morgan. Located at 94 Dune Road, East Quogue. 631-653-0653. FIDDLERS COVE – Acoustic open mic, 8 p.m. Located at 367 Three Mile Harbor Road, East Hampton. 631-3297577. THE LODGE BAR & GRILL –Happy Hour, 5-7 p.m. with free food at the bar, outdoor patio. Located at 31 Race Lane, East Hampton. 631-324-5022. THE PATIO AT 54 MAIN – Live music. Located at 54 Main Street, Westhampton Beach. 631-288-0100. SOUTHAMPTON PUBLICK HOUSE – Ladies Night, wit DJ Disco Pauly. Located at 40 Bowden Sq., Southampton. 631-283-2800. THE STEPHEN TALKHOUSE – Feed the Need, 8 p.m., $10. Karaoke at 11 p.m. $5. Located at 161 Main Street, Amagansett. 631-267-3117. TOM McBRIEN’S – Open Mic. Located at 174 East Montauk Highway, Hampton Bays. 631-728-7137.

THURSDAY, JULY 10 THE ARTFUL DODGER – Karaoke, 9 p.m. No cover. Located at 113 Main St., Westhampton Beach. 631-2882885. BAMBOO – Free sushi at the bar until 8 p.m. Half price sake martinis and 80s and 90s music. Located at 47 Montauk Highway, East Hampton. 631-329-9821. BAY BURGER – Leroy Live, 7 p.m. No cover. Located at 1742 Sag Harbor Turnpike, Sag Harbor. 631-603-6160. DUNE – Open every Thursday from 10 p.m.- 4 a.m. Located at 1181 North Sea Road, Southampton. 631-2830808. EAST HAMPTON BOWL – All night, $2 drinks, pool and bowling. Located at 71 Montauk Hwy, East Hampton. 631-324-1950. GURNEY’S INN – Karaoke, 9 p.m. Located at 290 Old Montauk Highway, Montauk. 631-668-2345. LE CHEF BISTRO – Vocalist Ludmilla and guitarist Marcello Pimenta, 7- 10 p.m. Located at 75 Jobs Lane, Southampton. 631-283-8581. MUSE –Steve Fredericks, 7-10 p.m. No cover. Located in the Water Mill Shopping Centre, Ste. 5A, Water Mill. 631726-2606. THE PATIO AT 54 MAIN – Live music. Located at 54 Main Street, Westhampton Beach. 631-288-0100. PINK ELEPHANT – Open for late night clubbing Thursdays through Sundays. Located at 281 County Road 39, Southampton. 631-287-9888. THE STEPHEN TALKHOUSE – Eek-A-Mouse, 8 p.m., $50. Bastards of Boom, 11 p.m., $10. Located at 161 Main Street, Amagansett. 631-267-3117. TOM McBRIEN’S PUB – Ladies. DJ Shawn. Located at 174 East Montauk Highway, Hampton Bays. 631-728-7137 WÖLFFER ESTATE VINEYARD – Twilight Thursdays, 5- 7:30 p.m. Located at 139 Sagg Road, Sagaponack. Visit www.wolffer.com or call 631-537-5106. Email all nightlife updates to nightlife@danspapers.com or fax to 631-537-3330 by Friday at noon.

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 151 www.danshamptons.com

Meeting Thy (Wine) Maker Wine Events Present Opportunities To Meet The Extraordinary People Behind The World's Greatest Wines

Photo by Chris Miller

By Christopher S. Miller My view of wine is greatly influenced by passion, personality and place. I am lucky to receive invitations to some of the world’s most renowned wine regions and many prestigious wine events, both great and small. Some of these are grand affairs, such as the Henriot 200th anniversary luncheon at the Modern, where I mingled with a large group of wine writers. Others are more intimate, like the small dinner with the owner and winemaker of Domaine de Montille in Volnay. The people who are invited to these events are all wine professionals of some sort. Over the course of my career I have been involved in many sides of this diverse and expanding industry (wine buyer, wine educator, sommelier and wine writer), so I am often invited to wine events wearing different “hats.” My observation is that wine writers in general get the real cushy invites (like the Henriot and Croft luncheons at the Modern), while the wine buyer/sommelier invites are much more work and pressure filled. Buyer events are more about sales than history, region and personalities (my favorite wine topics). At all these events there are many very strong personalities with opinions to

Recently I had the wonderful opportunity to talk with Christian Moueix while tasting some of his wines (no, not Petrus).

match. There is also lots of knowledge, but often it takes a bit of archeological work to get to the real information that a winemaker or grower has to impart. I often see many of the same people at these events, like Howard Goldberg, Long Island wine writer for The New York Times. Seeing him often at wine events gives me confidence when reading his articles. Howard always asks a question or two of the guest, and his questions are always phrased like he writes. In fact they often sound like a paragraph from one of his articles, and are always very articulate and amusing. Then there are those annoying questions that aren’t really questions at all, like “Michel (as in Gros, one of Burgundy’s top producers), how will your 2005 Clos Vougeot age in comparison to the spectacular 2000 I had last week?” OK, we get it. You own some of Michel Gros’ older wines, and want everyone to know. Next question, please. But what I love about these events is being able to learn things I couldn’t find in a book or from other resources. I speak of the little nuances of the producer, vineyard or winemaking process. Recently I had the wonderful opportunity to talk with Christian Moueix while tasting some of his (continued on the next page)

Letter From The Editor: Summer Wines, Some Are Not By Susan Whitney Simm Finally. After many false starts and an unusually cool spring, summer is truly here. We head outdoors for barbeques poolside and attend cocktail parties under the stars. Summer, at its best, is all about ease and languor, and in this blissful state we find ourselves craving lighter foods and the wines that flatter them. David and I always have a few bottles of Sancerre and Rose from Provence on hand to replace the hearty cocktails we offer in cooler months. We also find ourselves pulling out bottles of lighter reds, Pinot Noirs as opposed to big Bordeaux. And, of course, it just wouldn’t be summer without the occasional gin and tonic (try Tanguerey Ten for the smoothest cocktail imaginable). In this issue of Dan’s Wine Guide writer Christopher Miller explores the region of Alto-Adige in northern Italy in “Mountain Wines” (page 153). This little-known destination (as compared to Napa and Bordeaux) produces some lovely wines that are perfect for summer’s heat. Chris recommends both whites and

reds that will fit almost any budget. information. Every weekend in July at Lieb Cellars you can taste their Bridge Any season is a good time for storytelling, but summer especially seems to Lane white and red Merlots (“white is the lend itself to the task. In "Meeting Thy new red”) side by side. Call 298-1942. (Wine) Maker", above, Chris regales us Our next Wine Guide will be published in with tales from recent wine events he has Dan’s Papers in August. David and I are attended. Over his long and illustrious already busy planning our Fourth Annual career, our senior writer has rubbed shoulGreat Bordeaux Style Wine Tasting. How ders (and raised glasses) with such icons time flies! I remember our first, held at a in the industry as Petrus owner summer rental on Shelter Island in the Christian Moueix and wine expert sweltering heat of August (we have learned Michael Broadbent. It is his passion not since that fall weather suits the tasting far Christian Moueix just to taste the wines but also to share better), and I am proud to say we have the stories behind them. come a long way. Our tasting last year featured horiHere on Long Island, there are a few notable events zontal vintages and we omitted very hot climate wines planned for July. On the 12th, Lenz Winery will hold (Australia and Spain) from the lineup as the guest its 19th Annual Chardonnay World Classii c feawinemakers always picked them out instantly! turing wines from around the world, from 5:30-8 p.m., In the meantime, here’s to summer. and on the 26th star chef David Rosengarten Susan Whitney Simm is Dan’s Wine Guide Editor. returns from India with a grilling demonstration Email ssimm@optonline.net paired with Lenz wines at 4 p.m. Call 734-6010 for

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 152 www.danshamptons.com

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wines (no, not Petrus). Christian is hugely famous in the wine world, and his Chateau Petrus is one of the world’s most sought after and expensive wines. With such an esteemed reputation one might think he could be a bit aloof. Not even close. He is charming and gentle. It was a great pleasure to meet him and learn something new. What I learned from Christian involved my favorite underdog, Cabernet Franc. When he showed me where his newest Pomerol property (Chateau la Providence) is located, I noted that it bordered Certan, and the Certan properties use up to 30 percent Cabernet Franc in their Bordeaux. This began a discussion on the sad treatment of the grape in the vineyard. He explained that Cabernet Franc does not produce its best fruit till the vine is at least 15 years old (versus other Bordeaux grape varieties, most of which produce wine-quality grapes at about 7 years of age). He spoke of the impatience of most wine producers with Cab Franc. Given the economics of wine, very few producers are willing to wait the extra eight years till the vine is really mature. Christian loves the character of Cab Franc, so he just won’t use it in his wines until it is of age. This requires him to find other outlets for the young-vine Cabernet Franc planted in all his properties – Petrus (5 percent of the vineyard planted to Cabernet Franc, none used in the wine), Trotanoy (10 percent), Lafleur-Petrus (10 percent), La Grave a Pomerol (10 percent), Hosanna (20 percent), Lagrange (5 percent), Latour a Pomerol (10 percent), Lafleur-Gazin (20 percent) and in St-Emilion, Magdelaine with 10

percent Cabernet Franc as posed about Bordeaux, and well. Joseph’s response was a bit conAnother Cabernet Franc spetroversial. He indicated that cialist, Bruwer Raats of Raats the Henriot Family would not Family Wines in South Africa, look to Bordeaux for properties told me how he prefers his Cab because he doesn’t believe that Franc vines in reflective soils, the terroir of Bordeaux is that trained low to the ground so unique. He sited all the great they get plenty of indirect sun Cabernet Sauvignon-based in the warm South African wines from other regions as summer. examples and reminded us that Chateau Petrus A few weeks after talking terhe developed two properties roir and vine age with Christian, I had the oppor‘Down Under’ that have become standouts for tunity to talk with Joseph Henriot at the Henriot Bordeaux grapes – Cape Mentelle in Margaret event about terroir. Joseph is a former president River, Australia, and Cloudy Bay in Marlborough, of Veuve-Cliquot. He left Cliquot more than a New Zealand (Sauvignon Blanc, but more Loire in decade ago to focus on his family firm and began style). I see his point, and have my own referto purchase properties in Burgundy. Now, along ences that would agree or disagree, depending on with Henriot Champagne, he owns Domaine how I look. Dominus, Selene, Diamond Creek, Bouchard Pere et Fils (in Cote d’Or), Domaine Forman, and Ridge Montebello would have me William Fevre (Chablis) and has just acquired agree. But Lafite, Pontet Canet, Cheval Blanc and Chateau Poncie in Flurie, Beaujolais. I asked Petrus itself (some of the greats from Bordeaux) Joseph what he looked for when determining new would have me disagree. acquisitions. His reply was all about terroir: great The most recent winemaker meeting was here sites, soils, and climates for the right grapes. And in Bridgehampton with a dinner at Almond feawith the new Beaujolais property, Chateau turing the wines of the Montille family and Poncie, the Henriots plan to go slowly and learn Etienne Montille. Etienne is the winemaker for the grape, region and terroir before making any Chateau de Puligny-Montrachet, Domaine de drastic changes. The Henriot wine philosophy is Montille and DEux Montille, though he shares slow and steady, with an eye towards long-term some of the winemaking responsibilities with his rewards, and this has been proven by their sucsister, Alix, who is in charge of the white wines at cess with Bouchard in the last three vintages the Domaine and DEux Montille. I understand after owning the property since 1995. the reasoning of Alix overseeing the whites better Later at the same event another question was (continued on page 154)

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Mountain Wines A Little Known Alpine Region In Northern Italy Where They Speak German And Grow Pinot Noir By Christopher S. Miller Every time a Dan’s Wine Guide deadline approaches, I inquire of editor Susan Whitney Simm and her husband David if they have recently tasted any wines that they feel would make an interesting article for our readers. This month they happened to have had a wine from a wonderful alpine wine region in northern Italy called Alto-Adige, and asked if I had an interest in writing about the wines of this place. It so happens that Alto-Adige is of particular interest to me given its location and language. I have spent a bit of time traveling in Italy, but am severely handicapped by my lack of Italian linguistic skills, which are limited to culinary and vinous terms. Having worked and lived in Switzerland and Austria, however, my German, which is the language of choice in the Alto-Adige, is decent. The region is referred to as SudTirol in the mother tongue and most signs, menus and wines found in the region are labeled in both Italian and German. Alto-Adige is named for the Adige river that drains from the Dolomites into the Adriatic, and alto refers to the high part of the river. The valley, Val d’Adige, is one of many alpine valleys that run between Austria, Switzerland, Italy and France. It is also one of the valleys situated between the Val

d’Engadina and Val Gastein, two valleys where I lived while training as a chef in the mid 1980s. The wines of Alto-Adige are just beginning to gain respect in this country. Pinot Grigio may still be the most recognized wine of the region, but there are several other grapes that produce both unique and fine wines. It is quite possible that Alto-Adige is the oldest wine region in Italy with a winemaking tradition that is at least 2000 years old. One of the region’s most famous exports might be the Gewurztraminer grape, which was originally called just Traminer after the town of Tramin (the spice, or Gewurz, came later). Today it is possible to find wines labeled as Traminer, Gewurztraminer, Tramin Aromatico and Termeno Aromatico. My palate indicates that the Traminer may be a different clone than the spicy or aromatic versions. Besides Traminer, the region has two indigenous red grapes: Vernatsch, that is thankfully being replaced by other varietals, and Lagrein, which has shown great potential. Lagrein produces wines that are deep and dark with plenty of plum, violet and spicy notes, but very soft tannins. Due to the tannins and rich dark fruit these wines match many styles of cuisine. Wines produced from

It is quite possible that Alto-Adige is the oldest wine region in Italy with a winemaking tradition that is at least 2000 years old.

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now that I know she is married to Jean-Marc Roulot, who produces some of Meursault’s finest wines for his family’s estate, Domaine Guy Roulot. As Burgundy is such a complicated patch-work of vineyards, history and generation upon generation of family relationships (both good and bad), it is always a great pleasure to hear some of the intimate details of the region first hand. Etienne regaled us with stories of carving up the Thomas Moillard Domaine with Jacque Seysses of Domaine Dujac and how he secured some Grand Cru sites in Corton and Clos Vougeot with that acquisition. I learned that Corton-Pougets, a Grand Cru site for Pinot Noir, can be grafted over to Chardonnay and become Corton-Charlemagne! The vineyards are right next to one another and share the same exposure, altitude and soil, so Etienne grafted his new vineyard over to Chardonnay and is now producing exceptional

Mountain

Corton-Charlemagne. But what about vine age? Didn’t I already note how important that is earlier? The key to vine age is the roots, and when Pinot Noir is grafted over to Chardonnay the roots remain and the resulting vine assumes the age of the roots! So after a 300 year history the Montille family now has a handful of Grand Cru vineyards to go along with their great Pommard and Volnay vineyards. Etienne also reflected on the state of the vineyards in Puligny-Montrachet versus those of Meursault, and indicated that the wines of Meursault were much more exciting than those of Puligny because the growers of Puligny have so much demand for their fruit due to the prestige of the name. The next time you are shocked by the price of a wine, try to determine if the price is based on the reputation of a particular site (Puligny) or the hard work, passion and history of the people

behind that wine. I hope to have more stories about wine regions and families after my trip next month to Mendoza, Argentina, to learn the secrets of producing Malbec at high altitude.

The climate and soils of the region allow cool climate-loving varietals such as Sauvignon Blanc, Chardonnay and Pinot Noir to prosper. For Chardonnay, look for Alois Lageder and Hofstatter wines. Sauvignon Blanc is sometimes labeled just plain Sauvignon – I am not sure if this is due to the potential for some Sauvignon Vert being blended in or just a tradition – but the best Sauvignons can compete with the best France and New Zealand have to

offer. I have been lucky enough to experience the great old Sauvignon Blancs from Cantina di Terlano and Manicour. Both are very age-worthy, including a still lively Sauvignon from the late 1960s I tasted last year, which must be the oldest Sauvignon Blanc I have ever tasted. Pinot Noir, which is labeled in Italian as Pinot Nero and in German as Blauburgunder, has great potential in the soils and climate found in these alpine foothills. Some producers have really started to produce fine examples. My current favorite is Tiefenbrunner’s Riserva Lintaclarus. But I feel that there will be many more producers making excellent Pinot Noir in the near future. Other producers of note for Pinot Nero in the Alto-Adige include St. Michael-Eppan, Alois Lageder, and Hofstatter for their Riserva Mazon, but I am sure there are many more to come with the increased popularity of both the region and the grape.

Christopher Miller is the Senior Wine Writer for Dan’s Papers “Wine Guides.” Mr. Miller is a graduate of the Culinary Institute of America, an Advanced Sommelier with the Court of Master Sommeliers, a wine consultant for SherryLehmann and wine educator. He is also the Education Director for Long Island’s Sommelier Wine Academy, and has held the position of saucier chef at Schweizerhof in St. Moritz, Switzerland, and that of sommelier at Manhattan’s ‘21’ Club. He is teaching a Captain’s Course at the Ruvo Restaurants starting in September fall. Visit his website noblewines.com or email csm@hamptonswineclub.com

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Lagrein can vary from gentle and fruity to serious and complex. In general, the less expensive Lagrein will cost just below $20 a bottle and the more complex, serious wines can cost as much as $50 a bottle. Look to Cantina di Terlano for both inexpensive and pricier Lagreins and to Tiefenbrunner and MuriGries for less expensive wines. Near the top of the quality and price spectrum are the rare wines of Abbazia di Novacella.

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House/ home The Charms of Chinese Chippendale Chairs By Mary Beth Karoll As you may recall from your school days, sometimes the best way to jumpstart an essay is with a few tentatively reworded passages purloined from an out-of-date encyclopedia. In order to blast through my writer’s block, I scanned the article on “Chairs” in Volume 5, CHA to COL, in The Practical Encyclopedia of Good Decorating and Home Improvement. More of an aider and abettor to procrastination than a font of tangibly useful information, this multi-volume set is chock-a-block with deliriously kitschy interior design from the 1960s. I was lucky to purchase the mint-condition books for a mere $5.00 at a church tag sale in the pastoral hinterlands of Connecticut. Unfortunately, the text lacks the juicy color and the pop-art punch of illustrations but is rather neutral in tone, although the pictures make for lazy days flipping through dazzling designs. Here is the straightforward caption underscoring a black and white shot of bamboo chairs on page 778: “Bamboo turnings in chairs or tables have been popular since the mid-eighteenth century. Thomas Chippendale made extensive

Faux bamboo table and chairs from home114 use of bamboo in his Chinese designs. Usually the wood . . . had a painted finish. This technique was used frequently for bedroom chairs and tables. Bamboo turnings suggest a traditional feeling, yet they blend

well.” In truth, celebrated furniture maker Thomas Chippendale never actually designed bamboo or faux-bamboo chairs, but such seats still bear his weighty name. Chippendale’s Chinesestyle chairs with elaborate backs, intricate pagoda crests and geometric, flat carvings were informed by Oriental latticework and fretwork but were not made of bamboo or faux bamboo like many of the chairs grouped under the rubric “Chinese Chippendale” today. Unavoidably ubiquitous to design mavens and catalog shoppers familiar with the market, Chinese Chippendalestyle chairs have seen a resurgence in popularity the past few years. For its meticulous attention to authentic detail, the top of the line reproduction would be San Francisco socialite designer Ann Getty’s elegant Georgian-style cream and gilt Winter Garden chair modeled after a ca.1760 original in her collection. However, most contemporary pieces are stylized modern interpretations of the genre in bamboo and cane, wood fashioned to resemble bamboo, or metal faux bamboo. They may have Chinese-style geometric (continued on next page)

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Two from Hampton Briggs, Chinese childs chair motifs but these are generally more streamlined and simplified than the original Chippendale creations. Contemporary designers, including the thrillingly daring Kelly Wearstler, the ebulliently stylish Jonathan Adler, and the swankily feminine Ruthie Sommers set the tone and define the trend, lending the style a refreshing update with vivid color and strong lines. From these leading lights in the design world, the so-called Chinese Chippendale chair or faux bamboo chair has reached outwards and downwards in consumer consciousness from the high to the low, one might say. Ballard Designs, West Elm, and Front Gate are just a few of the numerous catalog emporia featuring various versions of the iconic style. Many of these chairs are acceptable, some are even quite appealing, and others are just plain cheap and cheesy. True trendsetters and the self-consciously stylish who avidly seek the next rare revelation may feel that these Chinoiserie-style seats have seen their heyday, just like the oversized damask prints, zebra rugs, David Hicks retro patterns, dark woods, blue and brown color combination, or bird silhouettes that have also recently inundated decorating magazines and littered the blogosphere. However, the posh pedigree and refined personality of the so-called Chippendale chairs make them an ever-welcome guest at the dining table. As Adler claims on his website, “Our Chinese Chippendale chairs are the ultimate dining chair and you’d be mad not to own them!” Versatile, elegant, and vivacious, with a fresh coat of color they are always palatable. In designing his faux-bamboo side chair, which he rightly considers a must-have item, zippy tastemaker Adler was also inspired by 1960s and 70s design. A look back at high-style homes and haute watering holes from that time proves inspirational. In 1971, the celebrated gossip columnist known as Suzy described the fantastically vibrant Peacock Alley, a restaurant at The Waldorf Astoria. Decorated by Ellen McCluskey in homage to the bizarrely beautiful Brighton Pavilion, an early 19th Century Chinoiserie pleasure dome graced with an exuberant and extravagant richness of detail, Peacock Alley features Chinese Chippendale seating.

In one section of Peacock Alley, a white wrought iron faux-bamboo chandelier illuminates the striking see and be-seen scene, where white Chinese Chippendale chairs upholstered in hot pink are paired with sleek snakeskin banquettes in midnight blue, all perched on a blue ceramic tile floor bordered in white. Off-white columns entwined with gilt serpents punctuate the glamorous space. An inner lounge features shirred peacock feather-printed fabric and Chippendale chairs upholstered in a modishly offbeat acid green and mauve. Although the style of this fantastic folly may be a little wild for your Bridgehampton breakfast room or Southampton sunroom, the color scheme is a revelation. On a recent search of 1stDibs.com, a website which is literally like a hallucinogenic drug for the decorator and antiques aficionado, I discovered a fabulous avocado-colored faux bamboo enameled metal table and chairs for sale at Home 114 on Shelter Island. Perhaps the idea of avocado gives you a bad taste in your mouth as you recall the puke-green appliances in your childhood kitchen, but this fun and funky dinette set from the 1970s is tangy and timelessly tasty! For your edification, there is an important historical reference to the color family, as the beautifully preserved Chinoiserie ensemble designed by Chippendale for the State Bedroom at Nostell Priory, a venerable British Palladian mansion, is lacquered in a piquant olive green. Back in the 1970s, it was considered truly adventurous to pair Chippendale-style chairs with a sleek and simple lacquered Parsons table or mate them with a glass and chrome dining table! In photographs and descriptions of bamboo chairs and Chippendale Chinoiserie from the swinging 70s, I’ve encountered shiny white chairs with black plastic seats arranged around a black and white striped Formica table and bright Coral Chinese Chippendale chairs teamed with a glass-topped chrome dining table lit by a flying saucer shaped plastic chandelier. Designer Melvin

... and Shanghai red lacquer slotted stool Dwork, no dork but an influential decorator listed in the prestigious Architectural Digest AD 100 and the Interior Design Hall of Fame, orchestrated an eclectic dining room where white lacquered Chippendale chairs contrast with the straightforward lines of a simple burled elm dining table, surrounded by the stimulating shock of shiny walls horizontally striped in broad bands of gold, black and white patent leather vinyl from the floor up to the tray ceiling. For those who may claim that if they are confronted with yet another pale green or blue bamboo chair they will do something drastic, either to themselves or the current issue of Domino magazine they’re reading, perhaps such a blast from the past will prove salubrious in assuring the timely traditionalism and the versatility of Chinese Chippendale.

“It’s a shady business, but somebody’s got to do it.”

