Your Retirement Living 8th edition 2021 (not including Home Care)

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2021

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Life starts at Thornton Park

Your time to discover, explore and enjoy what makes you happy Imagine no longer having to devote time to maintaining a family home, mowing lawns or worrying about home practicalities. With all that taken care of, you have complete peace of mind and are free to focus on what really matters. Not only will you secure the relaxed, comfortable retirement lifestyle you promised yourself, you’ll be part of a vibrant community of like-minded people. Thornton Park is about freedom and space to choose the lifestyle that’s perfect for you and an opportunity to strike up new friendships. With a great range of activities, services and amenities onsite, these stylish, contemporary apartments start from only $495,000. If you’ve ever thought about retirement living, don’t hesitate to contact us for an information pack and to book your obligation-free tour. It just might be the best thing you ever do. All apartments feature: • Modern kitchens • Beautifully finished bathrooms • Blinds and curtains included • Ducted air conditioning • Miele appliances

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Study or study nook NBN & Foxtel-ready Lift access to all levels Secure access & parking 24-hour emergency call system

1800 860 502 thorntonpark.com.au You may have to pay a departure fee when you leave this village.


CONTENTS How to use the Guide

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4

Retirement planning

Finance  Preparing yourself for retirement life

5

5 key tips to plan for a secure retirement

7

Most important questions to ask your financial advisor

9

Investing  Building and securing your nest egg

11

Boosting your super before retirement

13

Funding the lifestyle you want to lead

15

How to avoid your super running out

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Superannuation

Selling/Moving  All things selling and moving

18

55

Retirement Living Options

Types of villages

55

Choosing a village

56

Not just a new home, a new lifestyle  consumer story

58

Legal structures

60

Fees and charges

63

Your rights & responsibilities

68

Understanding your contract

70

27

Life in a village

72

Great Australian Bucket List

31

When your needs increase

76

14 fabuloursly scenic drives

34

Top retirement living FAQs

78

7 top tips for capturing the best travel photos

37

Checklist

79

8 essential Australian experiences

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5 essential tips for a smooth road trip with your pet

40

123

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Lifestyle

Leisure  Journey to retirement

21

Finding purpose in retirement

23

Travel  Living life on the road

42

Health & Wellness

Nutrition

Resources

How to read the directory

124

Directory Contents

125

Abbreviations

125

Terms and Definitions

126

Eat yourself healthy in retirement

42

Australian Capital Territory

127

Are supplements worth it?

44

New South Wales

131

Physical health

Northern Territory

145

The importance of staying active

46

Queensland

147

10 habits linked to a long life

48

South Australia

157

Tasmania

167

Victoria

174

Western Australia

187

Index

192

Mental health   Looking after your mental health

50

Ways to keep mentally fit

52

YourRetirementLiving.com.au

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From the Managing Editor It’s my pleasure to welcome you to a new and improved version of Your Retirement Living, incorporating Home Care Guide.

the future when you may need to start considering some basic supports to help you continue living an independent life for as long as possible.

After years of producing a practical guide with information to help retirees choose retirement living options as well as a stand-alone publication dedicated to home care options, DPS decided to transform these two publications into one magazine covering the broader retirement lifestyle as well as help preparing for the years where you may need to consider some basic support.

We have designed this publication into two separate Guides so you can absorb the information most relevant to you and your situation.

Retirement is an exciting time in most people’s life, allowing you to wind down and enjoy the finer things in life, after years filled with work and family obligations. This life stage is really broken down in three phases, moving from an ‘active’ phase where you are generally in good health and able to enjoy life to the fullest, to the ‘quiet’ phase where things are starting to slow down a bit as you age, and finally the ‘care’ phase where people may need more assistance in day-to-day life. We know that Australians are living longer than ever before and that most people want to remain in their own home and community as they get older. We also know that people are finding it hard to think about what may happen when old age sets in, let alone plan for this time in their life. But the reality is, the more you can plan ahead, the better prepared you will be when the time comes that you need some sort of assistance. In this publication we set out to present useful and inspiring content to make the most of the retirement years while at the same time, assist with planning for

Chief Executive Officer Michelle Beech

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The Home Care Guide starting on page 80D will help you understand the different types of assistance that are available to make sure you can stay in your own community for longer and help you on your journey of living your best life at home. Making the most of the supports available to you within your local community, as well as accessing those provided by the Government, can make a huge difference in helping you to remain living independently in the home and community that you know and love. The ‘Third Age’ is a time to be enjoyed and everyone deserves to choose how and where they want to live. I hope this Your Retirement Living, incorporating Home Care Guide will inspire you to take charge of this next stage in life and wish you all the best on your journey. Margot White, Managing Editor

DPS Publishing Pty Ltd ● 1300 186 688 ● 145 South Tce, Adelaide SA 5000 info@dps.com.au ● AgedCareGuide.com.au ●  ABN 53 090 793 730

Your Retirement Living 8th edition Incorporating Home Care Guide 2021 Printed December 2020 RRP $25, inc GST Managing Editor Margot White margot.white@dps.com.au

The first part is all about Your Retirement Living filled with useful information to help with your retirement planning, inspiring destinations for your next travel adventure, tips and tricks to help you look after your mental and physical health as well as what to keep in mind if you are considering moving into a retirement community.

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The factual material contained in this publication has been obtained from information supplied by government departments, industry and organisations, by personal interview and by telephone and correspondence. At the time of going to press the publisher believed that all information submitted for publication was accurate and complete. However, the publisher can take no responsibility for inaccuracies or incomplete information that may have been supplied to them in the course of their enquiries detailed above. The facts published indicate the result of those enquiries and no warranty as to their accuracy can be given. The information in this publication is general in nature and does not constitute financial, legal or other professional advice. Readers should consider whether the information is appropriate to their needs and seek professional advice tailored to their personal circumstances. Images within this publication may have been altered from their original format. © Copyright. No part of this publication can be used or reproduced in any format without express permission in writing from The Publisher. ® Aged Care Guide is a registered trademark. ®  Your Retirement Living and Home Care Guide are pending registration.

Your Retirement Living – 8 th edition

Home Care Guide 2021


Retirement Planning – Finance

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3


Your guide to retirement life and village options Welcome to the 8th edition of Your Retirement Living, a title by DPS – Australia’s specialist information provider for the aged, community and retirement sector.

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hey say ‘life begins at retirement’ and this publication was created to inspire you to make the most of this next stage in life. Whether you have only just started thinking about what retirement could look like for you, are actively preparing to retire from the workforce, or are entering this exciting time of ‘new beginnings’. This Guide can help you on that journey to the next stage of your life. Different people look for different lifestyles in retirement. For some people, the reward after many years in the workforce is to travel, live life on the road and discover new places. Others may choose to study and learn new skills or focus on family and spend time with children and grandchildren. Whatever direction, they’ll have one thing in common; to make the most of the Golden Years. The articles in this Guide can help you prepare your finances for retirement, assist in finding purpose and happiness in this time of your life, and inspire your next travel adventure. We gathered expert advice on how you can make sure your physical and mental health are in tip-top shape, as well provide a range of considerations if you’re looking at retirement living options. The demographics of ‘retirement living’ are changing as the life expectancy of Australians has

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Your Retirement Living – 8 th edition

increased well beyond the age of 80 years. Some retirees are happy to continue living where they are, while others may be planning a final move to a safe and secure environment in a retirement community where they know they’ll be supported well into their senior years. The average age of entry into a retirement village is currently 75 years of age – well past the traditional age of retirement. But people as young as 55 are moving into these lifestyle communities where they find a supported environment with like‑minded people. Your Retirement Living will help you understand many of the things you need to know before choosing to live in a retirement village – the different types of villages/communities, the accommodation on offer, the purchasing options and financial implications. We have designed it as a guide to your questions and needs to help you make the best choices; from the range of accommodation options available to the contact details of people who can assist you further. To provide you with an even more comprehensive and accessible service, you can also find detailed information about retirement living – including the latest retirement living news, and more in depth provider and village profiles – online at YourRetirementLiving.com.au. On this website, you will not only be able to access more editorial

information to help you make the right choice about retirement living. You will also be able to further explore any retirement villages you see here in this publication by typing in the ‘Web ID’ that you can find in the tables section, alongside the individual listing, as part of the Resources section starting on page 123. From the ‘Web ID’ search, you can view more information about each village you search and see any available images of the site. Find out more about our range of home, aged care and disability support resources on AgedCareGuide.com.au and DisabilitySupportGuide.com.au or call 1300 186 688.


Retirement Planning – Finance

Preparing yourself for retirement life Retirement is the long-awaited dream for many. While there is no fixed retirement age in Australia, some people choose to retire in their fifties while others work to pension age and beyond.

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f you retire at the age of 65, the life expectancy for females is 87.3 years, whereas men have an average life expectancy of 84.6 years. This life expectancy rate continues to increase as the years go on. Peak body for older Australians, National Seniors, released research in early 2020 highlighting that many older people are worried about outliving savings. The research showed that 53 percent of survey participants were concerned about outliving their savings and women were more worried than men (59 percent to 47 percent). Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of National Seniors, Professor John McCallum, believes the findings really show how older Australians feel when it comes to their financial security. “Australia has one of the best pension systems in the world, yet Australian retirees are still showing high levels of worry that they will outlive their savings,” says Professor McCallum.

what you want to be doing during this new period of your life.

Does that align with your current retirement wealth? What about the lifestyle you want to lead in retirement? The Association of Superannuation Funds of Australia (ASFA) developed Retirement Standard benchmarks to help older people gauge how much they may need a year to live modestly or comfortably in retirement. For instance, to live a comfortable lifestyle as a single person, you would need $43,687 a year, or $61,909 as a couple.

This could include travel and other big expenses, whether you want to lead a modest or comfortable lifestyle, when you want to retire, whether you are wanting to stay at home, downsize or move into a retirement village, and implementing all your estate planning.

Or to live modestly, a single person would need $27,902 a year, and a couple would require $40,380 a year.

Are you ready to retire?

Manage your expectations for retirement between what you want and whether that is actually possible to achieve.

Wanting to retire is different to actually being able to retire. Older people tend to have a set age they want to retire, but is that viable for you? The preservation age in Australia for retiring is from 55 – 60, which is when you can start accessing your superannuation, but you cannot receive the age pension until you are at least over 65 years of age.

These numbers are also based on the idea that you already own your home, no mortgage, and are in good health.

Important decisions Another important consideration is what your home situation will be like for the first decade or so into retirement, and how that may look when you become more frail. Do you intend to stay at home and receive care inside your own house? Does a retirement village seem like a

“This shows a need for better advice and education to help older Australians manage their savings so they can have the confidence to spend their money and enjoy retirement.” While it’s important to plan your retirement financially, you also need to have an overall view of what you want your retirement to look like and YourRetirementLiving.com.au

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Retirement Planning – Finance

“Australian retirees are showing high levels of worry that they will outlive their savings.” better lifestyle fit for yourself? Or do you want to move into an aged care facility when you need a higher level of care? These are important decisions you need to think about. It means you may need to consider downsizing your assets or possessions, or relocate for a sea change or move closer to family. While it can be a bit distressing, downsizing may also be a great way to boost your superannuation or savings. Make big decisions earlier rather than later, as you don’t want to be downsizing and relocating last minute after a crisis hits and the choice is taken out of your hands.

Debts

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You are always in a better position if you don’t have debt following you into retirement, otherwise, you will end up cutting into your superannuation and reducing how long you can live on your super.

Big expenses Besides financing the day to day, it’s important to consider if there are any big expenses while you are in retirement and to plan for those. Would you like to buy a new car or caravan or go on the trip of a lifetime? It may be worth considering whether you can make big purchases before you retire or if it’s best to wait a while. A financial advisor can help you work through the best options for you.

In 2019, the Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute (AHURI) found that nearly half of people between the age of 55 – 64 were still paying off their mortgage, and that the average mortgage debt had increased by 600 percent over the last three decades.

The more you can prepare for any big expenses while you are retired, the easier it will be on your superannuation.

Many older people are entering retirement with mortgage debt or other debts. A financial advisor will always recommend you enter retirement with as little debt as possible, and preferably no debts at all.

The best way to ensure that your retirement is going to be as full proof as possible is to make sure you have appropriate estate planning in place and have all of the relevant insurance you would require to protect your assets, including yourself.

Your Retirement Living – 8th edition

Foolproofing retirement

What insurance do you have in place to protect yourself and your family? Life insurance, funeral insurance, health insurance, contents insurance: all these insurance types can safeguard you from any expected or unexpected instances. Estate planning is protecting your assets and making sure they are distributed how you wish after you die. Not only that, estate planning can include all the relevant documentation for Enduring Power of Attorney or Guardian, your Advanced Care Directive, and your Will. Estate planning can be really important for yourself first and foremost, to be treated with dignity and respect as you become more frail, but also provides your family with guidance during future difficult events. Additionally, insurance and estate planning is the best way to secure your retirement plan so you don’t have to worry about any unforeseen life changes. Disclaimer: The information in this article is general in nature and does not constitute legal or financial advice. Readers should seek their own personal legal and financial advice from a suitably qualified practitioner.


Retirement Planning – Finance

5 key tips to plan for a secure retirement Retirement is an exciting time of your life where you should be able to relax and take time to smell the roses. But you need to prepare and plan for your retirement if you want to live comfortably.

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our retirement is a stage of your life that you should be excited to reach and work towards over your lifetime.

Securing your retirement plan In most cases, people work towards securing their retirement funding ahead of time, but many don’t think about what planning should accompany it. And do we start early enough? Rosie Bouton is Principal Financial Planner and Aged Care Specialist at We Plan Financial where she helps seniors plan for retirement and beyond. She says that when it comes to retirement planning, it’s a case of ‘the earlier the better’. According to Ms Bouton, people who have engaged a financial planner early into their retirement planning, are less panicked than those who only start to think about what they want and how they are going to fund this next stage of life when they approach the retirement age.

Positive impact Any early planning you do can greatly benefit your retirement outcomes and have a positive impact on you down the track. Ms Bouton is especially insistent that people need to not only

consider their preferred lifestyle requirements for retirement, but also prepare for any increased care needs that may occur as they get older.

Any early planning you do can greatly benefit your retirement outcomes

Her advice is that you should be realistic about when you are going to retire, consider future medical conditions you may develop or if you plan to work for longer to better boost your savings and superannuation.

Top five tips 1. Keep an eye on your super While it sounds simple, Ms Bouton says that people need to know where their superannuation is held. A lot of people end up with multiple super funds across different super companies and are unaware of how and where they are invested. In some instances, your super may be invested in a way that is not aligned with your preferences or appropriate risk profile. She recommends keeping an eye on your superannuation accounts and make sure your super fits your specific risk profile.

2. Protection Insurance can be very important when it comes to large assets; you have insurance for your car or on your home. However, according to Ms Bouton older people don’t protect the biggest asset they have, which is their ability to earn an income themselves. Once you lose the capacity or struggle to undertake your job, this can have a huge impact on your life and financial situation. Ms Bouton recommends people have adequate insurance cover such as personal insurance, which could be life insurance, Total and Permanent Disability Insurance, Trauma Insurance or Income Protection Insurance to protect themselves as much as possible from different events that can occur that may impact on their ability to save for retirement.

Additionally, always keep your expectations in check. While there are dream ideals for how and when to retire, it doesn’t necessarily mean you will be in the position to reach that goal. It’s better to be realistic about your retirement outcomes. YourRetirementLiving.com.au

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Retirement Planning – Finance

Tracking your expenditure can be a vital part of meeting your retirement plan goals. 3. Estate planning Ms Bouton encourages all of her clients to have updated estate plans. It is important to ensure that your Will, Advance Care Directives or other important documents are as relevant as possible to your current beliefs and circumstances. Estate planning can only be put together if you have full capacity, and you can

Planning helps prepare for anything Aged in their mid-fifties, Joe and Lucy were worried about their financial situation. With increasing debt levels due to credit card debt, they had very little in savings and were unsure how their superannuation worked. They had an overwhelming feeling they were not moving forward and a fear they would never be able to retire. Guided by their financial advisor, Joe and Lucy were able to identify clear goals and create workable strategies within realistic timeframes, whilst receiving ongoing education and support.

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never know when you will lose the ability to make decisions for yourself. It is better to be prepared for any incidents by having up‑to‑date estate plans in place.

4. Track your budget It may seem like a no-brainer for some, but there are people that don’t track their every-day spending as they should. Tracking your expenditure can be a vital part of meeting your retirement plan goals. If you don’t track your spending, you may not be able to appropriately understand why you aren’t hitting your super or saving targets, or aren’t growing your retirement nest egg. Watching where your funds are going day in, day out, can help you stick to a budget and achieve your financial retirement objectives.

5.  Engage a financial planner A financial planner can take a load of stress off when preparing for retirement and they can even implement appropriate strategies

that fit your individual needs. For many, retiring can be scary, especially when there are unknowns you don’t understand. An aged care financial planner can have the skills to help you navigate the barriers you face and prepare you for future costs. According to Ms Bouton, when asked, the number one priority of her clients is always living independently at home for as long as possible. So if you want to meet this goal, you need to start thinking and talking about how you want to live when you retire, how you are going to fund this and plan for the possibility of requiring extra help or care around the home later on. Otherwise, you may be left without any choice and the decision is taken out of your hands. Disclaimer: The information in this article is general in nature and does not constitute legal or financial advice. Readers should seek their own personal legal and financial advice from a suitably qualified practitioner.

Aged Care Financial Advisers (ACFA) assisted Joe and Lucy to consolidate their debt into the one loan, manage their budget and cashflow, boost their savings to provide them with some cash reserves and increase their superannuation investments using tax effective strategies and reviewing their underlying investments.

Although Lucy was devastated, she and her family were reassured that financially she would be ok.

The organisation also ensured they had adequate insurances in place so in the event of illness, injury or death their financial future would not be in jeopardy.

As Joe’s spouse, Lucy inherited his superannuation and this, along with her own superannuation, allowed her to still be financially secure in retirement.

Joe and Lucy would meet with their advisor twice a year to ensure they were on track with their plans. Their cash reserves and super grew in value while their debt decreased. As a result, they were able to reduce the level of their insurances and in turn provide them with improved cash flow. Sadly, nine years after meeting with ACFA, Joe passed away unexpectedly.

Joe’s insurance allowed Lucy to pay off the mortgage. She had cash reserves, allowing her to take some time off work while she got accustomed to life without Joe.

Financial planning is not just about money, it’s about peace of mind, confidence, a trusted relationship and financial certainty. Case study provided by Aged Care Financial Advisers The information contained within this content has been provided as general information only and prepared without taking into account your financial position, objectives, and needs. You should consider its appropriateness and seek financial advice before making any financial decisions.


Retirement Planning – Finance

Most important questions to ask your financial advisor Planning for your retirement can be confusing and tricky, especially if you want to make the most out of this next stage of life or have specific goals.

Y

ou may be looking forward to slowing down, spending time with the grandkids, or volunteering, or doing the exact opposite and heading into another job or travelling the globe. The best people to assist you in making sure you can live the retirement lifestyle you want to live from a financial point of view are a financial advisor or consultant.

Tailored advice A financial advisor can help you work out the finer details and tailor their advice to your particular circumstances. They should have your best interest at heart and are obligated to leave you in a better position financially than when you first started with them. Rosie Bouton, Principal Financial Planner and Aged Care Specialist at

We Plan Financial, says depending on the type of financial assistance you are looking for, a financial advisor can help you plan for retirement in both the short and long term. She recommends always being open with your financial advisor about your financial situation so they are better able to service your financial requirements. “The best way into a financial relationship is to be open and honest and to make sure you are not withholding any information. The more information you can provide to your advisor, the better,� explains Ms Bouton.

Transitioning a loved one to a care facility can be challenging for the whole family. There are many decisions to make and the options can be confusing. That is where we come in. Our practise knowledge and experience of the industry have supported our clients and their families navigate through the Aged Care System. Aged Care Financial Advisers are well respected in the Aged Care industry and understand how to best help. We focus on our service delivery, providing you with the right information and answers to your questions. Together we explore your options and support you in choosing what best suits your unique circumstances. We are there for you providing advice and support throughout the process with no ongoing fees in Aged Care.

Derek Armstrong Aged Care Specialist Masters Financial Planning 1300 554 393 info@acfadvisers.com.au

Aged Care Financial Advisers www.acfadvisers.com.au

SUPPORTING FAMILIES ACROSS AUSTRALIA YourRetirementLiving.com.au

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Retirement Planning – Finance

with the financial answers they will be giving you.

Bring as many important documents as possible to assist your financial advisor in their evaluation “We can also weigh in on people’s expectations, so if they want to live a comfortable lifestyle but they don’t have the super there to do that, we are instrumental in shifting their expectations as well. And bringing them more into line around what they can afford and what they can’t.”

Choosing an advisor When approaching a financial advisor, there are a number of questions you should ask them to make sure you find the best person to assist with your financial needs: ◆  What are their credentials and are they registered as a financial advisor? ◆  What products can they advise on? ◆  How do the fees and charges work for their service? ◆  Do they provide broader financial advice or is it only in aged care finance? ◆  Is the service on an ongoing basis or is it once off advice? ◆  How will they provide their advice? Is it in writing, will there be multiple options to choose from and will it be easy to understand? Similarly, a good financial planner will ask you questions to help them

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Your Retirement Living – 8th edition

Some of the questions they may ask could be: ◆  What are your objectives for retirement? ◆  Do you intend to have an active retirement with lots of overseas trips or will it be more low-key with occasional trips to the movies and local football? ◆  Under the financial retirement standards, are you aiming for a comfortable lifestyle in retirement or a modest lifestyle? Ms Bouton adds that she finds it more helpful to speak to people that are thinking about what they want their retirement to look like rather than focusing on the numbers. “Rather than keeping it to just figures, think about what they like to do in retirement, it brings it towards more fruitful discussion,” says Ms Bouton. “It can give me a bit more insight into what really makes them tick, how they might respond to your fluctuations or market volatility, and gives you a bit more idea about the person that they are. Financial advice is more of a relationship you build with them rather than a static thing over figures.”

Preparing for your first meeting Being well prepared for your first meeting with a financial advisor is important, as this will be the best time for them to get a snapshot of what your finances look like and whether you are on track to retire. It’s important to bring as many important documents as possible that cover your finances and assets, which can assist your financial advisor in their evaluation such as: ◆  Statements of your accounts, including superannuation, current savings, and any other bank accounts

◆  An overview of your current investments, such as stocks, bonds or your housing portfolio ◆  Your current income or pension statements ◆  A fortnightly or monthly overview of your expenses, including food, accommodation, travel and insurance ◆  Any outstanding debts and loans you have, like mortgage or car repayments ◆  Your tax statement from the last year ◆  Any other important information, such as inheritance or trust, your Will, or life insurance After your financial advisor has analysed your financial situation, here are some questions you could be asking them to understand where you are at: ◆  How does my current financial situation look? ◆  Am I on track to meeting my retirement goal or is there anything I should review? ◆  If I am not meeting my goal, what ways can I reduce my spend and boost my superannuation? ◆  How are my investments looking? Should I be doing more or changing up my investment scope? ◆  What is the next step from here? Remember, your first meeting with a financial advisor probably won’t be your last. If you are tracking well for retirement, then you may not have to do anything. But for most people, you will most likely need to make changes to your investments, your current expenditure or super contributions. Your financial advisor shouldn’t be leaving you feeling like you’re in over your head, but assured that you can either meet your goal or make changes to put yourself in a better position for the future.


Retirement Planning – Investing

Building and securing your nest egg It's common for people to call their retirement savings their 'nest egg'. It's your accumulated savings that should get you through retirement and, hopefully, help you lead a comfortable, carefree life once you retire.

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owever, it's best not to put all your 'eggs' in one basket and ideally, super should not be the only money you have or have invested in. Diversification is absolutely key when it comes to building your retirement savings, says Derek Armstrong, Principal and Financial Planner at Aged Care Financial Advisers. He explains that a lot of people look as superannuation as "guaranteed", however, that isn't the case. Superannuation can be subject to market fluctuations, just like any other investment. "The lifestyle [people] choose needs to be monitored, reviewed, like any good investment." "A lot of people leave it up to superannuation. But when you are looking at retirement, the whole thing about retirement is how can you generate income not to have to work,” says Mr Armstrong. "In that case, you have to start earlier, you diversify. You put away your 9.5 percent [into super], but also manage your debts or manage your cash flow."

Set the goalposts When you begin building your nest egg, you need to understand what you are working towards or trying to achieve in the first place before you can start setting any investment strategies. Mr Armstrong says the first thing any financial planner will do with a client

is figure out what their end goal is. If you don't have any specific goals, then you need to lock down how you want to spend your retirement and what that is going to look like. For example, if you are wanting to use $70,000 a year once you retire, you need to ascertain how likely that would be for you. Important things to consider are do you have debt in retirement? What about big expenses? Are you intending to buy a caravan or car? What about travel, has that been factored into your yearly spend? Some people just want peace of mind when they retire, but what does 'peace of mind' look like to you and how important is it to you? "When you look at your retirement savings, obviously, you have to look at where you are putting away money for the future," explains Mr Armstrong. "The longer you leave it, the harder it is to achieve those objectives… Time flys.

"Your timing, your debt levels, your cost of living, these are the major factors that present challenges for people. And then there are life issues such as divorce. In planning, you have the opportunity to look at how to address these things, then you have a clearer vision, which means your goals are probably achievable, but your goals need to be reviewed on a regular basis."

Timing Mr Armstrong adds that timing is really important when it comes to investing. “I would say when it comes to building your nest egg, where you are at in your financial journey will impact on the type of investment you make,” says Mr Armstrong.

Budgeting Budgeting is another big step for people when nest egg building. Budgets can help you figure out whether you are projected to reach YourRetirementLiving.com.au

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your goal or if you need to start making major changes to how you spend your money. "The way you harness your income is very important. Also understanding your spending habits, where money is going and how it is going," explains Mr Armstrong. If you have to work on saving more money, you really have to assess what spending can be cut so you can meet your goals. Whether you spend lots on shopping, sports, or hobbies, you need to see if this is viable for you and your budget plan. You don't necessarily have to cut out those passions and interests altogether, it could just be reducing your overall spend to help you in the long term. A financial planner will be able to identify where your money is going and how you can change your spending habits to get you on track for building your retirement nest egg.

