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DAN'S PAPERS, February 8, 2008 Page 15 www.danshamptons.com

Looking Closely Hillary & Barack Debate with One Another in Regular & Hi-Def TV By Dan Rattiner I watched the Clinton-Obama debate on television at my home the other night. I have DirecTV, so I get CNN on two different channels, one that is regular TV and one that is HiDef. I started out on the regular TV channel. Obama made some strong points about Iraq and his opposition of the war from the beginning. Clinton made points about health care and her long-term involvement with it. The two candidates are both smart, and they sparred gently with one another, I thought. It seemed, to me, to be a tossup about who was the better choice at that point.

But then some friends of mine came over to watch, and one suggested we watch all this in Hi-Def, so I hit the remote. One thing about Hi-Def is that it is so clear and sharp you really get to see everything up close and personal. From this point on, all I could think about as these two continued to debate was the physical characteristics of the candidates that I never noticed before. We were looking at people under bright lights who were not Hollywood types. They were politicians and they had flaws. It was like at dinner when somebody has a piece of spinach in their teeth. Obama has a prominent vein, actually two of

them, on the left side of his forehead. He also has several black moles. And I thought he did not shave his neck as closely as he shaved his cheeks. Maybe it was fear of getting a razor cut — wouldn’t that have been something. So he apparently went gently with the razor down there. One of my guests pointed out the vein also. We talked about it. Other than that he is quite charming. Hillary has apparently had some sort of facelift. There are now dimples on her cheeks, but they are not where most people have dimples. The dimples are in the crease of her face (continued on the next page)

THEGIANTSWINIT!THEGIANTSWINIT! THEGIANTSWINIT! By Dan Rattiner At the beginning of November, I wrote an article in this newspaper about the pathetic condition of the sports teams in the city of New York. Three games had gone by in professional football and both the Jets and the Giants had lost all three. In basketball, the hopeless New York Knicks were getting clobbered every other day by every team that came into Madison Square Garden, from the Detroit Pistons to the Secaucus Mudcats. And the New York Mets baseball team, which led the National League for months, suddenly collapsed and embarked on a record-breaking

series of losses that resulted in their not even making the playoffs. Meanwhile, up in Boston, the traditional rival of New York, everything was breaking their way. The Red Sox won the pennant. The Boston Celtics were in their own league in basketball — at one point they had 24 wins and 3 losses — and then there were the New England Patriots. Having made three Super Bowls in the last five years, they were moving now undefeated with quarterback Tom Brady at the helm, and truly becoming a legendary team for the ages. Boston is sports crazy. And I have friends

there. Never in my lifetime had there been an occasion when in every sport our archrivals were at the top of the heap and New York couldn’t punch its way out of a paper bag. But there it was. Thus it is that I am sitting here at 7 a.m. on Monday at the beach in East Hampton with my laptop to report that yesterday, Super Bowl Sunday, was probably the greatest day of my life. I’m sure you saw it, or at least heard about it. The New York Giants, having lost their first three games, struggled for much of the football (continued on the next page)

Dan's Papers Feb. 8, 2008  

Dan's Papers, the 51-year-old bible of the Hamptons, is owned by Manhattan Media, a multi-media publishing company based in New York City,...

Dan's Papers Feb. 8, 2008  

Dan's Papers, the 51-year-old bible of the Hamptons, is owned by Manhattan Media, a multi-media publishing company based in New York City,...

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