Awning Cleaning

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Chairs

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 158 www.danshamptons.com

Design & Décor

By Tricia Rayburn When Israel Simoes was growing up in Portugal and learning the careful craft of wood and furniture restoration from his grandfather, he often grew tired of hearing his beloved mentor constantly repeat one particular phrase: “If you’re going to do something, do it right.” Fortunately for Simoes, and for his many future customers, he listened. Decades later, he’s still following this wise advice — and the proof is in the final result of every antique chair, table and dresser he touches at Legacy Restoration, his Water Mill studio. Simoes came to Southampton from Portugal with his family in the late ‘80s. After completing

high school and attending a few semesters of college, he decided to trade in his math and science textbooks for books that were (and are), to him, the greatest stories ever told: those about wood and furniture. “Books were so expensive in Portugal,” Simoes said. “And books about furniture were very uncommon. Here, I loved borrowing them from the library, and eventually started buying my own. I have a huge collection now.” This collection taught him how furniture was built, what it was supposed to look like, and countless techniques, including those not commonly practiced today that might have been lost forever if not for a written record.

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Tricia Rayburn

Restoring Highboys, Preserving History

When he ran out of projects to repair and refurbish at home, Simoes supplemented his knowledge by working hands-on and behind the scenes at Victory Gardens, a high-end antiques store in East Hampton. He stayed there for 11 years and learned a lot – especially about French antiques, which the store specialized in – before deciding to venture out on his own. “It just got to a point where customers saw my work and said, ‘Israel, it’s time.’ And it was.” Today, five years later, in a studio filled with projects in various states of disrepair (and repair) and the tools of his trade, Simoes continues his journey of self-education. On a recent early summer evening, he’d just received 10 black Americanstyle chairs from a client who’d won the set at Sotheby’s. The auction house’s white satin ribbons still adorned the chairs’ arms and legs (“Maybe they think it keeps them from falling apart?”), and already Simoes had begun assessing what he needed to do to bring the pieces back to life – a process that, to start, included re-caning the seats and tightening the joints. Nearby, two twin beds were about to be transformed into one king-size bed without losing their original historic characteristics. A few pieces from Mecox Gardens, the popular antiques boutique in Southampton, awaited touchups. And the biggest of all the waiting projects, an 18th-century American highboy, had just been stripped of the black lacquer that wasn’t even around at the time of the piece’s creation, revealing the wood’s natural, delicate patterns. “That one,” said Israel, “That one was tough.” Tough, but not impossible. Simoes says he doesn’t have as much experience working with American antiques as he does with French and Spanish, but what he doesn’t know, he finds out. On a recent trip to Williamsburg, Virginia, he went to a museum and saw displayed a pristine version of the 18th-century highboy awaiting restoration 500 miles away. After asking a colonial-attired museum staff member for permission, he took dozens of pictures of the piece on his digital camera, carefully capturing every small detail he would need to replicate upon his return. Since that trip he’s also discovered the public “studies” in the American Wing at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, which, with their shelves filled with untouched, original American antiques, are a restorer’s heaven. For Simoes, this is how you do it right. “I always want to learn more — through books, colleagues and hands-on experience. If you stop learning, if you refuse new ideas, or what someone else did 200 years ago, your business will suffer. It’s an evolution of yourself and your business at the same time.” Legacy Restoration is located on Windmill Lane in Water Mill. For more information, call 516-3147219, or visit legacyrestoration.com.

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 159 www.danshamptons.com

Design & Décor

By Alison Caporimo Emil Braun, the executive director of green construction company Holistic Homes, approaches house design and construction like a scientist. “This house is my experiment,” Braun said in reference to the house he is constructing at 1188 Scuttle Hole Road, Southampton. What is this mad scientist’s basis experimentation? Braun believes in green. Holistic Homes, a company that Braun developed last November, attempts to redefine the confines of the home. “The holistic feeling is about bringing the outdoors, indoors and the indoors, outdoors,” said Braun. In order to stay true to this motto, Holistic Homes uses environmentally friendly wood and stone and recyclable materials in their construction. But just because Braun’s houses are constructed from all natural, untreated materials, doesn’t mean that they are some scrapped together tree houses. “We create luxury homes on par with any luxury home out here,” said Braun, “But the difference is that our houses will be environmentally healthy and as green as can be.” What can you expect from a green house? With non-toxic oiled exterior wood and mold proof interior wood, a green house encourages a healthier lifestyle. Mold and toxic paint cause allergies, a malady easily cured when your house is coated in organic sealers. Radiant heat flooring prevents dust buildup and excess bacteria in the air. A pool house with a solar paneled roof uses solar energy to power the pool. An organic roof herb and vegetable garden will yield fresh produce. Gutters on the roof will collect rainwater and naturally irrigate the garden. The list goes on and on. And while Braun hunts the green construction market in search of the most efficient

Alison Caporimo

Hammer, Nails and a Green Thumb

geo-thermal air conditioning and top of the line antimicrobial sheet rock, he also turns back to his lab to create his own organic concoctions. “Right now, we are working on making our own insulation,” says Braun. Along with custom made and organically treated materials, Braun uses a lot of recycled construction components. 300-year-old beams taken from a building on Canal and Greenwich in Manhattan support some of the house. Materials from houses built in the 1700s have been recycled and incorporated into the new structure. When asked about the company

name, Braun replied, “Holistic is a combination of different pieces and parts that result in a desired end.” It appears that many Hampton residents desire Holistic Homes’ end products. During the interview, a couple knocked on Braun’s unfinished front door and asked to have a look around and learn more about building a green house. Marilyn Miglio is building a house in Southampton and would like to learn to eco-friendly approaches to home construction. “I’ve always been environmentally conscious,” (continued on page 161)

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DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 160 www.danshamptons.com

Earthly Delights

Design & Décor

April Gonzales

Organic Gardening: Where the Bee Goeth, So Shall We

minds of the twentieth century. Considering the decline in honey bee populations perhaps we had better begin to listen. And changes are being made. The organic gardening and recycling crowd is no longer a bunch of sandal wearing hippies. Municipalities and large food store chains are getting on board with the concept, and recycling has experienced a huge swing in popularity. NYC sludge is now being

used on Texas farm land, old subway cars are decommissioned and repositioned under sea to create reefs and Whole Foods grocery stores are selling liquid compost by the gallon at some of their locations. Jeff was followed by a presentation on the importance of clean water. This is the topic of the World’s Exposition this year in Zaragoza, Spain. But it has long been on the mind of noted Japanese scientist Dr. Emoto, who was a keynote speaker at the United Nations in 2005 and his book The Hidden Message from Water was on the New York Times best-seller list. Check out hado.net and click on water crystals to see the results of some of his work. Several years ago Dr. Emoto took samples of water from a famous natural spring in Japan, the River Thames, the Seine and other noted locations around the world. He froze the water and then brought it back up almost to the point of thawing and noted the crystals that formed, or didn’t. The purest waters formed crystals like snow flakes, six sided beauties that he photographed and catalogued. But the more polluted the water, the less crystals formed, until some were just amorphous masses. He proceeded to experiment with distilled water and came up with some interesting results. Starting with samples of highly polluted lake water, Dr. Emoto had monks pray over the lake for many days. As time went on the water samples (continued on next page)

7/18/08

Ramp Systems

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Photos by April Gonzales

Two weeks ago I attended the East Hampton Garden Club’s seminar on organic gardening. It took place at Devon Yacht Club, overlooking Napeague Bay and the old fish factory. It was an auspicious view considering that fish emulsion and kelp products were going to be topics on the agenda and samples lined the information tables. Each dining table was set with beautiful arrangements, artfully put together in attractive kitchen compost containers. I almost nibbled on some strawberries before I realized that they were part of the décor. Jeff Frank from the Lyceum Organic gardening school gave his usual entertaining and wide-ranging introduction dressed in a shirt that proclaimed “Rocks think.” Offering advice and reading lists that included Chief Seattle’s speech to Congress and Dr Seuss’ The Lorax, he reminded all of us that disease is a result of malnutrition in plants, the same way we experience health problems from poor diets. His emphasis was on feeding the soil, mostly with compost. And he quoted Einstein as a way of prodding us to change our ways to go organic. “Once the bee goes, then mankind will follow,” stated one of the greatest

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 161 www.danshamptons.com

Design & Décor

What to do Right Now It is time to yank out anything that bolted in the veggie garden. A few weeks ago 90 degrees of heat did in the broccoli rabe, the arugula and the spinach. I am reseeding with lettuces and fertilizing my fruit trees. Stake the tomatoes before they fall over and detach those energy sapping side shoots for bigger fruits. For more than 20 years, April Gonzales has been involved in garden design, installation and maintenance on the East End, as well as specimen plant scouting and site supervision for landscape architects.

said Miglio, “I want to make my house as energy efficient and environmentally friendly as possible.” With Hamptons locals flaunting solar powered appliances instead of Range Rovers, there’s proof that people feel good about going green. And what about the man behind it all? “I feel great about this company,” says Braun, “This is a labor of love.” Braun is no stranger to purposeful construction. After helping to clean up part of the World Trade Center after 9/11, Braun proved that his company’s policy stretched far from construction to incorporate ethics. Braun has been investing so much of his personal time and ideas into this house that he’s considering making it his own. “The house is not currently on the market. But if someone makes me an offer that I can’t refuse, then I’ll have to reconsider,” said Braun. For now, he plans to use the house as his showroom and expects to occupy the green abode around February or March of 2009. In the meantime, Braun will continue to experiment with and test the green materials emerging in the construction market. With the right combination of components, this scientist can concoct the perfect environmentally friendly and aesthetically pleasing home for your family. Frankenstein never looked so good.

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doing a few things correctly. For example, his emphasis on foliar feeding has turned out to be the secret of my success as we use a formulation of fish emulsion, humic acid and kelp that can practically bring things back from the dead. You can buy a hose end attachment that allows you to simply fertilize every time you water, some can even be attached to a rotating sprinkler. It could not be easier or more effective in building healthy soil and beautiful plants. The day ended with a presentation by Steve Storch on bio-dynamics. Sometimes this sophisticated form of organic gardening and farming, developed by Rudolph Steiner, seems like hocus pocus. But it is practiced with great success locally by the Green Thumb in Water Mill. And when Steve breaks out the photos of cow horns that he packs with compost and buries in the ground to ferment, well you may think he’s madder than scientist. But what he is doing is similar to brewing compost tea. He is creating the ideal environment for growing certain types of beneficial bacteria. And it is bacteria that break down organic matter in the soil and produce nitrogen to feed the plants. Some bacteria can even break down plastic into harmless compounds. Scientists are finally studying what has been practiced for millennia as a part of organic farming traditions, and their conclusions point to the most effective and safest way to work in the field, farms or flower beds.

(continued from page 159)

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slowly began to form crystals. Draw your own conclusions, but read the book first, before you throw the baby out with the bath water so to speak. After a fantastic lunch as part of this marvelous presentation by the East Hampton Garden club, a representative from the Green Mission department of the Whole Foods grocery chain spoke about compost. He focused on how simple it is to make it, as well as compost tea, which is a wonderful liquid fertilizer. It was heartening to listen to him and be reminded that we have been

Hammer

Alison Caporimo

(continued from previous page)

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Earthly

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 162 www.danshamptons.com

Design & Décor

Choose Candlelight for Elegant Entertainment

Photos by S. Galardi

By Mary Beth Karoll credulous company that thrift-shop In examining the most abstruse yet tableware is a family heirloom, amusing dining room lore for this artiMelamine is Meissen, stainless steel is cle, we were inspired by “Directions to estate silver, and cut glass is Christofle Dinner-Givers,” a tongue-in-cheek crystal. A piquant atmosphere, a hazy piece from the past. Published in 1848 glow, can also work wonders if you are in The Albion, A Journal of News, and serving a savory Spam loaf in lieu of Politics and Literature, this witty guide honey-baked ham. Such shady frugalireflects our viewpoint that lighting, ty is increasingly the fashion in today’s even more than china or crystal or flattough economic times, and if your dinware or flowers, makes for a festive ing table isn’t brightly lit, food snobs dining room. A wise host or hostess will be foiled. from any era will closely heed the As for Shakespeare and Shelley, we clever directives of the anonymous are rather fond of quoting Hamlet’s sarauthor’s Rule Nine, “Light your table donic dismissal of the leftovers served modestly and umbrageously. Nothing at his parents’ wedding banquet, injures the eyes like the glare of a “Thrift, thrift, Horatio! the funeral great many lamps and chandeliers. baked meats[Did coldly furnish forth You . . . may have a passage from the marriage tables.” Nonetheless, to Shakespeare or Shelley, on the charms follow the above Ninth Rule to the letof twilight, ready to quote. I need ter, the inquisitive Dan’s Papers readerscarcely add how much the aspect of a Candles to match food, or decor (right). A Mano Beach House, Bridgehampton ship must research appropriate verses great many of your dishes will probato shed a murky literary light on the subtablemates. A soft glow of tea lights and tapers erasbly be improved by shade; particularly ject of the evening’s entertainment. es the appearance of wrinkles far more expeditiously the most mysterious, those chef d’oeuvres of your In contrast, citing the poet Sylvia Plath as a and economically than costly Crèème de Mer or some cook, which combine the advantages of at once rationale for candlelit dining would be a rather bold, other trendy salve. piquing curiosity and repressing appetite.” avant-garde gesture. Her 1962 poem, By Judiciously placed candles mask a variety of ills Indeed, only the grossly common and the uncomCandlelight, seems to describe her violently passionranging from stained tablecloths to fallen souffléés. monly fastidious that need to actually discern what ate marriage to Ted Hughes, “The mirror floats us at If you cast the mesmerizing spell of candlelight, your they are eating would take umbrage at a shadowy one candle power./ This is the fluid in which we meet guests may not be able to decipher your child’s craydining room. After all, candlelight is sublimely flateach other, /This haloey radiance that seems to on scrawls on the walls or make out the marks tering to anyone’s complexion. Its seductive flicker breathe/ And lets our shadows wither/ Only to blow/ stamped on the back of your porcelain. Thus, in the adds a sparkle to the eye otherwise dulled by the Them huge again, violent giants on the wall./ One dim radiance you might be able to convince your tiresomely self-referential conversation of one’s (continued on next page)

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Design & DĂŠcor

Candlelight

(continued from previous page)

match scratch makes you real./ At first the candle will not bloom at all - - / It snuffs its bud/ To almost nothing, to a dull blue dud.â&#x20AC;? Whatever you are serving, merely reciting such passages imparts the rich savor of haute cuisine to the most humble chow. Now, your attempt to channel the spirit of Julia Child with dollar-store ingredients may be a culinary catastrophe. But when you declaim verses between courses, your guests will truly have food for thought. An artistic atmosphere trumps appetites every time, and glamorously gloomy lighting is poetic punctuation for your scintillating souper intime! Surely, there will be nothing dull or blue about a dinner party where guests are squinting across the table, seeing each other as if for the first time. A dullard who must be invited for the sake of etiquette will transform from a dud into the most eligible, swankiest stud on the East End if seen in the proper light (dim). When dining tĂŞte-Ă -tĂŞte with your beau in such a suggestive ambience, you wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even taste the food. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t bother attempting to seduce his stomach by tarting up takeout fare to simulate homemade. Why, in the romance of candlelight, you may soon find yourself, like Plath and Hughes, right up on the table casting frolicking shadows on the wall! Readers may hence be entranced by the charming concept of a chandelier outfitted with real candles but might fear wax dripping directly onto a guestâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hairdo, into a dĂŠcolletage, or all over the lobster en croĂťte (Stoufferâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Chicken Pot Pie, but who can see it?). Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a little candle-wax dropped in your chilled cucumber soup or drizzled on your mesclun salad? Nowadays, tomatoes are far more lethal! Be

brave, think of the dribbles of beeswax as a garnish and forage onward. In all seriousness, there are ways to circumvent this faux-pas and not with LED candles or tacky plastic candle sleeves that simulate a dripping taper. Simply freeze the wax tapers for 24 hours before lighting, soak them in salt water to eliminate the drips, or purchase silver, plastic or crystal bobèches to catch the melting wax. You neednâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t worry about the depredations of hot wax if you have small recessed overhead electric lights on dimmers, enhanced by candlelit sconces or torchières placed around the perimeter of the dining room away from the table. If the flames are reflected in mirrors or shiny surfaces, this creates a wondrously magical mood. But in mixing lighting and candles, beware of overpowering candlelight with the hard glare of electric bulbs. Candle chandeliers are available in styles from rustic to regal, from â&#x20AC;&#x153;Shabby Chicâ&#x20AC;? distressed whitepainted iron to elaborate Venetian glass confections,

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all at a variety of price points. While Holly Huntâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s iconic contemporary chandeliers amassed with faux candles are a staple in upscale decorating magazines and online design blogs, real candles have so much more character than their electrified substitutes! However, the prudent home decorator neednâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t make any new acquisitions. While you are probably familiar with the concept of electrifying antique gas lighting fixtures, why not consider retrofitting your existing electric chandelier? Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not advocating reverting to gas, as columnists from the gaslight era bemoan its sickly yellowish shine on skin tone. Rather, convert your electric light fixture to hold candles. You can purchase candleholders that screw into the light sockets on a chandelier in lieu of lightbulbs. Eschewing the literary lions for a lowly viewpoint, we end with another ditty entitled Dim View. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Candlelight dining/Has qualities fine:/The tiny flames flicker/ Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;er entrees and wine. The only real problem/ In this elegant seating/ Is that in the dark I/ Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t find what Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m eating.â&#x20AC;? Elegant candlelight dining might usher in a return to nouvelle cuisine, one of the least overindulgent excesses of the 1980s. Elaborately arranged portions of julienne vegetables and colorful sauces were so small you couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t see them anyway, so the parsimonious presentation of food is absolutely ideal for present day rising costs and rationing. But if you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t quite make out the tiny, faintly-lit food, perhaps youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be blinded by the first flush of love as you perceive the radiance of your dining companion across the towering tapers. An old adage runs, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Choose neither women nor linen by candlelight,â&#x20AC;? but we canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t afford to be so particular.

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DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 164 www.danshamptons.com

pet agree By Jenna Robbins

HOMELIFE

Celebrate Independence Day with Your Best Friend

ties. Loud noises, like fireworks, can frighten pets. They may exhibit unpredictable and out of character behavior. Even a well-mannered dog on a lead can bolt into traffic if frightened. So protect your dog or cat this coming Fourth of July, and plan ahead. Here are some SHOULD and SHOULD NOTS. –Refrain from taking your dog to fireworks displays. Noise, crowds and heat make a lousy cocktail for a dog day afternoon. Even worse would be taking your dog to a July 4 celebration and then leaving him or her in the car, alone, to deal with the noise and heat. –Don’t leave your dog outside with or without a leash or chain. Frightened dogs will do anything to escape and can injure themselves trying to run. –If you have plans somewhere other than your home, think about leaving your pet with a friend while you’re gone. Even indoors, a dog or cat can become overwhelmed with fear and anxiety resulting in

health issues, injuries and damage to your home. –Don’t give your dog or cat over the counter prescription drugs to relieve anxiety without talking to your vet. Instead… –Keep your pet indoors in a cool, comforting area where they feel safe. –Keep them with you as much as possible. A kennel with a nice blanket and some toys and chews with a light sheet thrown over it may relieve some stress. –Leave the T.V. on to muffle the noise outside. –Spend time doing something they really like. Playing ball or any distracting activity will help. –Make sure your pet is wearing ID tags. –Feed your dog before the celebration begins, as they are less likely to eat during the fireworks. If your dog is suffering from anxiety, there are a few effective training techniques to help your pet. Buy or make a recording of the noise that’s frightening to your pet, whether it be fireworks or a vacuum. Set aside 10 – 15 minutes, 2 or 3 times a day and play the recording on the lowest volume possible during a fun activity. Be as reassuring and comforting as possible. As the days progress, play the noise a little louder each time. This will help to condition your dog or cat to the sounds that frighten them. Your pets well-being depends on you. A little planning ahead can make the holiday a success for whole family. Have a wonderful Fourth of July weekend. Questions? thoughts? Email harleysangelsinc@comcast.net

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At my house, holiday fun always includes the dogs. And July 4 is no exception. For the barbeque, we have Kahuna and Wolf’s favorite grilled chicken breasts with sliced red peppers. Turkey burgers are always a hit with the Murphdogs. Wheat and gluten free pasta make a great doggie side dish. And for dessert? Vanilla yogurt, ices or sherbet. Playtime involves throwing around a ball. I found these fabulous red, white and blue Wiffle Balls – 6 for $5. You can’t beat that. They’re great for big and small dogs. Small dogs can pick the balls up by the little holes around the ball. The balls are manageable for a tiny pup, yet big enough to prevent a big dog from swallowing them. The light-weight balls bounce and float, which will save you from diving into the pool or the ocean to look for them. However, dogs can chew them if left unattended. Valentine tries to hoard as many as she can. The Fourth of July in the Hamptons is definitely party time. So if you’re taking your favorite canine with you, stop by Little Lucy’s at 91 Jobs Lane, Southampton (631-287-2352) and check out the adorable Red, White and Blue Sailor’s outfit, perfect for yachting in style or attending any July 4 festivities. You’ll also be “bow wowed” at her collection of doggy bandanas and personality tees. If it’s designer dog collars you’re looking for, then a visit to Jackie Rogers of Southampton and East Hampton is a must. All proceeds from these great “love knots” will be going to the Animal Rescue Fund. Summer is a great time to enjoy activities with your dog, especially during holidays. Think it through before you take your dog out for the weekend festivi-

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DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 165 www.danshamptons.com

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 166 www.danshamptons.com

HOMELIFE

Kid’s Calendar THIS WEEK ART WORKSHOP – 7/5 – 10-11 a.m. “Circles,” celebrating artist Kenneth Noland with Karyn Mannix. $20. At Golden Eagle, 14 Gingerbread Ln., East Hampton. 631324-0603. AT ROGERS MEMORIAL LIBRARY – 7/5 – 11 a.m. John Reid Magic Show. 1 p.m. Balloon Sculpting Workshop. 3 p.m. Teens learn how to DJ with Jester Jim. Located at 91 Coopers Farm Rd., Southampton. 631-2830774. BOOK SIGNING – 7/5 – 12 p.m. Author Kate McMullan and illustrator Jim McMullan sign copies of their book I’m Bad. At Canio’s Books, 290 Main St., Sag Harbor. 631-725-4926. DRIBBL AT THE BEACH – 7/6 – 9-10:20 a.m. An 80minute instructional basketball class for boys and girls in grades K-5. Every Sunday at the Southampton Town Recreation Center. $450 for nine Sundays. Sysinc.org. TEA PARTY – 7/6 – 1 p.m. For girls and boys ages 6-12. Located at 90 Quogue Street, Quogue. 631-653-4224. SAT PREPARATION – Verbal, 7/7-28, Mondays and Wednesdays, 7-9 p.m. Math, 7/8-29, Tuesdays and Thursdays, 7-9 p.m. Each course is $225 for Southampton Town residents and $250 for non-residents. At the Hampton Bays Community Center, 25 Ponquogue Ave., Hampton Bays. 631-728-8585. MOVIES IN THE PARK – 7/7 – 8:30 p.m. The Bee Movie. At the Shinnecock Canal Park, 6 Newtown Rd., Hampton Bays. 631-728-8585. YOUNG COMPOSERS’ WORKSHOP – 7/8 – 11:15 a.m. At the Montauk Library, Montauk Highway, Montauk. 631-668-3377. BOOKS AND ELEMENTS OF ART: REPETITION AND RHYTHM – 7/8 – 3:30-4:30 p.m. For ages 4-6. At the East Hampton Library, 159 Main St., East Hampton. 631324-0222. PAUL KLEE STORYTIME AND ART WORKSHOP – 7/10 – 3:30-4:30 p.m. For ages 4-6. At the East Hampton Library, 159 Main St., East Hampton. 631-324-0222.