Consider your investment options Mr Armstrong explains that there are hundreds of investment options available to you, and there is no such thing as a 'top investment option'. A financial advisor can help you find options and investment strategies that actually benefit you in the short or long term.

“You need to understand the goals you want to achieve and align your investments with those goals.” You may not have an idea of how to invest or you may have areas that you want to invest in, either way, a financial planner will find an investment that meets your risk type and is the best option that suits you financially. "Each person has a different roadmap. All you can say is not one approach suits all. There is an obligation to ensure that we act in the best interests of the client and that is within the new Financial Adviser Standards and Ethics Authority (FASEA) guidelines," says Mr Armstrong. Just because you like the idea of owning property or stocks doesn't mean it is necessarily the best investment option for you. Property has a high pay in and very little financial return and stocks are subject to frequent market fluctuation. "When choosing to invest, a cautious and considered approach is best. There is no one size that fits all when investing . . . All the best advice in the world has to benefit the person you are talking to," explains Mr Armstrong. "You need to understand the goals you want to achieve and align your investments with those goals. It is worthwhile not capitalising on one investment. Put simply, don't put all your eggs in one basket."

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Tips for when you start investing: ◆  Engage a financial planner for expert advice. ◆  Understand your risk profile. If you are really worried about losses, buying shares in a fluctuating market might not be for you. Nothing delivers big bucks unless it's riskier and you need to be prepared for if there is a bad outcome. ◆  A sk for proof that an investment is actually a good investment. Just because something is a good investment for other people doesn't mean it is a good investment for you. ◆  Understand what you are trying to achieve and align your investments with these goals. ◆  Research the investment option you are considering. ◆  Don't invest in one area or only focus on one type of nest egg option. ◆  Watch out for get-rich-quick schemes they are usually too good to be true. ◆  Good planning is vital when investing. ◆  Have cash reserves for one year in case something unexpected pops up. ◆  Consider the benefits of an investment before jumping in. Will this investment make you a return? Does this investment suit your financial needs or risk profile? ◆  If you don't have a lot of money to spend, start small and build yourself up so then you can start diversifying your investment portfolio. According to Mr Armstrong, the biggest tip for when you want to build your nest egg is that "investing and financial planning needs to start at a younger age". Disclaimer: The information in this article is general in nature and does not constitute legal or financial advice. Readers should seek their own personal legal and financial advice from a suitably qualified practitioner.


Retirement Planning – Superannuation

Boosting your super before retirement Most people don’t really think about superannuation during their working life, other than making sure their employer makes regular contributions.

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sually, ten to fifteen years before retirement is when people suddenly become interested in their superannuation, especially if they want to find out if they are fully prepared to retire at the retirement age and live off their super. At least, that’s definitely what Jennifer Langton, Specialist Advice Manager for Aware Super, has seen over the years. In some cases there may be the realisation that there are not enough funds to live comfortably or be able to retire at the age you would like to. When boosting your super before retirement, you need to consider the

It’s never too late to plan for retirement For Janelle and Steve, planning out their retirement wasn’t at the forefront of their mind. Now that they are both soon to be fully retired, they have engaged a financial planner from Aware Super to get themselves on track and living the lifestyle they want to lead. The pair want to become “grey nomads” and travel as much as possible early into their retirement. Steve retired first and he withdrew his superannuation to pay off their mortgage. He also bought a caravan and 4WD with his super to allow the pair to travel around Australia.

three phases of retirement and how that will impact your funds: ◆  Active phase – You are newly retired and are most likely travelling, spending more on the finer things in life and enjoying your new found freedom. ◆  Quiet phase – Where you are spending more time at home, visiting family and the grandkids, and old age issues are slowly starting to creep in. ◆  Frailty or care years phase – You are requiring more health and personal assistance, and this is often the most expensive stage of your life.

Janelle is now retiring and wants to sort out their financial situation for retirement. They believe they will be able to fund their lifestyle and meet all of their expenses with $50,000 per year The pair has found benefits from engaging a financial planner as they now have a clear direction with what they need to do to reach that goal while also gaining peace of mind that their retirement will be comfortable. Janelle will withdraw part of her super to allow Steve to make a contribution and they will each have an Individual Account Based Pension of $222,000, drawing an income of $25,000 per year. This will fund their lifestyle and expenses. Steve and Janelle don’t consider themselves as “risk takers” but understand that they need to take on some investment risk to achieve market returns and provide for a hedge against inflation.

It’s not just maximising your wealth and travel that you should be thinking about, according to Ms Langton. You also need to take a serious look at what may occur during the frailty years phase of your life, because many older people don’t want to think about the ‘C’ word – Care, or the ‘D’ word – Death. The frailty years, when you might need to be accessing health services, assistance with daily activities and even accessing aged care, can be the most expensive time of your life. In the lead up to your retirement, Ms Langton suggests sitting down with your partner or family

Aware Super has structured their investments so that the impact of significant market movements, like COVID-19, is softened and their retirement assets match their appetite for risk. The couple feel comfortable knowing that their wealth will provide them independence and ownership in retirement, and they also feel reassured that they may be entitled for the age pension when they reach the qualification age and meet the assets and incomes test. They are hooking the van up and heading off on their travels, secure in the knowledge they have ticked all of the boxes for retirement and have access to guidance into the future. Case study provided by Aware Super. This has been prepared for illustrative purposes only, Janelle and Steve are not real clients. Visit aware.com.au for more information.

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Retirement Planning – Superannuation

Compounding is when an asset has accumulated earnings, which you reinvest to build more earnings over time. The investment and its earning both gain more earnings on top of it.

and defining what you want your retirement to look like. She adds that it can be hard to pinpoint your current spending if you don’t map it out properly, so she recommends spending at least a month recording all of your expenditure. “It is amazing how many people are completely disconnected from their actual day-to-day spending!” says Ms Langton. Ms Langton explains that once you have a defined amount on day to day spending, you can start calculating how much money you will require per year to live comfortably. You should also consider paying any outstanding debt you have before you enter retirement, so you can retire with minimal or no debt and with maximum investments. “The other thing people forget about, particularly if they are looking at their superannuation, is that they need to invest their wealth appropriately to ensure it can actually grow. You should get advice on what spare capital and cash you have and what avenues are available to boost your retirement wealth,” Ms Langton adds. When maximising your super, you really need to be aware that superannuation legislation is complicated, so a financial advisor can help you increase your wealth growth while reducing your tax.

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An advisor can direct you to the best option for growing your retirement wealth, including: ◆  Salary sacrificing An arrangement between yourself and your employer, allowing a part of your wage to go to your super. This is on top of your mandatory super guarantee (SG) contribution. ◆  Voluntary contributions One way to increase your super is through concessional (salary sacrificing) or non-concessional (after tax) contributions. There is a contribution cap for concessional contributions of $25,000 (as of 2020/21), anything over this annual amount will be taxed. Nonconcessional contributions have a cap of $100,000 annually or $300,000 over a three-year period. ◆  Investments Investing your super in a particular way can help you grow your retirement wealth before you retire. When you choose a super organisation, you can choose between a variety of low risk to high risk investment types. What investment type you choose depends on your age and what your appetite is for risk. ◆  Compounding If you start retirement planning early, you have time to take advantage of compounding.

◆  Splitting super between spouses Sometimes, splitting your super contributions with your partner can actually help you save money on tax. Or if you or your partner have retired, it would allow for the couple to have a bigger amount of funds to withdraw without tax being applied. ◆  No debt into retirement Dipping into your super to pay off your debts when retired leaves less money for yourself near the end of your lifetime. That’s why it’s best to have your debt as minimal as possible when entering retirement. It’s best to get advice for all superannuation related matters because there are guidelines you need to follow and certain thresholds and caps to be aware of when maximising your wealth, or there could be unintended consequences. A financial advisor can evaluate your current situation, understand and assess your appetite for investment risk, and find the best mix of investments that can bring you the right returns over your expected time frame. “Nothing stands alone, it’s about using all of the different options available and really maximising your situation. You shouldn’t look at things in isolation,” says Ms Langton. “By going it alone, not only are you missing out on expert advice to maximise your situation, you are really running the risk of getting things wrong.” Disclaimer: The information in this article is general in nature and does not constitute legal or financial advice. Readers should seek their own personal legal and financial advice from a suitably qualified practitioner.


Retirement Planning – Superannuation

Funding the lifestyle you want to lead Superannuation, or ‘super’, can take a long time to build, especially when you are trying to put as much into your super to best achieve your ideal retirement.

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here are many different avenues you can take when choosing an option for funding your life after retirement, but you need to make sure you choose an option that fits your circumstances and assists in providing some return to keep your superannuation growing whilst you use it, to avoid running out of money later on.

Seeking advice The legislation around super can be very tricky to understand and navigate, and can also incur serious consequences if not adhered to appropriately.

that balance over time and it is subject to market fluctuation. So you run the risk of running out of superannuation if you don’t invest it in a way that enables you to achieve some growth.” It’s important to remember that under normal circumstances you can only touch your super once you reach your “preservation age”, which is currently between 55-60 years of age depending on when you were born, and there are laws around how you take out your superannuation.

Funding options When the time comes that you need to access your super to pay for your day-to-day living expenses you’ll need to meet a “condition of release” before your funds will be made available. You need to contact your super company to apply for a condition of release. There are a number of different options for funding your retirement lifestyle: ◆  Account based pension Transferring all or part of your super into an account based pension enables you to start receiving regular income payments. There is a minimum amount you need to withdraw each year based on your age and the balance of the account. The longevity of your account depends on how your account is

invested, how much income you draw and how markets perform over time. ◆  Super lump sum Once reaching your ‘preservation age’, you may be able to withdraw all or some of your super as a lump sum, also known as cash, and place it in your bank account. If you are under 60, you will need to pay tax on lump sums over $205,000, withdrawals after age 60 are tax free. What you do with your super lump sum after you withdraw it may affect your eligibility for age pension. Additionally, if you take a super lump sum and spend a large amount of it, it leaves less super to last during your life. ◆  Annuities Investing a lump sum of your money into an annuity, with either a super fund or life insurance company, that will pay you a regular income for a chosen duration or for life. Your income payments are guaranteed, no matter the market performance or interest rate changes, but you may not have the ability to withdraw more money if you need it. ◆  Term deposit You invest a lump sum of money for a fixed period of time into a fixed interest rate with a financial institution such as a bank. Generally, the money only becomes available to withdraw

Jennifer Langton, Specialist Advice Manager for Aware Super, says it is important to seek advice over one of the most important financial decisions you can make in your lifetime. Ms Langton gives an example, saying, “Once you roll super into a pension and start taking income from that, then you are reducing YourRetirementLiving.com.au

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Retirement Planning – Superannuation

after the agreed period of time the term deposit runs for is finished. You may have to pay a penalty or fee if you wish to make an early withdrawal before the agreed term. ◆ Pension and other Government assistance The Government provides a range of funding assistance to older people in the form of pensions and subsidies. The age pension provides financial support, plus a range of concessions and subsidies for older Australians. Your eligibility for age pension payments is based on financial thresholds. If your assets and income are above the published thresholds, you may be able to receive a part pension. Other concessions and subsidies you may be eligible for include the SeniorsCard, Commonwealth Health Card and electricity, water and gas rebates. ◆ D iscretionary income After you have paid your taxes, basic living costs and bills, the extra amount of money left over is considered discretionary income. This income should only be used on the finer things in life after you have bought essential items. Discretionary income can be used on any activities or for unexpected expenses. ◆ I nvestment bonds An investment bond is a debt, which you invest in and it provides a regular payment of interest for a set period of

time. At the end of the bond period, you receive the main investment back. Think of it as you are lending money to a company or Government, who pays for interest on the bond, and then returns the investment you made back after the set period of time finishes. An investment bond is not a very flexible agreement. These are just some of the options available to you to fund your lifestyle whilst you are retired and there may be others that are more suited to your specific circumstances.

Taking risks Engaging a financial advisor can be beneficial in finding the right investment products and mix of investments or funding options for your circumstances. They can make sure you have enough opportunity for growth in your retirement wealth and help you understand how your superannuation system works once you retire. Expert knowledge around superannuation and investment risk and return is key. Ms Langton says some people retire and put everything in cash, because they consider that cash is ‘safe’, but it is actually unlikely to sustain you through your lifetime because it doesn’t have the opportunity to grow or increase in value to keep up with inflation and the cost of living over time. “The reality is, the more risk you take, the more opportunity for growth but there is also more opportunity for loss. There is a sweet point where everybody is comfortable and a good financial advisor will have a robust discussion with you about risk and return.” She adds that based on what works best for you and your goals, your portfolio will then be invested into a diversified range of assets to ensure you have a mix of conservative,

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“The more risk you take, the more opportunity for growth but there is also more opportunity for loss.” capital stable assets, such as cash and bonds and growth assets, like Australian and international shares and property. When investing money it’s important to be aware that the markets fluctuate often, so moving everything to cash after a blip in the market, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, is a very rash decision. It’s important to remember that once you make a decision on how you want to fund yourself during retirement, it is difficult to change the choice you have made without financial advisor assistance. For example, if you decide to take out a lump sum out of your super and put it into another investment, once this is done there are not a lot of other avenues you can take if you change your mind. Once you take money out of the superannuation environment, there are limited opportunities for getting money back into super. “Some of these decisions once made cannot be undone.” Disclaimer: The information in this article is general in nature and does not constitute legal or financial advice. Readers should seek their own personal legal and financial advice from a suitably qualified practitioner.


Retirement Planning – Superannuation

How to avoid your super running out Having a solid retirement wealth nest egg before you retire is a big goal that many strive for.

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ith the current life expectancy in Australia sitting at 83.5 years of age, if you retire at 65 you need your super to last you for nearly 20 years. But what happens if you are burning through your super quicker than expected? Jennifer Langton, Specialist Advice Manager for Aware Super, explains that the next generation of people to enter retirement have had the full benefit of superannuation, but for older generations, the system came into effect later in their life.

Backup She says that people should be reassured that the age pension is always a backup for all older people if they do run out of their super. “This next generation really has had the benefit of superannuation for their whole working life. The older generation now in their 70s and 80s didn’t have that,” explains Ms Langton. “We do find that clients run out of money but we are lucky enough that we have the age pension, that is always the safety net. It won’t provide a luxurious lifestyle, but nobody should be living in poverty Ms Langton explains. “This is where structuring your situation earlier in life and making sure you have had advice on investing appropriately, and maybe considering different options other than super to supplement things to make it easier for you to manage in the long term.”

It’s best to avoid running out of your super. Here are some tips to help you stretch your funds as far into retirement as possible: ◆  If you own a home, it would likely hold many memories and might be hard to part with. However, it is one of your biggest assets. If you find that you are going through your superannuation quicker than expected, downsizing to a smaller home and selling your current house can provide extra funding for yourself. ◆  Don’t forget, your home is also an asset that can provide income and capital in later life by releasing equity via the Government Pension Loans Scheme or a Reverse Mortgage from a bank. ◆  Start budgeting. While people may not be a fan of the technique, if you are drawing your super quicker than you expected, it may be a good idea to rein in your spending and map out your necessities for a while. ◆  Utilise other Government benefits and entitlements. Some easy ways to cut costs is through using available resources for older people, this could include supplements for energy, utilities and travel, or special seniors meal deals. Your local council and community groups also provide a range of subsidised services for older Australians.

◆  Keep on top of fees. You may not realise it, but your super organisation does charge fees to your account. Reassess your super account every now and then to see if it is fiscally still the best decision for you, or whether you should change to a different super organisation that has lower fees. ◆  Diversify your investment portfolio so there are multiple options for income over time. For instance, lifetime annuities and deferred annuities are investments that can be put in place to provide later life income. ◆  It’s never too late to pick up a part-time job. If you are fit and have spare time, a part-time job can take the burn off of your super.

Get advice It is really important to get advice from a certified financial planner and reassess your situation regularly. “I will often pick up a client who has not had advice for years and years, and they are drawing so much from their superannuation that they are actually running down their super too quickly. In some circumstances, they are drawing so much from their superannuation that it is actually reducing their age pension entitlement,” Ms Langton says. YourRetirementLiving.com.au

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Retirement Planning – Selling/Moving

“it is a double edged sword. If someone had taken the time to review their situation, or the family sought some advice for them, [a financial advisor] could have given them some benefit by increasing their pension and protecting their superannuation for longer.”

Ms Langton says a common issue she comes across is people not updating their financial situation on Centrelink records, so they are actually not receiving a part or full pension like they should be. Ms Langton says, “Ideally, you should be seeking expert guidance

All things selling and moving Having made the decision to leave the family home to enter a retirement village, how and where do you begin with selling what may be your biggest asset?

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ost people use a real estate agent to sell their property but you may choose to be your own agent and look after the sale yourself or use a seller advocate to help you with the selling process.

Real estate agents Selling through an agent means you can take advantage of their experience and expertise to achieve the best selling price. An agent will

on how to structure your finances so that your super and retirement wealth doesn’t run out.”” Disclaimer: The information in this article is general in nature and does not constitute legal or financial advice. Readers should seek their own personal legal and financial advice from a suitably qualified practitioner.

When choosing an agent to represent you, it is important to do your research. The right agent will make sure that selling your home is a smooth process while acting in your best interest. It is worth speaking to a number of agents and inviting a couple to do an appraisal on your home so you can compare. As part of your selection process you may want to consider an agent’s: ◆  Experience ◆  Reputation

manage the sales process for you, from marketing your property, to holding open inspection days and managing enquiries from potential buyers. They often have access to more potential buyers through their own database and can negotiate the sales price on your behalf. An agent will prepare a contract of sale and can guide you through the legal and financial process of selling a house.

◆  Market knowledge ◆  Negotiating skills ◆  References ◆  Commission ◆  Marketing budget Selling your home privately could save you money because you don’t have to pay agent commission and are in control of how much you spend on advertising your property. But it’s important to do your research properly so you have a realistic expectation of what your property is worth, know the rules and regulations of selling a home and be sure you have the time and patience to go through the process.

Seller Advocates Some of the stress from selling your home can be removed by engaging the services of a seller advocate to deal with the real estate agent. By helping you through every step of the selling process, the seller advocate can help you get the best price for your home.

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Retirement Planning – Selling/Moving

The right agent will make sure that selling your home is a smooth process while acting in your best interest. The seller advocate assesses your property’s worth, selects an appropriate target market and can advise on the sale method. They then interview and select an agent based on your requirements. This ensures your budget is not exceeded and that your expectations are met. The seller advocate can also negotiate the agent’s fee and sale price. This service reduces the contact between the seller and the real estate agent and ensures that the property’s set price range is attained with no unexpected surprises at any stage.

Tips to selling ‘stress free’ Here are some tips to selling your home ‘stress free’ to maximise the outcome: ◆  Do your research – what is the house really worth? ◆  Think about the presentation of the home – are you going to sell it furnished or empty? ◆  What methods of sale and marketing will you employ? Will the home be auctioned or will you accept expressions of interest? ◆  Will the sale of your home impact on pensions? ◆  Seek professional advice from a real estate agent or seller advocate, as well as a financial and legal advisor. Selling a property is a big financial transaction, and whether you choose to go it alone or use the services of an expert, make sure you are confident that whatever option you go with is the right one for you.

Managing the move It is not unusual for people who are downsizing and moving into a smaller unit to have many years of accumulated goods and belongings.

The situation can be even more difficult for people who are on their own or where family is interstate and not available to help. Many people who are moving feel they need a cleaner, removalist, sorter, assistant, confidant, coordinator and gardener all rolled up into one. The stress of both finding the assistance and then coordinating can be overwhelming. Being prepared for your move is the key to a smooth transition and will take a lot of the stress out of the experience.

Tips and tricks We’ve gathered some handy tips and tricks to help you be well prepared for and on moving day: Don’t leave things to the last minute, but start well ahead. One of the first steps is to decide on a moving date. Ideally you move from your current place to the new location, however, sometimes timelines don’t align and you need to find some temporary accommodation. Next, decide whether you want to move your belongings yourself with the help of family and friends or whether you prefer to outsource the job to professionals.

In most cases the seller advocate’s fee is a percentage taken from the real estate agent’s fee. There is no direct cost to the seller. A seller advocate can also organise and manage the presentation of your home. Everything from a quick tidy up to a renovation or makeover can be handled by them. Landscaping, gardening, building, and decorating, re-fitting, rubbish removal – you name it. They know how to increase the appeal and value of your home. And, if there are items you wish to sell, the seller advocate can arrange to have them valued and auctioned. YourRetirementLiving.com.au

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Retirement Planning – Selling/Moving

You may want to get some quotes from removalists to weigh up the cost and effort involved.

can take your time and sort through the things you want to take, sell, donate or throw out.

◆  Compiling an inventory of the contents and arranging valuations

Once you have worked out who will do the moving, the next step is to gather supplies. If you are using a moving company they will most likely provide you with boxes so you can start packing ahead of time or they can do the packing for you on the day.

Closer to the moving date you can dismantle larger furniture, such as cupboards, shelves and desks, but be sure to keep all the small pieces together in a plastic bag and taped to the main pieces so they don’t get lost.

◆  A ssisting people to relocate into alternative accommodation

If you are organising the move yourself make sure you have cardboard boxes, tape, bubble wrap or blankets for fragile items, markers, a utility knife and garbage bags.

When you are ready to start packing smaller belongings in boxes, don’t overload them and make them too heavy. Use a marker to indicate what rooms the items should go in or if the contents are fragile and should be handled with care.

◆  Delivering valuables, financial, legal and personal papers to the appropriate person

Now that you have your supplies ready it’s time to start packing. Allow a few weeks for this process so you

Clean all your belongings before you start packing so you don’t take dirt and dust to your new place.

Being prepared for your move is the key to a smooth transition

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Your Retirement Living – 8th edition

Relocation specialists There are businesses that specialise in providing practical assistance with all aspects of moving. Relocation specialists provide a range of services that often include: ◆  Sorting the saleable items, identifying valuables, determining items to be discarded, compiling all documents

◆  Clearing the home or unit prior to sale or tenancy termination ◆  Gathering bequeathed items, photographs and memorabilia

◆  Removing all rubbish items from the entire property and cleaning ◆  Coordinating real estate agents, auction houses, cleaners, gardeners and all other services ◆  Unpacking your belongings in your new home and put furniture in position ◆  Install electronic devices like a TV or computer and hang pictures These professionals can take the stress out of moving so all you need to do is arrive at your new house and make yourself at home!


Lifestyle – Leisure

Journey to retirement The change of lifestyle when you finish work and move into retirement can be quite dramatic. There is a lot of focus on preparing financially for retirement, but most people don’t think about how drastically retirement can impact your mental health, sense of self and purpose. Of course retirement is fantastic and is going to be a whole new wonderful time of your life to experience. But the change from going to work each day to finding a life without that obligation and routine can be huge. Many people don’t realise how much they rely on their daily or weekly routine until that routine is no longer there. That’s why, preparing yourself for retirement also means getting yourself mentally ready. Think about what the transition from work into retirement may look like, find a new purpose and set goals so you are as prepared you can be for this next stage of life.

Sense of loss Closing the door on a workplace when you retire can be quite emotional. After the initial sense of freedom and elation of never having to work again wears off reality sets in. In many cases, there can be a sense of loss. A loss of purpose. A loss of activity. It can be difficult to deal with and there will be a time of adjustment to get used to your new life. Some people struggle more than others and for them this feeling of loss and the fear of losing their identity associated with their career could result in depression.

Adelaide Clinical Psychologist, Simeon Jones, explains that people can struggle with a couple of things after they retire, usually their identities and sense of purpose. “Our identity is central to how we live and how we feel about ourselves and the world. To have an identity where we feel valuable or valued, to have an identity where we feel empowered or a certain level of influence is key to anybody’s mental health,” says Mr Jones. “If someone doesn’t feel valuable and [feels] powerless, they won’t be feeling positive about their life or enjoying their life. That autonomy, and also just having an opportunity to explore and enjoy ourselves, is key to mental health in general. “It would be pretty natural for a majority of people to have a level of grief around [the end of] their careers they have really enjoyed. It is actually pretty normal to find that sad or a little bit scary to transition out of that.”

Retirement blues It is common to develop the “retirement blues”, where your loss of the 9-5 job leaves you with a large hole to fill. Harvard Medical School even recommends that retirees “don’t take it easy” when they retire, but instead stay engaged with all their interests and priorities during retirement.

Mr Jones agrees with that sentiment, saying it is important people build their social connections with people and their community, and have a willingness to experience new hobbies and activities which provide them purpose and value. “People who stay fairly rigid on their views on how they should do life or what makes them valuable as a person, those are the people who will struggle more. I would encourage flexibility, and try to look at life and the world in different and new ways, and also experiment,” says Mr Jones. After retirement there will be a period of reinvention, where you try to find what and who you are, and redevelop your personal identity. It is the perfect time to get to know yourself without your daily job to get in the way!

“Having an opportunity to explore and enjoy ourselves, is key to our mental health.” YourRetirementLiving.com.au

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Phases of retirement In your final five to 10 years before retirement, also known as the preretirement stage, your main focus is probably on being able to retire financially. But have you thought about what you are actually going to do with your time and how this change will affect you mentally? “Often with retirement, the focus is on setting yourself up financially as opposed to setting yourself up for a lifestyle change,” says Mr Jones. “People, in the year or two leading up to their retirement, [should] actually start to reflect on how they want to spend their time when they do retire. And even take that up before they retire, so they might start volunteering or buy a set of golf clubs or try different hobbies or engage with different social groups beforehand. “Then when the transition comes, they are excited to spend more time doing those things as opposed to being left feeling kind of empty or less full than before.” Usually, the second phase of retirement is like the “honeymoon stage” of a relationship or after a wedding. It refers to the time period straight after finishing work. Those first few weeks or months when you’re enjoying not having to go to work each day and the days are yours to do what you like.

“See it as a chance to become a new person and expand the person who you are.” Once the phase has run its course, the rose coloured glasses will come off, and you will be experiencing more neutral feelings about retirement. After the honeymoon phase is the letdown period, where you have come down from your high of retirement. Many retirees find this period difficult to find things to keep themselves busy. Mr Jones says people should expect a certain amount of adjustment to retirement, ranging from about six months to a year. You will eventually move into a phase of redevelopment, where you actively seek new activities to keep yourself busy. Whether that be through volunteering, new hobbies, or keeping social.

“If you have that willingness to put yourself out there, then the vast majority of people will find their own equilibrium, their own balance, their spark in life again. It just takes that willingness to try,” says Mr Jones. Eventually, you will settle into your new routine and are able to get used to the downtime you now have available for the things you enjoy.

Beating the blues Mr Jones stresses that it is important to recognise if you are struggling with retirement. He recommends attempting to find new meaning and purpose in things that bring you pleasure in life. But if this doesn’t work and you are finding it hard to get there by yourself, visit your General Practitioner (GP) and get a referral to a psychologist to get support. Putting yourself out there and experimenting with new activities and things can be really beneficial in improving your wellbeing. Mr Jones also recommends keeping active through exercise and catching up with friends and family when you need social connectedness. While the first few years can be different when you are retired, Mr Jones says you should remain positive and look at retirement as a new chance to learn more about you. “Look at retirement as an opportunity rather than a loss of identity or loss of role,” suggests Mr Jones. “You can view it as an opportunity to find out what your role will be going forward and you can take that time to reflect and think about who you want to be, who you want to engage with, what you want to experiment with. “Rather than feeling like you have lost something, you can see it as a chance to become a new person and expand the person who you are.”

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Lifestyle – Leisure

Finding purpose in retirement The first few months of retirement can be bliss and may seem like a holiday. You have no work or obligations getting you out of bed in the morning, and you suddenly have a free schedule.

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ut as reality sets in, it is pretty easy to fall into what some people call, the “retirement rut”.

or business and then life will keep going, because they don’t think they have to plan for it at all,” says Mr McKnoulty.

You may feel lost and unsure what to do with all this free time you now have on your hands. And the realisation sets in that this is your new life. Where the joys of not having work doesn’t outweigh the sudden need for a purpose during your new retirement life.

He goes on to explain the impact of not being properly prepared for the next stage of life.

Peter McKnoulty, Founder of Transition Planning Australia, explains that in his experience, people barely think about the transition into retirement. “[People] are not at all prepared. Part of the problem is that they have no idea that they need to do anything about it. They just think they will just waltz on from work

This is an optimum time to build your social network, get to know new people, and catch up with old friends.

“There are different components of it there, part of it is people are reluctant to let go. And those that do, haven’t planned properly. “When people leave their businesses or work, unless they spend time to find new activities to replace those work ones, that is when they risk falling into a hole, becoming bored and depressed, and then it is a slippery slope from there.” To avoid falling into a rut after retiring, there are a number of ways to remain part of the community and make a meaningful contribution to those around you, to the public or for yourself.

Family and friends Retirement is a great time to bother your children and borrow your grandchildren for a catch up or two, or even a vacation! A lot of grandparents even pick up the roles of supportive nannies to help their children with their busy workload. Seeing family is a lot easier when you have all the time in the world. Retirement is a time for lots of laughs and special memories with family. You should also have more time for social occasions. This is an optimum

time to build your social network, get to know new people, and catch up with old friends. Remember when you used to tell your best friend that your dates didn’t match up and it was impossible to coordinate a get-together? In retirement, that shouldn’t be an issue any more. Keeping strong relationships in retirement is important for your health and wellbeing. And who doesn’t love a good afternoon barbeque! If you don’t have as many people to be in contact with or you are socially isolated, Australian Retired Persons Association (ARPA) might be the next point of call. The organisation encourages people over 50 to keep active in both your mind and body while making friends. They provide a range of activities and groups you can get involved with, including bushwalking, computer groups, cycling, golf, pleasure fishing, Wednesday weekly walkers, tap dancing and variety concerts, photography groups, and so much more. Alternatively, COTA Australia’s State and Territory organisations have a wide range of partnerships with over 50s Senior groups and organisations which you can choose from. Probus, Country Women’s Associations and Lions Clubs are also always looking for new members to assist with volunteering initiatives and to create stronger community networks.

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Lifestyle – Leisure

Exercise and wellness

clubs are extremely popular and a great way to meet other people in your community.

Your retirement is a great time to focus on yourself, both mentally and physically.

Hobbies

This could be a time to become more in touch with your spiritual or religious side, or you may want to get on top of your physical health and pick up a sport or start going for more walks. There is no excuse not to get fit and healthy when you no longer have work taking up your time, and your local Church or Temple would be more than happy to receive any extra help in their daily running. Modified sports are becoming more and more available around the country. Football Federation Australia has a national Walking Football program for older people so they can continue playing the sport they love without injuring themselves. Walking Netball is also a modified sport for men and women that encourages fitness and health among older people. Maybe this is the time to get involved with your local bowling club? A fantastic place for a natter, a drink and low-impact sport, bowling

With all of your available spare time, it is the perfect opportunity to invest in your personal hobbies that you really enjoy. Whether it is gardening, reading, painting, knitting, or carpentry, you can now dedicate yourself to perfecting a craft. Maybe even sell your wares at the local market. Just because you are retired, doesn’t mean you can’t try a new personal venture. Contact your local Council to find out about any hobby groups that may be available to join. For instance, gardening groups or community plots are usually organised through Councils. If you have a general interest in a hobby, like knitting or reading, search for local groups near you on the internet or you may be able to use the directory section of your local newspaper to see if there are any hobby groups who are recruiting new members.

Retirement is a great time to focus on yourself, both mentally and physically However, if you are looking to learn a new hobby by yourself, like learning a new language or skill, there are many online options that can assist you. Searching ‘how to’ and your chosen hobby on YouTube can bring you a huge library of educational videos. Phone applications are also a lot more advanced than they used to be, it is quite easy to download an educational app, like Duolingo, and learn a new skill.

New career Even if you retire, you don’t have to completely give up work. Working part-time can give you more time to yourself without compromising on income. Working part time can also be a great way to make your superannuation last longer if you are concerned about your current wealth. This could also be an opportunity to engage in a career you have always been interested in and passionate about. If you want to stick with what you know, consultancy in your field of expertise is really common for retirees. This keeps you involved in the industry or career you love, but without the added stress of a 9-5 job. Alternatively, if you are looking for that career change, the Federal

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Your Retirement Living – 8th edition


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Lifestyle – Leisure

a Guide Dog while it learns to become a seeing eye dog, or you could volunteer at your local Red Cross Shop. There are so many volunteering options to choose from that can make a huge difference in your local community. Volunteering Australia also runs an initiative called GoVolunteer.com.au that helps connect volunteers with the right organisation match.

Study It’s never too late to study at university and learn something new! Government developed an initiative called the Restart Program, which encourages employers, through a financial incentive, to take on mature age workers. Not only that, the Government has a Career Transition Assistance (CTA) program that helps older job seekers build confidence and skills so they can re-enter the local job market. It is common in certain industries for people approaching their older age to move into positions that have less hours. For instance, teaching is a pretty full-on career, but substitute teaching or tutoring can be an alternative to working full time. If you are lost about what to do next or what field you would like to move into, a career counsellor could be greatly beneficial with finding a new avenue of employment and

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Your Retirement Living – 8th edition

enjoyment. And if need be, maybe look at further training to help you move into a new industry.

Volunteering Most older Australians will lend their time to volunteering causes. A majority of Australia’s volunteers are older retirees. Being able to give back to your community or to others not only provides a sense of achievement, but can really give you purpose. So whether it’s cooking meals for the homeless or helping out at your local op shop, see what volunteering opportunities are available to you in your community. Contact your local Council to see what local volunteering options are available, depending on where you live, they may have a town beautification group, which keeps the gardens and towns looking clean and tourist-friendly, or many Council’s utilise older volunteers to drive vehicles and assist other older people attend their doctor’s appointments. Volunteering Australia has a directory, where you can find what volunteering opportunities are in your local city or town. You could become a puppy raiser, fostering

More often than not, older people are starting to diversify their own education at universities or learning institutes during their retirement. You can now follow interests or passions you have never had time to dedicate yourself to previously. Why not learn another language? Or take up a course in archeology? Live the dreams you had as a child. Heading back to university is becoming more common, and even encouraged, for older people. There is a large portion of older women who are entering university as they never had the opportunity when they were raising the family. University of the Third Age (U3A) is an international education organisation that provides courses to people over 50 who are no longer working. Each State and Territory has its own U3A available to older students. Most universities in Australia also make special effort to support mature-age students, including through flexible study options and support services. They tend to have a more flexible admission process when applying for a degree that includes your work and life experience. There are usually orientation programs for mature students so they can transition back into an education environment.


Lifestyle – Travel

Living life on the road Being able to travel around Australia visiting some of the most beautiful and pristine places the country has to offer is often a dream for many older Australians; becoming a grey nomad.

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here is a lot of planning involved if you want to live your life on the road, whether you choose to travel for a short time or for a long, once in a lifetime trip. You need to consider how to finance your travels and make sure you don’t have a care in the world when you are away from home.

When deciding where to travel, make a list of places you want to visit.

And of course, there is not a set way to travel as a grey nomad, so have a think about what you imagine your trip to be like so you can plan for it.

When deciding where to travel, make a list of places you want to visit. The Great Ocean Road in Victoria? The Kimberley in Western Australia? What about Uluru in the Northern Territory? Millaa Millaa Falls in Queensland? Are you prepared to ferry over to Tasmania with your motor home? Set up your caravan for a night under the stars in the Blue Mountains National Park in New South Wales? Or how about visiting Wilpena Pound in the Flinders Ranges in South Australia? If you have a number of iconic spots you want to visit, you should try to map out the best way to reach all of your dream destinations without making the travel route too difficult. You should also be aware of if you intend to stay in caravan spots or camps, or whether you may need to go bush and make friends with the wild. And are the caravan sites you are visiting free or paid?

Ask other grey nomads about their experiences along the way and what they recommend to visit or suggest to avoid. If you are new to caravanning, you may find a lot of the Kimberley can be difficult to traverse if you aren’t experienced enough. Whereas, some people may not feel comfortable travelling along the Great Ocean Road on its windy roads with their caravan.

Budgets and bills Money is going to be a big component of travelling. Firstly, you need to think about how long you want to travel for and then figure out how much your dream trip is going to cost. Knowing how long you will travel for will give you a better idea around all the different monetary variables for the trip. While you want your travel to not feel like a chore, it is better to be prepared for how much things

Make sure to take into consideration all of the variables, for instance, the health needs of your partner or yourself, what caravan or motor home you intend to purchase, and talk to family and friends about how this trip will work.

Location, location, location Do you know where you are travelling to? Is it easy to get to? How long does it take to drive between towns?

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Lifestyle – Travel

belongings. Some people may borrow sheds or spare rooms from their relatives, but it would still require you to downsize your assets. Alternatively you could hire a storage unit to store your possessions. If you decide on this option you may want to check beforehand if the facility is clean, well-reinforced from elements like water, closed off from rodents, and whether your chosen provider has security in place, like cameras. Similar to a home contents insurance, you should be able to buy storage unit insurance from your new storage provider. will cost, for instance, budgeting your food over this period or potential caravan or motor vehicle breakdowns. Keeping an eye on your spending or sticking to your budget can make your trip more enjoyable so you don’t get short-changed near the end of your travel. It’s important to remember that even though you are away, your bills don’t just stop. If you still own your home, you will have taxes and council fees to pay, and if you use mobile devices, you will still have phone bills to settle. Additionally, travelling around in a caravan means that you will need insurance and registration for your car and caravan, and will need an up-to-date driving licence. The best options to help with your bills include moving all of your payments to online if possible or to utilise mail forwarding to a close family member and friend. This means you won’t miss a bill!

What about my house? This can be a major concern for wannabe grey nomads, especially those that choose to live life on the road for an extended period of time.

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You can only take so much with you on your journey. Since your home and possessions are usually your biggest asset, you need to take every precaution before travelling. Many who want to lead the nomadic life will need to decide whether to keep their home, rent it or sell. For people that keep their home, they will need to figure out if they will get a house sitter for that period or have family, friends and neighbours keep an eye on the property. If you live in a retirement village or independent living, your home may have available vehicle or caravan storage. This can be helpful for when you go on trips, because your village operator or community can check on your home for you while you are away. If you intend to rent out your home, you will need to have someone checking on the property which would be easiest through a rental management company. You may also want to store your possessions elsewhere. And if you decide to sell, what will you do with your belongings? You can choose to sell most of what you own or store some of your

Make a list of all the things you’re putting in storage, either at a friends house or a rented storage facility, so it will be easy to locate your possessions on your return.

Try to map out the best way to reach all of your dream destinations without making the travel route too difficult. Before you leave While it is easy to put off making appointments, you should be undertaking all your medical and dental checks before you leave for your big trip. It’s smarter to get all of your checks out the way, have an assessment of your general health, and if you have current illnesses, have all your relevant documents ready


Lifestyle – Travel

It’s important to remember that even though you are away, your bills don’t just stop. and put aside in case you have an emergency or need to visit another doctor while on the road. Ensure you have your prescriptions and often used medications such as paracetamol or ibuprofen ready

to go and have scripts with you in case you’re running low. Also, keep all your medication safely stored in cool areas, especially if you are heading to areas in Australia that are incredibly hot. Depending on the route you take, it can be a good idea to make yourself aware of what towns you are visiting that have a pharmacy, as well as their opening hours. The same can be said for food and drink, and if you have a particular allergy or diet you need to stick to, it may be best to make sure you can access the healthiest or correct food products where you travel. Remember, some States and Territories do not allow you to bring in certain foods across the border.

Your caravan should be stocked with an up-to-date first aid kit. Most pharmacies sell fully stocked kits. Do you have the training to use some of the equipment in the safety kit? It’s a good idea to be across everything before you start travelling. First aid training is pretty easy to organise and access in every State or Territory. Make sure your car and caravan have been checked prior to leaving, so you don’t have any unexpected vehicle issues while on the road. Also leave a contact number with loved ones so they know where to reach you in case of an emergency. It can be a good idea to not only have your insurance details stored safely, but to also leave a copy with your loved ones just in case.

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Lifestyle – Travel

Great Australian Bucket List Uluru

Source: Tourism NT Matt Cherubino

Australia bursts with jaw-dropping sights and experiences equal to any the world over. And if COVID-19 has taught us anything, it’s to seize the moment and appreciate the immense treasure that’s in our backyard.

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his great Australian bucket list captures just some of the iconic destinations that we should experience at least once in our lifetime. So, when the opportunity arises, start ticking these amazing experiences off your list.

Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park, NT When it comes to iconic Australian images, Uluru quickly comes to mind. This 348m-high sandstone rock is mesmerising, intricate, and massive. And then there’s the towering dome-like peaks that make up Kata Tjuta. Admire it all in several memorable ways, including strolling along picturesque walking tracks, sunrise and sunset camel tours, scenic flights, and incredible outdoor dining experiences. Where to stay:  BIG4 MacDonnell Range Holiday Park, Alice Springs.

Great Barrier Reef, QLD One of the Seven Wonders of the Natural World, the Great Barrier Reef had to make this list. As the world’s largest coral reef, it hoards a profusion of marine and coral life and is home to hundreds of islands and their beaches.

The reef offers some of the best diving and snorkelling opportunities on the planet, or scenic boat tours and flights for those who prefer to stay dry, and plenty of other pinch-me experiences. Explore this treasure with ease from myriad destinations dotted along the QLD coast. Where to stay: BIG4 parks in QLD.

South West, WA

and the rugged landscape that surrounds it, create an aura of being among true wilderness. Ample walking tracks of various gradings and distances within Cradle Mountain - Lake St Clair National Park provide the best platform for soaking up the astounding scenery. Where to stay: BIG4 parks in TAS.

Daintree Rainforest, QLD

There is so much treasure crammed into this epic pocket of WA that it almost defies belief, including shimmering beaches mixed with dramatic coastline and funky rock formations, sprawling forests and their towering trees, and captivating caves.

This is the oldest-surviving tropical rainforest on earth, and the humongous region is divine. Part of the wider Wet Tropics of Queensland World Heritage area, the Daintree houses an incredible variety of flora and fauna, much of it rare. A visit here will leave you feeling as though you’re in another world.

Throw in wine regions led by iconic Margaret River, a myriad of microbreweries, and engrossing historical attractions, and you have a destination with absolute mustvisit status.

Daintree National Park is found within these sprawling surrounds and has two distinct sections to discover, Mossman Gorge and Cape Tribulation. Both offer extraordinary visual delights.

Where to stay: BIG4 parks in South West WA.

Where to stay: BIG4 Port Douglas Glengarry Holiday Park, BIG4 Cairns Crystal Cascades Holiday Park, and BIG4 Ingenia Holidays Cairns Coconut Resort.

Cradle Mountain, TAS This eye-catching Tassie mountain is used to starring in front of the camera, and it’s easy to see why. Cradle Mountain’s jagged shape,

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Lifestyle – Travel

Kakadu National Park, NT Australia’s largest national park is phenomenal, delivering copious amounts of serious eye-candy alongside culturally significant locations. Kakadu has earned World Heritage status for both its natural and cultural worth, which is a rarity. Expect dazzling gorges and waterfalls, lush wetlands, and rugged escarpments. You will be amazed by the Aboriginal rock art that dates as far back as 50,000 years. Where to stay: BIG4 Howard Springs Holiday Park.

World-famous wine regions of SA SA’s reputation for producing outstanding wine stretches across the globe, and there’s no better way to appreciate this than being in the heart of the action. Wind your way around the cellar-doors of the Barossa, Clare Valley,

McLaren Vale, and the Coonawarra and mix incredible views and tranquil environments with delicious wine. Where to stay: Barossa: BIG4 Barossa Tourist Park. Coonawarra: BIG4 Naracoorte Holiday Park or BIG4 Blue Lake Holiday Park. McLaren Vale: BIG4 Port Willunga Tourist Park, BIG4 Cape Jervis Accommodation & Caravan Park, or BIG4 Port Elliot Holiday Park.

Great Ocean Road, VIC Arguably Australia’s most famous drive, the Great Ocean Road is dominated by spellbinding sights. A seemingly never-ending sequence of sparkling coastal views, along with funky formations and time-honoured seaside destinations, ensuring this path requires an unhurried pace. In contrast, the dramatic coastal vistas are backed by a profusion of majestic rainforest, waterfalls, and other gems found within neighbouring Great Otway National Park. Where to stay: BIG4 parks in the Great Ocean Road region.

Swimming with whale sharks – Ningaloo Reef, WA Sharing the water with whale sharks is an exhilarating experience. The sheer size of these animals is almost unfathomable, up to 18m in length, and their distinctive markings appear painted on. Bethany Wines, Barossa Valley, SA

Source: Nick Rains

Luckily, they don’t consider humans to be particularly tasty. Whale sharks reliably congregate around Ningaloo Reef, part of the wider World Heritage-listed Ningaloo Marine Park. Where to stay: RAC Exmouth Cape Holiday Park.

Port Arthur Historic Site, TAS There’s a certain eeriness to this infamous convict settlement contrasting with the peaceful surroundings. And it’s easy to get swept up by it all.

Great Ocean Road

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Your Retirement Living – 8th edition

Source: Visit Victoria

This is the most intact convict site in Australia, and the well-preserved nature of this World Heritage-listed property helps bring to life the many colourful and evocative stories. Fascinating.


Lifestyle – Travel

Mona, TAS

Port Arthur Historic Site

Source: Alastair Bett

Where to stay: NRMA Port Arthur Holiday Park or BIG4 Hobart Airport Tourist Park.

Coober Pedy, SA There’s uniqueness, and then there’s Coober Pedy. This distinctive town is well-known for its underground buildings, including pubs and shops, lunar-like landscapes, rich opal-mining culture, and various quirks. And within daytrip distance are some attentiongrabbing natural wonders like the colourful hills of Kanku-Breakaways Conservation Park. Where to stay: BIG4 Stuart Range Outback Resort.

The Kimberley, WA An area of exceptional beauty in North West WA, the Kimberley features some of the most aweinspiring natural attractions on earth. Marvel at incredible waterfalls, rock formations, gorges, and so much else. The peculiar Bungle Bungle Range is among the many highlights.

Sydney, NSW Simply put, Sydney is stunning. The NSW capital regularly draws the eyes of the world and provides visitors with its own bucket list. It’s home to landmark structures like the Sydney Opera House and the Sydney Harbour Bridge, iconic Darling Harbour, and famous beaches like Bondi, and that’s just the start! Where to stay: Ingenia Holidays Nepean River or NRMA Sydney Lakeside Holiday Park.

Tjoritja West MacDonnell National Park, NT This attraction is somewhat underrated, yet flying under the radar is a large part of its appeal. Comfortably reached from Alice Springs, the national park dishes up a succession of remarkable natural features and sacred Aboriginal sites, gorges, chasms, colourful ochre pits, springs, and more. And when visiting, you might be lucky enough to have some of it to yourself. Where to stay: BIG4 MacDonnell Range Holiday Park, Alice Springs.

The Museum of Old and New Art (Mona) is firmly entrenched as one of Tasmania’s most popular attractions. Located in Hobart, Mona quickly shatters any preconceptions that this is just another museum. A series of quirky, thought-provoking, and even confronting displays and exhibits have led to worldwide acclaim. And it’s much more than a museum. Mona includes a cellar door, bars, a restaurant, café, and regular events like comedy and jazz. Please note: At time of print, MONA was closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Where to stay: BIG4 Hobart Airport Tourist Park.

Mount Kosciuszko, NSW Climbing Australia’s tallest mountain during warmer months has to be on the bucket list. While Mount Kosciuszko is a baby compared to the likes of many of the world’s tallest peaks, it still presents a fair old challenge. This 2,228m-high mountain strongly rewards those who reach its summit with awe-inspiring views extending over the diverse landscape of Kosciuszko National Park and beyond. Isn’t it time you enjoyed a bucket list experience? Start your adventures at BIG4.com.au.

WIN a BIG4 Break! DPS has partnered with BIG4 to share some of Australia’s must-see attractions and help you find your next holiday destination. BIG4 Holiday Parks is the home of the great Australian break, and it’s giving you the chance to WIN your very own getaway. Simply sign up to the free BIG4 Perks membership program and you’ll go in the running to win a two-night stay at any BIG4 park across Australia. There are loads of quality holiday parks to choose from among some of the most desirable locations in Australia. And they are packed with fantastic features. There are 12 getaways to be won in 2021, with one winner to be drawn at the end of each month. Go to DPS.com.au/winabig4break and enter your details. Competition T&Cs can be found on DPS.com.au/big4compterms.

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Lifestyle – Travel

14 fabulously scenic drives Southern Ocean Drive - Rapid Bay

Source: Jem Cresswell

Australia is made for road trips. Coast‑hugging touring routes, rainforest‑clad paths, inland adventures, and trails showcasing anything from waterfalls to wineries.

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e’ve rounded up some of the most scenic drives in Australia that you simply must follow. Prepare for roads full of visual feasts and enthralling encounters.

Northern Territory Red Centre Way Where:  Alice Springs loop via Watarrka/Kings Canyon and Uluru Distance:  1135km, or 1750km for a completely sealed road In a nutshell:  Witness some of Australia’s most mesmerising, iconic, and significant natural creations, including rock formations, gorges, and watering holes. Central Australia’s famous red desert sands are a signature of this unforgettable, epic touring route, which is rich in Indigenous history and culture. Must-see attractions:  UluruKata Tjuta National Park, the many highlights of Tjoritja/West MacDonnell National Park, and Kings Canyon. Where to stay:  BIG4 MacDonnell Range Holiday Park in Alice Springs.

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Your Retirement Living – 8th edition

Nature’s Way Where:  Darwin loop via Litchfield and Kakadu National Parks Distance:  735km

In a nutshell:  This route joins a trio of captivating national parks, led by World Heritage-listed Kakadu along with Nitmiluk and Litchfield. Be enchanted by their bountiful natural treasures and couple this with visits to inviting townships, refreshing springs, and other Top End delights. Must-see attractions:  Ancient rock art and Yellow Water Billabong in Kakadu, Nitmiluk Gorge and Leliyn/Edith Falls in Nitmiluk, termite mounds and Florence Falls in Litchfield, and Berry Springs Nature Park. Where to stay:  BIG4 Howard Springs Holiday Park near Darwin.

New South Wales Waterfall Way Where:  Coffs Harbour to Armidale Distance:  210km

In a nutshell:  A path bursting with spectacular scenery. Expect to encounter World Heritage national parks, swathes of seemingly

never‑ending rainforest, and a handful of enthralling waterfalls among more. And the two cities that mark the route’s start and end points warrant extended stays thanks to their many excellent attractions. Must-see attractions:  Dorrigo National Park’s Skywalk lookout and Crystal Shower Falls, Wollomombi Falls in Oxley Wild Rivers National Park, Ebor Falls in Guy Fawkes River National Park, and the Dangar Falls near Dorrigo. Where to stay:  BIG4 Park Beach Holiday Park or BIG4 Sawtell Beach Holiday Park in Coffs Harbour, and BIG4 Armidale Highlander Van Village.

Grand Pacific Drive Where:  Royal National Park to Jervis Bay Distance:  180km

In a nutshell:  Sparking coastal vistas abound on this snaking path that begins south of Sydney in the world’s second-oldest national park. The sparkling water views contrast with sharp towering coastal cliffs and rainforest-dominated vistas. A highlight is the iconic Sea Cliff Bridge, which exemplifies the breathtaking beauty for 665 metres. Must-see attractions:  Royal National Park, Symbio Wildlife Park, Nan Tien Temple, and Kiama Blowhole. Where to stay:  BIG4 Easts Beach Holiday Park in Kiama.


Lifestyle – Travel

Sunshine Coast Hinterland

Source: Tourism Events QLD

Queensland Great Barrier Reef Drive Where:  Cairns to Cape Tribulation Distance:  140km In a nutshell:  This coast-clutching route exposes two of Tropical North QLD’s signature attractions, reef and rainforest. It all comes to a head at Cape Tribulation, accessed via a cable ferry, which is famous as a rare meeting point of two World Heritage sites, the Wet Tropics of Queensland and the Great Barrier Reef. Must-see attractions:  Palm Cove, Ellis Beach, Daintree National Park and its two distinct sections, Mossman Gorge and Cape Tribulation. Where to stay:  BIG4 Cairns Crystal Cascades Holiday Park, BIG4 Ingenia Holidays Cairns Coconut Resort, and BIG4 Port Douglas Glengarry Holiday Park.