ONGOING CMEE SUMMER CAMP ALTERNATIVE – Workshops and classes for toddlers to teens running from July through August. Cmee.org. Located at the Children’s Museum of the East End, 376 Bridgehampton/Sag Harbor Turnpike, Bridgehampton. 631-537-8250. AT THE MONTAUK LIBRARY – Story Hour for preschool children, Mondays at 10 a.m. Mommy and Me Mondays at 10:45 a.m. 631-668-3377. AT THE EAST HAMPTON LIBRARY – ParentToddler Workshops, Wednesdays from 10-11 a.m. Mother Goose Story Time, Mondays at 10:30 a.m. Located at 159 Main St., East Hampton. 631-324-0222. MANGA-ANIME CLUB – Tuesdays at 3:30 p.m. At the John Jermain Memorial Library, 201 Main St., Sag Harbor. 631-725-0049. GOAT ON A BOAT PUPPET THEATRE – Puppet shows every Thursday, Friday and Saturday at 11 a.m. Also, check goatonaboat.org for various weekly groups and activities for kids. Located on Rte. 114 and East Union Street, behind Christ Episcopal Church in the parish hall, Sag Harbor. 631-725-4193. THEATRE PROGRAM – Stages’ Summer Stock Program is entering its 15th season. Two sessions will be offered for ages 8-18, July 1-28 and July 30-August 24. For more information, call 631-329-1420. ART BARGE – Open Monday-Friday, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., beginning in June. Offers a weekly children’s studio programs and the Children’s Art Carnival. Theartbarge.com. COOL MOVES! THE ARTISTRY OF MOTION – An interactive arts-and-science exhibit. Also on display, through December 1, “Go Green.” At the Children’s Museum of the East End, 376 Bridgehampton/Sag Harbor Turnpike, Bridgehampton. 631-537-8250. KIDS CHALLAH CLASSES – Kids Challah Time every Thursday at 4 p.m. from through August 28. At Chabad of East Hampton, 17 Woods Lane, East Hampton. 631-329-5800. Kids Knead Challah every Friday at 5:30 p.m. through August 29, at the Southampton Jewish

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Center. Free admission to both. SHAKESPEARE’S PLAYERS THEATRE CAMP – Westhampton Beach Performing Arts Center is now accepting applications. July14-18, culminating with a July 18 performance at 7 p.m. $350. Call 631-288-2350 ext. 102. SOCCER CLINIC – Southampton Soccer Five Week Youth Clinics for children 5-15 will run every Saturday and Sunday from 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. through the fall. $175 per child per five-week session. 631-786-9511. ART FOR LIFE – Mondays through Thursdays from 45:15 at Amy’s Art Farm in Westhampton. Art projects, yoga, poetry and more. Call 631-288-3587. JACKSON POLLOCK DRIP PAINTING FAMILY WORKSHOP – Every Thursday and Friday, 10-11:30 a.m. Tour and explore the Pollock Krasner house. Call 631-3292811 for more information and to make a reservation. SUMMER YOUTH PROGRAM – For ages 6-14, at Applied Arts, 11 Indian Wells Highway, Amagansett. 631267-2787 or appliedartsschool.com for the weekly schedule. CHILDHOOD MEMORIES – July 7 through August 22. Playful pretend travel programs for children 3-8. Located at 160 Main St., Southampton. 917-538-5049 or childhoodmemories.com for more information. KNICKS SUMMER BASKETBALL CAMP – 8/25-27 and 8/28-30 – 10 a.m.-4 p.m. For boys and girls 8-18. $400 per camper, per session. At the Hayground School, 151 Mitchells Ln., Bridgehampton. 877-NYK-DUNK or nyknicks.com. ART FARM SUMMER CAMP – Mommy and Me classes during July and August, Monday through Friday. Located on Butter Lane in Bridgehampton. 631-537-1634 or theartfarms.com. TEEN COOKING CLASSES – $80 for an individual class; $375 for the five-day program. Cookeasecatering.com or 973-865-5832 for more information, Send all events for the kids’ calendar to events@danspapers.com by Friday at noon.

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DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 167 www.danshamptons.com

HOMELIFE

XÜÜ? T ÑtÜxÇà

By Susan Galardi

“Real Bad Guys” “I saw a real bad guy once. In Sag Harbor. I dropped a rock and it bounced across the street. He came out of his house and picked it up, and looked at me. Then he went back in his house.” Our son has been telling us this story, about the “real bad guy” since he was about three. We remember the winter day it supposedly happened. We’d gone to Sag Harbor with his godfather and his partner who were visiting. We tooled around, going into the Variety Store, getting coffee at Sylvester’s, meandering in Back from Bali. But none of us remember the bad guy who took the rock. The story changed a little over time. Sometimes the bad guy had a red whistle, sometimes he reappeared in a store. Even now, two years later he continues to talk about it. It’s the kind of story that could give parents nightmares. Did it really happen? Who was the guy? When exactly did it happen? And where were we? Was it a split second where Hudson was lagging behind before the chorus, “Come on, stay with us?” With four doting adults surrounding him, how could it have happened without our knowledge. Maybe something happened, but he misread it. Maybe it was just a guy walking behind us who picked something up and gave Hudson a teasing wink or smile. And maybe it never happened at all – a nightmare that became real. In the beginning, we’d just listen and ask questions in a quiet, measured way. One time I asked him to show me the house, but he couldn’t. When he was four, his bringing up the incident became an opening to talk about that dreaded subject: what to do if you really encounter a bad guy. We all remember our first “bad guy.” For me it was actually a bad lady, the Wicked Witch of the West

with her absolutely terrifying evil vibe. I remember burying my face in my mother’s lap when she appeared on the TV screen. (I didn’t get a feel-good glow from those twisted monkeys either.) Later there was Jacob Marley, Cruella deVille, Creature from the Black Lagoon, and all of the Super-foes. I remember our son’s first fictional bad guy: Spud from Bob the Builder books. He was more devious and impish than “bad,” but Hudson was affected by it, especially the page where Spud threw mud pies at a frightened Lofty. The next one was “Bad Diesel” from the Thomas movie with Alec Baldwin. We wondered if it was too scary when he was three and four

(and were mortified when Hudson would burst into a room yelling “Get outta my way!”). But both these characters prompted discussions on how teasing hurts people, how nothing good comes from bad intentions, how good prevails over evil. And since our son has long declared, “I’m brave of everything,” we try to gauge which bad guys are good lessons for him, and which are bad decisions on our part for him to experience. I’ve written before about the dilemma of how to break it to children that not all people are good guys. Incidents like the “real bad guy” and villains of classic and modern children’s literature speak to the basic concept of good and evil, giving us an opportunity to open the door todiscussion, particularly when the experience elicits feelings, thoughts, reactions. We can help children get clear on what those reactions are, and why they have them. Next Friday, July 11, the Westhampton Beach Performing Arts Center (PAC) is presenting a classic tale of good and evil: Snow White. It’s an original musical adaptation of the tale, performed by about 60 kids in Nancy and Fredrick DeMatteis Arts Education Program for Children. Somehow, kids seem to be less intimidated when its other kids on the stage. For the younger ones, or the easily freaked out, Liz Joyce & a Couple of Puppets perform Little Red Ridinghood with hand puppets on July 3 and 5 at 11:00 a.m, at Goat on a Boat in Sag Harbor. Both are great opportunities to discuss the battle of good and evil, and help a child gain a little more clarity on who the bad guys really are. PAC: (631) 288-1500 or WHBPAC.org. Goat on a Boat Puppet Theatre 631-725-4193; 631725-5280 goatonaboat.org

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The Hampton Classic Horse Show August 24 - 31, 2008 AD INE DL T* A DE Y 1S L JU

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DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 169 www.danshamptons.com

Life S tyle Beach Sports – Reaching Beyond Kadima and Volleyball

This game is the beach version of darts and only requires a few circles in the sand, as well as a bull’s-eye. Assign a point value to each circle and look for some stones or shells to act as darts. Players should take about five to ten steps back and try to hit the bull’s-eye. Each participant is allowed three throws per turn. After several rounds, add up the scores and determine who is the sand dart champion for the day. There are also different games depending on

the size of your group. Frisbee, hacky sack, bocce, sand tick-tac-toe, horseshoes, keep-it-up with a beach ball, and catch are great games for two or more people. However, if your group is more than two people, you may want to play kickball, tag, dodgeball or Marco Polo in the ocean. Fishing, flying a kite or building a sandcastle are fun beach activities for only one person. If these games aren’t for you, there’s always the good old-fashioned metal detector.

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By Justin DeMarco The Hamptons has some of the best beaches around. Southampton’s Cooper’s Beach and East Hamptons’ Main Beach have made Dr. Beach’s Top 10 Beach List for the past few years. At these top beaches, beachgoers can lie out on a towel, relax and work on that tan. However, the beach experience shouldn’t stop there. These beaches are ranked highly for a reason and should be enjoyed to their fullest capacity. One of the ways to enjoy these beaches is to play beach games. There are the typical beach sports such as soccer, football, wiffle ball, running, swimming, volleyball, and badminton. And then there are those games that go beyond the standard game of catch. These games, which are great for all ages, take a little more creativity than the standard games and require a little patience in learning the rules. Beach bowling, for example, takes the basic beach essentials – a ball and a bucket – and adds a twist. When playing beach bowling, take a bucket, fill it with moist sand, pat it down and turn it over to create a bowling pin. This process can be continued to construct a standard bowling triangle with one pin in the first row, two pins in the second row, three pins in the third row and four pins in the last row. A “lane” with the pin setup should be created for each bowler taking part in the game. This way each bowler can roll the ball twice each frame, as is done in professional bowling. When the pins are set up, take a few steps from the pins. You may want to draw a line when you find the perfect tossing distance to prevent arguments when the game starts becoming competitive. This way, after you play as many frames as it takes to tire you out, the scores can be added up and a winner can be crowned. Another game that can be played with only a ball and a few holes is beach golf. True beach golf does not mean bringing your sand wedge and a bunch of beat up golf balls to the beach to practice your bunker play. Rather, it is played with driftwood you find along the shore, a tennis ball and a few holes you dig up yourself. The object of the game is to hit the tennis balls into the holes you created. Extremely competitive beachgoers may be more interested in a water bucket race. To play this sport you need at least four players, two large buckets and two cups or small buckets. The two teams line up with all the players behind the large bucket. When the game starts, one player from each team will run to the shore, fill the cup with ocean water, run back and dump the water into the large bucket and then pass the cup off to a teammate. The game will be played until a team fills the large bucket with water. For those of you who prefer to keep it simple, beach bull’s-eye or sand darts may be your game.

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 170 www.danshamptons.com

TAKE

Sports/Outdoors

A HIKE

KEN KINDLER

Northwest Woods, Part One The trailhead is located between Swamp Road and Stephen Hand’s Path. If you look north from the parking area you can see where Edward’s Hole Road intersects with Route 114. Edward’s Hole Road links Swamp Road with Sag Harbor Turnpike, heading north. This road leads across Swamp Road to the trails of Barcelona Neck. From here you can walk the Paumanok Path (PP) in either direction, and you can follow the 6.5-mile Northwest Path (NWP) to Cedar Point. The end of our journey into East Hampton’s Northwest is at the southern end of Three Mile Harbor across the street from the Cathy Lester Preserve on a wide grassy shoulder at the Soak Hides Road and Springy Banks Road intersection. A warning to the wise; in order to avoid picking up ticks, wear light colored pants tucked into socks, and treat clothes with a product containing permethrin. Do not walk on trails that are not wide or cut back and allow some distance between your pants and the brush or high grass. Trails through beech and white pine forests are safer, because these trees block sunlight and nutrients from the competing plants below. Recent storms with heavy wind gusts have caused many trees to fall across the trails. Report them to your local trails group. An excellent source for contact information is Hike-LI.org, or if you need help locating those downed trees, ask about the great maps that are available from the hiking groups. When I am hiking or writing my articles, I search widely for information, however most of what I know about Long Island’s trails comes from Mike Bottini’s

Trail Guide to the South Fork, Lee McAllister’s book Hiking Long Island, and the wonderful maps created by Larry Paul and Charles Whalen. Without the hard work of these four people, few of us would be walking the trails. We start our walk after looking at the trail map kiosk. East Hampton Trails Preservation Society sells a version of this map that you can carry with you. A short path from the new trailhead intersects a wider path now marked with the yellow triangles of the NWP and the white rectangles of the PP. The two trails run north almost 5 miles together, before the

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PP turns east and then south and the NWP continues its journey north to Cedar Point. The convention for turn blazes on the PP is modified in East Hampton. The turn blazes are not two separate vertical rectangles (the top one offset in the direction the trail takes), but rather one vertical rectangle, contiguous with a second horizontal rectangle at its top, extending in the direction of the turn. We begin our journey walking through a common pitch pine oak mix with a brush layer of blueberry. At first, the trail tread is comfortable to walk, however we soon find ourselves traversing a knob and kettle terrain. The now old ATV damage is still obvious wherever the trail traverses a hill. A brisk 15minute walk through the woods will take the hiker across Two Holes of Water Road. It is easy to see where the trail continues because there is a deep cut into the berm along the road. Follow the ridge looking down on Chatfield’s Hole, a peanut shaped kettlehole pond. After passing Chatfield’s Hole, the PP intersects with Foster’s Path on the left, marked with orange (or red) rectangular blazes. It begins by Chatfield’s Hole, immediately north of where the PP crosses Two Holes of Water Road. It heads northeast while the PP heads in a northwest direction. The north end of this 9-mile loop, formed where these two great paths meet again, is at Northwest Road, just south of Alewife Brook Road. We will continue our walk in East Hampton’s Northwest next week. To find more walks on Long Island visit litlc.org.

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DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 171 www.danshamptons.com

Sports/Outdoors

Motor Trends and Predictions Recently, a long time reader of this column sent me two copies of Motor Trend Magazine – one dated April 1950 and the other November 1950. Many thanks, Toby. What this fellow doesn’t know is that I love vintage car magazines. Whenever I come across any at a garage sale, I grab them. I find magazines of any early decade terrifically representative of the pulse of the era, and am fascinated by the comments made by the editorial writers. These two Motor Trend magazines, which were a very skimpy thirty-five pages long, cost only twentyfive cents each. The current Motor Trend runs about 150 pages and has a newsstand price of almost five bucks. Both issues contained many interesting automotive facts. I doubt many of you out there remember the Mobil gas economy run competition that was held in the fifties, but the results were in one of the articles. In this competition there were 31 American automobiles, driven by non-professionals, competing to see which car could achieve the best gas mileage. Surprisingly, the average of all the cars was only 22.7 miles per gallon. The winning car was 1950 Mercury that achieved 26.52 miles per gallon. This proved to me that gas mileage hasn’t gone up very much in 57 years of automotive development, especially here in America. Don’t forget, in 1950 gasoline cost about twenty-five cents a gallon. That sleek new 1950 Mercury sold for around $2,300 dollars. Virtually every ad in the magazine was for performance parts for the Ford flathead V-8. Amazingly, one could purchase an entire dual exhaust system, including new engine headers, tailpipes and mufflers for the flathead for $49. No wonder all those sporty Fords had duals. A flathead supercharger could be

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purchased for $387. A pair of “highly polished” aluminum heads were yours for $54. It’s obvious that the Ford flathead engine was the king of the road in those days. Incidentally, all of the high performance accessories I just mentioned are worth a fortune in today’s collector car market. Especially that supercharger. There was also a great deal of buzz about the V8 overhead valve engines just introduced by General Motors in the new Cadillac and Oldsmobile. Motor Trend predicted that the new V-8s were the power plants of the future. Wow, were they right! Conversely, Americans are now witnessing the end of the popularity of the V-8 engine, and the resurgence of the more fuel efficient six cylinder and four cylinder engines. Suddenly it’s 1950 all over again. One other observation about these magazines. There was very little mention of foreign cars, although there was a paragraph about a Ferrari race car and a new “souped up and streamlined Volkswagen,” called by the very unknown and strange name of Porsche. There was also one small quarter page ad for the new 1950 MG-TD, which was advertised as being much improved over the 1949 MG-TC. It had “a new lower price, a softer ride, and left hand steering.” All very true, I owned both a TD and a TC. For the record, the older TC is the much more handsome model. There was a fascinating technical and extremely well written review of the newly introduced Jaguar XK-120 sports car, which most critics consider to be one of the most beautiful cars of all time. By modern standards, the XK-120 is truly a primitive machine, with its box type ladder frame, four speed transmis-

sion with synchromesh on only the first three gears with solid rear axle and drum brakes. The only thing truly advanced on the car was the engine. Let me quote the summary that Motor Trend wrote of the car, “As a technical achievement, the Jaguar is outstanding. It incorporates the most advanced technical knowledge available on naturally aspirated engines today. Jaguar has combined comfort and high performance, and it’s evident that they have produced a car that will be honored and admired for many years to come.” Technically, today’s cars are virtual space ships when compared to cars of 1950. Unfortunately, what really hasn’t changed that much is the fuel mileage. The main change relating to engines compared to the fifties is that we are getting about the same mileage with engines that are virtually twice as powerful. That economy-run winning Mercury was powered by a Ford V-8 flathead that produced about 100 horsepower. Today, the average passenger car V8 easily has twice the power and gets about the same mileage. The obvious question is why is it that we can’t make cars with even smaller engines, with less horsepower, that get better mileage. We can and we will. But in past years, virtually every American car manufacturer, to their shame, has seemed to be avoiding the consequences of high gas prices. We will soon see fuel efficient six and four cylinder motorcars on the American highways. After almost sixty years, isn’t it the right time for more fuel efficient vehicles? Bob Gelber, an automotive journalist living in the Hamptons, appears regularly on television as an automotive expert. You can email him at bobgelber@aol.com.

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Go Fish

Sports/Outdoors

By Rich Firstenberg

NYS Attorney General Fights Fed Fluke Rules extinguisher. The Coast Guard advises all boaters to wear life jackets, know the waterway rules, and check expiration dates on all boat safety gear. NYS Attorney General Andrew Cuomo’s office is suing the federal government over inequitable fishing regulations on summer flounder (fluke) caught in East Coast waters. New York anglers and the recreational fishing industry are discriminated against because New York anglers are limited to fluke of 20.5 inches or more, while Connecticut anglers can catch fluke of 19.5 inches and New Jersey fluke size minimum is 19 inches. The daily fluke limit is: four fish per angler in New York; five fluke in Connecticut; and eight fluke in New Jersey. Jack Yee

Happy Independence Day to all anglers – let’s celebrate by liberating our briny relatives from the briny depths (but don’t take more than you’ll consume). If weather conditions are favorable this weekend, fishing should be as active as it has been these last weeks. Many boats are in coastal waters this holiday so the U.S. Coast Guard and local marine patrols will be checking at random to see if boats comply with federal and state regulations. Boats smaller than 20 feet are required to have one life jacket for every person onboard, and a horn or whistle to signal your location. Boats larger than 20 feet have the same requirements as smaller boats plus signal flares, a life preserver ring and a fire

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We all basically fish in the same coastal waters, so the difference in regulations is not aiding the longterm sustainability of the local fluke fishery. Reports of brown tide in our southern coastal waters from Great South Bay to western Shinnecock Bay have come across my desk since early April. I investigated western Shinnecock waters two weeks ago. I did not see any of the telltale coffee-colored water indicating brown tide. Suffolk County’s Bureau of Marine Waters reports the bloom may be receding because of the warm weather, but there is still an elevated concentration of the marine organism which causes brown tide in these bays. John Skinner, a good writer for Nor’east Saltwater and its online edition noreast.com, recently published A Season on the Edge: Stories from a Surfcaster’s Year. The book is full of surfcasting tips for northeast saltwater surfcasters, but the chapter I really enjoyed concerns an offshore shark-fishing trip where he hooked a mako of about 600 to 800 pounds. John fought the shark for more than five hours – and then lost the fish as he attempted to bring it alongside the boat. The book is at local tackle shops. Scott of East End Bait and Tackle, Hampton Bays, says the fluke bite is really on in the ocean and Shinnecock Bay. Striped bass are being caught at the Ponquogue Bridge with top-water plugs and live bait, and both mako and thresher sharks are showing up offshore around the Cambria wreck. Ken Morse of Tight Lines Tackle, Sag Harbor, reports Mecox Bay was cut open to the ocean this past week attracting large striped bass just outside the inlet. Anglers are catching the stripers on poppers, and one 42-pound striped bass was caught with a sinker and hook baited with clams. Ken also says there are keeper-sized fluke at the Ruins off Gardiner’s Island. John at Jamesport Bait and Tackle confirms fluking off Gardiner’s Island is good, and there are large porgies in the Sound at Mattituck inlet. Off Robins Island in the Peconics, there are reports of weakfish and striped bass hitting on live bunker. Harvey Bennett of Amagansett’s Tackle Shop reports “Coffee Bill” caught an 11.5-pound fluke at the Ruins in Gardiner’s Bay and another client hooked a 47.5pound striper there using a live porgy. Fishing photographer Jack Yee reports a 41-pound striper caught with a live eel at night in the Race off Orient Point. In Montauk, Mark Foschi landed a 46pound striper at night at the town beach. Capt. Steve Forsberg of the Viking fleet reports good fluking, and Capt. Joel Lizza of the Sea Otter agrees fluking is fine in the ocean off Montauk. West Lake Marine weighed in a big 13.5-pound fluke, and the offshore charter boat Lady Grace brought in a 125-pound mako shark. Tight lines to all! –Rich Firstenberg (YeOldeSalt@aol.com)

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 173 www.danshamptons.com

10 Minute Golf By Darren DeMaille

Sports/Outdoors

Control the Clubface and Swing

er path. Darren May Teaching Professional Atlantic May relies on ball flight to determine the efficiency of a golf swing. Ball flight provides feedback on the clubface, path, speed, and the golf club’s angle of attack. With today’s technology, Darren no longer has to just watch a player’s ball flight, he can actually measure it. May uses radar to show students hard

data including spin rate, trajectory, club head speed, path, and face angle at impact. Using technology allows Darren to show precise swing changes in numerical data and provides useful information for club fitting. Jeff Warne PGA Professional The Bridge Warne looks for the position of the clubface throughout the swing. A proper clubface position allows for an athletic and natural swing. It promotes an efficient plane without any need for manipulation. A clubface that is not square forces a player to take instinctive, un-athletic corrective measures that result in path and plane errors which ineffective teachers often address as a cause (rather than a result). Any PGA golf professional would agree that there are many ways to get the ball in the hole. Golf is a game with a ball and a stick. The golf ball does not have a brain and does not go in a certain direction because it wants to. Take some advice from some of the best teachers on the east end. Learn to control the clubface of the golf club and you will hit good golf shots. Every shot you hit is telling you something, all you need to know is what it is saying. If you have any questions please send them to tenmindoctor@aol.com.

Dr. John G. Rupolo 1142275

If you ever attend a PGA Tour event and wander over to the driving range, you will see some great ball striking. Take a closer look and you’ll realize that there are no two swings alike. Great teachers realize that there are a lot of different ways to swing a golf club. I had the opportunity to ask Jim Flick how he became a one of the greatest instructors in the World. He answered, “I have seen and fixed every swing in the book two times over”. This reminds me of how many Seinfeld episodes I have seen; I can recite most of the lines in any show. The eastern end of Long Island is famous for some of the greatest golf courses in the United States. Below are a few professionals and their different philosophies on teaching golf. Greg Gauvin PGA Professional Southampton Golf Club Gauvin looks for tendencies in each student with their body lines and clubface alignment. Greg inspects feet, hips, shoulders, and clubface. Correct body lines are essential for ensuring proper path and a square face. Gauvin also looks to see if a player has the correct equipment. Poorly fit clubs makes it difficult for a player to setup correctly hitting errant shots. Students will then start to adjust their body lines to the off-target ball flight they start seeing. Properly fit equipment with correct body and clubface lines will promote a square hit with the prop-

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Sports/Outdoors

By Justin DeMarco My best friend and I always seem to find a way to turn some mundane activity into an intense competition. Some people would simply call this competitive habit masculinity. We, however, take it to the next level. For example, we were at the beach flying kites this past weekend. Rather, I should say we were both attempting to fly kites. After much frustration, the

wind finally picked up and the kites lifted off. That, however, wasn’t enough for us. We created a competition to see whose kite could fly the highest. There was no real way for us to gauge the heights of our kites since they were both pretty close, but we argued back and forth making our cases as to whose kite went the highest. We ceased making a scene at the beach, called it a draw and decided to throw a football around. While we were having a catch, my friend pointed out a man, who looked like he was a body double in the movie 300, walking on the beach with a board and something that looked like a parachute. We couldn’t figure out what he was doing, but we saw the girls we were scoping out switch their attention from us to the dude who went into the water with his board and parachute. Within minutes, he was whipping around the ocean on this board of his with a kite that definitely went higher in the air than the stationary kites my friend and I were arguing about earlier. As we were walking back to my car after watching the man we called “The Greek God,” we tried to figure out where we went wrong with the women. It probably was the moment we were flying kites, but we couldn’t admit to that. So, we decided to check out kitesurfing. Now, I’m not a water sport expert, but kitesurfing looked pretty easy. The guy who went from lying on his back in the ocean to standing and riding waves as the kite went higher and higher in the air looked like he didn’t even break a sweat. I figured I’d be cruising around the ocean in no time. I went home that night and did some research. If there’s one thing I can tell you from my research, it’s that I was wrong.