Sunshine Coast Hinterland Where:  Brisbane to Montville Distance:  140km In a nutshell:  While sparkling waterways are a hallmark of this famous region, its hinterland is just as impressive. Lush rainforest, famed national parks and their towering peaks, charm-rich towns, and welcoming wineries all feature on this path. And the beauty of a return drive is you can follow the inland route one way and combine it with the coastal path for the other. Must-see attractions:  Glass House Mountains, D’Aguilar and Kondalilla National Parks, Maleny Botanic

The Epicurean Way - Seppeltsfield Road

Gardens and Bird World, and the Chapel Montville. Where to stay:  BIG4 Sandstone Point Holiday Resort, BIG4 Caloundra Holiday Park, BIG4 Maroochy River, and BIG4 Ingenia Holidays Noosa.

South Australia The Epicurean Way Where:  Adelaide loop via four prominent wine regions Distance:  400km In a nutshell:  Incorporating some of Australia’s most famous wine regions, McLaren Vale, Adelaide Hills, the Barossa, and Clare Valley, this route is all about indulgence, glorious scenery, and relaxation. Prepare for a taste of the good life. Must-see attractions:  Aside from the many iconic cellar doors, highlights include Port Willunga Beach, the German-themed town of Hahndorf, Mount Lofty Botanic Garden, and Mount Crawford Forest Reserve. Where to stay:  BIG4 Adelaide Caravan Park, BIG4 West Beach Parks, BIG4 Port Willunga Tourist Park, BIG4 Hahndorf Resort, and BIG4 Barossa Tourist Park.

Southern Ocean Drive Where:  Adelaide to Mount Gambier via Kangaroo Island Distance:  650km (not including Kangaroo Island ferry crossing) In a nutshell:  Explore two treasurestuffed regions, the Fleurieu Peninsula and the Limestone Coast,

Source: SA Tourism Commission

with its mix of stunning, dramatic landscapes. Be greeted by long stretches of astonishing coastline and glistening beaches, captivating caves, vivid lakes, and much more. And a side trip from Mount Gambier to the Coonawarra wine region and Naracoorte Caves is highly rewarding. Must-see attractions: Kangaroo Island, Victor Harbor, Coorong National Park, Cape Jaffa, Tantanoola Caves, and Mount Gambier’s Blue Lake. Where to stay:  BIG4 Cape Jervis Accommodation and Caravan Park, BIG4 Port Elliot Holiday Park, BIG4 The Bend Holiday Park at Tailem Bend, BIG4 Blue Lake Holiday Park at Mount Gambier, and BIG4 Naracoorte Holiday Park.

Tasmania Great Eastern Drive Where:  Orford to St Helens Distance:  175km

In a nutshell:  Embracing Tasmania’s enchanting east coast, the drive unveils a plethora of bedazzling scenery. Expect to witness beautiful beaches, majestic mountains, rows of vineyards, quirky formations, and iconic national parks while indulging in fresh and tasty homegrown produce. Must-see attractions:  Freycinet National Park and its hero attraction, Wineglass Bay, Maria Island, Bicheno Blowhole, Binalong Bay, and the Bay of Fires. Where to stay:  BIG4 Iluka on Freycinet Holiday Park in Coles Bay and BIG4 St Helens Holiday Park. YourRetirementLiving.com.au

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Lifestyle – Travel

this terrific trail. Along the way are vibrant towns and cities that ensure this touring route is one that is best served unhurried.

Great Eastern Drive - Little Beach

West Coast Wilderness Where:  Cradle Mountain to Lake St Clair Distance:  275km

In a nutshell:  It’s no stretch to say this drive encounters some of the most spectacular scenery on the planet, including sections of the enormous Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage area. Towering peaks, tapestries of rainforest, and sparkling lakes and rivers all feature alongside captivating heritage towns and plenty of other surprises. Must-see attractions:  Cradle Mountain - Lake St Clair and Franklin-Gordon Wild Rivers National Parks, the timeless streetscape of Zeehan, Montezuma Falls, the West Coast Wilderness Railway, and the ‘moonscape’ scenery around Queenstown. Where to stay:  BIG4 Strahan Holiday Retreat and BIG4 Ulverstone Holiday Park.

Victoria The Great Ocean Road Where:  From Torquay to Warrnambool Distance:  255km

In a nutshell:  One of Australia’s most famous touring routes was built as a memorial to those who died fighting in World War I. A succession of astounding coastal vistas and sparkling beaches contrast with glorious rainforest, and some of Victoria’s mostloved holiday destinations are dotted along the way. A bucketlist experience. Must-see attractions:  The rockstar like Twelve Apostles, Loch Ard Gorge, and the dazzling waterfalls and rainforest within Great Otway National Park.

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Your Retirement Living – 8th edition

Source: Lisa Kuilenburg

Where to stay:  There are plenty of BIG4 parks in the Great Ocean Road region.

Great Alpine Road Where:  Wangaratta to Metung Distance:  340km

In a nutshell:  An assortment of stunning, diverse scenery makes this an irresistible route. Be wowed by majestic mountains and alps, colourful vineyards, and expansive forests before reaching glittering waterways. The route slices through vibrant towns and sleepy townships that add to its rich allure. Must-see attractions:  Mt Buffalo and Alpine National Parks, including Mt Hotham and Mt Feathertop. Charm-packed Bright is an essential stop, as is the old-gold town of Omeo. Where to stay:  BIG4 Wangaratta North Cedars Holiday Park, BIG4 Bright Holiday Park, and BIG4 Porepunkah Holiday Park.

Western Australia Best of the South West Where:  Perth to Albany and return Distance:  1185km

In a nutshell:  A first-class mix of exceptional coastline, dramatic formations, towering trees, stunning caves, and fabulous wine regions are just some of the many highlights of Great Ocean Road

Must-see attractions:  Busselton Jetty, Walpole-Nornalup, LeeuwinNaturaliste, Torndirrup and William Bay National Parks, Margaret River wine region, and National Anzac Centre in Albany. Where to stay:  BIG4 Perth Midland Tourist Park and BIG4 parks in South West WA.

The Indian Ocean Drive Where:  Perth to Kalbarri and return Distance:  1780km In a nutshell:  This is a road trip for the ages, encompassing a raft of mind-blowing scenic wonders from colourful formations to mesmerising coastline. Witness amazing sunsets, feast on delectable seafood, and soak up fascinating histories. Must-see attractions:  Pinnacles Desert in Nambung, spring wildflowers in Lesueur, limestone caves in Stockyard Gully, and Nature’s Window in Kalbarri. Hutt Lagoon, also known as the Pink Lake, is not to be missed either. Where to stay:  BIG4 Perth Midland Tourist Park, BIG4 Ledge Point Holiday Park, BIG4 Dongara Denison Beach Holiday Park, BIG4 Geraldton Sunset Beach, and RAC Cervantes Holiday Park. Isn’t it time you went on a road trip? Start planning your touring route adventures at BIG4.com.au now. Please note: All distances are approximate and don’t include detours. On any road trip, it’s advisable to stop regularly for breaks. Don’t drink and drive but do have fun. Source: Visit Victoria


Lifestyle – Travel

7 top tips for capturing the best travel photos Holiday happy snaps are time-honoured. Photos brilliantly capture priceless travel moments and preserve cherished memories with family and friends. Hikers at Mount Buller

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echnology has only increased our thirst for photography. The emergence of smartphones and digital cameras, as well as image-focussed social media channels, means being behind the lens is easier and more rewarding than ever. While technological advances have made photography simpler, your camera or phone can’t do all the work for you. So, have a read of these travel photography tips to help you capture the best holiday snaps possible.

1.  Get to know your camera in advance You’ve just bought a new camera but if you’re not acquainted with your new toy well before departure you might find yourself wasting precious time flicking through manuals and being frustrated by settings when you should be enjoying yourself. Even if you spend only a short amount of time getting a feel for your camera before you head off, it’s better than nothing. And while not so important with smartphones, it still helps to be familiar with its features in advance.

2. Do your research Scenario: You spy a breathtaking rock formation or towering waterfall online and decide you want to photograph that particular scene for yourself. You arrive at your prized vantage point and gasp in horror, the image you’ve gazed at doesn’t contain busloads of tourists! Solution: Do your research to avoid peak times if photographing

Source: Visit Victoria

at popular sites. Or ask locals for advice, they may reveal an alternative vantage point to snap away at your treasured subject.

3. Think about your timing Image quality varies considerably depending on the timing of your photograph. Early risers are consistently rewarded, cue jawdropping sunrises and crowd-free spaces. Conversely, patiently waiting to shoot a blazing sky at sunset can be equally gratifying. Yet again, ask a local, or research the optimum time to capture landmark sites. Standley Chasm near Alice Springs is a good example of an attraction that rewards savvy photographers (for the record, it’s best photographed around midday).

4. Composition While this is not a technical photography guide, we have a couple of simple composition tips to make your photos more pleasing to the eye. Give thought to the key element/s of your image and what you’re trying to achieve. For example, photographing friends or family requires versatile thinking. Sometimes it pays to ‘fill the frame’ (take a close up) to best capture a beaming smile and portray your subject’s excitement.

helps to ‘bring out’ the main subject of your photo, include it. If photographing from a lookout or at a crowded area (where people are not your subject matter), identify a key element. Otherwise the image may be too ‘busy’, boring, or inadequately convey the scene.

5.  Don’t be afraid to experiment For those who like to be creative, experiment to your heart’s content! Digital technology means photographic experimentation does not have to equate to churning through rolls and rolls of expensive film. Nowadays, if your creative efforts don’t work out, simply delete the image, and try again.

6.  Charge your battery It’s obvious advice, but it can’t be stressed enough, always charge your camera battery or phone before you head out to shoot. You’ll never forgive yourself if you miss that once-in-a-lifetime shot as a result of a dead battery.

7.  Enjoy the moment

However, if you’re near an iconic sight, consider giving more weight to the surroundings to highlight the destination’s significance.

To finish with, remember this understated tip, don’t let the process consume you. Enjoy the moment and never let photography detract from your holiday experience. If you’re stressing about camera settings or trying to perfect a shot, you may miss the moment altogether. Take time to appreciate what’s in front of you.

Similarly, don’t shy from ‘negative space’, such as a backdrop of a bright blue ocean. If negative space

For more tips and tricks and to plan your next break, head to BIG4.com.au. YourRetirementLiving.com.au

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Lifestyle – Travel

8 Australian experiences you might not know about In the words of Captain Obvious, Australia provides some amazing experiences. What the captain fails to mention, though, is that this wealth of remarkable attractions means some truly incredible experiences are often overlooked.

2.  Climbing the Shot Tower, Hobart, TAS Found 10 kilometres south of the CBD, the Shot Tower was once tasked with manufacturing ammunition. Today, it’s in the firing line of visitors seeking spectacular panoramic vistas. The structure has a few quirks that might enhance your interest, including a sign that proclaims it took eight months to build when the actual figure is more like eight years. Its height is another point of contention. Where to stay:  BIG4 Hobart Airport Tourist Park.

3.  Wandering around Umpherston Sinkhole, Mount Gambier, SA

I

The Gap, Torndirrup National Park

t’s time to change that with this superb line-up of underrated Australian activities.

From the easily reached and the inexpensive to the once in a lifetime, exciting adventures await.

1.  Exploring Torndirrup National Park, Albany, WA Australia teems with treasure-rich national parks that all jostle for attention, but Torndirrup clearly

Source: Tourism Western Australia

deserves far more footprints than it receives. It’s massively mesmerising, rugged and windswept and crammed with eye-popping, funky features. Among the most impressive is The Gap where the full force of the ocean’s wild fury is laid bare in dramatic fashion. And it’s all easily admired from a raised viewing platform. Where to stay:  BIG4 Emu Beach Holiday Park or BIG4 Middleton Beach Holiday Park. Umpherston Sinkhole, Mt Gambier

Torndirrup deserves far more footprints than it receives 38

Your Retirement Living – 8th edition

Nature has moulded a wonderful creation with a little help from humanity. In a former life, the sinkhole was a limestone cave before relentless corrosion from seawater resulted in its roof collapsing. It has since become a spectacular sunken garden with a size and scale that is only truly appreciated with a first-hand visit. Better yet, it’s centrally located and open day and night. Where to stay:  BIG4 Blue Lake Holiday Park. Source: Offroad Images


Lifestyle – Travel

7.  Historical Clunes, Goldfields region, VIC

Coober Pedy

4.  An airboat tour of Mary River wetlands, NT Spotted on the fringes of Kakadu National Park, the wetlands of Mary River are home to a feast of fascinating flora and fauna, including crocodiles. And witnessing it all while on an airboat is unbeatable. It’s an exhilarating experience that provides unparalleled access to a mind-blowing section of the Top End. If you’re lucky, your friendly guide will be armed with intimate knowledge of these actionpacked surrounds. Where to stay:  BIG4 Howard Springs Holiday Park.

Coober Pedy is a truly captivating destination

5.  Delving into the SS Yongala wreck, Ayr, QLD

Source: Angela Lisman

Although this isn’t the only place in Australia that could claim to be forgotten by time, it certainly seems to be overlooked by the masses. A wander along this old gold-mining town’s main street is like a trip down memory lane with a streetscape that appears untouched since its creation besides the modern cars.

Dive tours depart from Ayr and provide an eerie, incredible experience where you’ll be joined by a wealth of magical marine life. Or relive the fascinating yarn at the Townsville Maritime Museum.

In fact, Clunes is regarded as having the finest collection of 19th-century buildings anywhere in Australia, which helps to easily evoke thoughts that you’ve travelled back a century or so. Charming.

Where to stay:  BIG4 Ayr Silver Link Caravan Village, BIG4 Rowes Bay Beachfront Holiday Park, or BIG4 Townsville Woodlands Holiday Park

Where to stay:  BIG4 parks in the Goldfields region.

6  Touring Coober Pedy, SA

Move over Bondi Beach’s Iceberg Pool, Bermagui’s Blue Pool is every bit as alluring. Found in the South Coast NSW region, this natural pool is a prized place for a refreshing swim.

The opal-mining town is hardly a spotlight avoider, but you get the feeling its unique nature warrants more attention. Simply put, Coober Pedy is truly captivating and a destination that every Australian should experience at least once. It’s well-known that much of its infrastructure has been built underground so locals can avoid the heat, and it makes for a super interesting and incomparable visit from the moment you enter town. The incredible landscapes in and around Coober Pedy only add to an extremely memorable experience. Where to stay:  BIG4 Stuart Range Outback Resort. Blue Pool, Bermagui

8.  Swimming at Blue Pool, Bermagui, NSW

The backdrop of craggy, towering cliffs only adds to the occasion, while the sparkling coastal views afforded from this vantage point are worth a visit alone. Best of all, this experience won’t cost you a cent. Where to stay:  BIG4 Wallaga Lake Holiday Park. Isn’t it time you uncovered something new? Start your holiday adventures at BIG4.com.au

Supplied

Admittedly, this site earns much attention, thousands head underwater each year for a diving experience regarded as one of Australia’s best. Yet how many of us can honestly say we know the doomed ship’s backstory? It’s not exactly Titanic like, but details of how the SS Yongala ended up on the seafloor are thoroughly captivating. YourRetirementLiving.com.au

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Lifestyle – Travel

5 essential tips for a smooth road trip with your pet For many people, the thought of holidaying without their pet is like travelling without an arm. A break just isn’t the same unless their furry friend is coming along for the ride.

W

hile taking a road trip with your pet can be a fun and memorable experience, it can have its challenges. However, with these handy tips you can have a smoother journey when on the road with your dog.

3. Avoid pet sickness

1. Give your pet a check up

It’s important to minimise the chances of your pet being sick while

Shhhh – don’t say the V word too loudly. But before you take to the highway, it’s important that you visit the vet to ensure your furry friend is healthy, up-to-date with vaccinations, and equipped to travel.

2. Take a trial run If your pet has never been on holidays, consider taking it on a trial run. A test run or two with your dog can familiarise it with the vehicle’s BIG4 Great Lakes at Forster-Tuncurry

surroundings and allow you to gauge how well it might travel when it comes to the real thing. Hopefully, this groundwork will provide you with peace of mind, too.

Depending on the length of your road trip, be sure to factor in rest stops Source: supplied

BIG4 Gold Coast Holiday Park

Supplied

on the road. One way to help avoid travel sickness is ensuring your furry friend has been fed prior to departure; at least three to four hours in advance. Your dog’s vet may also recommend ginger-based tablets in case of travel sickness. It also helps to exercise your pet long before you hit the road so as to ensure they aren’t dehydrated while travelling.

4. Take rest stops It’s best to be prepared if your pet can’t read the sign that states ‘next toilet stop 20km away’. Depending on the length of your road trip, be sure to factor in rest stops. A quick break to give your canine the chance for relief, fresh air, a stretch of the legs, and water will provide great benefit.

5. Safety first Despite cute images suggesting otherwise, dogs should not have their heads hanging out of the window while the vehicle is moving. This exposes them to the danger of being hit by objects and can also be harmful to their health, as cold air can cause ear damage and even lung infections. In addition, this obvious but important advice can’t be stressed enough: never leave your pet alone in a parked car. Even if the weather is only mildly warm, leaving a pet in a parked car can result in heatstroke after as little as 15 minutes. Now that you’re armed with a bunch of tips for travelling with animals, it’s time to check out BIG4’s petfriendly accommodation options at BIG4.com.au.

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Your Retirement Living – 8th edition


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Health & Wellbeing – Nutrition

Eat yourself healthy in retirement It’s not unreasonable to assume that once you retire, you will be able to spend more time ‘wining and dining’ with your friends and family.

W

hile there is nothing wrong with enjoying the good things in life, you should remember that a balanced diet is key to a healthy and long life.

can support you when you have a chronic health issue. Ms Freeman says it’s a great way to be involved in managing the treatment of your health.

Food and nutrition are an important part of looking after yourself as you age. An old body will never function well off poor nutrients and vitamins.

As you get older and frailer, you start to lose a lot of muscle, which can impact you in terms of mobility and strength. Protein intake needs to be increased compared to what a normal adult would need to eat.

A bigger problem as you age can be reduced taste and smell, a decreased appetite, or the loss of skills to make yourself food. Jane Freeman, Accredited Practising Dietitian and Spokesperson for Dietitians Australia, says that healthy eating when you are older can really help with reducing the likelihood of developing or exacerbating chronic health conditions. “Good nutrition is important as you age and ageing obviously brings body changes with it. These can be health issues or high risk of heart disease, diabetes or things like arthritis and osteoporosis,” says Ms Freeman. “A diet has to be quite nutrientdense, meaning the food you eat you need to aim to really pack it full of healthy food nutrients, particularly protein. “Really focusing on the quality of the food that you are putting on the plate more so than the quantity.” When reaching your 50s or 60s, more key health problems start to present and health becomes a bigger issue for older people. Tuning in your diet to support good health can be really beneficial and

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Your Retirement Living – 8th edition

The more mobile and healthy you are, the longer you can remain living an active and independent life. For more information about help in the home, see the Home Care Guide starting on 80D. Fueling your body with the right food can assist in ‘eating yourself healthy’. A good diet can reduce the likelihood of you developing chronic

illnesses, keep your muscles and bones strong, and nurture your mental health.

Tips for keeping healthy in retirement ◆  Eat a well-balanced diet ◆  Make sure you reach your five vegetables and two fruits a day, plus eat whole grains and lean meat. Gravitating towards a balanced diet is the best way to get the nutrients and vitamins you need to fuel a healthy body. Vegetables, fruit and whole grains are good fibre for your body that assists in moving cholesterol out of the body and promotes happy bowel health.


Health & Wellbeing – Nutrition

◆  Reduce your salt and sugar intake ◆  Salt can easily increase high blood pressure and heart disease. Many pre-packaged foods have large levels of sodium, and adding salt to flavour your food should be replaced with using different fresh herbs and spices. Additionally, many processed foods have hidden sugar crammed in, which means you may not be aware of how much sugar you are actually consuming. Sugar can result in chronic health conditions, like diabetes or heart diseases. ◆  Eat lots of protein ◆  Protein guidelines for older people are that they need around 1 to 1.2 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight. This is quite a lot of protein. Muscle loss is a big problem for older adults, so you need to be mindful that you are eating lots of different protein through legumes, vegetables, yogurt and meat. ◆  Vitamin D and Calcium ◆  Older adults need Vitamin D to be able to ingest calcium properly, and of course, calcium is important for your bones. If you have a fall and break something, you will be more likely to bounce back if your bones are strong and healthy.

Calcium also assists with arthritis and osteoporosis.

◆  Enjoy your wine and beer, but don’t overdo it

◆  Cut down on saturated fats

◆  Everyone can enjoy an alcoholic beverage occasionally, but it’s important to remember that alcohol doesn’t have any nutritional benefit and can be just empty calories. It has high amounts of sugar and the older body doesn’t respond well to alcohol. It’s recommended that men and women should not have more than two standard drinks a day.

◆  Heart health is key when you are older, so cutting down your saturated fat consumption can be really important. Avoid highfat dairy or your discretionary foods/junk foods, like take away, as much as possible. Using healthy oils, such as olive oil, in your cooking can also help in reducing your saturated fat intake.

A good diet can reduce the likelihood of you developing chronic illnesses, keep your muscles and bones strong, and nurture your mental health.

Since your body requires fewer calories as you age, you need to make every bit of food you consume count. It’s well known that malnutrition affects many older people in aged care facilities, but most don’t realise that malnutrition can occur before someone is even in a facility and may even be the cause for ending up in a nursing home. Your body is less able to absorb the nutrients and vitamins you need when you are older, which is why you really need to focus on what you are putting in your body early on. Having a basic meal plan for the week can keep you on top of your eating habits. You should also complement healthy eating with exercise. For more information about keeping physically fit, see page 46. YourRetirementLiving.com.au

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Health & Wellbeing – Nutrition

Are supplements worth it? Your body requires a good mix of vitamins and minerals to keep you functioning and healthy when you are older. However, you are more susceptible to deficiencies in certain vitamins and minerals during your old age.

I

n some cases, supplements can be very helpful in fueling your body with the right nutrients, if your normal diet is lacking. Supplements can also boost your nutrition even if you have a well-balanced diet.

Pic

Not all older adults need to take supplements or vitamin tablets to improve their nutritional intake, it definitely depends on how you are managing your own diet. There are some instances where an older person can fall behind in their nutrition levels, explains Margaret Hays, Accredited Practising Dietitian and Spokesperson for Dietitians Australia. “Supplements wouldn’t be for everybody. Some people eat really well and some people eat really poorly. It would be that old thing of somewhere in between would be fine, but if at the other end of the spectrum you would definitely need to be looking at nutritional support,” says Ms Hays. “You have to take it case by case. A lot of people wouldn’t have access to a dietitian, but their General Practitioner (GP) should

be trying to screen all that and make suggestions.”

Finding the right foods Before taking any supplement or vitamin tablets, you should check with your doctor about whether they are right for you. Additionally, a supplement may interfere or react with other medication you are taking. For instance, iron and zinc supplements should not be taken at the same time.

Not all older adults need to take supplements or vitamin tablets to improve their nutritional intake, it depends on how you are managing your diet. 44

Your Retirement Living – 8th edition

If you have issues absorbing nutrients or with eating, like dysphagia, supplements may be beneficial. However, you should never substitute supplements for actual food. All the nutrients and vitamins, fats and carbohydrates your body needs can be found in the day to day food you eat. It’s about finding the right foods that meet that criteria and eating enough of it. Ms Hays adds that there may be instances where an older person would be aware of when they need to take supplements, for example, for more fibre or because they aren’t meeting their protein requirements. In cases like iron levels, it is quite common for people, including older people, to have low levels of iron, so iron supplements are a great way to reduce the risk of issues like anemia that could result in a fall.


Health & Wellbeing – Nutrition

Although, Ms Hays explains that for some vitamin deficiencies, like iron, you really need to have a baseline blood test completed before taking iron supplements.

What vitamins are important? Vitamins and minerals become really important as you age, as your body needs a lot of nutrients to keep you fit and healthy. On top of a balanced and nutritionrich diet, supplements may be able to assist in boosting your nutrition intake, particularly in areas that are more difficult to maintain. Important vitamins to monitor are: ◆  Fibre, or rather a lack of fibre, can be a relatively common issue for older adults. Ms Hays explains that older people can struggle to chew foods or may not be bothered to cook their own food and aren’t eating as much fruit, vegetables and whole grains. Fibre is really important for digestive health and regular bowel movements and should be part of the day to day diet.

“Supplements may be able to assist in boosting your nutrition intake, particularly in areas that are more difficult to maintain.” ◆  Protein is another important vitamin for older adults, but it can be difficult to reach the level that an older body would need. Ms Hays says a lot of older people reach for sugary food and skip their main meals, and because you aren’t eating protein you are more likely to snack on food you don’t need. ◆  Your iron intake can go down quite easily at any age, but can have a more apparent affect when you are older, especially if you are not eating enough protein. You will feel tired, rundown and be more prone to colds and infections. ◆  Calcium is vital to reinforcing and strengthening your bones. Women are more susceptible

to osteoporosis when they are older, so calcium is really important to consume. Additionally, calcium also has a benefit on other areas of the body, like your muscles, nerves, cells and blood. ◆  V itamin D helps your body absorb calcium the most effectively and is produced naturally in the body when you’re exposed to sunlight. If you are not meeting the mark with your Vitamin D levels, then your calcium intake won’t be working as well as it could and you’re at higher risk of developing bone conditions such as osteoporosis. A lot of people assume they are getting weak due to old age, but Ms Hays explains that may actually be because they are not getting the right nutrients. “If people are unsure, see your dietitian or see your GP and ask to be referred to a dietitian. We have really good advice that we can offer to people in a way that is not going to cost people a lot of money,” says Ms Hays. “They are going to be able to increase their nutritional intake very easily because we would listen to their lifestyle and what barriers they have got when considering changes, and make some really useful and practical recommendations to help them get their nutrition up to speed and make their body perform and age better.”