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Don’t Fly a Kite, Let a Kite Fly You

Not that kitesurfing is impossible from what I found, but it’s definitely not as easy as flying a kite. First off, kitesurfers have to be strong and have a good sense of balance to be pulled through the water. People attempting to kitesurf should also be pretty good swimmers and comfortable in the water. Without a doubt, the main thing when it comes to kitesurfing is safety. It’s important to check the (continued on next page)

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Sports/Outdoors (continued from previous page)

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Kite

kitesurfing classes tend to focus on teaching the important skills of kite launching, flying, landing, using the bar and lines, as well as teaching beginners about the safety devices. One of the first lessons taught to most students is body dragging. Body dragging is exactly as it sounds, in that the student’s body is dragged through the water as the kite flies in the sky. This technique can come in handy later on if a kite surfer loses his or her board mid-kitesurfing and needs to get to shore. Usually, the next step after body dragging is getting your feet hooked up to the board. After that, it’s hopefully smooth surfing.

However, getting started may not only be a physical obstacle for some, but a monetary one too. Basic kitesurfing equipment can cost anywhere from $1,000 to $3,000, depending on the gear you buy. The essentials are a kite, board, harness, bar, and lines. However, some people may want to have a life jacket, wetsuit and gloves among other items. After researching these kitesurfing basics and seeing what’s involved, I think I may go back to just flying my kite and realizing that there are just some things I’ll never be good at. Admitting that to my friend, on the other hand, is something I don’t plan on doing anytime soon.

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weather forecast before heading out and to continue checking the weather and wind conditions while you’re out in the water. Kitesurfers should also ride with side-shore winds and avoid kitesurfing in crowded areas, near rocks, trees or power lines. And when it comes to launching or landing the kite, kitesurfers need to be extremely careful, as that’s when most accidents occur. It may be a good idea to have a safety knife attached to the harness for cutting tangled lines. In order to minimize possible dangers, it’s highly recommend that beginner kitesurfers take lessons. The equipment can be misunderstood and the

DAN'S PAPERS, February 29, 2008 Page 176 www.danshamptons.com

Sports/Outdoors

Row With the Hamptons Current By David Lion Rattiner Water is the world when it comes to the Hamptons. When you are out on the water, whether on a sailboat, paddle board, surfboard or kayak, you feel a connection to nature unlike any other. In the Hamptons, water activities are part of the daily summer life of most residents. We go to the beach and dip our toes in the ocean or we jump right in and body surf for the day. Feeling the salt water of the ocean around you is magical, and most experts agree that salt water offers healing powers not just for the body, but for the mind as well. What is probably most amazing about this area is its passion for caring about and protecting our waterways. We have a lot of fun playing in the water, and we want to keep it natural and clean so that our children and our childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s children continue to enjoy the life out here that all of us have been lucky enough to experience. Almost every single water sport in the Hamptons has caught on. Even the super new ones like stand up paddle

Club has long been an idea in the making, and, thanks to Lee Oldak, just about anybody with a desire to learn about rowing can join up and begin gliding on the water. The only other rowing club that has been even remotely close to the Hamptons is the East End Rowing Club, which is located in Riverhead. The East End Rowing Club offers training to high school students and hosts 20 schools at the invitational Snowflake Regatta â&#x20AC;&#x201C; arguably the only serious rowing race for the East End. The Sag Harbor Community Rowing Club is in the early stages of offering the same kind of training for students and (continued on next page)

boarding have made a big impact on the Hamptons. But, there is one very traditional water sport that dates back to the time of sailing that has simply never made its way to the Hamptons. That is, at least, until now. Rowing is finally east of the Shinnecock canal. A rowing club in Sag Harbor has opened its doors to sculling classes, pair rowing, four man and eight man boats. The Sag Harbor Community Rowing

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Sports/Outdoors

Current

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athletes alike. Just because they are in the beginning stage, however, doesn’t mean that you can’t learn the thrill of what it is like to power a boat in sync with others, flying across the top of the water on a flat day in Sag Harbor. The Sag Harbor Community Rowing Club offers rowing to its members any time of day. Of course, in the collegiate rowing tradition, the Sag Harbor Community Rowing Club has no problem getting up before 7 a.m. to row. Lee Oldak is sticking to his, “If you build it, they will come,” motto. When you are out in Sag Harbor on a skull or crew boat, developing that connection to the water that so many of us seek happens nearly instantaneously. Rowing is a graceful sport and, like any-

thing, if you want to get good at it, you really have to work at it. The first time you step out onto a skull, you are going to find it a bit awkward. Like kayaks, crew boats can tip over easily. Unlike kayaks, however, it’s the importance of centering the boat that allows it to gain any type of power or speed. Because balance is so incredibly difficult to attain, but also so crucial, rowing can feel very much like surfing because there is a moment where you completely break through all of its difficulties and can simply dance with the water. Sag Harbor Community Rowing was able to start up because people out on the East End of Long Island understand the importance of contributing some of their hard earned money for valuable causes. Because of Bettina Stelle, the

EAST END MOTORSPORTS

rowing club now has a brand-new quad that is named after her father Thomas Keller, the president of FISA, which is the governing board for international rowing. Nancy Newman and Ray Pride donated a single rowing shell, East End rowing has donated an eight and a quad, and the International Recreation and Open Water Rowing Association has donated two pairs. I highly recommend you give rowing in Sag Harbor a try. I rowed in college, and it changed my life when it comes to my abilities in physical fitness. You can join the club for just $250 a year. If you have kids interested in rowing, you can enroll them in their rowing camp, which starts on July 7. Get out there and row! Visit rowsagharbor.org for more information.

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DAN'S PAPERS, February 29, 2008 Page 178 www.danshamptons.com

Health/Fitness

Yoga Means Union extreme ways, centering her attention on events such as marriage, loss, and love. These aspects of our life make for an emotional rollercoaster. To compound the situation, the emotional stresses manifest themselves physically, creating a rather toxic environment, which generally gets worse before it gets better. Acknowledging this, Weitz began a particular focus on weddings, devising a plan that would allow everyone to get the most joy out of marital bliss. Her philosophy is to help “clear out the unnecessary aspects (stress, fighting, petty things) and focus on the essence, which is love.” The Lovers’ Series is an eight-session program that offers the bride and groom-to-be an oasis from the chaos of planning a wedding, giving them weekly re-focusing, understanding and time for themselves. Each class is tailored to the couple based on interviews leading up to that week’s session. A goal of the program is to allow you and your partner to refocus on what this time in your life is all about – each other – and get your mind of whether or not to make it black or white tie or whose parents are paying for what. (An added bonus is that two months of yoga is going to strengthen your core, firm your muscles and make you look pretty fit come wedding day.) While Yoga Means Union is meant to celebrate the Christian McLean

How does preparing for what is supposed to be one of the greatest moments of your life become so stressful? With flower arrangements, venue selection and seating charts it’s easy. Planning a wedding can be a nightmare. To cope with the stress, some couples seek counseling, others grin and bear it and some just call the whole thing off. But there’s another option. Wedding yoga is a completely unique form of preparation for your blissful day down the aisle. For those who practice yoga, you already know some of its mental and physical benefits. By helping to regulate the pituitary and thyroid glands, yoga can calm anxiety, and increase energy and oxygen to the body. Believe it or not, certain poses can even help release locked or suppressed emotions. Partner yoga in particular encourages bonding, connecting, trust and openness. With all these perks, it’s no surprise that it could help keep bridezilla at bay. Yoga Means Union takes it one step further by personally tailoring each class for soon to be I-doers. You wouldn’t walk into a doctor’s office and assume the doctor is going to help you if you never tell him what ails you, the same goes for this program. The more you explain in your pre-session conference, the more you will get out of your classes. The mastermind behind Yoga Means Union is Hamptons/NYC based yoga instructor, Emily Weitz. The impetus occurred during her Anusara teacher training when she was asked to examine her innate strength in yoga. After great thought, she came to understand that it was her rich connection to the heart and emotions that set her apart. This relationship led her to examine the human condition in

coming together of two people, it doesn’t necessarily need to involve both the bride and groom. Not into hitting Vegas or watching men grinding in thongs for your bachelor or bachelorette party? Then try something that’s going to give you a little more to focus on than a shot of tequila. Sessions for the bridal party allow you to share some time with the people that mean so much to you. Wedding yoga doesn’t even need to include the bride or groom. A group yoga class the morning before or the morning of is a great way to get guests in the right mindset for the big event. “We had everyone from grandmothers to little kids,” Laurie Gutmann Kahn says about her wedding yoga experience. “Weitz based the session on the theme of ‘joining’ and it really did bring people together. Everyone loved it.” This summer, as the days dwindle down and the guest list piles up, maybe it’s time you carve out a little piece of the day for you and the one you love. Get back to the reason you proposed in the first place. Open your heart, release your worries, and say “ommm” before you say, “I do.” For more information on Yoga Means Union please visit www.yogamatized.com or contact Emily Weitz at (631) 278-0037. Questions or thoughts? Email mcleanstories@hotmail.com

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Health/Fitness

Yin and Yang of Macrobiotics: Diet for a Happy Life A macrobiotic diet isn’t simply a diet – it’s a philosophy and way of life. It isn’t as much about the food you eat as it is about how that food can help you maintain a natural balance and live a happier life. “It stems from an intuitive understanding of the orderliness of nature,” said Michio Kushi in his book The Macrobiotic Way. Kushi was a student of George Ohsawa, a Japanese philosopher who brought his teachings on the macrobiotic diet to Europe and North America in the 1950s. “Modern macrobiotic philosophy focuses on offering a way of living that closes the widening gap between humans and the natural world.” Similar to a vegan diet, the staple foods of this regimen are whole grains, such as wheat, oats and barley, coupled with vegetables (mostly green leafy, roots and round veggies), fruits, beans, soy products, mild and natural seasonings, nuts, seeds and, occasionally, fish. It eschews refined sugars, processed foods, dairy, eggs and most animal products. Practiced for thousands of years, with contemporary interest in macrobiotic diets stemming from Japan, followers of the diet believe that the quality of the food you put into your body has a great effect not just on your health, but on your happiness and well-being as well. The macrobiotic diet – macro meaning large and bio meaning life - also calls for the reduction of salts, fats, sugars and stimulants, such as alcohol and coffee, from your diet.

Those who follow the diet believe that sickness and unhappiness are nature’s way of telling us that we need to adopt a healthier diet and way of life. They also believe there are physical manifestations of the diet, including a longer life and the reduction of many diseases, including heart disease, hypertension, obesity, gallbladder and liver disorders and cancer. Many studies over the years, including “Dietary Goals for the United States” (1977) and “Diet, Nutrition and Cancer” (1982), side with the macrobiotic diet, finding that a simpler diet based around whole grains is ideal for one’s health.

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Foods are categorized as either a “yin” or a “yang,” depending on how the food grows, where the food was grown, its sodium-potassium content and the effect the food has on the body. Yin foods are rich in potassium, while yang foods are rich in sodium. There are also five elements that must be balanced as well. The “Seven Universal Principles” of oriental medicine are also followed in order to balance the yin and the yang. And it’s easier than you might think to maintain a macrobiotic diet. Once you rid your home of all the junk and processed foods you once ate, it’s easy to keep your pantry full of healthy foods so you don’t immediately reach for the junk. Also, while it might be difficult to go out to eat (though, go to any Asian restaurant, such as Chinese, Japanese or Thai, and ask about what they might be able to throw together for you), you can still ensure that you keep your diet. You can keep healthy snacks in the car or in your bag for when you get hungry while out of the house, and making sure you cook for yourself at home before going out will keep you from stopping off for a quick, and likely unhealthy, snack. It’s also important to keep track of what you’re eating. That way you can actually see how healthy you’ve been, and conversely, see how unhealthy you’ve been if you’ve strayed from the macrobiotic diet at all. For more information on this diet and way of life, go to macrobiotics.org.

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 180 www.danshamptons.com

Health/Fitness

C7, T12, L1, L5, Bingo! Time to Align the Spine becomes almost concave. But there is time to save yourself from this seemingly inevitable fate. Your spine consists of separate vertebrate, each of which is sort of like a jelly donut: soft on the inside and strong on the outside. In an aligned spine, these vertebrate are stacked on top of each other without strain. There is a natural curve to the spine, so the vertebrate are not straight up and down. The spine is divided into three sections: the cervical vertebrate is from the base of the skull to the C7 vertebrate. That’s the knobby one that sticks out more than the others at the top of your back. From that vertebrate to the to T12 vertebrate, which is in the middle of your back, is the Thoracic vertebrate. Just below T12 is L1. From L1 to L5, just five vertebrate, is the Lumbar spine. Each of these sections curves in a “C” formation, creating a connected sort of curving line. Thus, to have your back in alignment does not mean it is entirely straight. It means more precisely that each vertebrate is in line with its neighbors, and the natural curve of your spine is respected. A simple exercise to practice good alignment involves attentiveness to these curves in your spine. By simply rolling your shoulders back so that your shoulder blades are lowering down your back, you are compensating for that forward tendency that leads to poor posture and permanent problems.

So if you just focus, once in a while, when you take a deep breath, on rolling your shoulders down your back, you are giving balance to your posture. Once you’ve rolled your shoulder blades down your back, take a deep breath in. Fill your lungs with air. Your lungs have the most capillaries at the bottom, so it’s good to fill your lungs deeply, almost like you would fill a glass, from the bottom up. Tuck your tailbone beneath you, let your stomach hollow. Imagine filling your body with breath in

Alsion Caporimo

Perhaps for you, the phrase “sit up straight – don’t slouch” recalls a nagging granny voice from across your childhood dinner table. Or perhaps it’s a dance instructor, or a yoga teacher, or an etiquette expert. The point is this advice is more worthwhile than you may have once believed. I was once a 16year-old huncher because my gawky height advantage made me miss out on whispers among my friends. And it didn’t cross my mind until years later that this was much worse than being improper or unladylike. It was compromising my stomach muscles and my shoulders, it was damaging my spine, and it was constricting my breathing. Now that I’ve realized the wide-ranging effects of slouching, that old granny voice sounds a whole lot wiser. Besides the psychological reasons behind an awkward teenager’s slouching, there are anatomical impulses that make poor posture a natural progression. We live in a forward facing world. Everything we do is towards the front. We speak forward, we move forward, we react forward. Our shoulders have a tendency to roll forward. Young children are like sprouting bean plants, reaching straight up for the sky. But put that child at a desk for a dozen years and cut funding to their physical education classes. Watch how they cave in towards their chests. Then give that growing child, now a young adult, a seat in a cubicle, with attention on a computer screen and fingertips striking a keyboard. The hunch worsens. As that young adult grows older, sitting at the steering wheel of a car, on a couch in front of a television, in a wheelchair in the park on a spring day, the shoulders creep so far forward, the shoulder blades so spread apart, that the chest

a figure 8 motion. As you inhale, let your breath go from your lower back/waist (think kidneys!) to your chest, then allow it to circulate through your shoulders and down your spine, and then to the bottom of your belly. If this is difficult to perceive, just give it a try. Take a deep, slow inhale and picture your breath filling your body in a figure 8 motion. Just one complete inhale and exhale like this, and you will feel how your spine is supposed to be aligned. Your stomach muscles strengthen so you’re holding yourself up from the root up. The muscles in your lower back counteract that tension in the stomach with their own strength. Your shoulder blades draw closer together, creating space in your chest. And suddenly, your head seems to float atop your neck, each vertebrate in line with the last. Perfect posture never felt so relaxing!

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DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 181 www.danshamptons.com

Beauty/Fashion

Experiential Shopping at Maison 24 and Urban Zen By Alison Caporimo A whirling masquerade of toothy online sales models and clickable blouses – online shopping is a free for all that reduces your shopping experience to a pixilated blur. Your packages arrive in the mail and you have no connection or memory with the item. You didn’t pick up that dress and relish in the texture that reminds you of your mother’s old nightgown. You didn’t indulge in that perfume that brings you back to warm summer sea breezes in the country. You’ve merely acquired more stuff to add to the pile in the corner. And while the online shopping network expands, the Internet lacks one crucial aspect to shopping – human connection and experience. Shop owners have been experimenting with new concepts in order to give life back to the store. Louis Marra and Allison Julius, owners of Maison 24, 2424 Main Street in Bridgehampton, have brought their home environment and personal experiences to the retail setting. Upon passing through the solid wood door, complete with doorknocker, the shopper is welcomed into a slice of life where many eclectic items are for sale. Men’s shirts and ties, women’s handbags, jewelry, art, music and furniture are spread about the store for the shoppers’ perusal. “Entering the store is really like coming into someone’s home,” explains Marra. Rather than a collection of random objects, the items in Maison 24 are hand-selected – each piece has a personal story to accompany it. The store sells Globe-Trotter luggage, a British luxury luggage company, which makes Julius’ husband’s

Allsion Julius and Louis Marra welcome you to Maison 24. favorite suitcase. Fornasetti, an Italian designer known for incorporating art into furniture, spread around the store has produced pieces that both Marra and Julius personally collect. A Cuckoo clock mounted on the wall mirrors the one that

Marra gave to Julius as a Christmas present. With each piece reflecting a personal experience for the storeowners, Maison 24 embodies a particular lifestyle. And what lifestyle is that? “Our store is for a person who likes to travel and entertain,” said Julius. With pieces from England, Italy, France, the Netherlands and spanning the states, it is clear that the store appeals to a shopper with an international design palette. Maison 24 is not the only store reaching out to shoppers through personal connections and international tastes. Urban Zen, 4 Bay Street in Sag Harbor, opens up Donna Karan’s couture closet to reveal African-inspired jewelry, furniture and clothing. Through her nomadic-styled collection, Karan attempts to preserve the dying cultures around the world. The Urban Zen Foundation, the driving force behind the store, collaborates with existing organizations in hopes of changing the world. Standing by their slogan, “Raise Awareness Inspire Change, the foundation focuses on well-being, empowering children and preserving cultures. By purchasing items from the Urban Zen store, you are supporting these initiatives. Kevin Salyers, the Urban Zen Foundation’s vice president for retail development, explains the store’s philosophy. “It’s more than buying an article of clothing,” said Salyers, “it’s about bringing people together in one collaborative effort.” Urban Zen’s outdoor seating area and beautiful framed photographs communicate a tranquil energy that is inviting to a busy-minded shopper. With vegetable-dyed clothing in colors like chalk (continued on page 183)

4-DAY “HAMPTON CHIC” VINTAGE EXPERIENCE Amazing one of a kind Vintage Clothing and Accessories from the collections of…

Our Collections have been featured in “Sex and the City” And the upcoming film “Confessions of a Shopaholic” JULY 17TH 18TH 19TH & 20TH 9:00-1:00

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Personal Styling for Any Event 264 BUTTER LANE BARN BRIDGEHAMTON For more information call:

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HALSTON…YSL…OSCAR DE LA RENTA… PUCCI….COURREGE & CHANEL… Just to mention a few.

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 182 www.danshamptons.com

Beauty/Fashion

Ready To Wear Summer Beauty By Melanie Griffith In these early days of summer, a girl has more than enough to worry about when it comes to beautifying for all the demands of the season. The task can become daunting, sifting through shelves at the drug store or flipping through catalogs. But the hunt for the right products to create a perfect summer look just got simpler. Remove the stress from your summer beauty routine with these additions to your make-up kit. When it comes to perfume, women are always looking for their new, favorite fragrance. Fragrances from Antica Farmacista capture the best of summer in a charming, antiqueinspired apothecary bottle. Antica Farmacista has been in the business of combining old-world European charm and modern trends for over 25 years. A careful mixture of essential oils and natural ingredients, Antica Farmacista scents bring a whiff of Mediterranean charm and Tuscan elegance straight to the Hamptons. Dab on a little of Antica Farmacista’s

Blade of Grass fragrance for a sweet but subtle addition to your night on the town, or try Grapefruit for your schedule of picnics and barbeques. Sisley cosmetics may already be a staple in your beauty routine, but don’t overlook their products that are specially suited for a summer

vacation. Sisley fragrances, cosmetics and skincare products cater to the beauty of your face and body, but even more importantly, they protect your skin from sun damage. Suncare products like Sisley’s line of Broad Spectrum Sunscreens. Another great, summersuited product from Sisley is their Sunleya Age Minimizing Sun Protection that boasts both SPF 15 and anti-aging properties. Before you leave the house this summer, you should always make sure you and your family are protected from the sun. A great product for kids and adults alike is Ocean Potion Continuous Spray in Sport, H20 Sport (SPF 30) and Kids Instant Dry (SPF 50) formulas. Ocean Potion’s spray-on sunscreen takes the headache out of the pre-beach routine for moms who have kids who won’t stop worming around long enough to get an even coat of SPF. It’s also completely (continued on next page)

GIRL ROCKS Jewelry and Handbag Trunk Show by Barbara Rodolitz & Leslie Mathias for Ilene Kramer Handbags Semi Precious Stone and Pearl Jewelry & Exotic Skin Bags

Friday & Saturday July 11th & July 12th 12-5pm

Brazilian n Keratin n Treatment Enjoy y Coffee,, Tea,, etc.. from m J A V A N ATION-Ourr Treat

285 Flying Point Rd., Southampton

516-662-5522

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Wine will be served

Montauk HWY Flying Point Rd.

Bring a Friend...

Shopping g Cove,, Main n Street

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DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 183 www.danshamptons.com

Beauty/Fashion

Ready to Wear

Zen

(continued from previous page)

Melanie Griffith

water- and sweat-proof so itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s perfect for those of us who love to surf, run or play volleyball on the beach in the scorching summer sun. All this SPF doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mean you have to sacrifice a summer glow thanks to Sun Kissed Bronzer and Blush Enhancer from Ready to Wear Cosmetics. Ready to Wear has created a tan booster that works with your skin to improve and extend your natural tan. Wheat amino acids enrich the natural pigmentation of your skin, making it smoother to the touch and providing great moisturizing power. To achieve the perfect finishing touch on your summer look, many Hamptons residents and celebrities alike will be reaching for the Beautyblender. Rea Ann Silva and Veronica Lorenz, two renowned Hollywood beauty authorities, created the Beautyblender to help every woman, from novice to connoisseur, achieve an expert application of any and

(continued from page 181)

every makeup product by correcting one of the most common makeup mistakes: visible lines and distinctions between products on your face. The rounded curves of the bright pink, oval Beautyblender create a clean, natural application of makeup that is easy to achieve. And its suede texture was actually designed to imitate the texture of skin. Antica Farmacista products are available at Turpan on Main Street in East Hampton. Sisleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s suncare products and other cosmetics can be found at Saks Fifth Avenue in Southampton. Ready to Wear Cosmetics can be found at HSN.com, and visit oceanpotion.com for more information about their line of sunscreens. The next time youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re at Whiteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pharmacy in East Hampton, look for the bright pink orb that is the Beautyblender.

The widest array of

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115 East 57th Street, Suite 710, NEW YORK, NY UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ÂŁĂ&#x201C;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x2021;xäÂ&#x2021;nÂ&#x2122;ää 4800 N. Federal Highway, Suite C101, BOCA RATON, FL UĂ&#x160;xĂ&#x2C6;ÂŁÂ&#x2021;nnĂ&#x2C6;Â&#x2021;äÂ&#x2122;Ă&#x2021;ä Ă&#x201C;äĂ&#x160;*Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Ă&#x192;ÂŤiVĂ&#x152;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x203A;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x2022;i]Ă&#x160;-Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2021;äĂ&#x201C;]Ă&#x160;HACKENSACK, NJ UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£Â&#x2021;{{ÂŁÂ&#x2021;Â&#x2122;nÂ&#x2122;ä ­"ÂŤiÂ&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;-Ă&#x2022;Â&#x201C;Â&#x201C;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;äänÂŽĂ&#x160;£äxĂ&#x160;,>Â&#x2C6;`iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Â?iĂ&#x203A;>Ă&#x20AC;`]Ă&#x160;- ","1]Ă&#x160; Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;nääÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x2021;ÂŁnÂ&#x2021;xxä{ nääÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x2021;ÂŁnÂ&#x2021;xxä{Ă&#x160; U www.skinandlasers.com

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;retail with soulâ&#x20AC;? at Urban Zen. and spice and Karanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s favorite all-natural Jillâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cookies, the store possesses an organic quality. In what Salyers calls â&#x20AC;&#x153;retail with a soul,â&#x20AC;? Urban Zen carries items that have a special significance to Karan herself. With Lynn Kohlman, Karanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s longtime friend, supplying the art for the store and Karanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s personal favorite jewelry from Senegal, the items in Urban Zen are hand selected by a woman who knows fashion. More than a mere collection of Karanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s must-haves, the store aims to envelope the shopper in ambience. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about coming into the store and experiencing the five senses,â&#x20AC;? said Salyers. Maison 24 and Urban Zen add an important ingredient to the shopping recipe that does not exist in online shoppingâ&#x20AC;Śpersonal connections and experiences. Shopping is not longer a place of busy consumer transit. Shopping is the destination.

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 184 www.danshamptons.com

Beauty/Fashion

N E W K I D S O N T H E B LOCK MICHAEL PEREZ POP ART GALLERY 59 Main Street, Southampton 631-259-2424 – mperezpopart@aol.com Pop-Artist Michael Perez recently moved his gallery from Jobs Lane to a larger space on Main Street in Southampton where he’s showing new paintings as well as several vintage paintings from his own collection. “Having a gallery in Southampton for over eleven years makes me feel like I am part of something beautiful and special that has no equal.” Perez further explains, “There is nowhere like the Hamptons. Everyone enjoying themselves, whether it’s at our world famous

W I T H M ARIA T ENNARIELLO

beaches, quaint, unique shops, or just walking around town.” Born and raised in NYC, Perez was inspired by the ‘80s Pop Art revolution. His new works are fresh and captivating, using more shapes and colors than before. His paintings are surreal and tell a vivid story with his distinctive style. RETREAT BOUTIQUE 352 Montauk Highway, Wainscott 631-329-4398 Join the celebration at the Grand re-opening of the Retreat Boutique on July 3, 4 at 6 pm. You can shop for bargains, enjoy some refreshments,

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Store Hours: Mon-Sat 10am-6pm • Sun Closed 230 Montauk Hwy., Speonk, NY 11972 Ph: 631.801.2606 Fax: 631.801.2607 kathy@sweetartsupplies.com • sweetartsupplies.com 1142091

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and celebrate helping families affected by domestic violence. The new store features clothing, household items and furniture, also offering a variety of high quality, gently used items. The proceeds from the thrift store benefit the Retreat’s domestic violence services. Beyond fundraising, the Retreat Boutique offers families affected by violence access to clothing, household items and even furniture to help them start a new life free of violence and abuse.The new store, located in the Wainscott Shopping Plaza, is open 10:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. LABL 78 Main St. - #11 Sag Harbor Shopping Cove, Sag Harbor 631-284-3377 – lablny.com A Street Fashion store has just opened in Sag Harbor. LABL carries apparel and footwear for men and women, featuring bold colors, edgy graphics and high quality fabric. LABL boasts top quality clothing at affordable prices. By choice, the shop is off the beaten path, so you have to find it! It is tucked away nicely under Java Nation in the Sag Harbor Shopping Cove. Look for the sign on Main Street at the cove entrance (between the hardware store and movie theater). In short, it is apparel and footwear with attitude. Stocked brands are small labels that originate from various points in the U.S. as well as Sweden and Finland. For the most part, the items featured at LABL aren’t available anywhere else on eastern Long Island. Included in the mix are companies that donate goods or profits to those in need. The store also carries items by young local designers. LABL will also function as a gallery for displaying the work of local artists. The store’s Grand Opening will begin on Friday, July 4 with an opening reception for Arts 4 & Friends from 6 to 8 p.m. Frozen treats and cold beverages will be served. So get a cup of Java and wander on down, you will be pleasantly surprised and knocked out by the clothing and accessories right here in Sag Harbor. Orabella Scarano Beachwear & Intimo Boutique 21 North Ferry Road, Shelter Island 631-749-5440 – OrabellaScarano.com Italian designer, Orabella Scarano, has opened its first retail boutique on Shelter Island, introducing innovative high fashion design and high quality Italian production to the East End. Orabella Scarano is an Italian-made legwear, hosiery and seamless-wear brand started by Lindsey Hoffman, an East End native and former graduate of Southampton College, with offices in New York and Rome. Hoffman is excited to open the first Orabella Boutique and is currently designing the Orabella Scarano swimwear line set to launch in 2009. Their goal is to create luxury products that are a true accessory to fashion, inspiring women with unique, easy chic, glamour and sophistication. Along with the Orabella line of legwear and seamless tops, the boutique hosts a unique selection of high-end swimwear, contemporary clothing, Italian lingerie, beach bags, hats, jewelry and the black and white “Sand” photography collection by Eric Striffler. The boutique, designed entirely in blue and white, bringing the flair and ambiance of the Italian Riviera to Shelter Island for sure. If you are a new business or have just relocated your shop and you want everyone to know about it, e-mail me at NewKids@danspapers.com or via fax at: 631-726-0189. I would love to hear from you!

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 185 www.danshamptons.com

Beauty/Fashion

Fashionista!

By Kelly Krieger

Yoga: Combining Mind, Body – and Lightweight Fabric Yoga allows us to surrender our mind, body and soul. Methods date back nearly 5,000 years ago. Although yoga fashion was not a consideration back in those days, comfort and freedom to move has always been a necessity when exercising. According to an American study in the Yoga Journal, more than 18 million people are actively involved in yoga. Yogis spend nearly 6 billion yogarelated expenses per year and 138 million specifically on yoga apparel The yoga apparel market is definitely on the rise and designers are creating unique designs that can be worn for everyday as well as for workout routines. The combination of color, style and comfort are the key ingredients. Stretch and lightweight fabrics are recommended for extra support. There are many pant styles to choose from such as fold-over waist bands, shorts, leggings, drawstring pant, cropped pant, flare-leg and side-ankle slit style pant. Fitted tanks, racer-back and stretch tees are most popular.

New to East Hampton, Lululemon Athletica specializes in fashionable yogawear. The Vancouver, Canadian based company has been a success since 1998 when they opened their first special boutique. Today, the rapidly growing company has 38 stores worldwide including locations in Japan and Australia. Designer, Andrea Murray uses a fabric called “Luon” consisting of 14% stretch fibers (a combination of nylon and Lycra). She also designs with “seed” an environmentally friendly fabric made of a stretch hemp material. Lululemon is also known for offering an extensive color palette. A few basic colors in Lululemon’s collection this season include; champagne, black, white, anise, fox, light tan and India ink. Hot colors like pond, tide pool, peacock, kinky green, willow, pretty pink, petal, sea spray and groovy melon have also recently been added to the collection. Kristin Turlington’s yogawear line, Nuala (partnered with Puma) offers an assortment of fashion forward styles and colors. Nuala’s (which stands for Natural Universal Altruistic Limitless Authentic) slouchy yoga pant is made from soft stretchy cotton with an elastic ankle (great for any body type.) This yoga-inspired clothing line offers style, comfort and durability. In 2007, Stella McCartney introduced her yogawear line, adidas by Stella McCartney. Inspired by dance and ballet, McCartney created a line that includes such items like double-layered tanks, deep necklines, low-waisted trousers, gym yoga tees, cropped knit pants, footwear and accessories. With

the likes of Madonna and Gwyneth Paltrow at her side, her new avenue of fashion has quickly caught on. Searching for the right yogawear has been made easy. Whether on line (check-out www.gaiam.com, www.omala.com, www.shopzilla.com, www.docevidafitness.com, www.yogahyde.com and www.bluecanoe.com) or in boutiques, there are many options. Locally, there are many yoga studios with connecting yogawear and equipment boutiques. Ananda in Southampton, Mandala (Amagansett) and Lotus Blossom (Wainscott) offer a variety of yogawear lines that include such brands like; Prana, Hard Tail, Blue

Canoe (who uses organically grown cotton), Yogini and Gaiam just to name a few. Yoga apparel can be worn in and out of the studio. Many of the styles offered are easy-to- wear pieces that can be incorporated into your casual attire. From playing with the kids and grocery shopping to working out, the transition has been made easy. Yoga has become more than a routine. It’s a way of life. For a full listing of all the yoga studios and yoga retail establishments, please check out Dan’s Insider Guide for details and locations. Questions or thoughts? Email fashiontimes@live.com

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DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 186 www.danshamptons.com

Beauty/Fashion

FASHION PLATE There’s a treasure trove of great stylish menswear awaiting you at Impulse for Men in Westhampton Beach. The long established shop carries the leading menswear designers including Robert Graham, Agave, Berle, Nat, Gardeur, Jack of Spades, Alberto, Haupt, MacHay, Tailorbyrd and Cole Haan. Our model Rich, arrived at the shop in a hip ‘67 Lincoln Continental which was a Father’s Day gift. The fit 40-year-old from Remsenburg was shopping at Impulse with his wife Tara and their two children. This weekend is the preview of the new Robert Graham collection at a Robert Graham Trunk Show on Saturday, July 5th

By Tony Vargas

Robert Graham “Frere” Shirt $188.00 Agave jeans $195.00 Cole Haan air Barrett brown shoes $195.00 K&Bros clear Italian watch $315.00

from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. – You could win a Robert Graham shirt just in time for fireworks. IMPULSE FOR MEN 85 Main Street Westhampton Beach, NY 11978 631-288-5406 Fashion Editor and stylist: Tony Vargas Photo Credit: Ann Watt

Tommy Bahama V-neck sweater $130.00 Robert Graham “Reefer” Board shorts $158.00

Celebratee Julyy 4th h with h Madison n & Mulholland n Jitneyy Goodiee Bag---it’ss Free… … Hampton and d itt could d bee yours!

Celebrate July 4th with Madison & Mulholland’s Summer Free Goodie Bag given away on the Hampton Jitney July 3 from 9-12 NYC to the beaches… or go to www.danspapers.com and enter to win one!!!! 1146438

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 187 www.danshamptons.com

Beauty/Fashion

The Fourth of July is here and we are well on our way into the dog days of summer. Each year when we celebrate my son Joe’s birthday on July 17, I always say, “We are half way through the summer.” Let’s do some summertime shopping! Just a reminder that Jimmy’s, Westhampton Beach beginning Thursday, July 3, with Cynthia Rose and her Fall 2008 collection. Vintage, one-of-a-kind fabrics and custom creations, will add to your fall wardrobe. In Southampton at Rose Jewelers on Main Street look for beautiful gifts and jewelry for every occasion that include the unforgettable Dorfman Sterling line. In light of the election craze, iconic velvet slipper company Stubbs & Wootton, have designed the most fabulous velvet loafers honoring this year’s national Presidential election. Best known for their whimsical velvet and linen slippers, the Election Slippers allows both men ($395 a pair) and women ($350 a pair) both of which are embroidered in gold metallic thread on the classic black velvet slipper to put their best foot forward and show your support with either the Republican’s elephant logo or the Democratic donkey logo.

unique and eclectic merchandise include beautiful sarongs for beach and casual wear, jeweled slippers, beach bags, umbrellas, hammocks, plant jewelry, oneof-a-kinds, and kites that will make a statement for my favorite event, Dan’s “annual kite fly” that is coming up on August 17, at Sagg Main Beach. Stop in and say hi to Melisa, she will be happy to help you pick and choose.

At Marders on Snake Hollow Road in Bridgehampton you can save some bucks on gas by getting everything you need under one big roof. Save up to 40% off on roses, select trees, shrubs, selected annuals and perennials, glazed and ceramic pottery, fiberglass garden containers, outdoor furniture and accessories!

Calypso, 21 Newtown Lane in East Hampton has invited Alicia Shulman Jewels for an exclusive “Trunk Show” on Friday, July 11, Saturday July 12 from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. During the two-day event, the designer will be on site showcasing a wide selection of her summer collection as well as one-of-a-kind pieces from Alicia’s private assortment. A portion of the proceeds from the sales will benefit VHI The Music Foundation. For information log onto calypsocelle.com Mark your calendar for this great event. On The North Fork: Gloria Jewel located at 1560

Here is a good one for you, a dreamy little shop, Mo Cosas at 337 Montauk Highway in Water Mill has it all going on. There are wearable summer items for the entire family and featured artwork local artists. The

The Down Factory Store at the Elegant John at 74 Montauk Highway, East Hampton is having their annual July Sale on their famous goose down pillows and comforters, Espalma Deluxe towel set ($19.99), in great shades of summer colors along with coordinating bath rugs and a wide selection of bath towels that start at $9.99. Look for summer weight down blankets in five colors ($119) and lightweight cotton blankets in white and ecru from $29.99. Don’t pass up the buys on sheet sets; English hotel towels, beach towels, bathrobes, sun and skin care products, bathroom and accessories. The new lamp selection reflects 30% off. Open every day from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Main Road in Jamesport, has started their “Summer Sale” and is also offering 20% on everything white including new clothing as well, for the entire month of July. This is the right time to stock up on basics from C&C, Velvet and Organic by John Patrick. Call Megan Leary at the shop for more information at 631-2843761. The Tanger Outlets in Riverhead are having a July 4th through July 6 sale and sidewalk sale that include Williams Sonoma Outlet, Michael Kors, Juicy Couture, Cole Haan, Nike Factory Store, Banana Republic Factory Store, Giorgio Armani, Kate Spade, Gap Outlet and so much more. At ABC Carpet & Home, all locations look for the ultimate ABC Summer Tag Sale that is now in progress. You can save 50% off the original prices on select furniture and accessories for living dining, bedroom and home office and 75% off on modern and handmade rugs, Chinese needlepoint’s, mansion size rugs, runners and wall to wall. This is the sale you have been waiting for! A quick stop at Panera Bread in the Bridgehampton Commons for an Osiago cheese bagel with an iced coffee and a special hello to Debbie at Panera. This is one of my favorite stops after a full day of shopping…… Until next week. Ciao and happy summer shopping! If your shop is having a sale, new inventory or you are a new business or have relocated, and you want everyone to know about it, please e-mail me at shoptil@danspapers.com and at newkids@danspapers.com. I would love to hear all about it!

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Day By Day COMING UP Upcoming events can be seen in the following sections:

Art Events – pg. 131 Benefits – pg. 188 Day by Day – pg. 188 Kids’ Events – pg. 166 Movies – pg. 124 Nightlife – pg. 131

BENEFITS AMERICAN PICNIC – 7/4 – 7-10 p.m. Fireworks by Grucci. $250 per adult, $100 for ages 20-30, and $75 for those 19 and under. To benefit the Southampton Fresh Air Home. Located at 1030 Meadow Ln., Southampton. 631-283-5847. CORMARIA SUMMER GALA – 7/4 – Dinner,

dancing and fireworks, to benefit p.m. Honoring artist and printPICK OF THE WEEK maker Will Barnet and benefiting the Cormaria Center for Spiritual HAMPTONS GREEK the American Heart Association. and Human Growth. Tickets are FESTIVAL – 7/10 – 4-11 Held on the grounds of the $300. 631-725-4206. Located on p.m. At the Greek Bridgehampton Historical Society. Bay Street in Sag Harbor. Church, 111 St. Arthamptons.com or 631-283-5505 CHAINE FOUNDATION Orthodox AUCTION – 7/5 – 5-8 p.m. $95 Andrews Rd., Southampton. 631- for more information. per person, to benefit national 283-6169. HAMPTON”S ANTIQUES & culinary programs. At the home of DESIGN SHOW PREVIEW Philip and Audrey Davis, 69 Scotline Dr., PARTY – 7/10 – 6-8 p.m. $25, to benefit the East Sagaponack. Chaineus.org. Hampton Day Care Learning Center. At the HALSEY HOUSE COCKTAIL GALA – 7/5 – 6-8 Bridgehampton Community House, Montauk p.m. To benefit the Southampton Historical Society. Highway at School Street, Bridgehampton. 631-537Tickets are $125 in advance, $150 at the door. At the 0333. Thomas Halsey House, 249 S. main St., Southampton. 631-283-4540. FRIDAY, 4 ARTHAMPTONS PREVIEW GALA – 7/10 – 6-9 STORE GRAND OPENING – 7/4 – 6-8 p.m. LABL, 78 Main St., Sag Harbor. 631-284-3377. Lablny.com. PERLMAN MUSIC PROGRAM – 7/4-5 – 7:30 p.m. “Works in Progress,” Located at 73 Shore Rd., Shelter Island. Perlmanmusicprogram.com. 212-8775045. DARRELL HAMMOND – 7/4-5 – 9 p.m. Preview. At Bay Street Theatre, Long Wharf, Sag Harbor. 631725-9500.

SATURDAY, 5 LOVE WITHOUT PAIN – 7/5 – 9:30 a.m.-1 p.m. $20. With Kadam Morten. At the Vajravarahi Meditation Center, 40 W. Montauk Highway, Hampton Bays. 631-728-5700. MEET THE AUTHOR – 7/5 – 11 a.m. Dan Rattiner at Bobby Van’s Restaurant, Main St., Bridgehampton. Danrattiner.com. AUTHOR READING – 7/5 – 6 p.m. Alan Furst. At Canio’s Books, 290 Main St., Sag Harbor. 631-7254926. THE NEVILLE BROTHERS – 7/5 – 8:30 p.m. At the Westhampton Beach Performing Arts Center, 76 Main St., Westhampton Beach. 631-288-2350.

SUNDAY, 6 WATERCOLOR CLASSES – 7/6 – 10 a.m.-1 p.m. and 1-4 p.m. With artist Lois Bender. $45 for three hours. At Sag Harbor Florist, 3 Bay St., Sag Harbor. 917-282-5930. BUDDHIST MEDITATION – 7/6 – 10:30-11:30 a.m. Meditations to increase mental peace and well being for everyone. Located at 40 West Montauk Hwy, Hampton Bays. 631-728-5700. PERLMAN MUSIC PROGRAM – 7/6 – 11:30 a.m. Annual Children’s Concert. At 73 Shore Rd., Shelter Island. 212-877-5045. EASTVILLE COMMUNITY HISTORICAL SOCIETY – 7/6 – An exhibit about the original Eastville families. At the Eastville Heritage House, 139 hampton St., Sag Harbor. 725-4270 or 725-9361. ART LECTURE – 7/6 – 5 p.m. Marion Wolberg Weiss. At The Fireplace Project, 851 SpringsFireplace Rd., East Hampton. BOZ SCAGGS – 7/6 – 8:30 p.m. At the Westhampton Beach Performing Arts Center, 76 Main St., Westhampton Beach. 631-288-2350. HIP-HOP VIOLINIST – 7/6 – Grammy Award winning artist, Miri Ben Ari. At the Hampton Synagogue, Westhampton Beach.

MONDAY, 7 PHILOSOPHY CLASS – 7/7– 3 p.m. With instructor Susan Pashman. Registration is required. At The Hampton Library, 2478 Main St., Bridgehampton. 631-537-0015. PIANOFEST – 7/7 – 5-7 p.m. $12, students free. At the Avram Theater, Stony Brook Southampton, 239 Montauk Highway, Southampton. 631-329-0530. OPEN STUDIO FIGURE DRAWING – 7/7 – 6-9 p.m. – Open studio Mondays. $15 per person. Located at Applied Arts, 11 Indian Wells Highway, Amagansett. 631-267-2787. 1146356

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DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 189 www.danshamptons.com

Day By Day TUESDAY, 8 BEGINNER PAINTING – 7/8 – 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Oil or Acrlyics. Every Tuesday through July 29. $80 for Southampton residents. $90 for non-residents. At the Lodge at Squiretown Park, 62 Red Creek Rd., Hampton Bays. 631-728-8585. DRAWING WORKSHOPS – 7/8 – 10 a.m.-2 p.m. and 7-9:30 p.m. Sponsored by Southampton Artists Association. Located at 2 Pond Lane at the Veterans Hall, Southampton. 631-725-5851. TUESDAY MORNING YOGA – 7/8 – 10:15 a.m. $5 per class. At the Quogue Library, 90 Quogue St., Quogue. 631-653-4224. THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE UGLY – 7/8 – 7-8 p.m. Learn about different types of fats and foods that will improve your health and help you to lose weight. At Wild by Nature Health Food Market, Hampton Bays. 516-827-6329. HAMPTON BAYS HISTORICAL SOCIETY MEETING – 7/8 – 7 p.m. Presentation on the restoration of Brecknock Hall in Greenport. At the Hampton Bays Public Library, Hampton Bays. 631728-0887. MEDITATIONS FOR A BALANCED LIFE – 7/8 – 7:30-8:45 p.m. $15. At the Yogi Shanti Yoga Center, 23 Washington St., Sag Harbor. 631-728-5700. BEYOND THERAPY – 7/8 – 8 p.m. Preview. At Bay Street Theatre, Long Wharf, Sag Harbor. 631725-9500.

THURSDAY, 10 INSTRUCTED LIFE DRAWING CLASSES – 7/10 – 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Every Thursday. At the Southampton Veterans Hall, 2 Pond Ln., Southampton. 631-725-5851. HAMPTONS GREEK FESTIVAL – 7/10 – 4-11 p.m. At the Greek Orthodox Church, 111 St. Andrews Rd., Southampton. 631-283-6169. BEACH CHAIR POETRY SERIES – 7/10 – 5 p.m. In the music room of Rogers mansion, 17 Meeting House Ln., Southampton. 631-283-2494. HAMPTONS GREEN DRINKS AND ECOFASHION SHOW – 7/10 – 6-9 p.m. $15. At Southampton Inn, 91 Hill St., Southampton. 631721-1908.

Play where the pros play.

OPEN STUDIO DARK ROOM – 7/10 – 6-9 p.m. Open studio every Thursday. $20 per person. Located at Applied Arts 11 Indian Wells Highway, Amagansett. 631-267-2787. FOOD OF LOVE – 7/10 – 6:30 p.m. An original production of Shakespeare’s most romantic scenes and songs. $15 for adults, $5 for children. At Fort Pond House, on Second House Road, Montauk. 212726-2494. HOME RENOVATION TIPS – 7/10 – 7 p.m. At Rogers Memorial Library, 91 Coopers Farm Rd., Southampton. 631-283-0774 ext. 524. MUSIC AT SOUTHAMPTON CONCERT SERIES – 7/10 – Joint concert with PianoFest, with a special performance by Christine Goerke. At Stony Brook Southampton, Montauk Highway, Southampton. Stonybrook.edu/treasures or 631-6328000.

OUTDOOR RECREATION & FITNESS SATURDAY, 5 EXERCISE HIKE – 8 a.m. Meet on Abrahams Path in western Amagansett about 2/10 of a mile north of the intersection with Town Lane in East Hampton. 631-329-1470. COOL WATERS HIKE – 9-11 a.m. Meet at Trout Pond parking lot on Noyac Road, Noyac. 631-7252888. SUNSET AND FIREWORKS – 8 p.m. Meet at the end of Napeague harbor Rd., off Rte. 27 in Napeague. End by watching the Devon Yacht Club’s fireworks display. 631-375-2339.

SUNDAY, 6 WILLIAM MULVIHILL PRESERVE – 9-11 a.m. Meet at Fair Hills Lane, off Brick Kiln Rd., 1/4 mile north of Scuttlehole Road. 631-725-5861.

KAYAK TOUR – 5:30-8 p.m. A tour of Shinnecock Bay, West End, Quogue Canal. $25 for Southampton Town residents. $35 for non-residents. 631-728-8585.