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Health & Wellbeing

◆  Prevents cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and other chronic diseases ◆  Manages arthritis ◆  Reduces anxiety or depression (see page 50 for more information about mental health) ◆  Improves sleep ◆  Increases self-esteem

The importance of staying active Keeping moving and active is really important in your older age, as it has a direct effect on your mobility, health and wellbeing.

R

esearch has found that lack of physical activity when we are older plays a big part in the physical decline linked to old age. Regular exercise has also been proven to provide cardiovascular benefits to people over the age of 50 and is a huge contributor to life longevity. If you keep fit and healthy through regular exercise, you will be less likely to develop mobility problems, unsteadiness, trouble getting in and out of a chair, difficulty walking, or having a fall at home. Additionally, health conditions can become bigger problems without exercise, including joint problems, pain, disease and muscle weakness. So it’s worthwhile to keep yourself moving as best as you can, even if you’re becoming less mobile. And while it may be harder to get those skills back that you lost, it’s

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Your Retirement Living – 8th edition

not impossible. It is never too late to get fit, and keeping healthy physically in our old age is instrumental in living longer. Sports and Exercise Physiotherapist, Matt Ransom, says that you have to ‘use it or lose it’ when it comes to moving your body and remaining mobile. “If you don’t remain active you won’t be able to maintain the physical capacity that you currently have which is enabling you to stay in the comfort of your own home. Regular exercise has numerous benefits from physical to mental,” explains Mr Ransom.

Benefits to regular exercise Exercise is really important to everyone for its benefits to the body and how it can enhance your life. Mobility isn’t the only reason you should exercise. It can also help with: ◆  Reducing fractures by improving bone strength ◆  Increase in energy levels ◆  Helps maintain a healthy weight ◆  Regulates blood pressure

If you participate in social sport, you will have the added benefit of social interaction. Exercise can be a great way to socialise and get to know new people. A local sporting club or social group, including lawn bowls, badminton, tennis or a walking group, helps you get in your daily exercise while making a friend or two along the way. Not only that, if you love a sport but it’s too rough to play, you may be able to find a ‘modified’ sport version that keeps you on the field without having to worry about any injuries. Contact your local council or sports club for more information about activities or exercise groups in your community. It is also common for communities to have classes or groups available that focus on fall prevention, maintaining your balance and flexibility, and improving muscle strength. Mr Ransom explains, “There are numerous community falls and balance classes that are created for older Australians to help improve muscle strength, balance and coordination. These classes also have a social benefit.”

What if I don’t exercise regularly? Similar to not keeping active when you are younger, not exercising later in life can have very obvious side effects and lead to poor health.


Health & Wellbeing – Physical Health

Your metabolism will slow down naturally as you age. This can make weight gain easier and keeping off the kilos more challenging. There are huge health benefits that come from exercise. Exercise can build your muscle mass and kickstart your metabolism, which, in turn, helps burn calories and keeps your weight in check. Particularly for older people who don’t exercise, there can be increases in body fat levels, risk of developing diseases, like heart disease; blood pressure and susceptibility to mood disorders. While in other areas there will be a reduction in your muscle mass, strength and physical endurance, coordination and balance, joint flexibility and mobility, immune system, bone strength, and cardiovascular and respiratory function. All of these health issues can have huge effects on your physical abilities. It’s important to nurture your body and undertake some form of exercise. Being healthy and fit also has been known to have positive impacts on your mental health.

Keep those knees up! Exercise is really important to continue into older age. There is never a reason to give up being active, except if you have an injury that stops you from moving, but even then there are usually ways to get around it. You don’t have to be doing full workouts or participating in sport, however, just continuing daily things, like going for walks or standing up to make dinner, can make the difference in keeping up your everyday motor skills. If you love sport, there are modified sport options available, like walking football, which has become very popular in Australia recently.

Getting back onto the proverbial bike Firstly, if you are overweight, have a chronic illness or disease, or live a sedentary life, it might be a good idea to see your doctor or a health professional for advice on getting into an exercise routine. At the start, exercise will feel like a chore, so try to do something that you enjoy.

Encourage your friends to get involved. Ask some close friends if they want to start a walking group with you and see if you can work your way up to higher intensity exercise together. Otherwise, choosing safer exercise options might be the way to go. Take a ride on your bike or have a walk around the local park. Swimming is also a great low-impact form of exercise. If you want a more guided exercise program, join a local gym or hire a personal trainer (PT). A personal trainer will not only be able to help you get fit, they will also sit down with you and organise goals you want to achieve and keep you on track to accomplish those goals. Learning how to use weight training with the help of a personal trainer can be a great way to improve your muscle mass. The main aim is to start off small and work your way up. Doing something is better than doing nothing. While age can be a factor in physical health, being active and nurturing your physical abilities can stave off the effects of getting old for longer.

Fall prevention One of the most common mobility problems in older Australians is falling over at home. Falls is a common reason for an older person to end up needing help at home or even end up in an aged care home. Taking a fall can be deadly for some older people, whereas others experience broken bones, bruises and soreness. A fall can also lead to older people not wanting to take risks or being scared of falling over again. To reduce the risk of injuries and falls, physical exercise is your best preventative. At least 30 minutes of moderate physical exercise or activity a day is recommended, with a focus on aerobics or muscle strength. YourRetirementLiving.com.au

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Health & Wellbeing – Physical Health

Undertaking regular strengthening, stretching or bodyweight exercises are great for developing and maintaining your muscle strength, which is paramount to staying mobile. Always talk with your doctor or a health professional about increasing your physical activity. Remember, some activities you do regularly may be considered exercise without you

10 habits linked to a long life When people turn 100, everyone always wants to know what their secret is to long life.

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n many cases, centenarians have provided some unique answers to how they reached 100.

A 107 year old woman from New York said it was because she avoided men and stayed single. Another centenarian said his secret elixir had kept him alive for so long – a beer at 4 pm everyday! He did this for 15 years straight! While some people search for the secret to a long life, the truth is, longevity comes down to your general health and wellbeing. Here are ten science-backed habits that link to a long and happy life:

Eat well In your old age, a balanced diet can be key to a healthy body and mind. Cooking at home is a great way to target the nutrients you need.

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even knowing! For example, walking to the supermarket, mowing the lawn or dancing. If you are already struggling with mobility issues, there are low impact exercise or light activities you can do, like walking, yoga, pilates, stretching or swimming. You can easily access stretching or exercise programs on the internet or prescribed by a physiotherapist.

Mr Ransom says, “Physiotherapists are ideally situated to do something like this as they have an understanding of your functional capacity. “They’ll be able to assess your current mobility and function and prescribe an exercise program of gradual difficulty.”

Fuelling your body with the right vitamins and minerals can prepare your body for anything!

Being able to maintain your body weight within a healthy range means you will have a better chance at living longer. If you are obese or overweight, you have a higher likelihood of developing serious health conditions.

Exercise

Stop bad habits!

An obvious one here, if you keep yourself fit and healthy, then your body will be in the best position possible to live long and well.

That extra glass of wine may have felt like a treat when you drank it, but drinking over the daily amount of two drinks can be detrimental to your health. You absolutely can enjoy a good tempranillo or morning mimosa, but drink in moderation.

But these days, even when eating out there are more healthy food options available in restaurants and cafés than ever before.

Developing your strength, mobility and overall heart health through regular exercise is a great way to combat diseases that start to set in during your older age.

Reach and maintain a healthy weight Chronic health conditions, like diabetes and cardiovascular diseases, can shorten your lifespan significantly.

Cigarettes are also incredibly bad for you and addictive, they can lead to all types of poor health and chronic illnesses, such as cancer. Ditch the cigs if you want to be healthy and live long!


Health & Wellbeing – Physical Health

It’s never too late to start implementing good and healthy habits and get yourself on the road to longevity! Take up meditation Low stress is directly linked to long life. A proven activity that helps reduce stress levels and focus on you is meditation. A research study from a UK university found that people meditating are able to handle pain better and don't need as much pain medication. Try to implement activities in your life that remove stress as a factor.

Invest in your friendships Having a trusted friend and ally is vital to a good mental wellbeing. Who doesn't love catching up with your friend for coffee and cake, or going for a hit of golf for a bit of friendly, competitive fun. Social enjoyment and inclusion is really important when you are older and have more time to yourself.

Put your happiness first A study from 2013 found that happier people live longer. What a great reason to do what you can

in retirement to be happy and enjoy yourself! Being happy can positively affect your physical and mental health, leading to a long and fruitful lifespan.

Get some zzz's in Everyone loves a good night's sleep. You feel ready for anything and have all this energy to do what you need to. Having a good sleep is also linked to a long and healthy life. While you are sleeping, this is the best time for your body to repair from the day's activities, both physically and mentally. If you keep a regular sleeping routine, then your body will be well adjusted to keeping you in optimum running condition.

A furry friend by your side A loving pet is a great companion to keep you company and feeling loved. Loneliness is a big problem among older adults, and animals have been proven to help with feelings of loneliness and isolation.

people. Animals can also help with lowering any chronic heart issues, through stress reduction, and encourages you to exercise.

Keep on top of your medical appointments If you want to be fit and healthy, then you need to keep on top of expert advice. Yes, we know going to the dentist or your doctor isn't always fun, but it is vital to making sure you are in tip top shape. Try to visit the same dentist or doctor when you can, they will have a better understanding of your personal health history and have more of a connection with you. It's never too late to start implementing good and healthy habits and get yourself on the road to longevity!

Research has found that animals have a healing power over older YourRetirementLiving.com.au

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Health & Wellbeing – Mental Health

Looking after your mental health Mental health is an important factor in living a happy and healthy life. And especially for older Australians, your mental health can be critical to your overall health and wellbeing, which enables you to live at home for as long as possible.

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ne in five Australians experience a mental health condition in their lives. A large number of older people regularly experience feelings of anxiety or depression. And one in twenty people over the age of 65 will have a diagnosed depressive disorder or an anxiety disorder. Professor of Psychology and Director of the Centre for Ageing, Cognition and Wellbeing at Macquarie University, explains that feelings of depression and anxiety occur often to people in residential aged care or to older people with chronic health conditions. “Anxiety and depression can pop up for the first time in later life or it can be something someone has

experienced on and off through their lifespan,” she says.

Seek help The good news is though that it’s never too late to seek help and according to Professor Wuthrich, seniors generally respond well to treatment. “Once older people are told they have depression, then they are actually really willing [to get treatment]. Research has shown that they are really good candidates for psychological treatment. “They are much more reliable, they do their homework more consistently, and they actually get better treatment outcomes because

once they understand, they are really dedicated.” Some common reasons for symptoms of depression and anxiety in older people include: ◆  Health, where health issues start to play a part or you end up hospitalised ◆  Losses, whether that means retirement, family moving away, the death of loved ones, or the loss of physical abilities, like not being able to play golf or not being able to see well enough to drive ◆  General life stresses, such as financial problems, marital conflict, and more Be honest with yourself if you are suddenly experiencing depression or anxiety from difficult events in your life. Depression or anxiety in seniors can be hard to diagnose. Research has shown that a lot of GPs, clinicians and even psychologists believe that depression and anxiety are just expected for older people to experience, so they won’t encourage the person to seek treatment.

Not normal Professor Wuthrich says, “The thing that is really interesting about anxiety and depression in older people is that if it is not treated, it actually has really serious consequences. “We know you are more likely to die early, you are more likely to have worse physical health, you are more likely to develop dementia. Of course, you are also at risk of suicide or self-harm, the same as other populations. “There are lots of reasons why we should be trying to actually treat this, while usually we kind of ignore it and dismiss it, like ‘It’s normal when you are old to get grumpy and

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Health & Wellbeing – Mental Health

down because your body is failing and your friends have died.’ It is actually not normal.”

How to get help? Mental health issues can be hard to detect in older people and you may not even recognise that you have mental health issues. It’s important to seek advice from your General Practitioner (GP) or local doctor if you begin not feeling yourself. They can help you to seek treatment from a psychologist, psychiatrist or counsellor to discuss how you are feeling.

The number of older people who experience feelings of anxiety and depression is really high. Additionally, you can contact helplines, support groups and other health professionals who are able to listen to you and assist with your mental health. You will need a referral from a doctor if you want to claim mental health appointments on Medicare. Otherwise, you will have to pay for mental health appointments yourself. Your doctor will create a mental health treatment plan including the issues you are experiencing, potential treatment options, and support services. They will also provide a letter of referral to your mental health expert of choice.

This referral will allow for six appointments with a mental health professional that is subsidised by the Government. You will need to be reassessed by your doctor after your sixth appointment to receive a further four Government-subsidised appointments. You don’t have to receive a referral from a doctor, but you will have to pay the full price.

Getting on track All mental health specialists can assist you in being happy and enjoying life. Different mental health specialists are able to provide assistance in different ways. ◆  Psychologists can treat mental health problems by helping you understand how you are feeling, resolving any issues you may have, implement different treatment strategies and make changes to your day to day that can improve your quality of life. You don’t have to get a referral to see a physiologist, however, it will cost more, and they cannot prescribe medication. ◆  Psychiatrists can treat and diagnose mental health conditions with the use of medication, treatment plans and therapies. They will work alongside you, your family, and other specialists to make sure you understand and can manage your symptoms. Most psychiatrists do need a referral and there can be a long waiting list for appointments. ◆  Mental health nurses are available in the community and can provide education, counselling, offer advice and support, assist with medication, and link you with other services and professionals that can help. ◆  Social workers are able to assist you in improving your mental wellbeing by making recommendations and promoting positive change.

◆  Counsellors are able to discuss your feelings, possible solutions and causes of any stress, anxiety or depression, and then formulate a plan of action to manage your mental health. All of these professionals can have a positive impact on you and assist you in getting on track with your mental health.

Boost your mental health There are some basic daily things you can do to boost your mental health and combat any negative side effects. For instance, socialising can play a positive role in keeping your mind happy and healthy. Whether it’s catching up with a friend for a regular cup of coffee or attending group social events with other older people in the community, there are a lot of different ways you can be social. There are also support groups available to assist you with any mental health conditions you may have. These groups can be targeted towards specific areas, like grief, boredom, loneliness or isolation. Additionally, it means you are getting out, meeting new people, and increasing your confidence. Depending on the support group, you may meet in person, online or over the phone. Staying active is another key component to developing optimal mental health. Try to engage in exercise where possible, like light walking, pilates, yoga or agemodified exercise and sports. Engaging with hobbies and activities you enjoy is a great way to boost your mental health and your mind. Try to keep your mind active through playing board or card games, crosswords, and sudoku, reading books, magazines or newspapers. On the next page we’ve listed some different ways to stay mentally fit. YourRetirementLiving.com.au

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Health & Wellbeing – Mental Health

Ways to keep mentally fit Mental activity is really important as you get older because you are more susceptible to cognitive decline and mental health issues.

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eeping your mind engaged through activities that challenge and interest you is an excellent way to stay mentally fit as you age.

Study Having a purpose is vital during your retirement, and studying is a great way to test your memory, learn new skills, and open up your mind to new ideas and concepts. Read more about Finding Purpose in retirement on page 23.

Video games Not just activities for the young, there is proven evidence to suggest that videogames are fantastic for young and old to keep their mind engaged. A recent study has actually shown that regular ‘gaming’ can slow down the progression or improve the cognitive ability of an individual with dementia.

Music

Brain training apps

Games and puzzles

Music is a great way to keep yourself mentally active. Why not develop your musical side and start learning a new instrument, take singing lessons or join a local choir or band?

Mobile phones have allowed for the creation of brain training apps. You can test out your own mental abilities with short little problemsolving games or see how you are ranking against other people in your age group. Brain exercises are also known as “neurobics”.

Often, people associate crosswords and sudoku with older people, but these games are actually great for improving and maintaining cognitive abilities.

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Your Retirement Living – 8th edition

Exercise Funnily enough, physical exercise can have a really positive impact on your mental health. Going for a walk or run also jogs your memory!

Journal Start a diary or gratitude journal to write down your thoughts and feelings or something you are grateful for each day. Keeping a journal can be a great outlet for releasing pent-up feelings and emotions as a way to free up negative energy and remind you of the small things in life you have to be grateful for.


Health & Wellbeing – Mental Health

Socialise Already, older people have a higher likelihood of facing loneliness and isolation, this can severely impact your mental health and cognitive abilities. Getting out and seeing family and friends is a really great way to boost your mood and make you feel good. We are social creatures after all.

Try new things One way to keep your brain active is to try new things as it helps build brain cells and connections. It can be as simple as breaking up your routine, taking a walk in a different neighbourhood, trying new foods or doing regular tasks a different way.

Sleep well A good night’s sleep can do wonders for the body and mind. Older people should get around seven to eight

Keeping your mind healthy is important for your overall wellbeing, especially as you age.

hours of sleep a night so your mind has time to repair. A night of good sleep is a key component of keeping your memory in top condition.

No stress, no worries Stress can have a very real effect on your mental health. It’s important to minimise any stress you may experience where you can. Meditation can be a great way of being more thoughtful and in tune with yourself.

These are only a few examples of ways to stay mentally fit. There are many other activities you can do to slow down the mind and help you think more clearly, and they don’t have to take up much time. A couple of minutes each day can make all the difference. Keeping your mind healthy is important for your overall wellbeing, especially as you age. Taking preventative measures now may minimise your chances of developing a mental illness or cognitive decline later in life.

Looking for independent advice?

Talk to a real person who can help now 08 8121 3715 Home Care Options ~ Retirement Living Options ~ Residential Aged Care YourRetirementLiving.com.au

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Retirement Living Options

Retire on your own terms Live life to the fullest in our Wellbeing Communities We believe that growing older shouldn’t have to mean sitting on the sidelines. People who join our Wellbeing Communities want to live life to the fullest. That’s why we can help you take care of the everyday things, like home maintenance and security, so that you can focus on the big things. Plan ahead with confidence, knowing that if your needs change in the future, we can meet them in the one community. You’ll enjoy priority access to onsite health care, support and personalised advice from our team.

Find your nearest Australian Unity Wellbeing Community

Retirement Communities

Our wellbeing communities are open for COVID-safe inspections. Retirement communities: A range of retirement living options, architecturally-designed for healthy ageing: from three-bedroom villas on the NSW coastline, to luxury apartments in the heart of Melbourne–all with services and support available, whether you need it now or in the future. All-inclusive Wellbeing Communities: A range of retirement living options, care apartments and small-scale aged care in one location, so that you don’t need to move if your needs change.

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Bateau Bay

Cromer Hunters Hill

Northmead Penshurst

Bondi Bowral

Albert Park Carlton Geelong

Contact us to book your personalised tour 1300 160 170 australianunity.com.au/retirement-communities AU1404_201027

Port Macquarie

All-inclusive Wellbeing Communities

Croydon Kilsyth Vermont South Glen Waverley Mornington


Retirement Living Options

Types of villages There are many styles of retirement villages and they can be referred to by a variety of names.

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ome of the more common names include retirement villages, over 55 lifestyle villages, lifestyle resorts, lifestyle or retirement communities, supported living communities, lifestyle estates, manufactured or relocatable homes, residential parks, or rental villages. In this guide we will be referring to all as retirement villages. While many of these communities offer similar services, there are also differences. Some are designed for a younger set of active seniors while others enable residents to continue living at the complex as their care needs increase, meaning they may never need to move again. Others may offer aged care accommodation on the same location to suit the level of care you may require in the future.

Do your homework The accommodation options in villages will generally range from independent living units to serviced apartments with many different options in between. Each complex will offer a specific legal structure enabling you to ‘own’, ‘purchase’ or ‘lease’ your new home. Some villages may offer rental accommodation. When visiting a village, look for what makes you feel most comfortable. Do you enjoy a homely feel to your house or do you like the idea of feeling like you are waking up in a five star hotel? Entering a retirement community is an important financial investment, so be sure to check out the various purchasing or leasing options available. Ask a finance expert for advice about your financial situation before you settle on your retirement village preference. It is important to be clear about where you wish to live, and what community services you desire based around your current and future health and financial requirements.

Do your homework and carefully plan and research all of the options available to you, such as the type of accommodation which will best reflect your lifestyle and the legally binding documents that come with entering a village.

How villages are funded Resident Funded Village This type of residential village is owned and operated by the private sector or by a not-for-profit organisation on a commercial basis to produce a profit or surplus. The village is funded by residents who ‘purchase’ their villa or apartment under one of the tenure arrangements. The residents also contribute to the villages’ capital infrastructure cost and to the ongoing management of the village. Resident Funded Units are sold at market value, meaning the resident does not own the unit but purchases a loan licence agreement, giving the administration of the village an interest free loan and the resident a licence to reside in the village. Personal support or care is not always offered in Resident Funded Villages but, in residential communities, this can be purchased for an extra fee. Some new retirement complexes allow you to purchase the unit and land outright, so it is important to check the purchase or lease arrangements on offer.

Donor Funded Village These villages are normally owned and operated by not-forprofit organisations. Donor Funded Villages include an element of charitable subsidy, and entry is generally restricted to the disadvantaged. YourRetirementLiving.com.au

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Retirement Living Options

Choosing a village If you are looking for a supportive environment with safety and security, consider a well managed community living development.

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he size and levels of accommodation vary from self contained independent living units to serviced apartments, and some villages offer residential aged care accommodation on site to suit the level of care you require, if the need arises. Consider the type of community you wish to live in and what you can afford on a continuing basis. Retirement villages host a variety of lifestyles, whether that be resortlike communities, where you feel like you are on holiday everyday, or neighbourhood environments, which feels like you haven’t left your local community. Ask as many questions as you can as it is important you completely understand the financial implications of ‘owning’ a unit in a village.

Seek expert legal advice and contact the chair of the Residents’ Committee of your chosen village with any questions, and assess the culture and social aspects of the community to see if it meets your expectations.

The location When looking at locations, you may want to consider whether you want to be closer to family or stay in or near the community you’re already in. You may have always dreamed of living by the sea or in the country. Making a ‘sea change’, ‘tree change’ or ‘vine change’ is a common phrase passed around when you take that leap. While others may find proximity to shops and health facilities more important to their health, wellbeing, and security.

Whether located near sandy white beaches, overlooking the hills, hidden away in quiet suburbia or exposed near city lights, every residential community should be based on ‘senior friendly’ criteria. Things to keep in mind when choosing a village: ◆  proximity to shops and commercial districts ◆  transport ◆  peaceful and quiet environments ◆  accessibility to major thoroughfares ◆  medical and health facilities.

Accreditation makes the choice easier The number one question potential residents should ask themselves before signing up at any retirement village is: “Does it have the industry stamp of quality?” Choosing an accredited retirement village is encouraged, as it allows you to feel reassured in knowing the village is managed and operated professionally and ethically at all times. Accreditation also ensures village processes and procedures are effective, and that the village is a safe and harmonious environment that continually strives to improve its service delivery to residents.

Accommodation options Retirement accommodation comes in different shapes and sizes. They range from big resort type villages with hundreds of villas or high rise apartment complexes, to small communities with only a handful of units. The following chapter discusses the types of accommodation available at lifestyle villages.

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Retirement Living Options

Independent Living Units If you enjoy an active lifestyle and cherish independence, Independent Living Units (ILUs) may best suit your needs. Many ILUs, regulated by State and Territory Governments, are private residences that can provide village residents with the freedom to manage daily lifestyles, but with possible added benefits such as high quality community facilities, professionally managed gardens, and the guarantee of maintenance and security already taken care of by village staff. ILUs often feature easy, open plan living, which may include a complete kitchen, living and dining areas, bathroom, one to three bedrooms, as well as an external courtyard/ balcony/garden area and garage, carport or car space.

Consider the type of community you wish to live in, the lifestyle you’re after and what you can afford They may be situated within a high or medium rise complex, terrace housing arrangement, or as stand-alone or semidetached accommodation.

Serviced apartments and supported living Sometimes referred to as ‘Assisted Living’, serviced apartments provide residents with some daily living assistance. Residents of serviced apartments usually prefer to live in the privacy and comfort of their own apartment, and are generally mobile and independent.

The apartments ordinarily feature one or two bedrooms and are part of a larger residential village complex. Services provided may include cleaning, laundry and assistance with personal care. While a small kitchenette is usually included within the apartment, meals are served in a communal dining room for residents to socialise over meals. The safety of residents is a priority with some villages offering a 24 hour call system which enables residents to alert on site personal care staff in the case of an emergency.

Retirement. Live it your way. Our spacious retirement apartments have all the facilities you need to live independently, but with priority access to our co-located aged care services should you need them.

... it’s the best of both worlds.

To book a tour today, call 1800 52 72 72.

Our locations Balmoral Mews Grovedale VIC Barongarook Gardens Colac VIC

The Homestead Walkley Heights SA Cosgrove Cottages South Launceston TAS

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Consumer Story

Not just a new home, a new lifestyle When Kevin and Pamela Dring made a sea-change over 20 years ago, they didn’t realise they would eventually be city-bound again.

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ut after realising they were too far away from family and feeling like they needed a little bit extra protection, last year the couple decided to move into a retirement village in Sydney’s North. Australian Unity’s Constitution Hill Retirement Village based in Northmead, Sydney, became their new home, following nearly 20 years in Terrigal, New South Wales. They had moved to Terrigal for the lifestyle that an oceanside town brings, so their decision to move into their new community was the very same, searching for the ideal lifestyle that suited them. The pair have only lived in their new retirement apartment for a year, but they have wholeheartedly thrown themselves into their new life in Constitution Hill. Some of the couples biggest ‘musts’ when choosing a retirement village included a bowling green and gardening opportunities. However, they didn’t realise how much they would enjoy having a café facility, which is a common spot to catch the pair in the morning. “We certainly don’t have any regrets,” explains Kevin. “What we are doing, is investing in a new lifestyle in our

Kevin and Pamela have quite a free and full life with their own hobbies.

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ageing years and accommodating for not being as agile as we all used to be. “And you are in a facility that recognises that and provides a range of activities within those constraints and services that makes your life that much more enjoyable and stress-free.”

“I didn’t expect people to be so friendly and open. If you have some query, there is always someone who can set you straight or tell you where to go.” Pam agrees, saying there were a few things that surprised her about village life, but now that they are settled, they really enjoy the community and lifestyle they are able to lead. “I didn’t think it would be quite so free,” says Pam. “Or so many opportunities to do things, hobbies and activities, and again we are lucky because we are in such a nice village.

Source: Australian Unity


Consumer Story

Giving up their home was easier than they thought.

“I didn’t expect people to be so friendly and open. If you have some query, there is always someone who can set you straight or tell you where to go.”

Life doesn’t stop in retirement The couple have lived a busy life, Pam as a former nurse and then full-time mum, and Kevin as a marketing manager and in senior management positions. Kevin and Pam have kept themselves busy by being involved with multiple bowling clubs, including the bowling group at Constitution Hill Retirement Village. During retirement, Kevin says it is really important for people to keep themselves busy with things they enjoy otherwise they will find retirement difficult. “I think you have got to have something to do. You can’t switch off and do nothing. And our salvation – I initially did consultancy work – but the biggest aspect was my voluntary work in bowls administration. That has kept me pretty busy and I am still doing it,” says Kevin. “And Constitution Hill has a very nice four rink synthetic green, almost brand new. An active group of around about 30 bowlers, men and women. We are maintaining our interest in lawn bowls that way, as opposed to only joining a bowling club. “And we joined a gardening club. They have an area of gardening plots where you can continue to grow a few veggies and tomatoes and the like. That is another community aspect we are involved in.” Kevin has also put his hand up to be on the Residents Committee, which has been a big learning curve for him, coming up-to-date with retirement village legislation and requirements.

Source: Australian Unity

Feeling extra safe in their community Another big hobby for the pair is travelling. Pam always had itchy feet for travel, she says that hasn’t changed and they often organise trips around Australia when they can. Living in a retirement village makes them feel reassured that their home will be protected and taken care of while they are away. Their family is also very happy with the retirement village decision, as they are now close enough to pop in during the week for a visit, and knowing their parents have a close network of friends within the village. Kevin says, “I was always concerned that if something happened to me, living in Terrigal, Pam would be left a bit isolated, being an hour and a half away from family. Retirement living in a village overcomes a number of those negatives.” The location has also been a big plus for the pair, as they are close to major hospitals, doctors and shopping centres, along with public transport. Pam also adds that if something happens in the future, Australian Unity has an aged care facility on-site, which makes access to aged care services easier. Both Kevin and Pam’s advice to people if they are considering a retirement village is to not leave the decision too late. “You are not moving into aged care, you are moving into a new lifestyle,” says Kevin.

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Retirement Living Options

A care community will provide lifestyle village experiences with added care support It is important to understand that people with complex care needs, who may require greater medical attention, will not always suit living in a serviced apartment. Eligibility to reside in a serviced apartment or a supported living community may require you to be assessed as requiring assistance with daily living activities. A registered nurse or health care professional will complete the independent assessment which you can arrange to be conducted in the privacy and comfort of your own home.

Extra care services can be tailored to suit residents’ health needs if required for an extra fee, which may include help with personal hygiene or managing medications.

Rental units Some retirement villages offer rental accommodation, sometimes known as periodic tenancy, but these are generally reserved for people with limited financial resources and are usually income assessed. You will generally be charged a rental that is a percentage of the age pension and you may be eligible for rent assistance from Centrelink.

Community houses If you prefer to live in close proximity to other people and only require limited services, such as meals, then a community house is ideal as it offers low cost bedsitter housing. These are excellent options for those with a lower asset base. These communities provide lifestyle village experiences with added care support. Similar to serviced apartments and support living, this option is great for people who would prefer to be in retirement

accommodation and don’t want to go straight into an aged care facility.

Flexi units These one bedroom units allow a person to either remain independent or use the services the village offers on a ‘user pays’ basis, such as meals, cleaning or laundry services.

Care communities These communities provide lifestyle village experiences with added care support. Similar to serviced apartments and support living, this option is great for people who would prefer to be in retirement accommodation and don’t want to go straight into an aged care facility. When living in a Care community you can access additional supports as you age and your needs increase without you having to move to a different support setting such as supported loving or an aged care home. You can continue living in your own place in the same community but benefit from additional care and support, including personal support, dementia care and palliative care.

Legal structures The most common forms of tenure at retirement villages are loan, licence and leasehold, while Strata Title and Company Share are less common.

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egardless of the type of tenure, residents are consulted about the ongoing management of the village to ensure the tenure they have chosen cannot be changed without the residents’ approval.

Occupancy rights

It is strongly advisable to seek legal advice on the effect of the form of tenure which applies to you, this should also be specified in the residence contract.

Licences

Your Retirement Living – 8th edition

There are different ways a resident may be granted a right to occupy a unit in a retirement village by way of lease or licence.

Long-term licence agreements usually include a right to include common areas and village facilities. Licences are not registered on

certificates of title and therefore may appear to be a less secure form of tenure. Terms and conditions of licenses are usually similar to leases.

Leases Leases usually contain detailed provisions which set out the rights and obligations of residents and village administrators. This is the most common form of retirement village tenure.


Retirement Living Options

Strata titled units A Strata Title is created when a structure is divided into separate units. The ownership of a Strata Titled Unit is restricted to the space within its exterior walls, as well as any area defined on the unit plan as a unit subsidiary, such as a carport or fenced garden area.

Residents can be provided with a long-term lease for example for life or 99 years. This is is often registered on the title, providing security of tenure and the right to use common areas and the villages’ facilities. Current residents have no responsibility to pay rates, taxes and insurance for undeveloped land or newly built unoccupied units in villages operating under licence or lease agreements.

Retirement village residents, typically pay no stamp duty for a unit they acquire under a licence or lease tenure.

Direct unit ownership Direct freehold ownerships of Strata Title or Community Title units are given to residents under direct ownership arrangements.

The units must have common grounds which residents have a right to use, and for which everyone is responsible. Retirement village unit owners are members of a Strata corporation, which administers and maintains the property, and employs an operator to be responsible for providing extra services, such as social activities, transport and personal services. These unit owners usually pay a quarterly fee to cover costs associated with strata management,

Riverwood

Your Retirement Living, Your Community Riverwood offers an atmosphere of community and family. Residents can relax and enjoy enclosed, peaceful gardens or participate in the very active lifestyle of the Village. Family members and friends are always welcome, and are an integral part of the warm community feel of Riverwood.

Riverwood features: • Close to the centre of Albury and medical services. • Active Village lifestyle activities include bowling green, billiards, indoor heated swimming pool, shop, hairdresser, library and bar, all located onsite. • Private and spacious, set amongst 18 acres of established gardens and offering a 24-hour call bell system. • Strata titled. • Co-located with Aged Care.

Call to organise a tour of the Village at a time which suits you.

Riverwood Retirement Living 990 Padman Drive, West Albury NSW 2640 t: ( 02 ) 6023 9700

Making every day the best it can be

www.allity.com.au YourRetirementLiving.com.au

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Unit trust Unit Trusts entitle residents to occupy a particular unit in a village and use the common areas and facilities, similar to the Company Title arrangement.

the operator, building insurance and maintenance of the common areas.

Community title units These types of titles divide land to create separate lots and common property in an arrangement similar to Strata Titles. Community Schemes and Community Strata Schemes are two types of community titles available, and must divide the land to create at least two lots and common property. The difference between Community Title Units and Strata Titles is the developer in Community Title Units

There are different ways a resident may be granted a right to occupy a unit in a retirement village by way of lease or licence.

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must retain a development lot for later division into further lots within the scheme. The owner is responsible for the maintenance and insurance of structures in a community scheme, and lot boundaries are determined by surveyed land measure and not by relation to a structure. In a Community Strata Scheme, boundaries are defined by divisions in the building where there is more than one storey existing above another. Owners of community lots are automatically members of a Community Corporation under the Community Titles Act. This corporation administers, maintains and insures the structure, common land and any fixtures.

Indirect unit ownership Indirect ownership of a unit is an arrangement which gives the resident the right to occupy a residential unit in a village, or complex, owned by a company or a unit trust.

Company title This scheme allows residents to buy shares in a company that owns a village. Although residents do not own a direct interest in the unit, the shares entitle the resident to occupy a particular unit in the village and to use the common area and facilities.

The trustee of the trust owns the village and there is no registered title or lease with this scheme. If you opt for this legal structure, the deed under which the trust was created contains the terms and conditions of this arrangement.

Conventional lease This type of lease, which is often short-term, entitles residents to use the common areas and facilities of a village, but when the term expires, the resident is expected to either leave or renew the lease. In some cases, the lease converts to a periodic tenancy and the resident usually has a right to transfer or assign a lease subject to the operator’s consent. The resident may also have the right to terminate the lease on reasonable notice.

Residential parks Operating under a ground lease only, these villages are occupied by either new or used transportable homes, or a new home erected on the site. The manufactured transportable home can be dismantled and re-erected elsewhere. These types of homes may also be known as manufactured or relocatable homes. Under the site lease or licence agreement, residents are able to use the common areas and facilities of the village. Other terms and conditions relating to the rights and obligations of parties are documented in the lease or licence paperwork.


Retirement Living Options

Fees and charges The costs associated with living in a retirement village are not the same as owning your home.

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here are several charges and fees associated with living in a retirement village and all payments made before, during and after living in a retirement village must be specified in the residence contract. Each community has its own set of costs, so it is important you are provided with the full details of all applicable charges and what these costs cover. Consulting a financial advisor, accountant or lawyer to assist you in making an informed decision before entering into any agreement, is recommended.

There are three types of costs involved which include the entry fee or purchase price, the service or maintenance fees, and exit fees, also known as a ‘departure’ or ‘deferred management’ fee. If there is any part of the contract you don’t understand, don’t be afraid to ask questions or speak with family members who may be able to help you. It is important you seek legal advice and have the full details of all applicable charges, what they cover and what you need to pay on exiting before you sign any contracts.

Deposit Generally, you will need to pay a deposit to secure a unit or apartment. Check with the village how long it can be held for you. Should you change your mind within this specified time, the deposit will be refunded. If you enter into a binding arrangement with the village, the deposit will be part of the purchase price or entry payment. In some States and Territories, following the signing of a residency contract purchasers are entitled to a refund during a ‘cooling off’ period. Check with the village operator if this cooling off period applies and how long this period is. You will also need to check whether the village requires an administration fee for refunds.

Templestowe Manor

Your Retirement Living, Your Community Nestled in the beautiful leafy Lower Templestowe just 17kms north east of Melbourne’s CBD. Templestowe Manor is surrounded by three golf courses, local parks, sporting grounds and neighbourhood shopping hubs including Doncaster Shoppingtown and the Pines shopping centre. The Templestowe Manor community features 20 Independent Living Units with private rear gardens as well as a Signature Aged Care service.

Templestowe Manor features: • Newly refurbished units presenting quality internal furnishings and amenities. • Enjoy the self-serve café, library and BBQ terrace, all located onsite. • All meals are prepared onsite by our chef. • Regular happy hours and coffee mornings. • Program of activities which include Allity bus outings, regular film screenings, bocce/putting green, billiards, arts and music.

Call to organise a tour of Templestowe Manor at a time which suits you. Templestowe Manor Retirement Living 410 – 418 Thompsons Rd, Templestowe Lower VIC 3107 t: ( 03 ) 9850 8877

Making every day the best it can be

www.allity.com.au YourRetirementLiving.com.au

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Entry payment Before moving into a village, you will need to pay an entry payment, which is refunded if you move out of a village. The cost of entering a village depends on the village, its location, and facilities and services offered. Monthly service and maintenance charges also apply and you may be required to pay for extra personal services, such as laundry. Leaseholds and licence tenures are generally set up so the entry payment is usually the current market value of the property. Under strata, community and company titles, you generally pay a ‘purchase price’ for the legal title to your property. Some organisations may refund a proportion or all of the premium/ donation when the resident leaves the unit. Alternatively, this amount may go towards ongoing care. These financial arrangements are negotiated between the residents and organisations when accepting the conditions of entry. The resident may also be required to pay a weekly maintenance fee.

Deferred Management Fee Some operators offer a deferred management fee which means the village will deduct a ‘deferred’, ‘departure’ or ‘exit’ fee at the time of settlement of sale or re-occupancy of your home. The fee forms part of the purchase price, but its payment is deferred until the end of the occupancy. It is calculated at the time of entry and applied on exit. The amount is calculated using a formula that generally involves a percentage of your successor’s entry cost multiplied by the number of years of your occupancy, and may include a proportion of capital appreciation.

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The deferred management fee must be specified in the entry agreement or residence contract, to ensure you have clarity about the size of this payment should you need to leave the village.

Stamp duty You will normally have to pay stamp duty if your tenure is strata, community or company title. You will also have to pay stamp duty on leasehold titles if the lease is ‘assignable’ – this is when you can sell the balance of the term of the lease to a new resident when you leave the village. For other leasehold or licence arrangements, no stamp duty is typically payable, but make sure to check the particular arrangement in your State or Territory.

The cost of entering a village depends on the village, its location, and facilities and services offered.

Recurrent charges/ maintenance fund Recurrent charges are payable at regular intervals, either fortnightly or monthly. You should be informed of the expected, regular contributions prior to entering the village. This fee may also include a contribution towards other village funds which are used to meet capital replacement and/or longterm maintenance costs. Recurrent charges might cover expenses such as: ◆  Administration (ie stationery, office equipment, phone use) ◆  Wages, salaries and related costs (ie village manager, office person, handyperson or gardener or ‘on call’ overnight support staff) ◆  Property management (ie council rates, insurance) ◆  Food and catering (in the case of serviced apartments)

Capital Replacement Fund A Capital Replacement Fund is commonly used to fund a planned maintenance program. Over time carpets or major appliances, such as stoves, hot water services or air conditioners in residences, will need


Retirement Living Options

replacing, and this type of fund will ensure those upgrades can take place as required.

Long-term maintenance fund A long-term maintenance fund, also known as a ‘sinking’ fund, is usually set up to meet expenses which could include maintenance of road surfaces, downpipes and gutters, painting, security and salt damp repairs. It may also be used for the repair of recreational facilities such as spas and swimming pools.

Personal or additional service charges If you have any special care or dietary requirements, you will be required to cover these additional services.

Personal or additional service charges relate to services specifically provided to you on a personal needs basis, which will also cover residence cleaning. The schedule of services and charges payable by you should be detailed in the residence contract prior to you entering the village.

If you are a new resident at a retirement village, it may be a good idea to check with other residents to find out what the annual increases have been in the past, to get a better understanding of what to expect of future fee and charge increases.

Fee and charge increases All fees and charges incurred at retirement villages are subject to increases, however recurrent charges cannot be increased beyond a level deemed reasonable. Many villages use the Consumer Price Index (CPI) as a budgetary guide. However, CPI cannot be automatically used to justify an increase in fees because the CPI might be higher than the actual cost increase incurred by the village.

If there is any part of the contract you don’t understand, don’t be afraid to ask questions.

Hillside Gardens

Your Retirement Living, Your Community There is nothing else quite like Hillside Gardens. Located in the Adelaide Hills and set within a glorious wooded valley just five minutes drive from Stirling, you will find 24 state-of-the-art independent living apartments colocated with Allity Hillside Aged Care. All beautifully designed and appointed, residents are presented with the ultimate in contemporary senior living.

Hillside Gardens features: • Private and spacious, overlooking acres of landscaped gardens. • Fully appointed kitchen with Essastone island bench tops. • Ducted air-conditioning. • 24-hour emergency monitoring system, secure ground floor car park with lift access and keyless entry. • Communal library, games room, bowls, billiards and petanque onsite.

Call to organise a tour of Hillside Gardens at a time which suits you.

Hillside Gardens Retirement Living 88 Cricklewood Road, Heathfield SA 5153 t: (08) 8339 4815

Making every day the best it can be

www.allity.com.au YourRetirementLiving.com.au

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Retirement Living Options

An annual meeting is held between administering authorities and residents to discuss the financial statements relevant to all funds for the previous year and plan the coming year’s budget. Depending on when the villages’ annual meeting is held, a period of a few weeks or months may elapse before residents are liable to pay an increased fee. An administering authority may require the payment of this increased fee to be backdated to the beginning of the financial year.

Special levies In most States and Territories special levies can only be imposed if authorised by a special resolution and passed at a meeting of the village residents. While levies are rare, from time to time, a special levy may be charged by a retirement village for budget shortfalls in a particular year which may include, for example, costs to cover road resurfacing due to tree root damage. Ask the village operator about the last time a special levy was charged, why and how they will be imposed.

Centrelink Assessment Centrelink considers that your entry payment includes all amounts you must pay when you move into a retirement village, however, it does not include ongoing fees and charges for services and facilities. The entry payment amount you pay affects whether Centrelink considers you to be a ‘homeowner’, and if you will be eligible to receive rent assistance. Centrelink compares the amount of entry payment you pay against a figure called the Extra Allowable Amount, which is the difference between the non-homeowner and

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homeowner assets test thresholds at the time the entry contribution is paid. The Extra Allowable Amount is currently $214,500 (rate current at time of publication). Whether you are considered to be a homeowner affects the amount of assets you can own without affecting your pension entitlement. Your entry payment is included as an asset if you are not a homeowner and is not classed as a financial investment, and income will not be deemed.

Financial issues Moving into a retirement village is as much as an investment decision as it is a lifestyle decision, so asking yourself the hard questions, such as ‘Am I financially prepared for this transition?’, may help prepare you for any financial hurdles which could lie ahead. It can be costly to maintain your own home, but will you be better off if you move into a retirement village? There are recommended aspects to consider before moving to a village. For instance, try to take into account the sale price of your current home,

the costs associated with selling and moving, new furnishings which you may need to purchase for the new residential unit and consider the ongoing maintenance or service fees associated with retirement living. If you need to sell your home before moving into a retirement village, it is recommended any contract which is signed should be subject to conditions that meet your sale needs. Your financial position can be seriously compromised if you do not receive the amount that you need or are expecting from the sale of your home.

Plan ahead to stay ahead Proper planning of your finances can give you more disposable income, and possibly leave more for your loved ones. Entering a retirement village often requires a person to move out of their principal home on a temporary or permanent basis. While there will be a number of practical and emotional considerations, financial questions are likely to be the most complex.


Ardmillan is a boutique retirement village in a prime location in Moonee Ponds, one of Melbourne’s premier inner suburban areas. It is conveniently located near public transport and a short walk to Puckle Street. Our luxury apartments and private villa units are beautifully appointed, light and spacious with large living areas, high ceilings and generous bathrooms. Our residences offer superior design and quality with a choice of one, two or threebedrooms. An additional eight new apartments have been constructed and are ready to provide prospective residents with added choice. Ardmillan offers a range of luxury independent living alternatives to suit anyone’s needs and lifestyle with the added peace of mind that comes from knowing additional services and assistance are always close at hand.

Ardmillan Retirement Living Derby Place, 11-45 Derby St, Moonee Ponds VIC 3039

(03) 9377 2000 www.ardmillan.net.au

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A good financial advisor will explain your options in plain English. Below is a list of questions you should be able to answer before settling: ◆  Will someone else still be living in the principal home? Should it be sold or rented out? ◆  What will be the impact of the move on your Centrelink payments (if any)? ◆  What special tax offsets may be available when living in retirement villages?

◆  Are there Capital Gains Tax (CGT) advantages to passing on the former home? What if the house is retained throughout your time at a lifestyle village? ◆  What are the entry and ongoing costs of retirement villages, and can these costs be funded effectively?

Can’t plan? Engage someone who can During times like these, it is worth seeking the assistance of a qualified financial advisor. Having someone who will work closely with you to provide solutions may help. A good financial advisor will explain your options in plain English, and will make sure you are aware of the options that could significantly improve your overall financial position.

as simply as possible, your current financial position. This could mean identifying any investments like shares, property or other assets you hold. The services of a financial advisor may also involve clarifying any income streams, including government pensions, you might be receiving.

Borrowing money Borrowing money to enter a retirement village may require the expertise of a mortgage broker who understands what the lenders are looking for in the way of deposit or equity. Funding for these villages mostly comes from major banks and private lenders, but with larger deposits some second tier lenders can help.

The first thing your financial advisor may do is help you to understand,

Your rights & responsibilities The idea of downsizing and living in a retirement community may be appealing, but confusion and conflict can arise during your tenure if you make the move without understanding the financial or legal implications.

I

t’s important to understand your rights, responsibilities and obligations under the contract, before you sign.

requirements of what information and documents need to be supplied to you before you commit to a retirement village.

Do your research

In Western Australia for example, you must be given a disclosure document outlining your contract, all applicable costs you will be charged for and a document detailing your rights, at least 10 days before signing a contract.

Before you sign a retirement village contract, shop around and do your research. Visit several villages that fit your requirements before deciding, talk to residents, look at the facilities and compare contracts. Retirement legislation is set by individual State and Territory Governments and each has different

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In New South Wales, retirement villages are required to use a standard contract and it is compulsory that you receive a

disclosure document at least 14 days before signing a contract. South Australia has a cooling off period of 10 days and on top of that you are entitled to a 90 day ‘settling in’ period, in which you can receive a full refund of the purchase price minus any rental costs for the time a unit was occupied and costs for services used. You will generally not receive your exit entitlement back until the residence has been re-licensed if you leave the village during the settling-in period.


Retirement Living Options

To enter a retirement village in Queensland, there is a 21 day precontractual disclosure process to give prospective residents easy access to information and financial or legal advice. You must receive a Village Comparison Document and Prospective Costs Document which ultimately assists you in comparing villages and also provides information about the costs of a village before you enter. In Victoria the operator needs to give you a copy of the contract at least 21 days before you sign, while in Tasmania if you sign a residence contract, you can change your mind within five days of signing and be released from the contract. Make sure you are familiar with the legislation in your State or Territory and know your rights and responsibilities when you decide to move into a retirement village.

Disclosure documents Ask village management for the following documents so you know what to expect and can make an informed decision before signing on the dotted line: ◆  A copy of the resident contract ◆  A copy of the village rules ◆  Financial information about all applicable costs and charges

Before you sign a retirement village contract, shop around, do your research and get advice from a professional. ◆  A document detailing your rights and responsibilities as a resident of the village ◆  A checklist of things to consider and questions to ask You are encouraged to request a number of disclosure documents from different villages to consider which village is most suitable to your needs. Even when you have signed a contract there will be a ‘cooling off’ period which allows you to withdraw from the contract if you change your mind. The cooling off period can be anything from 3-14 days, depending on what State or Territory you are in.

The legislation for State and Territory Retirement Acts can be found online agedcareguide.com.au /information/renting-or-owning, together with Resident Associations for each State and Territory who can help with advocacy, legal aspects and also promote the rights of residents to all levels of Government. Find out more from the following organisations: ACT: ACT Government, Access Canberra 132 281 accesscanberra.act.gov.au NSW: NSW Government, Fair Trading 133 220 fairtrading.nsw.gov.au NT: Northern Territory Consumer Affairs 1800 019 319 – consumeraffairs.nt.gov.au QLD: Queensland Government, Department of Housing and Public Works 137 468 – hpw.qld.gov.au SA: South Australian Government, Family and Community Seniors, Service SA 132 324 – sa.gov.au TAS: Tasmanian Government, Department of Justice, Consumer Affairs and Fair Trading 1300 654 499 cbos.tas.gov.au VIC: Consumer Affairs Victoria 1300 558 181 consumer.vic.gov.au WA: Government of Western Australia, Dept of Mines, Industry Regulation and Safety 1300 136 237 commerce.wa.gov.au

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Understanding your contract The idea of downsizing and living in a retirement living community may be appealing, but there are certain factors which should be considered prior to making the transition from your home to ‘the village’.

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etirement village contracts are different from normal residential real estate contracts. So, it’s important to understand your rights and responsibilities and obligations under the contract, before you sign.

This is an important document which sets out the incoming resident’s rights and obligations as a village resident.

There are different types of contracts that residents and operators enter into depending on the arrangements in place at the village. You are more likely to make the right choices if you know what you want.

It is important you read and understand the various clauses in the contract as it will be a legally binding document for both you and the administering authority should you proceed on taking the offer of accommodation.

Don’t rush into making a commitment, instead, visit the village often, get to know the management staff, as well as the residents’ committee, and seek expert advice and answers to all of your questions.

If you do not understand parts of the contract, highlight them and seek further written clarification.

Residence contract If you have found the retirement village you see yourself residing in, request a copy of their standard residence contract.

Retirement village contracts are different from normal residential real estate contracts.

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The contract ultimately governs the relationship between you and the administering authority.

To protect both you and the administering authority, the residence contract is a comprehensive document and should include references to: ◆  The parties in the contract and any associated conditions. ◆  Residence details such as its location, type, layout plan and size, the certificate of titles on which the village is situated, and the form of tenure (like Strata Title, a lease or licence) or purchase which applies to you. ◆  Settling-in period and your right to ‘cool-off’. ◆  The action required to terminate a contract. ◆  Communal facilities available to residents and/or separate or additional facilities allocated to you, or any optional personal services ie cleaning, laundry or meals.

◆  The amount payable, how and when it is to be paid, the basis on which any premium refund will be calculated and returned to you, and the recurrent charges and the way they are calculated. ◆  Any current, planned or proposed expansions to the village and future extra facilities or future services offered. However, there is no guarantee that these proposals will be completed as planned and any funds established by the administering authority to which you contribute, and the purpose of those funds. Before signing the residence contract you should be provided with copies of the following documents: ◆  Residence contract and premises condition report. ◆  Financial statements presented at the last annual meeting of residents, including a written statement of any changes at the village since that meeting which may significantly affect your decision to enter the village. ◆  Residence rules and dispute resolutions. ◆  Remarketing policy. ◆  Any other policy which may impact on the premium you are asked to pay. It is strongly recommended you seek legal advice and ask for a copy of the contract before signing.


Retirement Living Options

Sealed the deal? Cooling-off After signing a residence contract the cooling-off period will give you the opportunity to seek further advice or discuss the matter with others. During this period you can withdraw from the contract and receive a refund of any money paid by you under the contract, however some administrative charges may be incurred. It is recommended you use this cooling-off period to seek the advice of a lawyer (if you didn’t do so prior to signing of the contract) to ensure you understand the financial and legal implications of the contract. A financial advisor may also be able to help you.