WEDNESDAY, 9 SOUTHAMPTON TRIPLE DELIGHT – 9 a.m. Nature Conservancy’s Big Woods Preserve, the pond shore and marshland views of Emma Rose Ellison Town Park and the wetland trails of Wolf Swamp Preserve. Meet at the Y intersection of

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SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS DANSHAMPTONS.COM – Check out www.danshamptons.com for everything you need to know about the Hamptons! You can also post upcoming events by visiting http://calendar.danshamptons.com/events/ DATEHAMPTON.COM – Join an exclusive online community for singles who love the Hamptons. ROSS SCHOOL COMMUNITY WORKSHOPS – 7/8 – Communication Made Simple. 7/9 – Fresh Floral Design, Flower Essences. 7/9-10 – Creativity Workshops. 7/10 – Long Term Care: What You Need to Know. At the Ross School, 18 Goodfriend Dr., East Hampton.Call 631-907-5555 for more information on these workshops or any of their ongoing courses. SEEKING VOLUNTEERS – The Wildlife Rescue Center of the Hamptons, Inc. is looking for volunteers to feed spring baby birds and mammals. You must be at least 16 and have health insurance. Call 631-728-4200 to set up an appointment. VOLUNTEERS NEEDED FOR THE RETREAT DOMESTIC VIOLENCE SERVICES – theretreatinc.org or 631-329-4398. LEIBER MUSEUM – Antique Chinese porcelains on display. Open Fridays and Saturdays, 1-4 p.m. Located at 446 Old Stone Highway, East Hampton. 212-421-4475. FITNESS WITH FIDO – Every Saturday at 9 a.m. A group walk for people and their dogs. (continued on next page)

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THURSDAY, 10 LONG POND KAYAK TOUR – 5:30-8 p.m. $25 for Southampton Town residents. $35 for non-residents. 631-728-8585.

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NATURE CHAT – 7/7 – 7:15 p.m. Followed by a program by nature photographer Cal Vornberger. At the Quogue Wildlife Refuge, 3 Old Country Rd., Quogue. 631-653-4771.

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DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 190 www.danshamptons.com

Day By Day Organized by Bideawee. Meet at the gazebo on the Village Green on Main Street in Westhampton. POOCH SOCIALS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Every Saturday from 4-6 p.m. At Little Lucyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Canine Couture Boutique, 91 Jobâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lane, Southampton. 631-287-2352. SAG HARBOR WHALING MUSEUM â&#x20AC;&#x201C; â&#x20AC;&#x153;OIL: Whales, Wellsâ&#x20AC;Ś What Next?â&#x20AC;? Open Mon.-Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sunday 1-5 p.m. 631-668-6746. SAG HARBOR FARMERS MARKET â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Open every Saturday 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Located on the east side of Marine Park, Sag Harbor. 631-725-0770. LEARN TO SURF â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Tuesday evenings, 6:15-7:45 p.m. in Hampton Bays. $400 for a four-week course. 631-723-2341. ART BARGE â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Open Monday-Friday, 9 a.m.-4

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Food of Loveâ&#x20AC;? performs Thursday At Fort Pond House, Montauk

continued from previous page

Miri Ben Ari plays Sunday at the Hampton Synagogue, Westhampton Beach. p.m. Art classes in painting, drawing, printing, ceramics and 3-D. Napeague Meadow Road, Amagansett. 631-267-3172. theartbarge.com. JOE KOZIAZ CERTIFIED 5K RUN/WALK â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Now accepting applications for the 7/19 event. $20 if you register before 6/30. Call 631-288-3337 or go to whbcc.org. FRESH AIR FUND â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Looking for volunteers to host New York City children from low-income neighborhoods this summer. Freshair.org. 800-367-0003. VOLUNTEERS NEEDED FOR USA MUSIC FESTIVAL â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Held 7/26-27 at Abbess Farm in Calverton. The festival will benefit Long Island Cares, the Harry Chapin Food Bank. 631-281-0017. BRIDGE GARDENS TRUST â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Will be open to visitors Wednesdays and Saturdays 2-4:30 p.m. 36 Mitchell Ln., Bridgehampton. 631-537-7440. PET LOSS SUPPORT GROUP â&#x20AC;&#x201C; The first Monday at 5:30 p.m. and third Saturday at 10 a.m. of every month. At Bideawee Adoption Center, 118 Old Country Rd., Westhampton. 631-325-0200. SPONSORS NEEDED â&#x20AC;&#x201C; The annual East Hampton

SandCastle contest is seeking sponsors for this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s competition. Money will benefit the Clamshell Foundation. EHSandCastle.com or 631-324-6250. RECYCLING FUNDRAISER â&#x20AC;&#x201C; New York schools and other community groups can sign up for free to earn pennies for all yogurt containers and fruit drink pouches collected. To sign up visit www. Teracycle.net/brigades. RIVERHEAD FOUNDATION â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Donate money to sponsor a marine mammal. Call 631-369-9840. VOLUNTEERS NEEDED â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Bideawee is seeking volunteers to help care for the animals. Located on 118 Old Country Road, Westhampton. 631-325-0200 ext. 113. RETIRED AND SENIOR VOLUNTEER PROGRAM â&#x20AC;&#x201C; To learn more, call 631-979-9490 or visit rsvpsuffolk.org. SUMMER SEMINAR PROGRAM AT HAMPTON SYNAGOGUE â&#x20AC;&#x201C; In conjunction with Yeshiva University. Every Tuesday, issues for the upcoming presidential election will be examined from a Jewish perspective. Call 631-288-0534 ext. 23 for more information and the schedule of events. WESTHAMPTON BEACH FARMERS MARKET â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 9 a.m.-1 p.m. every Saturday through Nov. 15. All locally grown and organic.Westhampton Beach parking lot, Mill Rd. next to the Historical Society.

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DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 191 www.danshamptons.com

Shelter

Island

Photos by Greg Burt

Historic Home Makeovers: Preserved or Hamptonized?

This Shelter Island home gets a facelift — and another floor. By Greg Burt Heights alone. If you like Shelter Island Heights the If you stand at the corner of Wesley Avenue and way it’s been for a couple of hundred years, it would not Waverly Place in historic Shelter Island Heights and be unreasonable for you to find all this a little scary. In look down the hill toward the village of Dering Harbor, a place that’s accessible only by ferry or private boat, past gingerbready old bungalows like Corner House change has of necessity come slowly to Shelter Island, and Woodbine, on down to the gracious old Chequit but the pace is accelerating. This is a place that people Inn and the town’s restored but still-quaint drugstore, have sought out precisely because its peace and quiet you’ll be looking at Shelter Island’s past – and the part and quaint old homes are part of a past they want to of its present that still belongs to the past. If you turn continue to inhabit or, at least, be able to revisit. Giving a talk to the Sag Harbor Historical Society in around and look up the hill, you’ll be looking at the 2003, Dunhill, a strong believer in preservation and Island’s new present and what some people here fear is an unwanted future, in the form of a large and old-fashioned simplicity, lamented that Shelter Island rather dramatic renovation currently in progress. was even then becoming “Hamptonized with SUVs and cell phones.” When I visited the ladies of Shelter The house has been jacked up into the air and a Island’s own Historical Society – they were all out in whole new storey added at ground level, which looks larger than the original footprint and includes a turret the barn getting ready for July 5th’s “One Day in and a couple of other new flourishes. The entire propHistory,” antiques auction – they admitted that erty, from the road up to the bluff upon which the Priscilla Dunhill’s old home had been on the verge of house stands, has been torn up and some Olympian collapse before the renovation by its new owners saved looking walls are being erected. The neighbors are not it. pleased. The owners of the first house in question – the one And this isn’t the only one. Just up the road, a house with those imposing walls – declined to comment, as that used to belong to Priscilla Dunhill, the author of did the builder who pleaded client confidentiality, but “An Island Sheltered,” is likewise undergoing a major, he did say that the architect had taken pains to preif not quite so dramatic, renovation. There are curserve the character of the old house and setting in the rently four major house renovations in progress in the new plans. One person I spoke with who’s seen those

plans said it was “going to be beautiful when it’s finished.” Apparently, this is not the first house in the Heights this particular family has renovated. They also restored the so-called “Leaning Tower House,” and went so far in the name of preservation as to hire an engineer to devise a way to preserve the tower’s lean, while keeping it from falling down. He did this by installing, at no small cost, an interior sleeve which made the structure hurricane proof – and as permanent as it’s possible to make a building that’s leaning over. This doesn’t sound like people who are out to wreck the place. Julie Ben-Susan, General Manager of the Shelter Island Heights Property Owner’s Association, was hesitant to comment because feelings have been running high in the neighborhood and she didn’t want to fan the flames. Ben-Susan did point out, though, that these historic homes are being saved when they could just as easily have been bulldozed to make way for McMansions. The Island has fairly strict rules about what it will allow, and as an historic district, the Heights adds another layer on top of that. Nonetheless, every one of these projects had to pass muster in order to get a permit. “We recognize that we have to grow with the times,” Ben-Susan said, “but we still do everything within our power to preserve the character and charm of the Heights.” This story isn’t over, but if there’s a moral to be derived from it at this stage, it may be that if you want things to stay the same, you might have to put up with a little change.

Former home of Priscilla Dunhill, author of A n Island Sheltered.

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DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 192 www.danshamptons.com

Shelter Island

Vine Street 41 South Ferry Road Shelter Island, NY 631-749-3210

Beth Troy

By Susan Galardi There’s a strategy among some food writers reviewing restaurants in the local community: If the food’s not good, talk about the decor and the service. I will not be talking about decor or service in this review of the Vine Street Café (although both were lovely). As a foodie, I have my own litmus test for restaurants. Sure, when you’re sitting there having your courses, which are never inexpensive on the East End, and chatting with a friend, it’s easy to comment that the food is, “kind of interesting,” as you move it around on your plate. No one wants to admit to a bad dining experience when you’re finally at a table being served. But the morning after brings the soul searching question: “Would I ever go back to that restaurant?” I didn’t ask myself that the day after dining at Vine Street. Instead, I strategized, “How soon can I get back there to have that whole roasted branzino again?” Two weeks after my visit, I can still summon the flavors of that delicate sea bass, infused with rosemary, served atop braised, almost carmelized, fennel – god help me! This was one of many dishes we sampled at Vine Street filled with flavors that dance in the mouth – from the crispy soft shelled crab with a coating of spices nodding to classic, spicy crab seasoning, served with an organic canteloupe gazpacho sauce, to the strawberry shortcake that evoked Norman Rockwell Americana. I could almost hear an Aaron Copland symphony as I ate. It’s the Central Casting

version of the dessert, exactly what you hope for: a barely sweet, crumbly, buttery cake – almost a shortbread – perfect strawberries in a simple sauce made from perfect strawberries, topped with freshly whipped cream. Now in its sixth year on Shelter Island, Vine Street is the labor of love of Lisa and Terry Harwood, who met at New York’s Union Square Cafe. Lisa is a Culinary Arts Institute trained chef who did her externship in pastries at Lutece. Terry came up through the ranks of the business, eschewing formal education for time at the stove, working

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in seafood restaurants in Chattanooga, before doing stints in New York and traveling to Tunisa and Italy to cook. The two produce dishes that are delicate and deliberate. It’s quickly apparent that every ingredient – down to the olive oil – has been carefully chosen. Much of this is a result of the owners’ refined palates and skill, and an obvious commitment to the highest quality. Terry is on top of the seafood and beef industry, spending a lot of time with purveyors to find the best choices on the market. The Black Angus strip steak with bordelaise was a case in point. The exquisite flavor and texture of the meat was graced by a silken sauce. If I wasn’t raised better, I’d have licked the plate. Same with the seafood. Quality all the way, from the velvety grilled scallop with summer succotash that popped with flavor, to the miso glazed salmon with perfect char marks and inspiring accompaniment of bok choy and mushrooms. It’s rare that a restaurant does everything well – meat, seafood, veggies – but Vine Street does. The beet salad, for example, was a spring song of texture, flavor and color. Vine Street is literally three minutes from the Shelter Island south ferry landing, but eons away from the South Fork insanity. The serene ferry ride gives way to a short drive on a verdant stretch of road, and there you are at the vine arbor. The decor is simply elegant. There are no paintings on the walls, just lovely, twiggy sconces. The food is clearly the focal point. Deservedly so. It holds up under scrutiny.

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 193 www.danshamptons.com

Shelter Island

Sparkle On “Woman sues Victoria’s Secret claiming thong injury” Fri. Jun. 20, 2008 AP: A woman who says she was hurt by her thong panties when a metal clip flew off and hit her in the eye has sued Victoria’s Secret, saying in a TV interview on Thursday that the injury caused her “excruciating pain.’” In a secret room in the basement of the Shelter Island Police Department, Officer John Smith conducts an interview: “Now Ms. Flynn, we’ve talked to you about this before. Shelter Island is upgrading its image. Property taxes are skyrocketing to force the middle class people to sell out, and we are moving towards a population of millionaires and the people who serve them. People like you have to stop embarrassing the Island or leave. Now, where did you get this thong?” “I bought it online. I thought I’d get myself something sexy for my birthday last year. I put it on, and then it disappeared.” “What do you mean, ‘disappeared?’” “I don’t know. I put it on and it was gone until last week. I bent over to pick something up and — boing! The thong reappeared and a metal clip shot out and tried to kill me.” “First, you’re going to drop the lawsuit against Victoria’s Secret. And next, you’re going to sign this statement agreeing never to purchase a thong again. We’ve added a few other limits for you, as well.” “Wow, this is a long list.” “It may appear long to you, Ms. Flynn, but the town board has approved it.” “Let’s see, no tank tops, nothing sleeveless, no shorts, no sheer clothing, no thongs, no two-piece bathing suits, no belly shirts, no spandex clothing at all. Oh, c’mon, all my clothes will be boring now!” “Not necessarily. We’ve eased the restrictions for you on sequins and sparkly things. You have a sequin limit for evening attire so you don’t catch too much light and interfere with planes landing at Kleniwicus International.” “Do the other women on the Island have to abide by all this?” “Well, you’re our test case, but we’re going to implement a program whereby the closer you are to your correct height and weight ratio, the more clothing options you will be allowed.” “I’m height/weight proportionate...” “For an Orca, yes, but we are using a human scale for people.” “Geez, I didn’t know you guys would be this strict. So, can I wear my top with the sequined regatta on it?” “Only during the day. You’re limited to one ship on your chest at night.” “My bright yellow pants?” “Someone should have taken those away from you a long time ago. No bright yellow pants over size 12 will be worn on Shelter Island.” “If I dress by these guidelines, people will think I’m slipping into good taste. My image of being one of Shelter Island’s sparkly gals will be lost.” “Don’t worry about that. You are one of Shelter Island’s official characters. We have all learned to tolerate your big mouth, like Roseanne Barr or Lisa Lampenelli.”

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“But I’m not like them, they’re loud and annoying.” “If the thong fits...” “What about the men on Shelter Island? Lots of them should have limits on their appearance.” “What are you talking about? All the men on Shelter Island are handsome and fit. Each and every one of us deserves a Miss November.” “The Miss Novembers of the world are dating corporate executives, not the regular Joes on Shelter Island.” “True. That’s what I hate about beautiful women. They think their beauty entitles them to everything. They’ll marry the ugliest men just for money. Look at Donald Trump — beautiful women line up to

marry him. His current wife wouldn’t have looked at him twice if he didn’t have any money.” “And he wouldn’t have looked at her once if she didn’t look like that. So he’s just as shallow as she is.” “I think your logic is flawed.” “My logic is perfect. You, like every other man, think you rate a Miss November, regardless of how you look or what you can offer.” “Just sign the form, Ms. Flynn.” “And if I refuse?” “You’ll lose your sequin privileges.” “Damn, you got me between a sparkle and a rhinestone.”

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 194 www.danshamptons.com

Dan’s North Fork

Over The Barrel... with Lenn Thompson

The New York City Wine Market New York City is perhaps the world’s most important wine market. It is also the most competitive. So, it only stands to reason that Long Island wine country’s proximity to the market is both a plus and a minus. Most local winery owners focus on the advantages, which make for a better story. After all, didn’t Sinatra sing, about New York City “If I can make it there, I’ll make it anywhere.” Well, it’s a nice theory, but the Chairman of the Board won’t be remembered for his wine marketing acumen. So far, only a handful of producers have been able to infiltrate New York City restaurants lists — places like Wolffer Estate, Channing Daughters Winery, Paumanok Vineyards, Lieb Cellars and Schneider Vineyard (not a completely list by any means). It takes a lot of hard work pounding the pavement and a fair amount of money to gain traction in the vaunted NYC market. To date, there hasn’t been a concerted, or at least effective, effort on the part of the region as a whole to market its wines in New York City. As such—and unfortunately—the average New Yorker doesn’t think much of Long Island wines. Because the wines are so scarce, they’ve probably only tasted one or wines—and probably not from a top producer. New Yorkers can be a judgmental lot, so they are more than willing to write off an entire region based on one or two bottles of thing, vegetal merlot or a watery, woody chardonnay. Is that a bit like judging all of California wine based on Sutter Home White Zinfandel? Maybe, but in a city filled with endless wine options, New Yorkers can afford to be particular. There are

always different (and often cheaper) wines available—usually less than a block away. But, I think if Long Island wineries can get their better and best wines, many of which are in fact values, in front of more New Yorkers, they can start to turn the regions NYC reputation around I think. And $200,000 that New York State Senator Kenneth P. LaValle assigned to the 2008-2009 New York State budget specifically allocated for marketing Long Island wines in New York City should

help. But only if it is used well. As of this writing, specifics about what programs they plan to invest the money in aren’t available, but the grant will be administered by the New York Wine & Grape Foundation and will focus on four ideas outlined by the Long Island Wine Council: awareness building, media outreach, restaurant outreach/direct marketing, and marketing analysis and education. According to a press release I got this week about the news: The goal of this initiative and the focus of the strategies are to generate wholesale opportunities in restaurants and retail stores in the New York City market. Ideally, the project will not only result in new sales over the course of the (one year) initiative, but will also lay the groundwork for sustained, longer-term interest and demand on the basis of a new understanding of the quality and consistency of our region’s products, as well as new relationships formed between wineries and sales targets. I, for one, will be watching this closely to see what programs and strategies the region comes up with. This would seem to be well timed considering the continuing and swelling “local” movement. Maybe this will be a perfect storm of funding, programming and audience. Maybe it will be another costly flop of a tax-supported program. With so many wineries involved, making different kinds (levels of quality) and with so many strong personalities (egos) involved the LIWC and NYWGF will have their hands full trying to focus members on common goals and action plans.

North Fork Events FRIDAY, JULY 4 PERLMAN MUSIC PROGRAM- 7:30 p.m.: Works in progress concerts at Perlman Music Program campus, 73 Shore Rd., Shelter Island. Sunday, July 6, 11:30 a.m.— Annual Children’s Concert. Call same day to confirm. 631749-0740, 631-877-5045, perlmanmusicprogram.org. RIVERHEAD SUMMER CONCERT SERIES- 7:30 p.m.: Riverhead Summer Concert Series at East End Arts & Humanities Council property features Who Are Those Guys? performing rock and blues. Sponsored by Cliff’s Rondezvous and Peter Danowski. Rain location: Pulaski Street School. Free. 631-727-1215.

SATURDAY, JULY 5 STREET CLEANUP IN GREENPORT- 10:30 a.m.noon: North Street cleanup in Greenport with Group For the East End; help restore Silver Lake area. Bring gloves; meet at east end of North Street Extension. Collection bags provided. 631-537-1400, ext. 12, jsamuelson@eastendenviron-

The

BEST BEST 2006

Restaurant at

OF THE

Est. 1930

German & Italian Specialties

Shrimp Scampi Authentic Sauerbraten known to Melt in your Mouth!

Veal Franchaise Open 7 Days a week for lunch and dinner

Main Road • Mattituck (631) 298-8311 Across from the Mattituck Movie Theater

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1st Place Winner “Best Chili” 2006 & 2007

ment.org. HOMEGROWN STRING BAND AT CUSTER- 8 p.m.: Concert by Homegrown String Band at Custer Institute and Observatory, Southold. Tickets: $15; members, $13. 631-7652626, custerdonna@yahoo.com. 44TH ANNUAL ANTIQUES SHOW- 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m.: Cutchogue-New Suffolk Historical Council’s 44th annual antique show and sale with 78 dealers, snack bar and homemade baked goods. Rain or shine. Village Green, Main Road, Cutchogue. Admission, $5; early birds (7:30-9 a.m.), $10. Information: Janet Healy, 631-734-2608, cutchoguenewsuffolkhistory.org. ARTS AND CRAFTS SALE- 10 a.m.-5 p.m.: Arts and crafts snow fence show and sale at Old Town Art & Crafts Guild, Main Road, Cutchogue, features local artists and original crafts. 631-734-6382, oldtownguild.com. 9 a.m.-4 p.m.: Lawn sale on Mattituck-Laurel Historical Society museum grounds, Main Road and Cardinal Lane, Mattituck. $1 admission fee benefits museums’ upkeep. North Fork Animal League brings puppies and kittens to adopt. Rain date Sunday, July 6. mlhistoricalsociety.org, 631298-5248. WINE PRESS CONCERT- 6 p.m. check out the Wine Press Concert: Swingtime Big Band performs original arrangements of popular standards under tent at Martha Clara Vineyards, Sound Avenue, Riverhead. Tickets: $20. Purchase at East End Arts Council, 631-727-0900, or at gate; season pass: $80. Bring lawn chair or blanket; picnics encouraged; no outside wine or other alcohol permitted. eastendarts.org. HALLOCKVILLE MUSEUM FARM- 10 a.m.-4 p.m.: L.I. Antique Power Association’s annual tractor pull and antique farm machinery show at Hallockville Museum Farm, 6038 Sound Ave., Riverhead. Fee. 631-298-5292. hallockville.com. PERLMAN MUSIC PROGRAM- 7:30 p.m.: Works in progress concerts at Perlman Music Program campus, 73 Shore Rd., Shelter Island. Sunday, July 6, 11:30 a.m.— Annual Children’s Concert. Call same day to confirm. 631749-0740, 631-877-5045, perlmanmusicprogram.org.

SUNDAY, JULY 6 BREAKFAST WITH THE KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS- 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m.: Breakfast buffet at Knights of Columbus, Depot Lane, Cutchogue; all you can eat. Adults, $8; children, $4. 631-734-7338. ANNUAL TRACTOR PULL- 10 a.m.-4 p.m.: L.I. Antique Power Association’s annual tractor pull and antique farm machinery show at Hallockville Museum Farm, 6038 Sound Ave., Riverhead. Fee. 631-298-5292. hallockville.com. CUTCHOGUE LIONS CLUB CLASSIC CAR SHOW- 9 a.m.-4 p.m.: Cutchogue Lions Club’s Classic Car Show charity fundraiser, Capital One Bank Operations Center, Main Road, Mattituck. Over 250 antique, classic, foreign, domestic and “muscle” cars dating from 1905-1982. Ample free parking, refreshments, rest rooms. Adults, $5; under 12, free. Car registration fees: before event, $15; at gate, $20. Includes car, driver and one passenger. Forty trophies awarded. Forms available on Web site. John Hofer, 631-765-6262, cutchoguelions@optonline.net, cutchoguelions.org.

ONGOING EVENTS HEALTHY COOKING MADE QUICK & EASY – The second Friday of every month, a Quick and Easy Healthy Cooking demonstration is being offered. The demo will be done by Dr. Russ L’HommeDieu, DPT; a certified Wellness Coach – who has himself, maintained an over 200 pound weight loss for the last four years. Call to reserve your spot! 888-446-7764. REIKI CIRCLES- Reiki Circles Monday Nights @ Grace Episcopal Church Last Monday of the month, meetings are held at Peconic Bay Medical Center. For more Information, contact Ellen J. McCabe at (631) 727-2072 SKATEBOARDING – Great skate park in Greenport offering ramps and a half pipe. Call 631-477-2385 for hours. INDIAN MUSEUM – In Southold, open Sundays from 1:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Call 631-765-5577. CUSTER OBSERVATORY– Weather permitting Custer staff will be on hand to assist visitors in observing the night sky using their telescopes. From sunset until midnight in Southold. Call 631-765-2626.