Settling-in After signing the residence contract, you may find that the residential village, unfortunately, does not meet all of the care needs you require, or you may simply decide to leave for personal reasons. In some States or Territories, should this be the case, you are entitled to a ‘settling-in period’, which, depending on the village, generally is about 90 calendar days after the date of the contract (or longer if specified in your contract), or the date on which you are first able to occupy your residence. It is during this settling-in period that you may elect to leave the

It is essential to know your rights and entitlements.

village without adjustment to your premium refund. Keep in mind that you may be required to pay any costs and market rent for the period of occupancy as detailed in your contractual agreement. Be sure to find out if a settling‑in period applies in your State or Territory before you make a decision. It is important to remember the premium will be held until your residence is re-licensed, but you should not be required to pay any monetary penalty for termination during the settling‑in period.

Premises Condition Report This report is one of several documents you will be required to sign prior to moving into a residential village. The Premises Condition Report sets out information on the condition of the fixtures, fittings and furnishings, the people who will be responsible for repairing and replacing any items, and how the cost of repairing any items are to be funded.

This report should be signed together with the residence contract and must be completed at the date of the contract. Make sure you are satisfied with the information contained in the report before signing it.

Know your rights and entitlements It is essential to know your rights and entitlements. Referring to the residence contract throughout your stay may be one way of helping you to understand your liabilities. If you need to purchase personal care services or meals, remember these will be at an additional cost. Keeping up to date and ensuring you receive all of the entitlements and concessions you are eligible for from Centrelink or Veterans’ Affairs is also important. If you are finding it financially difficult to manage, speak to a specialist financial planner about retirement living financing before signing an agreement, or make an appointment to see a social worker at Centrelink by phoning 13 23 00. YourRetirementLiving.com.au

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Life in a village Living in a retirement village can offer a supportive environment and encourage independence, as well as the ability to enjoy social and leisure activities, if you choose.

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ost retirement villages have a great sense of community and you can expect to be surrounded generally by like-minded, friendly and welcoming neighbours.

Culture Each village has its own culture, but generally each village should be based on ‘senior friendly’ criteria and a community focused environment. While each village differs from another, residents usually have an active say in which activities will take place, and are often involved in running events at the village.

Settling into village life Judy and her partner, Bill, were in their 60s when they moved to SwanCare retirement community and instantly got involved in village life. They volunteered, as many residents do, in various roles around the community, including transporting residents around the site in a buggy. Judy enjoys sewing and as a member of a patchwork club, speaks about the importance of keeping hobbies. “It’s important to keep outside interests as long as possible. But also, there are so many opportunities here for those that want to participate. That’s a benefit of being in a bigger retirement village, we have more services and facilities,” says Judy.

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Depending on the village, some of these activities may include aerobics, water/aqua aerobics, card afternoons, Probus, personal training, knitting and sewing circles, craft groups plus outings to galleries, movies, events and places of interest. Regular ‘Happy Hours’ and afternoons spent watching televised sport are also popular among some residents.

Amenities Retirement villages are run by professional managers and support staff who are committed to making life easier for residents, whether it is arranging for the collection of dry

cleaning or keeping the garden in top condition. Security and 24 hour call systems, communal facilities such as games rooms or dining areas, or medical and allied health services are some of the amenities available to residents. Before moving to a residential village, enquire about the services and amenities available.

At your service Indulge in catered dining at the village’s restaurant or bistro, catch up with neighbours in the coffee lounge or enjoy a barbecue with your family, or perhaps you might simply prefer a quiet dinner in your own unit. These are the options available at most villages.

Sharing is caring Communal facilities are common features in retirement villages, with a range of services and amenities available to residents.

As well as keeping up with her hobbies, Judy also volunteers as a member of the village residents committee. “We meet with residents over morning tea and they discuss any issues or problems that have arisen. Then we meet with the Executive team to relay information and provide feedback,” explains Judy. With the Executive Team on-site, all residents have the ability to contact and interact with all managers and staff, making for a great environment. Staff regularly participate in activities with residents including line dancing. Judy says, “They have an excellent structure here, an open-door policy where you can get access to management on all levels. Plus, management is all on-site which is advantageous as it means we can communicate more effectively.

“It’s why I’m part of the council, so I can get involved in the running of the village and help improve life for residents.” SwanCare has a handy ‘What’s On’ guide published every month to help residents plan their activities. Judy likes to keep herself busy, filling her day with her many hobbies and commitments. “There are at least thirty clubs here (when not in COVID times). You can join anything and everything!” she says. Case study provided by SwanCare.


Retirement Living Options

Some villages have call systems installed in their villas and apartments to provide a 24 hour monitoring service for medical emergencies. Staff trained in first aid may also attend to the emergency.

There are recreational, service and social communal facilities which, depending on the village, may include:

◆  Other services such as banking and hairdressers

◆  Libraries and community centres

Be sure to visit and check the communal facilities available in the village you choose to ensure it fits with your lifestyle and needs.

◆  Barbecue areas, restaurants or internet cafés

Health

◆  Gaming areas such as billiards, table tennis,indoor bowls, bowling greens and swimming pools ◆  Medical services such as doctors, podiatrists and physiotherapists

Looking after your health is important. Some retirement villages are equipped to help you manage any existing health problems and may also be prepared to assist should you become unwell during your stay.

Some villages may also keep a confidential record of residents’ medical history on file. This information may include your next of kin and Medicare details, which is released only with your authorisation to medical services in an emergency.

Security and 24 hour call A safe haven we can call ‘home’ is important but, without security, a comfortable lifestyle can be difficult to maintain. Retirement villages can offer a safe environment. Most villages have 24 hour on-call assistance

!

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op

Retirement. Reimagined. With SwanCare Bentley Park’s new $20m Leisure Precinct, the future of retirement living is here. Complementing these world-class amenities is a full-service community offering to-your-door laundry, home care, groceries and freshly cooked meals as well as 24-hour resident support and security. There’s also four fullyaccredited residential aged care facilities on-site for future needs.

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and security and, at the press of a button, help is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week whenever required.

Most villages have a great sense of community, where you’ll be surrounded by like-minded and friendly neighbours.

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You can be instantly connected to a friendly and qualified staff member or call assistant who will organise the assistance you need, which may mean calling a family member, friend, neighbour or an emergency response service such as ambulance or police. Residents can also choose the option of a daily welfare call. Security is central to safe and comfortable living in everyday life, just as it is in community villages. Living in an environment where neighbours will look out for you and where dedicated staff are available to assist, will also give your family and friends peace of mind in knowing you are safe and well.

Are guests allowed? Family and friends are an integral part of life, and sometimes it’s enjoyable to have them stay with you as guests at a retirement village. Each village is different, but generally, visitors are welcome to stay and may also use the communal facilities as your guest.

What about pets? They love us unconditionally and have been known to boost a person’s health and happiness. While our family and friends are important to us, for some, pets also hold a special place in our lives. Whether you are allowed to bring your pet with you when you move to a retirement village will depend on the characteristics of your pet and the pet policy and rules of the village.


Retirement Living Options

The size, temperament and audibility of the particular pet will also be relevant when a village decides whether it is appropriate to welcome your pet into the residential community. You will have the best chance of bringing your pet with you if the village is large and open, the homes are well spaced and your pet is small, quiet, friendly and clean. If bringing your pet with you is essential, then learning about the village pet policy and rules should be one of the first enquiries you make before considering a retirement community.

Resident Committees To promote and protect the interests of residents, Resident Committees are an integral group at retirement villages. Committee members are elected by other residents to hold office for a term of one year, however residents can stand for re-election after their term passes. While participation is optional, Resident Committees offer residents the opportunity to make a contribution to the village and the

To promote and protect the interests of residents, Resident Committees are an integral group at retirement villages

chance to interact in a supportive way with other residents. The basic structure and functions of a Residents’ Committee are described below: ◆  A Residents’ Committee can determine its own procedures and appoint sub-committees. ◆  The administering authority does not need to be involved in the conduct of the Committee, but can meet with the group to ensure reasonable consultation on significant village issues. ◆  It is an offence for an administering authority to deliberately discourage or prevent residents from forming a Residents’ Committee or to obstruct a Committee in the performance of its functions. ◆  A member can be removed from office by a special resolution of residents if the need arises.

Finance committees While financial planning can be vital before entering a retirement village, it is equally important to look after your finances during your stay. The administering authority is required to undertake reasonable consultation with a Residents’ Committee on a number of issues, including the preparation of an annual budget for the village.

Finance sub-committees are made up of residents who have knowledge or are interested in accounting practices. However, it is a procedure which may vary from village to village, depending on its size and the needs of residents and administering authorities.

Retirement Village Associations Residents can choose to join their State or Territory retirement village association which represents retirees living in retirement communities. These members-only retirement village associations usually assist in Government and Industry policy changes and how they will impact their members. They also provide information or advice, can mediate conflict resolutions with you and your retirement village, and more. Australia’s peak body for the residential village industry is the Retirement Living Council. It works closely with state associations, particularly in relation to legislative matters. The Retirement Living Council advocates for the industry with Government while also encouraging high-quality village living.

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Retirement Living Options

When your needs increase Most retirement villages offer in home support when your needs increase and you need some assistance to remain living independently. you may need to consider a higher level of support or even consider moving into a different type of accommodation. Leaving the village may not be necessary as some villages offer this type of care on site. There are a few different options to consider when you’re wanting to maintain some independence while also having access to additional support options when needed.

Supported Living Supported living communities combine the best advantages of retirement villages and nursing homes.

S

ome retirement village operators give their residents the option to access various levels of personal care, nursing care or domestic assistance in the comfort of their own home. They may have care staff on site or outsource these services to third party providers. Retirement villages do not receive Government funding but if you live in a retirement village and your accommodation contract does not include home support services you may be able to access Government subsidised support at home or choose to pay for services yourself. In home care products and services range from assistance with daily chores including personal care, providing meals, transport assistance and home maintenance.

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In a supported living community you buy and have the leasehold title to your own home, as in many retirement villages. Go to the Home Care Guide starting on page 80D to find out more about the different support options available in your own home.

Moving to supported care If your care needs increase during your stay at a retirement village,

However, unlike in a retirement village, you’ll have access to various levels of personal care and nursing care provided in the privacy of your own home, a choice not available in nursing homes. Acquiring one of these homes, which is not Government funded, is surprisingly easy. As with a retirement village, there is no

Some retirement village operators give their residents the option to access various levels of personal care, nursing care or domestic assistance in the comfort of their own home.


Retirement Living Options

need for asset testing or income testing, and there is no need for an assessment by the Aged Care Assessment Team/Service (ACAT/S) that Government funded nursing homes require. Supported living providers may offer additional home care services at an additional cost or you may be eligible for Government funded in home support. If you already receive home support benefits before moving to a supported living community you can stay with your current provider.

Supported Residential Services and Facilities Supported Residential Services (SRSs) or Supported Residential Facilities (SRFs) (as they are known in South Australia) are generally private businesses that provide accommodation and care for residents on a fee basis. While they provide similar care to Government funded aged care facilities, they are not funded by the Australian Government. This means you don’t need to meet the Government’s eligibility criteria to access care in a SRS/F.

If you are unable to continue living independently you may choose to move into an aged care home to ensure you have the quality of care you deserve. The care provided by SRSs and SRFs usually includes assistance with showering, personal hygiene, toileting, dressing, meals and medication, as well as physical and emotional support. Some SRSs/ SRFs also provide nursing or allied health services. The fees, standards and services provided by SRSs/SRFs vary, so it is important to look at as many as possible to ensure you find the one that best suits your needs in terms of level of care and services. While SRSs and SRFs do not receive direct Government funding, you may be able to access some subsidised services. These services may include allied and mental health, disability services and Veterans’ Affairs.

As a SRS/SRF resident you’ll need to meet the same eligibility criteria for Government funded home care services as other people in the community.

Residential aged care If you are unable to continue living independently you may choose to move into an aged care home to ensure you have the quality of care you deserve. Some retirement villages offer aged care accommodation to residents on site in another purpose built complex within the community. Entry into a Government funded aged care home requires approval from an Aged Care Assessment Team (ACAT) or Aged Care Assessment Service (ACAS) in Victoria. There are also private nursing homes where you will be responsible for the payment of all associated costs. These can vary between different providers and areas across the country. The Aged Care Guide offers a detailed explanation of accessing residential aged care and lists all Government funded aged care homes in Australia. Visit AgedCareGuide.com.au or call 1300 186 688 for more information or to order a printed copy of the Aged Care Guide for your State or Territory. YourRetirementLiving.com.au

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Retirement Living Options

Top retirement living FAQs Chances are, any questions that you have about retirement living have already been asked before. Here are some of the most frequently asked questions that might help you make your mind up about moving into a retirement community. Q.  When is the right time to make a move into a retirement village? A.  Only you can decide when the time is right to move into a retirement village. Most people choose to move once they have retired and want to downsize the family home because it’s becoming too much to maintain. Retirement villages are specifically designed to meet the accommodation, social and recreational needs of over 55s.

Q.  Do I have to be retired to move into a retirement village? A.  Retirement communities are generally designed for people over the age of 55 but you don’t have to be retired to move in. Most people will have retired from full time employment although some may still be working part time or have taken on a volunteering role after retiring from the workforce.

Q.  Can we have guests stay with us? A.  Generally you are more than welcome to have family and friends stay over. However depending on the length of their stay, you may be required to obtain written approval from the Village Manager. This is to ensure the safety and security of all residents. You should ask the Sales Consultant or Village Manager for the rules relating to the village of your choice.

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Q.  What sort of ownership rights will I have?

Q.  What if I change my mind after I move in?

A.  Tenure is the term used to describe the different legal basis for the various forms of occupation or ownership rights used in the industry. All forms of tenure are controlled by specific legislation to ensure your right to occupy is secure. Different villages use different legal forms of tenure. In many cases you will enter into a lifelong lease, which gives you security as if you had a title.

A.  In some regions, legislation recognises that this may happen and allows a period of 90 days, called the Settling-In Period, for you to change your mind. You do need to be aware that some charges may apply. While this does not happen often, the village will understand that circumstances do change and endeavour to work with you to fully explore other options. This way you have the chance to make an informed decision in the first place.

Q.  How do people secure or purchase a unit, apartment or villa? A.  Effectively you purchase a guaranteed right to occupy the home for as long as you need. It means that there are no individual titles for individual homes. A deposit is required to secure your choice. The Sales Consultant or the Village Manager will discuss with you, the details of the deposit, how it is appropriately held and how it is refunded. Most villages generally allow up to three months for you to sell you own property. This should be sufficient time to market your property and they will keep in communication with you during this time to discuss any matters as they might arise.

Q.  Will I own my villa in a retirement village? A.  Specific legislation in each State and Territory protects your right to occupy your home. Different villages use different legal forms of tenure such as strata title ownership, leasehold estates, licenses to occupy or company share arrangements with related residency entitlements.

Q.  Will I have access to aged care if I need it? A.  Some villages have an aged care facility attached or connected to it while others offer ongoing personal care and home help services to residents in their own private unit on a fee-for-service basis. You can also access funded home care services if you pass an aged care assessment test – more information is available at the My Aged Care website.


Retirement Living Options

Checklist To help you make an informed decision when you tour a retirement village we’ve put together some questions to ask that will make your decision an easier one. We recommend that you visit as many villages as possible to see what they offer and see whether you could live there. Speak with residents and staff and ask lots of questions.

Lifestyle   Why do I want to move to a retirement village?   What location or area do I want to live in?   Do I want to be near my current home, close to family and friends or am I looking for a complete change?   What type of village and accommodation option will suit me most? Apartment living, a new development or an established older style village? Would you prefer living in an Independent Living Unit (ILU) or a Serviced Apartment with hotel‑like services?   Have I talked with my family and friends about moving into a village and their experiences?

Financial and Legal   What is included in the service or maintenance fees? Is it paid weekly, fortnightly or monthly? How often could this fee increase and will it increase much?   What does the service fee cover and what does it not cover? Could I continue to afford it if my spouse or partner dies?   Does the cost of the home, plus the ongoing monthly service fees fit into my budget?   Is there an exit fee or deferred management fee and how is this calculated? Many villages have different fees and structures.   How much is the deposit to secure a villa or apartment and is it refunded if I decide not to purchase?   What type of contract would I be entering into, e.g. strata title, leasehold?   What are the rules when I decide to sell my unit?   If I leave the village am I entitled to a refund? How soon after leaving the village will the refund be paid?

continued on next page YourRetirementLiving.com.au

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Retirement Living Options

Management and Resident Involvement   Is the village accredited?   How is the village managed?   Is there a Residents’ Committee and what role does it play in the administration of the village?   What dispute resolution procedures are in place?   Who is responsible for any replacements and repairs in my unit or apartment?   What arrangements are in place for maintenance of units, community facilities and grounds?   Can I establish my own private garden?   What protection do I have if the village is sold to another organisation?

Health and Security Considerations   What arrangements are there for times of ill health or need for hospitalisation?   Is there village staff or a nurse on duty and what hours are they available? Do they come to the village on the weekend?   Is there an emergency call button system in place? If so, who responds to such calls?   What types of services and amenities does the village provide? For example: podiatry, physiotherapy, wheelchair access?   Is there an aged care facility nearby or on site? Or if your needs change, are there alternative accommodation options in or near the village?

Village Life   Are the staff friendly and welcoming?   Are the grounds tidy and well maintained?   Can my family and friends stay?   Am I allowed to have pets?   Does the village provide a bus or other transport and at what cost?   Apart from the village facilities, what services are available to me from the local community? For example: library, recreational, Meals-On-Wheels, hospitals, doctors.   What age group are the residents?   Can I continue with my hobbies? What clubs, social groups and activities are on offer?   Are the floor plans, gardens and entertaining areas right for me?   What is the security like in the village?   Are the residents happy to talk to me about their experiences?   Are meals available if I am unable to cook?   What are the options for home help, dining facilities, etc. that can be accessed if needed? Source: Retirement Living Council

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Resources – State

South Australia useful phone numbers & websites Organisation

Phone

Website

Aged Care Quality & Safety Commission

1800 951 822

Aged Care Quality & Safety Commission

Aged Rights Advocacy Service

1800 700 600

Aged Rights Advocacy Service

Carer Gateway

1800 422 737

Carer Gateway

Carers SA

08 8291 5600

Carers SA

132 300

Centrelink – Older Australians Line

Centrelink – Older Australians Line Commonwealth Respite and Carelink Centre

1800 052 222

Commonwealth Respite and Carelink Centre

COTA SA

08 8232 0422

COTA SA

Department of Veterans' Affairs

1800 838 372

Department of Veterans' Affairs

Legal Services Commission of SA Legal Helpline

1300 366 424

Legal Services Commission of SA Legal Helpline

132 011

Medicare

Medicare My Aged Care

1800 200 422

My Aged Care

National Continence Helpline

1800 330 066

National Continence Helpline

Resources

National Dementia Helpline

1800 100 500

Office of the Public Advocate (SA)

08 8342 8200

Older Persons Advocacy Network (OPAN)

1800 700 600

Public Trustee (SA)

08 8226 9200

Public Trustee (SA)

131 450

Translating and Interpreting Service

Seniors Card SA Seniors Health Card South Australia Retirement Villages Residents Association (SAVRA) Translating and Interpreting Service

National Dementia Helpline

Office of the Public Advocate (SA)

Older Persons Advocacy Network (OPAN)

• Terms and Definitions 1800 819 961 Seniors Card SA 132 300 Seniors Health • Useful phone numbers andCardwebsites 08 8232 0422 South Australia Retirement Villages Residents Association (SAVRA) •  Retirement and Home Care listings

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Resources

How to read the directory tables The Resources section of this guide includes a selection of retirement village operators and home care service providers for each State and Territory. Refer to the directory contents on page 125 for detailed page numbers for each section. You’ll find useful phone numbers at the start of each section, followed by the Retirement Villages table and Home Care Services table.

Retirement Villages The Retirement Villages listed in the tables have provided DPS Publishing with information related to their village and the services they offer. The list gives an overview of villages by operator and includes location and contact details as well as the type of accommodation and a range of features indicated with icons. The inclusion of an icon in any of the service columns indicates that the Retirement Village operator indicated to DPS Publishing that this service was, in their opinion, available, provided or offered. The absence of an icon in any of the service columns does not imply that this service is not provided at the village. Icons used within the Retirement Villages tables are:

W ILUs U Serviced Apartments V Supported Living X Deferred Management Fee T Co-Located Aged Care

a Coded Keypad Entry H Dining Room P Hair & Beauty Salon r Hotel Services E Personal Care

K Restaurant or Café F Small Pets p Village Bus L Village Centre d Boat Storage

f Caravan Storage y Bowling Green I Swimming Pool The Advert page

number refers to the advertisement for this organisation elsewhere in the publication.

Organisation Name 1

1800 111 111

Organisation Name 2

0000 0000

1–4

CHS

e Ca Phone (00)

Hom

Web ID – Visit AgedCareGuide.com.au/home-care and type this number in the search field (top right) for more details on providers and their services

re P a

Home Care Services

cka ge l eve P Fu l n Priv ded ate S erv l y Dem Fun ices en ded Dom tia Ca Servi re ces es Hom tic Ass e M istan Me ainte ce als nan Med &/or S ce / Ga ica hop rde Pall tion S ping ning upe iati Per ve Car rvision e son Pha al Care rma Res ceut pite ical Soc Care Delive ial ry Tran &/or R e sp crea tion Cul ort al tura l Se rvic es

For a more extensive list of Retirement Villages search the website YourRetirementLiving.com.au or for more information on a chosen Retirement Village, type the associated Web ID numbers featured in this directory, in the search field on YourRetirementLiving.com.au

• •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Advert Web Notes  Page ID 000 23456 12345

Home Care Services The Home Care Services table gives an overview of providers choosing to promote their services with DPS. Listed in alphabetical order, the table displays contact details for each provider and the types of services they offer. The number(s) in the ‘Home Care Packages level’ column indicates the level of care this organisation can provide if you have been allocated a Home Care Package (HCP). 1–4 means the full range of HCP levels are supported. There is an indication whether the provider delivers subsidised services under the Commonwealth Home Support Programme (CHSP) or privately funded services, as well as the types of services they can provide. The ‘Web ID’ number can be used as a unique identifier to find out more information about the provider on AgedCareGuide. com.au/home-care. You can enter the ID number into the search bar on the top right hand side of the website to view the full profile and range of services of the provider. Visit AgedCareGuide.com.au/home-care for a complete list of services available near you.

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Home Care Guide 2021


Resources

Directory Contents How to read the directory tables. ........................................................ 124

Resources – South Australia........................................................... 157-166

Directory Contents................................................................................................. 125

Useful phone numbers & websites............................................................... 157 Retirement Villages listings......................................................................... 158-164 Home Care listings. ........................................................................................... 165-166

Abbreviations............................................................................................................... 125 Terms and Definitions........................................................................................ 126 Resources – Australian Capital Territory......................... 127-130 Useful phone numbers & websites............................................................... 127 Retirement Villages listings......................................................................... 128-129 Home Care listings. ...................................................................................................... 130

Resources – New South Wales..................................................... 131-144 Useful phone numbers & websites............................................................... 131 Retirement Villages listings......................................................................... 132-140 Home Care listings. ........................................................................................... 141-144

Resources – Northern Territory.................................................. 145-146 Useful phone numbers & websites............................................................... 145 Retirement Villages listings.................................................................................... 146 Home Care listings. ...................................................................................................... 146

Resources – Tasmania............................................................................ 167-173 Useful phone numbers & websites............................................................... 167 Retirement Villages listings......................................................................... 168-170 Home Care listings. ...................................................................................................... 173

Resources – Victoria. ................................................................................ 174-186 Retirement Villages listings......................................................................... 175-180 Home Care listings. ........................................................................................... 181-186

Resources – Western Australia.................................................... 187-191 Useful phone numbers & websites............................................................... 187 Retirement Villages listings......................................................................... 188-190 Home Care listings. ...................................................................................................... 191

Index....................................................................................................................................... 192

Resources – Queensland..................................................................... 147-156 Useful phone numbers & websites............................................................... 147 Retirement Villages listings......................................................................... 148-155 Home Care listings. ...................................................................................................... 156

Abbreviations A/Living........................................................... Assisted Living

Grv................................................................................... Grove

Pg. ...................................................................................... Page

AC............................................................................ Aged Care

HC...........................................................................Home Care

Pk........................................................................................ Park

ACAT/S.................. Aged Care Assessment Team/Service

HCP.................................................. Home Care Package(s)

Pl....................................................................................... Place

ACS........................................................ Aged Care Service(s)

HCP 1..................................... Home Care Package Level 1

Prog. ...................................................................... Program(s)

Advert............................................................ Advertisement

HCP 2..................................... Home Care Package Level 2

Pt. ............................................................................. Port/Point

Apts...................................................................... Apartments

HCP 3..................................... Home Care Package Level 3

R/Estate................................................... Retirement Estate

ATSI................................ Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander

HCP 4..................................... Home Care Package Level 4

R/Living...................................................... Retirement Living

Aust.............................................................................Australia

HL .................................................................... Healthy Living

R/Resort.................................................. Retirement Resort

CALD......................... Culturally and Linguistically Diverse

Hosp............................................................................Hospital

R/Village.................................................. Retirement Village

CC................................................................ Community Care

HS................................................................ Health Service(s)

RAS........................................ Regional Assessment Service

CDC.............................................. Consumer Directed Care

HSS............................................... Home Support Service(s)

Retire Com’ty................................ Retirement Community

CHSP.........Commonwealth Home Support Programme

I/Living.................................................... Independent Living

Retire Est................................................ Retirement Estate

Com’ty. ................................................................ Community

IBC............................................................. Inside Back Cover

Retire.................................................................... Retirement

CS...................................................... Community Service(s)

IFC. .......................................................... Inside Front Cover

RL. .............................................................. Retirement Living

Ct...................................................................................... Court

ILU..............................................Independent Living Unit(s)

RLUs................................................ Retirement Living Units

Ctr. ................................................................................. Centre

Indep. ................................................................ Independent

RV............................................................. Retirement Village

D..................................................................................... Divider

L/style, LS.................................................................... Lifestyle

Serv..................................................................... Service(s)(d)

Dem......................................................................... Dementia

LGA. .............................................. Local Government Area

Sthn. ........................................................................ Southern

Dis............................................................................. Disability

LGBTIQ.............................................Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual,

STRC............... Short-Term Restorative Care Programme

Dist................................................................................. District

Transgender, Intersex, Questioning

Super............................................................Superannuation

DVA.................................. Department of Veterans’ Affairs

Metro................................................................ Metropolitan

Supp. ...................................................................... Supported

Est. .................................................................................. Estate

Mt....................................................................................Mount

TCP................................................ Transition Care Program

Estn.............................................................................. Eastern

NESB........................... Non English Speaking Background

VHC..................................................... Veterans’ Home Care

Fac................................................................................. Facility

Nthn...........................................................................Northern

Vlg.................................................................................... Village

Gdns.......................................................................... Gardens

OBC....................................................... Outside Back Cover

Wstn............................................................................ Western

YourRetirementLiving.com.au

AgedCareGuide.com.au/home-care

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Resources

Terms and Definitions Aged Care Assessment Team/Service (ACAT/S) – Assess and approve older people for Australian Government subsidised aged care services. ATSI – Services offered to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander older aged people and their carers. Boat Storage – Any resident can store at least one boat on site at the retirement village. Booked Respite Beds – Taking a break from your role as carer, it’s advisable to book a respite bed in advance at an aged care facility. Prior assessment by an ACAT/S is required. Bowling Green – Fully maintained and operational bowling green for regular use at a retirement village. CALD – Services offered to Culturally and Linguistically Diverse older aged people and their carers. Caravan Storage – Any resident can store at least one caravan on site at the retirement village. Care Plan – Developed by the service provider delivering your care and outlines care needs and instructions on how these needs will be met. CHSP – Commonwealth Home Support Programme, a Government initiative funding in home or centre based care services. Coded Keypad Entry – Electronic Keypad or Scanner to ensure that only village residents and nominated persons can enter the site. Co-located Aged Care – An aged care facility is located on site of a retirement village. Consumer Directed Care (CDC) – Allows you to control the types of care you access, how it is delivered and who provides that care. All home care packages are delivered on a CDC basis. Deferred Management Fee – A deferred management fee is the amount a village operator deducts from the resident’s refund when they exit the village and is specified on the entry agreement or contract. Dementia Services – Services offered to clients with dementia and/or challenging behaviours, as well as their carers. Dining Room – There is a communal dining room in the retirement village where meals are provided on a daily basis. Domestic Assistance – Help with tasks at home such as cleaning, dishes, washing clothes, ironing, minor meal preparation, changing bed linen. Donor Funded – The price or entry contribution of a dwelling in a retirement village, paid by a resident which may be subsidised by a not-for-profit organisation.