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 195 www.danshamptons.com

The North Fork Is In Love With Bedell Former CEO Of New Line Cinema Starts A Vineyard And Makes History In The Wine World as Cindy Sherman, Sam Taylor Wood, Uta Barth, and Sarah Morris; all are from Lynne’s private collection. Live music will go on beginning in the afternoon til dark each Saturday and Sunday on the tasting pavilion throughout the summer months for the patron’s pleasure. Bedell encourages wine tasters to bring their own food and enjoy it out on the pavilion with them, although cheeses, crackers, and the like are available for purchase. Bedell’s commitment to quality and satisfaction begins with its staff. Winemaker Kelly Urbanik, originally of Napa, is the first female winemaker on Long Island. Additionally, Bedellhas taken on Pascal Marty as Consulting Oenologist, formerly of Chateau Mouton-Rothschild and Opus One. Mr. Silver was brought in from the Four Seasons Hotel group, and brings service and style “a la Four Seasons”, as he likes to say. Michael Lynne, Producer of the Lord of the Rings trilogy, has made considerable investment in time, equipment and people towards making Bedell a first class, cutting edge winery. Bedell, recently rated in the top 25 tasting rooms in the United States by Wine

Enthusiast Magazine, may enjoy an international reputation but they prefer to keep things personal, catering to each individual who comes through their doors. Additionally, Bedell offers a Wine Club membership which among other benefits includes 3 to 6 bottles shipped to your door every other month. Every member, of which there are several hundred including many high profile personalities, receives consistent personal attention and are never told a certain wine is out of stock even if it remains unavailable for restaurants, wholesale, and non-members. It is the perfect way to keep connected with Bedell’s new favorites and old classics. You will be doing yourself a great disservice is you pass up on the majesty that is Bedell Vineyards. Also visit Bedell’s sister vineyard, Corey Creek, just a mile down the road from Bedell’s Cuthogue location. Bedell will keep you coming back, so enjoy the finest the North Fork has to offer. For more information on hours, bands, or booking tastings please call (631)-734-7537. For information on Bedell’s Wine Club Membership, e-mail James Silver at Jim@BedellCellars.com. -Henry J. Salmaggi

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In 1980, Kip Bedell drove his grandfather’s 1951 fire engine red Ford pick-up down an old potato field in Cutchogue and planted by hand what would become Bedell Vineyard’s first crop of wine grapes. By 1985 the first wine was bottled and ready to sell and the vineyard has never for a moment looked back. Bedell’s original 7 acre plot, now over 70, has become one of the premier vineyards in the nation and a star here on Long Island. Bedell, now owned by Michael Lynne, former CEO of New Line Cinema, is internationally known for the quality of their wines. What most do not know however, is just what it takes to make an award winning vintage. “This is a very complex business,” says James Silver, Senior Vice President of Sales and Marketing, “people tend to oversimplify the process.” It all begins in the field; which one can view in its entirety from the third floor of Bedell’s tasting room. The vines require little nutrients from the soil because they root so deeply, up to 20 feet, and bear such small fruit. Long Island is mostly well-drained sand, with very little top soil. Vines are extremely delicate and must be tended to constantly. Bedell’s harvesting team, led by vineyard manager Dave Thompson, is a mix of German machinery and manpower; grapes intended for the high end wine are picked by hand to ensure the quality. The situation of the land is such that a constant breeze flows thru the vineyard, serving to keep the grapes dry after a rain and eliminating the ever-present threat of mold. Bedell’s wines are a result of mixing several versions of a single wine or combinations of multiple types to create a unique and magnificent taste. This philosophy of mixing has been adopted elsewhere but few have perfected the process as well as Bedell. “People say ‘I love your Merlot’ and I tell them ‘You don’t even know our Merlot!’” Mr. Silver says with a smile, “There are hundreds of variations of Bedell Merlot that must be mixed together to create a single vintage.” After the grapes are harvested they are given to the winemaker and begin their transformation in Bedell’s state-of-the-art open top fermenting tanks. Some wine will be placed in French oak barrels while others will go one to stainless steel holding tanks. The American trend is leaning toward “non-oaky” wine, which Bedell has mastered with the likes of their First Crush White and First Crush Red, free of any oak aging. No detail is overlooked as even the bottling process is given great care. The Taste White and Taste Red labels feature original artwork from Barbera Kruger, created especially for Bedell. The Muséé label is an original daguerreotype of Merlot grapes from Bedell Vineyards created by Chuck Close exclusively for this label. Bedell also uses natural corks, the longest possible, as well as a nitrogen closing process so that when you open a bottle at a later date it will still taste exactly as intended. If you come to Bedell for the wine, you will stay for the atmosphere. The buildings and grounds are so tastefully kept it is in a word, breathtaking. Old meets new as the tasting room and adjoining open air tasting pavilion have been renovated from a potato barn originally built in 1919. The interior has a very postmodern feel yet without a hint of tacky. The walls are adorned with original works from artistic giants such

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 196 www.danshamptons.com

Dan’s North Fork

North Forkers Reflect On The Special Flags In Their Life

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By Phyllis Lombardi Keep your eye on it. Especially this weekend, this Fourth of July weekend. Our grand old flag will be flying high all over the place. Fourth of July. What an old glory time of year. A season of warmth and promise. Much like what our flag represents. Now I imagine most Americans have a flag story. A flag folded carefully and presented to a grieving parent. A flag passing in review, held upright by a Boy Scout son, a Girl Scout daughter. A 9-11 flag. There have been several special flags in my life. Memorable all. But especially a tiny American flag clutched by a chubby three-yearold. Our children are all adopted and our

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Come Enjoy 4th of July Fireworks From Our Deck

Chowder Pot Pub Come Join us for our 30th Year serving the finest seafood and a large selection of local wines on the Boardwalk Bar overlooking the harbor Open Thursday & Friday @ 5 Sat - Sun Noon Featuring Live Music

Entertainment Schedule Friday - Alan St John Saturday - The Contractors Sunday -Capt Don & The Toucan Band

Restaurant Open 7 days Weekdays Noon to 10pm • Weekends Noon to 11pm

102 3rd Street, Greenport • 631.477.1345 Next to the Shelter Island Ferry

youngest son was not born in this country. From Toronto, Canada, he had to be registered each year as an alien until that day we brought him to Riverhead, to the courthouse, where he was granted United States citizenship. All kinds of candidates for citizenship were in the courthouse that day. Other youngsters, of course, but many older people, too. People who’d worked and prayed their way to citizenship and whose emotions showed in smiles and tears. When the ceremony was over, there were congratulations all around. Then the judge presented each new American with a small, very small, American flag. But it was a big, very big, gift. In our family’s case, for weeks our little son walked around our home singing “Nited States of Merica.” Over and over again. His parents hear that song still. On this North Fork there are others who remember special flag-occasions. Southold’s Irene Stewart has a little-boy story, too. Irene works at Arcade Department Store in Greenport. One day a two-year-old boy, in a stroller pushed by his mother, spotted an American flag just inside Arcade’s front door. He gestured toward the flag and his screams were so loud that other customers, and Irene, came to attention. The embarrassed mom bought the small flag and gave it to her son, now quiet and happy. Mom explained to Irene that this child just loved American flags and that there was at least a dozen of them displayed in her son’s bedroom. I like to think the little boy is on to something. Why not acknowledge what we love? Maybe even shout it out. Irene didn’t get the child’s name. I hope it’s Everyboy. Then there’s Peter Schmidt. He owns, and has read, hundreds of books about our nation’s history and he flies our flag proudly. He has tucked away, in a cedar chest in his Cutchogue home, a 48-star flag he flew for decades way back when he lived in Baldwin. “I just can’t part with it” said Peter. I think I understand. The 48 stars were part of Peter’s childhood, his young manhood. And they are part of our country’s history. We are 50 stars now but I suspect the starlight is no brighter than the radiance from the 13 original stars. So keep that 48-star flag, Peter. Let your grandson, Andy, hold it. He will know what was once – and what can be. In another Cutchogue home is displayed a very special American flag. Flown in Iraq, it now is cherished by Stan and Bobbi Rubenstein. They were given the flag by their son-in-law, a helicopter pilot. Geoff Boehm is married to the Rubenstein’s oldest daughter, Sharon. Geoff is a member of the National Guard – out of Otis Air Force Base in Massachusetts. On August 15, 2006, the flag “flew” in a helicopter to Tallil, Iraq. Custom has it that upon return to the home base, the flag is flown for a period of time. In this case, home base for Geoff was Camp Buehring in Kuwait. There the flag flew and when Geoff returned to the U.S. he presented it to Stan and Bobbi. They have a treasure, I think, in both the flag and their sonin-law. But it is our treasure, too, yours and mine. On a lighter note, I’ll reveal that Geoff frequently soars right over the North Fork. He flies training missions out of Otis and claims he’s often flown over the Rubenstein’s home. Look carefully, Geoff. We’re down here waving and saluting. While the North Fork is special in so many ways, when it comes to our American flag, our little piece of Long Island is no different from the rest of the country. From the Pacific to our Atlantic. Every heart beats true.

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 197 www.danshamptons.com

Dan’s North Fork

North Fork Dining Log Sipping tequilas, single-malt scotches & over 200 craft beers. Open 7 days a week, year-round for lunch and dinner. 835 First Street, New Suffolk. 631-734-5123 Old Mill Inn- Built in 1820 and tucked into an unspoiled corner of the North Fork, The Old Mill Inn continues to delight customers in search of great waterfront dining. In the heart of wine country, this destination restaurant showcases seasonal ingredients sourced from local farms and waters. The Old Mill is the first (and only) certified Green restaurant in Long Island. Join us for our Summer Sunset Cruise & Dinner every wednesday and our June concert series on Fridays. We welcome private functions. Call for hours and directions and to hear about our daily fish specials. 631-298-8080, or check www.theoldmillinn.net for details Parto’s – Italian restaurant, pizzeria, caféé. Frank Spatola invites you to enjoy a real taste of Italy. Old-style, rural Tuscan atmosphere. Appetizers, soups, salads, pastas, entrees, seafood, dessert, coffee. Open Mon.-Thurs. 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Fri.-Sat. 11 a.m.-10:30 p.m. Sun. 12-9 p.m. Visit www.partosrestaurant.com. Located at 12 West Main Street, 100 yards west of Atlantis Marine World, Riverhead. Call 631-727-4828. Porto Bello- An elegant restaurant, Porto Bello operates in the genuine European style of hospitality. The menu is all-Italian and offers something for everyone pasta, veal chicken and seafood. There are homemade Italian desserts, and a extensive wine list. Early bird specials; off premise catering; take out is available. 1410

Chowder Pot Pub Boardwalk Bar On the Boardwalk Overlooking the Harbor Hours Weekdays 5-10pm Weekends Noon til 11pm 4th Of July Weekend Friday - Alan St John Saturday - The Contractors Sunday - Capt. Don and Toucan Band 102 3rd Street, Greenport • 631.477.1345 1143424 Next to the Shelter Island Ferry

Manhanset Avenue at Brewers Stirling Harbor Marina 631-477-1515 Stonewalls- Stonewalls is the perfect compliment to the superb “Woods” golf course. Quality food with a picturesque setting, the ideal place for any occasion. Offering a complete menu, Prix Fixes and Sunday Brunch. 967 Reeves Ave. Riverhead. 631-506-0777. www.stonewallsrestaurant.com The Restaurant at Four Doors Down- Provides a warm and welcoming country atmosphere specializing in authentic Italian, German and continental cuisine. Well known for great food and reasonable prices. Private party room is perfect for special functions. Main Road, Mattituck (across from the Walbaum’s Shopping Center) 631-2988311. A Touch of Venice- A Touch of Venice offers fine dining in a casual waterfront setting. Our cuisine is prepared with fresh local produce and seafood, and Italian specialties. We have a large wine list with an emphasis on Long Island and regional Italian wines. Located in the Mat-aMar Marina (come by boat). 631-298-5851. 2255 Wickham Ave., Mattituck. www.touchofvenice.com. Tweed’s Restaurant and Buffalo Bar – Oldest restaurant & hotel on the North Fork. Famous for their buffalo steaks. Open seven days: lunch & dinner, 11 a.m. closing. Live jazz & blues. Call for reservations. Located at the famous J.J. Sullivan Hotel, 17 E. Main St., Riverhead. 631-208-3151.

GENE & THE LONE SHARKS TWO! Fourth of July @ 10 PM...Don’t miss it!!!

& er e n n Di Cruis ED YW ER V E

THE OLD MILL INN

GOOD FOOD, LOCAL WINES & A TOUCH OF OLD LONG ISLAND

631-298-8080 + 5775 West Mill Road, Mattituck + Call for directions + W W W. T H E O L D M I L L I N N . N E T

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The Bayview Inn and Restaurant- Located in South Jamesport boasts a charming country inn setting for delicious lunches and dinners featuring the best and freshest local ingredients. 631-722-2659. Blackwell’s- This wonderful steakhouse in Wading River serves amazing appetizers such as the Carpaccio of Beef with shaved truffles and Frisee salad or the Great Rock Chopped Salad. They also offer, besides the world’s greatest cuts of steak, an excellent choice of fish and seafood. A great spot to enjoy the good life after a game of golf. They also offer catering. Blackwell’s is a fixture in its class. Located in Wading River. 631-929-1800 or visit www.blackwellsrestaurant.com Buoy One – Fresh seafood market, dining room and take-out. Voted “Best of the Best Seafood” in 2005 and 2006. Open Mon.-Thurs. 10 a.m.-10 p.m. Fri.-Sat. 10 a.m.11 p.m. Sun. 10 a.m.-10 p.m. Located at 1175 West Main Street, Riverhead. Call 631-208-9737. Chowder Pot Pub - A Greenport tradition for almost 30 Years, featuring the North Fork’s best steaks, prime rib and seafood. Spectacular views of the Harbor from the Boardwalk Bar and the outside deck add to your dining experience. Live entertainment Saturday night and Sunday afternoon. Open 7 Days Lunch and Dinner. 102 3rd Street, Greenport 631-477-1345. Cooperage Inn - Baiting Hollow, the gateway to the North Fork! Casual Country Dining in a cozy, relaxed atmosphere featuring local wines and produce. Summer lobster clambake feast, Winter Friday Night buffet, murder mystery dinner theatres, wine dinners. Outdoor Huge Fall Festival Celebration. Serving Lunch-Dinner daily and our Grand Sunday Country Buffet brunch, generous portions of “good down home cooking” at its finest!!! email: info@cooperageinn.com or visit our web site for details www.cooperageinn.com. The Jamesport Manor Inn- Experience North Fork History and unprecedented local cuisine in the magnificently reconstructed 1850’s Gothic Revival Mansion. New American Cuisine with a Mediterranean flair, expertly prepared, each dish is infused with excitement, sophistication and pure artistry. Menu is complemented by an extensive wine list, carefully selected, featuring wines from the east and west coasts, the Mediterranean and down under. Serving Lunch and Dinner daily. Private parties accommodated. Located at 370 Manor Lane, Jamesport. 631-722-0500, email inn@jamesportmanor.com or visit www.jamesportmanor.com. Legends- Sophisticated new American dishes prepared by an imaginative chef. Eclectic menu with some Asian influences. Zagat-rated! Down by the water in quaint historic New Suffolk. Heart of North Fork’s wine country.

Lunch & Dinner + Open Wed - Mon

A Touch of Venice Restaurant fine water view dining

Fine North Fork Cuisine prepared with Italian soul

“Where chefs put “local” into culinary delights” Joanne Starkey - NY Times - 08/19/07 Y GOOD Rated VERY

Lunch h

Threee Coursee Prixx Fixe Monday through Saturday - $20 per person

Water view and patio dining

Sundayy Brunch h

“Along with the local bounty, A Touch of Venice offers white tablecloth dining with views of bobbing boats and spectacular sunsets” Rated - very good - NY times

Alaa Cartee Menu Service beginning at 11:30

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DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 198 www.danshamptons.com

Dan’s North Fork

North Fork High School Kids Are Financial Wizards By Phyllis Lombardi I’ll tell you that I do save money on yogurt. I buy it only when it’s on sale. So help me, there are more than 20 containers of coffee yogurt in my refrigerator right now. A certain supermarket checker must think I’m crazy. If I spend all my money on yogurt, who will pay my oil bill? Maybe Mr. Dannon? Probably not. But fortunately there’s help in handling money right in Riverhead. And I don’t even have to go to a bank. Four Riverhead High School (just graduated) students can help. Gosh, are they smart. I’ll tell you their names. Josh Berezny, Tony Fata, Frank Greenwood, Monica James. I decided to consult with them right away – before

the federal government got wind of their skills and brought them down to D.C. to help out. Then the students wouldn’t have any time for needy North Forkers. Here’s what the students did (with some guidance from Riverhead High School Economics teacher, Scott McKillop). The young people took first place among Long Island schools participating in The Stock Market Game. That’s a national contest in which students invest an imaginary $100,000 over a 10-week period. Our Riverhead students worked their way up to over $159,000! Not bad. Coming in second on Long Island was a Nassau County high school with $13,000 less than our guys. Now generally I’m a bit intimidated by the smart-

money people. I still confuse IRA with IRS. But I managed to compose myself and actually talked with Mr. McKillop. I think it’s OK if I call him Scott. And I talked with Frank Greenwood, too. Both Scott and Frank seemed to overlook my fiscal deficiencies. Scott has taught at RHS for 19 years. Mainly Economics. You don’t have to ask him if he likes his job. You know he does, just by listening to him. There was almost parental pride in his voice as he told me how hard his “kids” worked. He said the students “unloaded poor performers and reevaluated their positions.” Scott was talking about stocks, of course. But in a way I think he was talking about life lessons. We all need to reevaluate – just about everything. And Scott told me about the celebratory luncheon, held for Long Island winners, at Dave and Buster’s restaurant in Farmingdale. Certificates and cash prizes were awarded to winners. RHS principal David Zimbler went to the luncheon, too. How proud he must have been of his school, his staff, his students. Now the aforementioned Frank Greenwood is one of those RHS students. I’ve gotten better at math as I’ve aged so I divided $159,000 by four students. That means Frank made almost $40,000 in ten weeks. At that rate, give him a year of imaginary money and he’d have more that $200,000. Why, there’s no stopping Frank. Our young financier said he learned much from The Stock Market Game. For instance, you can start small with money or just about anything and grow big. And sometimes a risk or two is advisable. Frank said his family was surprised how quickly the money grew. He was, too. Frank’s immediate plans? To stay in Riverhead and attend Suffolk County Community College Culinary Arts School. He hopes to teach in that field and also have his own catering business. He’s off to a good start, cooking dinner for his family at least once a week. And he’s got his own super, secret barbeque sauce. Good luck, Frank. Well, there you have it. A crash course on money management and what to do with that $100,000 sitting in your checking account. Just go to that outstanding Riverhead firm of Berezny, Fata, Greenwood, James and start raking in the cash. Who knows? You might do so well that in a couple of months you’ll drive right up to your local gas station and say, quite casually, “Fill ’er up.” 1145719

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 199 www.danshamptons.com

Dan’s North Fork

Feel Like Partying With The Stars? By Phyllis Lombardi Wouldn’t you go? I mean, the invitation read “Annual Star Party.” Well, it wasn’t exactly an invitation. More of an announcement in a local paper but there was no charge and it began early – at dusk. A star party. One of my all-time favorite stars is Gregory Peck. I knew he couldn’t come to the party so maybe the star would be Harrison Indiana Jones Ford. That wouldn’t be bad. Makes sense, too. He’s young - only in his sixties - and he’s got a new movie out. Mr. Indiana’s been to the North Fork before so he wouldn’t get lost. Once he made a movie in Greenport with Brad Pitt. Maybe Brad would come to the star party, too. What to wear was no problem for me. I have everyday jeans from a Southold thrift shop and a pair of dressy jeans I bought from L.L. Bean when we camped in Maine in the 1990s. They still look good because I save them for events like star parties. And I just got a new T-shirt from Southold’s Relay for Life so I was set. (Sometimes I see famous people all dressed up. Their pictures are in Dan’s Papers. I bet they have lots of star parties on the South Fork.) As I mentioned, the party began at dusk. That’s a good time for me. I never went to a party that began after 8 p.m. except for one after a prom in an earlier century. I drove alone to the Southold party. Even dusk is too late for my husband. The address was 1115 Main Bayview Road in Southold A nice area. But the invitation also said “weather permitting.” I thought that was strange. After everything Mr.

Indiana has faced, I didn’t think he’d mind a little rain. Besides, he’s got that big hat. So it was I came to Southold’s Custer Institute and Observatory, the party site. I got there at least an hour before dusk yet there were cars all over the place. And all the time I thought stars arrived fashionably late! At the Custer Institute front door I heard some guys talking about Vega. Was this another Hollywood starlet I’d never heard of? I was about to inquire when I saw a telescope, then another, and another. Of course! This was a star party but not that kind of star. This was a party to celebrate the heavens. In the sweetest spot this side of heaven – the North Fork. In a year in which the United States will not elect its first female president, let me introduce you to Donna McCormick, Custer’s first female president (and the place has been around for more than 80 years). Donna told me the Southold property came to the Institute by way of May Custer Elmer, a niece of General George Armstrong Custer, and a Southold resident years ago. Appropriately, I guess, I met Donna in the Custer kitchen. She and her assistant, Anna Verticchio of Greenport, were cleaning up after a sky-size barbeque. Burgers and hot dogs, chicken and salmon,

all kinds of cake and big slices of watermelon. I learned that Custer is one of three astronomy societies on Long Island. The others, Amateur Observers’ Society of New York, and Astronomical Society of Long Island, are headquartered in Nassau County. But the price of gasoline did not keep members of the Nassau groups from coming to the North Fork for Custer’s celestial celebration. “Everybody looks up in the sky,” said Susan Rose, president of Amateur Observers. That’s why the societies devote time and energy to educational programs and research. Custer, for example, holds an annual Astronomy Jamboree at Southold High School. I climbed a staircase labeled “Stairway to the Stars” to the observatory’s dome. According to Susan Rose, my “Wow” was what most folks said when they looked more closely at our North Fork skies through Custer telescopes. Custer Institute is open every Saturday from dusk to midnight. Call 765-2626 and then go shout out your own “Wow.” For while astronomy textbooks may tell of upper atmosphere phenomena, personal experience with a Custer telescope sets you off on that pathway to the heavens – where you could be swinging on a star.

COOPERAGE INN (EST. 1994!)

Celebrating our 15th year

Dan’s Best of the Best Decor - Steak - Brunch

Always Open Day & Night, Year Round

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EARLY DINING SPECIALS

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Every day lunch or dinner May 1 through Labor Day Weekend

Includes Choise of Soup of the Day or Fresh Garden Salad, Entree, Dessert (Chef's Choice) or Vanilla Ice Cream & Coffee

Includer: Garden Salad, 1 1/4lb. Steamed Lobster, Baked Clams, Corn on the Cob, Sautéed Shrimp, Mussels, Sea Scallops and Herb New Potatoes. All for $34.00 per person

PRIX FIXE LUNCH MENU Served Monday - Saturday

11:30am - 3:30pm Complete lunch $19.94 per person plus tax & gratuity Includes choice of soup of the day or garden salad DESSERT & COFFEE

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DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 200 www.danshamptons.com

Dan’s North Fork

aMano Osteria and Wine Bar 13550 Main Road Mattituck 631-298-4800

Photo Henry J. Salmaggi

There’s a new flavor on the North Fork. Located in Mattituck, aMano is the newest addition to the North Fork’s eclectic restaurant scene. aMano, meaning “by hand” in Italian, is the motto behind the business. The “by hand” touch can be seen and felt in every aspect of the restaurant from the hostess to the owners. This Italian bistro is latest brainchild of chef-restaurateur Tom Schaudel of Jedediah’s in Jamesport and Coolfish in Syosset, and his partner Adam Lovett. Lovett is the general manager. With more than a decade of restaurant experience in the Hamptons at Passion Fish and in Manhattan at Vespa, Lovett said it was time to try his hand on the North Fork, “The town has really changed, and they’re ready for us.” The restaurant is located in the space formerly occupied by the “Red Door” on Main Road in Mattituck. The new renovations to the restaurant have really opened the space up. New lighting makes for brighter more comfortable dining, but it still sets an elegant and upscale tone. The eatery seats 60 people inside. And the newly remodeled outdoor stone patio offers dining for 28. The fairly priced cuisine features locally grown fresh produce, and some of the finer crafted wines from both the North and South Forks. Locally caught fish also make up a large part of the menu. “There is a seasonality out here you need to consider during the year, we’re going to “Chef Tom Lopez stands high among the ranks of the top chefs on Long Island.” ~ Roy Bradbrook, Dan’s Papers

Tom Shaudel and Adam Lovett

concentrate on Long Island’s products,” said chef Schaudel. To me the ingredients used to make the cuisine can really make or break a meal. Schaudel’s delectable dishes blend fresh dairy from Catapano Farms in Peconic and Mecox Bay dairy

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in Bridgehampton, with local vegetables, Long Island Duck, and local flounder. The portions are generous, but not overwhelming. One of the most memorable dishes on the menu is an appetizer, the BBQ smoked Octopus served with Ceci salad and lobster oil. The dish is a flavor explosion and a real eye catcher. I’ve never seen it served quite like this before. The menu also boasts unique deserts such as Reggiano Custard with figs and black truffle honey. “Forget about the Old Homestead in Manhattan, we have a new favorite in Mattituck,” is what a stuffed Luciano Schiff of Manhattan said about his dining experience. Kyla Primiano of Mattituck said she’s going to try and come back as often as possible, “it exceeds expectations, it was terrific.” On the wine list you’ll find reds, white’s and rose from only two regions, Long Island and Italy. Along with varietals from Borghese, Martha Clara, Shinn, Paumanok, Osprey, and Jamesport you’ll find a private signature chardonnay with the aMano label. The extensive local list also includes the critically acclaimed Chenin Blanc from Paumanak, which happens to be a personal favorite of mine. Unlike the “Red Door,” aMano will be open for lunches. They also plan to serve a late night light fare menu. They are trying to give the area’s restaurant staff a place to grab good food and wine after they’re shifts. “We want to focus on the people who really appreciate food and wine,” Levett said. The late night menu will feature gourmet pies from a Wood Oven Pizza stove. Waiter Eric Muller summers in Mattituck. Eric says “It’s nice to have a place for restaurant people to go and just hang out when we get off.” One of the topics of conversation among the knowledgeable and outgoing staff was who’s handprint graces the menu and the sign outside. If you want to know you’ll have to stop by, but come hungry! -Henry J. Salmaggi

Announcing a show of selected works by

Martha Margulis Martha Margulis Earth Into Sky 2000 54” x 48” Acr ylic on canvas

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• Fresh Produce • Baked Pies • Lettuce • Spinach • Asparagus • Radishes

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July 3 - August 31, 2008 at Clovis Point Winery 1935 Main Rd. Jamesport, Long Island

891 Main Road, Aquebogue 1143238

631-722-4369

Opening Reception Thurs. July 3, 2008 5:00 pm 1143239

www.marthamargulis.com

www.clovispointwines.com

1142060

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 201 www.danshamptons.com

Dan’s North Fork going to be anything left on this plate! The wine selection is wide ranging and interesting and the wines we drank by the glass 2925 North Wading River Road were very good quality and came at correct temperature and they also pour a good measure. Wading River Wines are from $8 to $10 by the glass and bot631-929-8800 tles start at $30. Appetizers are from $9 to $15; pastas from $15 evening. All were perfect in to $18; main courses from $24 texture and complemented to $34 and desserts from $6 to and never overwhelmed the $8. main ingredients. Apart from the a la carte Next came a lobster and avomenu, Mondays feature tapas cado timbale with a basil, and wine with six plates and orange vinaigrette. The combitasting pours of matching nation produced a light, deliwines for $40; Wednesday is cate dish. Italian night with soup salad For the main course we and pasta for $18; on Thursday chose two very different dishenjoy a lobster bake with es. Large juicy perfectly cooked unlimited sangria for $30 and shrimps and scallops came in a on Friday it is half price marti‘to die for’ fragrant sauce of nis at the bar with complimencoconut, curry and lime. tary hors d’oevres. During the Served with sticky rice it realsummer they open for dinner at ly was a masterpiece. In a very 6pm each day except Tuesday different fashion, the veal Tand serve till late. Reservations bone with fresh thyme and are always recommended. garlic that came with a really As I said at the beginning, tangy and delectable tomato you may have to seek a little to jam was one of the best veal Michael Anthony find this charming restaurant dishes we have eaten. The meat but for the exceptional quality of the food you will was white and juicy and again the accompaniments enjoy here, the task will be very rewarding for anyof small roast potatoes and al dente vegetables realone who really enjoys an innovative but not over ly lifted the overall flavor of the veal. the top menu plus the visual presentation and By now we were really wondering whether this expert cooking of a first class chef and his kitchen. feast could carry into the dessert phase but we Michael Anthony’s, based on our experience, must should never have doubted even for a minute. Crisp be rated in the very top level of restaurants on Long wontons filled with caramelized bananas came with Island and we can’t wait to go back again. another great caramel sauce and there was never – Roy Bradbrook

Michael Anthony’s Restaurant

Photo by Roy Bradbrook

This is without doubt a destination. You will probably need to consult Mapquest or your GPS system, unless you know the area well but believe me, your journey will be extremely well rewarded. Michael Anthony is a very charismatic chef/owner who obviously cares deeply about the food he cooks and for his customers. He opened his first restaurant in East Moriches almost twenty years ago and after a very successful time there he subsequently opened restaurants in Sayville, Woodbury and most recently on Shelter Island, before opening here just over two years ago. He has built up a number of faithful followers and Eleanor our very helpful and knowledgeable waitress told us that people regularly come from Shelter Island to dine here. The Italian rustic interior is warm and welcoming, as are the staff. The tables are charmingly set with crisp blue and white napery and blue water glasses and as soon as we read the menu we realized that this had every prospect of being a very good evening. The menu is extensive and is split into sections such as wine bar, beginnings, raw bar, salad bar, pasta bar and so on. We had no difficulty in making our choices. We started with escargot profiteroles with a warm garlic cheese and bacon wrapped figs with blue cheese. It was impossible to decide which we preferred. The profiteroles were crisp and light and the escargots perfectly cooked and very tasty without being overtly garlicky. The deep sweetness of the grilled figs melded with the salty bacon and tangy cheese to produce a dish that really filled the palate with sumptuous tastes and intriguing ranges of textures. The dishes were also beautifully presented with excellent garnishes and plating. Michael began his career in the kitchen as a saucier and this really showed in the excellent quality of all of the sauces we tasted during the

Indian Island Country Club Conveniently Located on Rt. 105 in Riverhead on your way to the North Fork!

RESTAURANT OPEN TO THE PUBLIC Hours of Operation Mon-Fri 11am -8pm Lunch and Dinner Fri, Sat, Sun 11am-8pm Lunch and Dinner Sat and Sun Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner 7am-7pm ¬ Saturday Night – King Cut Prime Rib Night – A generous cut of prime rib. Complete dinner includes choice of soup or salad $19.95. ¬ Thursday Lobster Night – Our famous lobster special. Said to be the best lobster deal on the East End. 1lb Lobster, Clams, Mussels, Corn Bread, Corn on the Cob, Beer Boiled Kielbasa, and Cole Slaw. Served with your choice of soup or salad. Only $19.95!! ¬ SUNDAYS – 2 for 1 dinners 3pm – 8pm. $27.95 for 2 dinners. Menu changes weekly. Best value in town! ¬ Friday Wine and Dine Night Price Bottles of Wine. All Bottles! Paired with chef’s specialties. ¬ SUNDAY BRUNCH – Ala carte menu including breakfast, lunch, and entrée specials. 7am –3pm every Sunday. ¬ Early Bird Dinners – Monday through Friday 3-6pm. $14.95 complete dinner.

***Cater your next party at Indian Island! *** Custom catering packages available for on or offpremise events. CALL US AT 727-0788 Visit our website at www.indianislandcatering.com 1145735

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DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 202 www.danshamptons.com

Dan’s North Fork

The Most Perfect Beaches In The World Are On The NF By Phyllis Lombardi Sorry, North Fork. You didn’t make “The List.” The top ten. Number one was Brisbane, Australia. In between one and ten were locations like New Smyrna, Florida and Kahana in Hawaii. Number ten was West End on Grand Bahama Island. North Fork, you didn’t even make honorable mention. But before we pull out our farm-size handkerchiefs and weep raindrop tears, check out that list again. The list of the most shark-infested beaches in the world! That’s according to forbestraveler.com. I’ll take their word for it and not go testing those waters myself. I’ll stick to North Fork beaches and maybe an Adirondack lake or two. Now I’m a little worried about what I’m going to do on this first day of summer. If I tell you what some folks consider their favorite North Fork beaches, do you promise to keep it an almost-secret? While we do like visitors every now and then, who can fault us if we revel in the solitude most often found on our beaches? It is good, sometimes, to be alone with the sea and the sand. We recognize our weaknesses and renew our strengths. I’ve a couple of favorites. Close by is the bay beach at the end of Pequash Avenue in Cutchogue. A short walk from my home, clusters of Rosa rugosa welcome me to the stairs leading to the beach. If I were younger I bet I could swim to Robin’s Island right out there. For now, though, I float about, hearing an occasional gull call. And I think sublime thoughts – like I’m glad I just have to heat up leftovers for supper. If we’re more energetic, we take our bikes to Orient Beach State Park. Ride for an hour or so around the

park, stop by the ferry and say hello, go for a swim, eat lunch. Now that’s a summer’s day. And you know what? Even if a bus arrives full of kids from distant places like Nassau County, we don’t really mind. For grade-school youngsters at water’s edge remain a constant. They laugh, they splash, they fish, they run, they build sand castles, just as we did in years long gone. Have fun, kids. Now for more special North Fork beaches. Remember, keep this quiet. And meet Peter Schmidt. Peter’s a Cutchogue guy who loves our beaches for the usual reasons – plus one more. Pete’s a treasure hunter. Yes, he really does spend summer days searching our shores, inch by inch, with electronic gadgetry guaranteed to unearth rings, watches, coins, maybe even one of Captain Kidd’s buried treas-

ures. Peter favors our bay beaches but occasionally walks the sound shores, too. And guess what? Peter promised to take me along on one of his early summer explorations. I don’t have the proper equipment but I’m going to bring along a big plastic bag for all the stuff we find. If I discover enough treasure, I may even move to a house on the beach! And I’ll also give you the name and location of the beach where I find treasure. Peter is generous in bringing me with him and I should be generous with you. Head east now and say hi to Doris Morgan of Orient. Just six months old, Doris made her first trip to the North Fork from New Jersey – many decades ago. Her family vacationed in Orient for years until 1982 when Doris moved here fulltime. Yes, she’s got some special beaches. Namely Truman’s Beach and Narrow River Road Beach, both in Orient. The Narrow River Road spot is probably her favorite and that’s because of her grandchildren. You see, the beach slopes out so gradually that the kids are safe and happy splashing in the shallow waters. And what makes the children safe and happy makes Grandma Doris happy, too. Me? I just like the name. Narrow River Road. All those “R” sounds. Stretched out like a long summer’s afternoon. Obviously, if you’re swimming off our North Fork beaches this summer, you’ll not meet any sharks. (Although Riverhead’s Atlantis Marine World aquarium on Main Street provides plenty of scary/friendly sea creatures.) So pack your lunch, your sunglasses, a copy of Dan’s Papers for some beach-chair reading. Maybe the North Fork didn’t make that shark list but we’re number one if you’re looking for perfection.

Motorcoach Service between

The North Fork & New York City Summer Schedule Effective Sat., July 5 through Wed., Sept. 17, 2008 Westbound

¬

READ DOWN

Independence Day Sale

D E PA R T I N G

i want you to beautify america

Airport Connection 7:05 Manhattan 7:20

Eastbound

¬

9:50 12:20 2:20 10:00 12:30 2:30

~Voted Best of the Best by Dan’s Papers Readers

Tanger Outlet Riverhead Aquebogue Jamesport Laurel Mattituck Cutchogue Peconic Southold Greenport East Marion Orient Village Orient Point

9:40 9:45 9:50 9:55 10:00 10:05 10:15 10:20 10:25 10:35 10:45 10:50 10:55

10:40 10:45 10:50 10:55 11:00 11:05 11:15 11:20 11:25 11:35 11:45 11:50 11:55

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7 Days 2:30 2:35 2:40 2:42 2:50 3:00 3:05 3:10 3:20 3:25 3:30 3:35 3:40 3:45

7 Days 4:00 4:05 4:10 4:12 4:20 4:30 4:35 4:40 4:50 4:55 5:00 5:05 5:10 5:15

5:20 5:30

6:50 7:00



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11:40 11:45 11:50 11:55 12:00 12:05 12:15 12:20 12:25 12:35 12:45 12:50 12:55

‡ 7 Days 7 Days 11:20 1:20 11:25 1:25 11:30 1:30 12:00 2:00 12:20 2:25 1:40 1:45 1:50 1:55 2:00 2:05 2:15 2:20 2:25 2:35 2:45 2:50 2:55

W Sun 7 Days Only 5:30 — 5:35 — 5:40 — 5:42 — 5:50 6:50 6:00 6:05 6:10 6:20 6:25 6:30 6:35 6:40 6:45 8:20 8:30

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To North Fork

D E PA R T I N G ARRIVING

Exp. July 9th

Calll uss forr yourr nextt landscape e design n orr masonry y project

8:50 9:00

7 Days 7 Days 9:30 11:30 9:35 11:35 9:40 11:40 9:42 11:42 9:50 11:50 10:00 12:00 10:05 12:05 10:10 12:10 10:20 12:20 10:25 12:25 10:30 12:30 10:35 12:35 10:40 12:40 10:45 12:45

Sat Thurs, Fri AM LIGHT PM BOLD Only & Sat 7 Days Manhattan/86th 7:20 8:20 9:35 Manhattan/69th 7:25 8:25 9:40 Manhattan/59th 7:30 8:30 9:45 Manhattan/44th 8:00 9:00 10:00 Airport Connection 8:20 9:20 10:20

(in stock inverntory only)

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To Manhattan

Mon thru Fri 7 Days — — — 7:00 — 7:05 — 7:07 6:00 7:15 6:10 7:25 6:15 7:30 6:20 7:35 6:30 7:45 6:35 7:50 6:40 7:55 6:45 8:00 6:50 8:05 6:55 8:10

*

READ DOWN

30% OFF Entire Inventory

DELIVERY Y AVAILABLE 722-40411 • 18755 Main n Road,, R te.. 25,, Jamesportt Open n 7 Dayss • 9am-5pm m in n Season

PM BOLD

Orient Point Orient Village East Marion Peconic Landing Greenport Southold Peconic Cutchogue Mattituck Laurel Jamesport Aquebogue Riverhead Tanger Outlet

ARRIV.

AM LIGHT

Mon Only — — — — 4:45 4:50 4:55 5:00 5:10 5:15 5:20 5:25 5:30 5:35

3:40 3:45 3:50 3:55 4:00 4:05 4:15 4:20 4:25 4:35 4:45 4:50 4:55

7 Days 3:20 3:25 3:30 4:00 4:25 6:15‡ 6:20‡ 6:25‡ 6:30‡ 6:35‡ 6:40‡ 6:50‡ 6:55‡ 7:00‡ 7:10‡ 7:20‡ 7:25‡ 7:30‡

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W 7 Days 7:45 7:50 7:55 7:57 8:05 8:15 8:20 8:25 8:35 8:40 8:45 8:50 8:55 9:00

W Sun Only — — — — 9:50 10:00 10:05 10:10 10:20 10:25 10:30 10:35 10:40 10:45

9:20 10:35 12:20 9:30 10:45 12:30

Wed

Thur & Fri 4:20 4:25 4:30 5:00 5:25

thru Sat 5:20 5:25 5:30 6:00 6:25

7 Days 6:20 6:25 6:30 7:00 7:25

7 Days 7:50 7:55 8:00 8:30 8:50

8:10 — — —

7:45 7:50 7:55 8:00 8:05 8:10 8:20 8:25 8:30 8:40 — — —

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10:10 10:15 10:20 10:25 10:30 10:35 10:45 10:50 10:55 11:05 — — —

This trip arrives approximately 20 minutes earlier on Saturday and Sunday. On select trips, North Fork passengers may be required to transfer in Manorville. The “Greenporter” Non-stop service to and from Greenport, available Eastbound on Thursday and Friday; Westbound on Sunday.

Visit our website www.hamptonjitney.com

for Online Reservations, Information and Value Pack orders



(631) 283-4600 (212) 362-8400 1143225

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 203 www.danshamptons.com

Letters LET FREEDOM SING Dear Dan, I wrote to say that I am proud to see someone writing about police harassment and arrogance...there is much going on. I am incensed about this push to have the police harass, intimidate and abuse innocents under the guise of homeland security. I have been listening to Internet radio, which speaks about this as a losing of our rights and freedoms...and talks about how Fire Departments and Police Departments are getting money from the Feds in this program. This is happening across Long Island. I know of innocent people who have been singled out and are bothered in Shirley, Oyster Bay, Levittown, King’s Park, Mastic Beach, Queens...my home was broken into by Police over hearsay by new neighbors who do not like that I am a Jew. There is much to my story that should not be going on in a free society. Eric H. Via e-mail Wow. – DR BOOK CHAT Dear Dan. A good friend, who owns a store Out East, gave me your book to me. When I went to say, “Goodbye” to her she told me she was sorry my wife and I had to leave Long Island. She gave me your book. I thought it might not be a good book. I sat down and started to read your book and it is one of the best books here on Long Island. I read a book called, The End Of The Hamptons from a bookstore in Sag Harbor. He did sign the book for me. Nelson DeMille is a good friend of mine and put my name in his book, Night Fall. Also my name will be in two books by Paul McElroy and Randell Jordan. Marson Randell Jordan has come to where we live three times. Paul McElroy is on AOL. Marson Randell Jordan is also on AOL. All three authors are very good friends of me. I do read over 100 to 150 books a year and have over 11,000 books in my home. Over sixty authors from all over the world have signed books for me. Wilbur Smith is from South Africa and one of his books saved my life in Vietnam. It is titled, The Train From Katanga AKA Dark Of The Sun. I

e-mail Dan at askdan@danspapers.com

modeled myself for my LRRP Team Leader in Viet Nam as the head of the guy in his book. I met Wilbur Smith in New York when he invited me to come to his latest book signing. We are not sorry to leave Long Island with all the traffic, car wrecks, hurricanes, taxes cell phones being used in cars and the cops do nothing! Peoplepc.com will have chat rooms very soon and I will be a Host in a book chat room with a screen name of HostRLBookChat and will tell all the people twice a week about your book! Tom Via e-mail Thanks. – DR THE BEES, THE BIRDS AND THE VINES Dear Dan, I just read your article about those carpenter bees. I wish I could say I was pleased when it wrapped itself up. I almost want those ten minutes back. It was a cute story at the beginning, but it got progressively less cute the more it went on. You admit these little bees do you no harm, except for some annoyance. So... you gassed ‘em for that? The vines are choking your house. The birds moved in upstairs and the bees like your backyard. Ever think, Dan...that it’s YOU who is in THEIR way? I think of Chief Seattle... “The earth does not belong to us. We belong to the earth...We did not weave the web of life; we are merely a strand in it. Whatever we do to the web, we do to ourselves.” It’s not hard to be Greener, Dan. Listen to the bees. Tamrha Richardson Lake Grove Via e-mail Wasn’t the whole Chief Seattle thing a hoax? In any case, he’s right. It’s just hard to do. – DR MAGIC ON THE ROAD Dear Dan, Looks like I finally got around to writing about something that happened last week, but it’s good news so I figured I’d submit it anyway. Early last week, I was driving my car; I’ll call it “The Volvo,” from East Hampton to Bridgehampton on Montauk Highway sometime during mid-afternoon. It was during the week so traffic wasn’t

terrible, but there were still many vehicles sharing the road. So here I am, driving The Volvo and thinking about getting The Volvo fixed, when I looked in my rear view mirror and saw an ambulance quickly approaching from several cars back. Never having been in this situation before, I tried my best to register what was happening, and what would be my role in this emergency. Like all 19-year-olds, I remember everything that I learned in Driver’s Education class, so before you could say “Stop, drop, and roll,” I knew that the right thing to do would be to pull over to the right-hand side of the road. Sure, I KNEW that, but mostly I worried that other drivers didn’t. Fortunately for me, I had underestimated all of the sane, responsible Long Island drivers that were on that stretch of road with me. Every car, behind me and in front of me, correctly signaled and moved to the right letting the ambulance rush by safely. Impressive it surely was! Just imagine seeing a bunch of elementary students perform a flawless fire drill, and you’d be in a similar state of disbelief. I think sometimes it takes bright flashing lights and wailing sirens to get us to stop, move to the side, and take a break from our busy days to examine the value of our lives. It is a beautiful moment, but just be careful not to relish it for too long because like I found out the hard way, you wouldn’t want to let that car behind you beat you back into the lane. Sincerely, Laura Jackson Via e-mail Slingshot Road Rage. – DR MILES PER AGE Dear Dan, Let’s sign a petition for increasing the speed back to 45mph on Suffolk County 39. It’s nonsense that the actual 35mph speed limit in effect when the highway is four lanes now, and in many places much narrower is 45mph. I run a limo service and tickets start to build up now in that area specially the nighttime. Dan Huzau Via e-mail Should e 35 for older people, 45 for young, eager people. – DR

Police Blotter Menacing A man in Montauk was arrested for brandishing a weapon, driving while intoxicated and criminal mischief after he pulled out a knife at a Montauk bar that was not intended for filleting a fish. The man left the bar and drove away at high rates of speed. Police were called and caught up with the man. While being arrested the man struggled in the police car and head butted the back windshield, damaging the car and causing himself injury. Police offered him medical treatment, but the man refused. Talk about being angry at the world. * * * Paying In Lawnmowers A man who rented a house in East Hampton called police after he found that his John Deer lawnmower had been stolen off his property. It appeared that the John Deer was lifted off of the ground by another machine and taken away. Police made this conclusion after they noticed large marks in the ground. Police are suspicious of either a large machine picking up the lawnmower or a Tyranasaurus Rex.

* * * Boats And Gasoline Marinas in the Hamptons all have been experiencing numerous gas thefts off of powerboats. These days if you want to take a powerboat out for a spin it can cost you well over $1.7 million worth of fuel. * * * Cell Phone For some people, losing a cell phone causes more trouble then others. A man who runs his entire business using his cell phone reported that it was stolen somewhere in Hampton Bays. What types of businesses can you run with just a cell phone? Well, male gigolo is one, but if you saw this guy, you would know for sure that his business has to do with something else. * * * Doggy Dog A dog in Montauk is looking for a home. Her name is Razzie and she is completely adorable. The owner of the dog passed away. In general, Razzie does not do anything illegal except for public urination. You can contact Deana if you are interested in adopting a

super sweet dog, 631-374-3150. * * * Tire Destroyer A man in Hampton Bays reported that the tires on his car had all been slashed. The man is suspicious that his former friend damaged his tires because he started to date his former friends girlfriend. That will do it. * * * Gonna Get Towed Police are telling residents and visitors of Southampton that if they park their car at the train station during the fourth of July their car will be towed away at the owners expense. The reason they are going to do this is because they have to make room for the Independence Day Parade. Freedom ain’t free folks. * * * Saturn Stolen A woman in Hampton Bays reported to police that her car, a Saturn, had been stolen while parked in front of her home. Yes, we had the same thought also, why the heck would anybody want to steal a Saturn? – Written and Compiled By David Lion Rattiner

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 204 www.danshamptons.com

DAN'S PAPERS, July 4, 2008 Page 205 www.danshamptons.com

Chimney

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Innovative Chimney (866) 899-8989 www.innovativechimneycorp.com

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Go Solar (631) 727-2224 www.gosolar.com

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East Hampton Fence & Gates (631) 324-5941

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MW Lavelle Painting & Restoration Inc. (631) 567-1767

J. Sanchez Gutters (631) 831-0951 • (631) 329-2138

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CLS Upholsterers & Slipcovers 1-800-281-8145 www.clscustom.com

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Spring & Summer Actvs (631) 728-1929 www.springandsummeract.com

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Southampton Decks & Fence (631)287-9277 www.southamptonhandyman.com

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Alure Home Improvements (631) 245-2196 1-800-New-Space • www.newroom.com

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Irrigation Irrigation Solutions (631) 205-5700 www.irrigationsolutions.com

Pet Fencing Invisible Fence by Canine Control Co. (631) 283-1913 • www.invisiblefence.com

Property Management Dave Greene Estate Care (631) 283-8085 www.dgec.net

Pest Control East End Tick Control (631) 287-9700 (631) 324-9700 www.tickcontrol.com

Air / Heating 5 Star Heating & Air Conditioning ( 631) 298-9122 www.5starhvac.com

Make Your House A Home

drawing by www.leroybrowndesign.com

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MIND, BODY & SPIRIT Massage Therapy

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SERVICE DIRECTORY Audio/Home Theater

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