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Hair & Beauty Salon – A dedicated room in a retirement village that is regularly staffed to provide hair &/or beauty services. Home Maintenance/Gardening – Assistance with jobs in and around the house such as replacement of tap washers, light globes, minor weeding/pruning, sweeping of outdoor areas, minor carpentry repairs and gutter cleaning. May include window cleaning. Hotel Services – The services that you would expect at a four star hotel but delivered in your retirement village. Services may include fresh linen daily, cleaning, laundry and meals delivered to the room, on a fee for service basis. Independent Living Unit (ILU) – Sometimes referred to as a villa and located in a retirement village setting. Lease – Residents purchase a long term contract for a dwelling with the right to use common areas and facilities at a retirement village. LGBTIQ – Some aged care services offer specific care to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex and Questioning residents. Licence to Occupy – Residents purchase a licence agreement for a dwelling with the right to use common areas and facilities at a retirement village. Meals &/or Shopping – Delivery of daily cooked or frozen ready‑to-eat meals, or transport to the shops and assistance provided, or having someone to do the shopping. Medication Supervision – Service provider attends the client’s home to assist in dispensing medication. NESB – Services offered to older people a Non-English Speaking Background (NESB) and their carers. Palliative Care – A nurse will visit you at home to deliver end of life care services such as dispense medication, wound management, convalescent care and pain management. Personal Care – Assistance with personal hygiene, washing, showering, bathing, dressing, feeding and toileting. May be a Government funded of self-funded service. Pharmaceutical Deliveries – The delivery of medications by a service provider directly to the client or older person’s home. Privately funded services – Services delivered on a fee for service basis. Regional Assessment Service (RAS) – In home assessments of new and existing clients/carers for CHSP services. Rental Accommodation – An ILU, unit, apartment or villa available for rent in a retirement village.

Resident Committee – Residents of a village elect volunteers to be on a Committee that will uphold their interests and engage with administrators in the village. Resident Funded – Funded by the resident who ‘purchases’ their dwelling under a tenure arrangement, also contributing to the village’s capital infrastructure and ongoing management costs. Respite – Services provided so a client or their carer can take a break from their daily routine. Includes care in the client’s home, at a day centre or in an aged care facility. Restaurant/Café – Fully serviced restaurant within the retirement village or café available for at least one meal per day. Serviced Apartment – Usually one or two bedroom accommodation in a retirement village providing residents with some domestic and ‘hotel’ like services on a fee for service basis. Small Pets Welcome – Residents are able to a bring small, non-intrusive pet to live with them in the apartment, unit or villa in a retirement community. Social &/or Recreational support – The client participates in social or recreational activities either in their home or at a community, day or recreational centre. Strata Titled – This allows for individual ownership of part of a property (called a ‘lot’ and generally an apartment or townhouse), combined with shared ownership in the remainder (called ‘Common Property’ ie foyers, driveways, gardens). Superannuation – A compulsory retirement savings account that can only be used to fund an individual during retirement. Supported Living – Supported living communities offer accommodation and care to residents on a fee for service basis, often up to high level care needs. Swimming Pool – A permanent swimming pool available for water activities, classes and casual swimming. Transport – Organising or providing transport services such as bus, taxi, private car etc. to activities away from the village. Village Bus – Bus at the retirement village available to take residents to specific locations regularly. Village Centre – A dedicated building or large room where residents can congregate, meet and have functions. Web ID – The unique number allocated to a retirement village or home care service by DPS. Use this number to find additional details about the village on YourRetirementLiving.com.au or home care service on AgedCareGuide.com.au/home-care.

Home Care Guide 2021


Resources – Australian Capital Territory

AUSTRALIAN CAPITAL TERRITORY

Australian Capital Territory useful phone numbers and websites Advocacy ACT Disability, Aged and Carer Advocacy Service (ADACAS) 02 6242 5060 adacas.org.au Carers ACT 02 6296 9900 carersact.org.au Carers Australia 02 6122 9900 carersaustralia.com.au Carers Helpline 1800 242 636 carersaustralia.com.au COTA ACT 02 6282 3777 cotaact.org.au Elder Abuse Helpline 1300 651 192 eapu.com.au/helpline Older Persons Abuse Prevention Referral and Information Line (APRIL) – ACT 02 6205 3535 dvrcv.org.au/ older-persons-abuse-preventionreferral-and-information-line-april Older Persons Advocacy Network (OPAN) 1800 700 600 opan.com.au

Cultural Partners in Culturally Appropriate Care (PICAC) 02 4229 7566 mcci.org.au

Government Aged Care Quality & Safety Commission 1800 951 822 agedcarequality.gov.au Carer Gateway 1800 422 737 carergateway.gov.au

YourRetirementLiving.com.au

Centrelink – Older Australians Line 13 23 00 servicesaustralia.gov.au/ individuals/centrelink Department of Veterans' Affairs 1800 838 372 dva.gov.au Medicare 13 20 11 servicesaustralia.gov.au/ individuals/medicare My Aged Care 1800 200 422 myagedcare.gov.au Services Australia (formerly Department of Human Services) 13 24 68 servicesaustralia.gov.au

Health Arthritis Australia 1800 011 041 arthritisaustralia.com.au Australia Hearing 13 44 32 hearing.com.au Beyond Blue 1300 224 636 beyondblue.org.au Dementia Australia 1800 100 500 dementia.org.au Dementia Support Australia 1800 699 799 dementia.com.au Diabetes Australia 1800 637 700 diabetesaustralia.com.au National Continence Helpline 1800 330 066 continence.org.au National Dementia Helpline 1800 100 500 dementia.org.au/helpline

Seniors Health Card 13 23 00 servicesaustralia.gov.au/ individuals/services/centrelink/ commonwealth-seniors-health-card

Legal

Access Canberra (Fair Trading) 02 6207 3000 accesscanberra.act.gov.au/ app/home Legal Aid ACT Helpline 1300 654 314 legalaidact.org.au/ contact-legal-aid Public Advocate of the ACT 02 6205 2222 hrc.act.gov.au/public-advocate The Public Trustee and Guardian ACT 02 6207 9800 ptg.act.gov.au

Other ACT Retirement Village Residents Association 0407 288 249 Independent Living Centres Australia 1300 885 886 ilcaustralia.org.au Relationships Australia 1300 364 277 relationships.org.au Retirement Living Council 02 9033 1900 propertycouncil.com.au/Web/ Membership/Divisions/RLC_Division Seniors Card (ACT) 02 6282 3777 actseniorscard.org.au Translating and Interpreting Service (TIS) 13 14 50 tisnational.gov.au Volunteering ACT 02 6251 4060 volunteeringact.org.au

AgedCareGuide.com.au/home-care

127


Retirement Villages – Australian Capital Territory Features

Organisation

Village Name Physical Address

Extras

ILU s/V il Ser las vic ed Ap Sup art po me rte nt dL De ivin s fer red g Ma Pur nag cha e se and ment Co -Lo Fee E ntr cat y ed Co Ag de e dK eyp d Car Din e ad ing En Ro t r om y Ha ir a nd B Ho eau tel ty S Ser alo vic Per n e s s on al C Re are sta ura nt/ Sm Ca all fé Pet sW Vill elc age om Ce e Vill ntr e age Bu s Bo at Sto r age Ca rav an S tor Bo wli age ng G Sw r e en imm ing Ad v Po o Pg ert l

Type

Web ID – Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au and type this number in the search field (top right) for more details on Retirement Villages

Adria Care Adria Care 89 Fremantle Dr, Stirling 2611

2T a

02 6288 0198

ID 12857

W

Brindabella Court Downer 59 Melba St, Downer 2602

1800 457 255

ID 12866

W

Xa

FLp

St David's Close Red Hill 167 La Perouse St, Red Hill 2603

1800 457 255

ID 12868

W

Xa

F

02 6162 5888

W

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BaptistCare Yarra Rossa 1800 512 116 Sales Suite, 3-4/1 Duyfken Pl, Red Hill 2603 ID 61678

W

4

Calvary Haydon Village 2 Jaeger Cct, Bruce 2617

1800 222 000

ID 21350

W

XaT

P

KF

02 6175 5045

ID 12858

W

4T

P

KFLp

Bellerive Village 15 Burnie St, Lyons 2606

02 6169 3669

ID 20302

W

HP

KFLp

Marigal Gardens 21 Snodgrass Cr, Kambah 2902

1300 884 784

ID 21917

W

P

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The Grange Deakin 67 MacGregor St, Deakin 2600

02 6129 1561

ID 20301

WU

6 X4 a 6 X4 a X4 a

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13 44 78

ID 19424

W

XaT

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1300 535 000

ID 61764

WU

Isabella Gardens 4 Azalea Ct, Isabella Plains 2905

1800 550 550

ID 38253

W

Xa

The Aerie at Narrabundah 265 Goyder St, Narrabundah 2604

1800 550 550

ID 38986

W

X6

H

FL

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The Grove Ngunnawal 1 Monty Pl, Ngunnawal 2913

1800 550 550

W

Xa

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Anglicare NSW South/West & ACT

Azure Village Azure Village 255 Goyder Street, Narrabundah 2604

BaptistCare NSW & ACT

ID 38473

HP

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133

Calvary Retirement Community Haydon Goodwin Aged Care Services Farrer Village by Goodwin 22 Marshall St, Farrer 2607

Hindmarsh Retirement

IRT Kangara Waters 2 Joy Cummings Pl, Belconnen 2617

LDK Seniors' Living Aspire Aged Care by LDK 260 Soward Way, Greenway 2900

Lendlease

ID 38255

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134, 155

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D Donor Funded L Lease LO Licence to Occupy R Rental RF Resident Funded ST Strata Title

‘I choose peace of mind with no home maintenance to worry about’

AINSLIE | CRACE | FARRER | MONASH GOODWIN.ORG.AU (02) 6175 5000

See Terms and Definitions on page 126. Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au for a complete overview of providers and services in each State and Territory.

128

Your Retirement Living – 8 th edition


Retirement Villages – Australian Capital Territory Features

Organisation

Village Name Physical Address

Extras

ILU s/V il Ser las vic ed Ap Sup art po me rte nt dL De ivin s fer red g Ma Pur nag cha e se and ment Co -Lo Fee E ntr cat y ed Co Ag de e dK eyp d Car Din e ad ing En Ro t r o y Ha m ir a nd Be Ho aut tel yS Ser alo vic Per n e s s on al C Re are sta ura nt/ Sm Ca all fé Pet sW Vill elc age om Ce e Vill ntr e age Bu s Bo at Sto r age Ca rav an S tor Bo wli age ng G Sw r e en imm ing Ad v Po o Pg ert l

Type

Web ID – Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au and type this number in the search field (top right) for more details on Retirement Villages

Pines Living Pines Living 9 Dreverman St, Farrer 2607

02 6162 2999

ID 20838

WU

aT a

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02 6283 4999

ID 12852

W

4T

Pr

RFBI Holt Masonic Retirement Village 138 Hardwick Cr, Holt 2615

1800 181 959

ID 21381

W

P

RFBI Pearce Masonic Retirement Village 7 Shepherd St, Pearce 2607

1800 181 959

ID 12859

W

X4 aT 7 X4 a

Coral Park 23 Burkitt St, Page 2614

02 6123 9000

ID 20951

W

HP

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136, 141

El Alamein Village 26 Archibald St, Lyneham 2602

0437 476 700

ID 20841

W

X4 aT 7 X4T a

HP

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136, 141

Garran Village 7 Boake Pl, Garran 2605

1800 870 427

ID 12863

W

XaT

HP

George O'Neill Court 5 Chapman St, Braddon 2612

1800 870 427

ID 18856

W

Xa

IFC, 91

Haseler Court 9 Chapman St, Braddon 2612

1800 870 427

ID 21481

W

a

IFC, 91

John Cahill Village 52 Novar St, Yarralumla 2600

1800 870 427

ID 18858

W

Xa

IFC, 91

Ozanam Village 7 Boake Pl, Garran 2605

1800 870 427

ID 38627

W

X

WE O'Brien Court 19 Chauvel St, Campbell 2612

1800 870 427

ID 18857

W

Xa

Uniting Amala 200 Woodcock Dr, Gordon, Gordon 2906

1800 864 846

ID 20624

W

X4T

Uniting Mirinjani 11 Namatjira Dr, Weston 2611

1800 864 846

ID 12871

W

X4T

Uniting St Aidan's Court 15 Wylie St, Narrabundah 2604

1800 864 846

ID 12872

W

X4

02 6255 1794

W

Presbyterian Aged Care NSW & ACT PAC Canberra St Andrew's Village 95 Groom St, Hughes 2605

K

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Royal Freemasons' Benevolent Institution (RFBI)

RSL LifeCare

Southern Cross Care (NSW & ACT)

Uniting Independent Living

Villaggio Sant' Antonio Villaggio Sant’ Antonio 35 Burkitt St, Page 2614

ID 12864

Lp

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IFC, 91

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IFC, 91

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D Donor Funded L Lease LO Licence to Occupy R Rental RF Resident Funded ST Strata Title

Choose your own care with Calvary

Home Care Services Retirement Living Residential Aged Care

1800 222 000 | www.calvarycare.org.au See Terms and Definitions on page 126. Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au for a complete overview of providers and services in each State and Territory. IFC Inside Front Cover

YourRetirementLiving.com.au

129


Resources – New South Wales

NEW SOUTH WALES

New South Wales useful phone numbers and websites Advocacy Ageing and Disability Abuse Helpline 1800 628 221 ageingdisabilitycommission.nsw.gov.au Carers Australia 02 6122 9900 carersaustralia.com.au Carers Helpline 1800 242 636 carersaustralia.com.au Carers NSW 02 9280 4744 carersnsw.org.au COTA NSW 02 9286 3860 cotansw.com.au Elder Abuse Helpline 1300 651 192 eapu.com.au/helpline Older Persons Advocacy Network 1800 700 600 opan.com.au Seniors Rights Service (NSW) 1800 424 079 seniorsrightsservice.org.au

Cultural Ethnic Communities’ Council of NSW 02 9319 0288 eccnsw.org.au Multicultural Communities Council of Illawarra 02 4229 7566 mcci.org.au

Government Aged Care Quality & Safety Commission 1800 951 822 agedcarequality.gov.au Carer Gateway 1800 422 737 carergateway.gov.au Centrelink – Disability, Sickness & Carers Line 13 27 17 servicesaustralia.gov.au/ individuals/centrelink YourRetirementLiving.com.au

Centrelink – Older Australians Line 13 23 00 servicesaustralia.gov.au/   individuals/centrelink Department of Veterans’ Affairs 1800 838 372 dva.gov.au Medicare 13 20 11 servicesaustralia.gov.au/  individuals/medicare My Aged Care 1800 200 422 myagedcare.gov.au Service NSW 13 77 88 service.nsw.gov.au Services Australia (formerly Department of Human Services) 13 24 68 servicesaustralia.gov.au

National Dementia Helpline 1800 100 500 dementia.org.au/helpline Seniors Health Card 13 23 00 servicesaustralia.gov.au/   individuals/services/centrelink/   commonwealth-seniors-health-card

Health

Independent Living Centres Australia 1300 885 886 ilcaustralia.org.au Relationships Australia 1300 364 277 relationships.org.au RV Resident’s Association (RVRA) 1300 787 213 rvra.org.au Seniors Card Service (NSW) 13 77 88 service.nsw.gov.au/transaction   /apply-nsw-seniors-card-or  nsw-senior-savers-card Seniors Information Service (NSW) 13 77 88 nsw.gov.au/living-nsw/   government-services/seniors Translating and Interpreting Service (TIS) 13 14 50 tisnational.gov.au The Centre for Volunteering 02 9261 3600 volunteering.com.au

Arthritis Australia 1800 011 041 arthritisaustralia.com.au Beyond Blue 1300 224 636 beyondblue.org.au Dementia Australia 1800 100 500 dementia.org.au Dementia Support Australia 1800 699 799 dementia.com.au Diabetes Australia 1800 637 700 diabetesaustralia.com.au Hearing Australia 13 44 32 hearing.com.au National Continence Helpline 1800 330 066 continence.org.au

Legal Law Access NSW 1300 888 529 lawaccess.nsw.gov.au NSW Fair Trading 13 32 20 fairtrading.nsw.gov.au NSW Trustee and Guardian 1300 360 466 or 02 8688 2650 tag.nsw.gov.au

Other

AgedCareGuide.com.au/home-care

131


Retirement Villages – New South Wales Features

Extras

ILU s/V il Ser las vic ed Ap Sup art po me rte nt dL De ivin s fer red g Ma Pur nag cha e se and ment Co -Lo Fee E ntr cat y ed Co Ag de e dK eyp d Car Din e ad ing En Ro t r om y Ha ir a nd B Ho eau tel ty S Ser alo vic Per n e s s on al C Re are sta ura nt/ Sm Ca all fé Pet sW Vill elc age om Ce e Vill ntr e age Bu s Bo at Sto r age Ca rav an S tor Bo wli age ng G Sw r e en imm ing Ad v Po o Pg ert l

Type

Web ID – Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au and type this number in the search field (top right) for more details on Retirement Villages

Organisation

Village Name Physical Address

Allity Riverwood Retirement Living 990 Padman Dr, West Albury 2640

61, 63, 65

02 6023 9700

ID 19950

W

X ST a HP

Alum View Retirement Living 27-31 Crawford St, Bulahdelah 2423

1800 733 553

ID 21934

W

X4T

140

Buchanan Court Retirement Living 49 Patrick St, Merewether 2291

1800 733 553

ID 19967

W

140

CA Brown Retirement Living 87 Toronto Rd, Booragul 2284

1800 733 553

ID 21499

W

Carey Bay Retirement Living 36 Laycock St, Carey Bay 2283

1800 733 553

ID 13486

W

Greenmount Gardens Retirement Living 4 Bristol Cl, Mount Hutton 2290

1800 733 553

ID 22063

W

Northwood Retirement Living 16 Collinson St, Tenambit 2323

1800 733 553

ID 21190

W

Storm Retirement Living 109 Cowper St, Taree 2430

1800 733 553

ID 19513

W

3 X5 4T X5 4T 5 X4T a X4 X6 aT

02 4951 6637

ID 21157

WU

X4

Constitution Hill Retirement Community 1 Centenary Ave, Northmead 2152

1300 294 519

ID 20664

W

Elderslee Retirement Community 15 Bias Ave, Bateau Bay 2261

1300 899 301

ID 12874

W

Greglea Retirement Community 192 Penshurst St, Penshurst 2222

02 9579 6444

ID 12887

WU

Karagi Court Retirement Community 2 Pheasant Ave, Bateau Bay 2261

1300 899 301

ID 12886

W

Kiah Lodge Retirement Community 15 Anne Findlay Pl, Bateau Bay 2261

1300 899 301

ID 12885

W

Lifestyle Manor Retirement Community 24-32 Flood St, Bondi 2026

02 9389 2777

ID 18987

W

Xa ST HPrEKFLp X6 L 4 a 0 HPrE S X6 L 4 a X6 L 4 a 6 a P KFL

Mt Eymard Retirement Community 502 Moss Vale Rd, Bowral 2576

1300 858 750

ID 12895

WU

XS

Sienna Grange Retirement Community 28 John Oxley Dr, Port Macquarie 2444

1300 899 759

ID 18988

W

X

The Governor's Retirement Community 166 River Park Rd, Port Macquarie 2444

1300 149 290

WU

X6

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Anglican Care

Arton Group Jenny MacLeod Retirement Village 48 Victory Pde, Wallsend 2287

p

140

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140

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140

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140

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Australian Unity Independent & Assisted Living

ID 18986

Willandra Village and Bungalows Ret Com'ty 1300 295 832 81 Willandra Rd and 51 Little Willandra Rd, ID 18990 Cromer 2099

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BaptistCare NSW & ACT BaptistCare Aminya Village 6 Goolgung Ave, Baulkham Hills 2153

02 8896 3905

ID 13522

W

X4T

P

KFLp

BaptistCare Angus Bristow Village 49 Lodges Rd, Elderslie 2570

02 4648 7170

ID 20895

W

X4

P

FLp

133

BaptistCare Maranoa Village 15 The Avenue, Alstonville 2477

02 6698 5718

W

P

FLp

133

BaptistCare The Gracewood Retirement Village 1800 116 550 8 Free Settlers Dr, Kellyville 2155 ID 20133

W

X4T X4 aT

HP

EKFLp

ID 19143

y

133

I

133

D Donor Funded L Lease LO Licence to Occupy R Rental RF Resident Funded ST Strata Title See Terms and Definitions on page 126. Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au for a complete overview of providers and services in each State and Territory.

132

Your Retirement Living – 8 th edition


Resources –

Welcome to Community Living At BaptistCare, retirement living is more than just a place to live, it’s a community. We take pride in the facilities and services we offer, but it’s our communities that make all the difference. Enjoy all the benefits of retirement living like having your lawns and gardening taken care of, property upkeep, onsite events and activities, and friends to watch over your place while you’re away, so you’ll be able to spend more time doing the things you love.

Why Choose A BaptistCare Retirement Living Community? Meeting your needs now and into the future It’s important when downsizing to choose a place that can meet your needs both now and into the future. Our Adaptive Living approach provides easy access to our home care and residential aged care so you have peace of mind that you can live as independently as you wish, while being able to receive the exact amount of support that’s right for you, if and when you need it.

A smart financial move We understand that every individual is unique, as is their financial situation. That’s why we’ve developed a range of easy to understand flexible financial options designed to suit your individual circumstances. Our contracts are completely transparent, so you’ll never find any hidden costs.. Over 75 years of experience BaptistCare has been trusted by thousands of Australians across the retirement living, aged care and community service sectors since 1944. While we are not-for-profit, there are a few things that we certainly are for: outstanding quality and a quest to truly make a difference, not just in our retirement living communities, but in all communities. Our locations • Alstonville • Bangor • Baulkham Hills • Elderslie

• • • •

Kellyville Macquarie Park Red Hill (ACT) Wagga Wagga

Call 1300 275 227 to book a tour at your nearest BaptistCare Retirement Living Community today 133


Retirement Villages – New South Wales

Retirement Villages Home Care You’re in good company.

IRT is a community-owned provider with 50 years’ experience improving the lives of older Australians.

QLD Sunshine Coast

We proudly support over 9000 customers across NSW, Qld and the ACT.

Brisbane

NSW

Retirement villages Active and independent living for over 55s. Sydney

ACT

Illawarra-Shoalhaven South East & Tablelands

Home care Support at home to live independently.

For more information call 134 478 or visit irt.org.au 134

Your Retirement Living – 8 th edition


Retirement Villages – New South Wales Features

Organisation

Village Name Physical Address

Extras

ILU s/V il Ser las vic ed Ap Sup art po me rte nt dL De ivin s fer red g Ma Pur nag cha e se and ment Co -Lo Fee E ntr cat y ed Co Ag de e dK eyp d Car Din e ad ing En Ro t r o y Ha m ir a nd Be Ho aut tel yS Ser alo vic Per n e s s on al C Re are sta ura nt/ Sm Ca all fé Pet sW Vill elc age om Ce e Vill ntr e age Bu s Bo at Sto r age Ca rav an S tor Bo wli age ng G Sw r e en imm ing Ad v Po o Pg ert l

Type

Web ID – Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au and type this number in the search field (top right) for more details on Retirement Villages

BaptistCare NSW & ACT continued BaptistCare Warena Village 66 Billa Rd, Bangor 2234

02 4658 0882

ID 13171

W

BaptistCare Watermark 14-20 Church St, Wagga Wagga 2650

02 6925 8660

ID 21132

W

BaptistCare Willandra Village 149-153 Epping Rd, Macquarie Park 2113

02 9346 1340

ID 13515

W

X4 P aT X4 a a P X4 aT HP

Calvary Mt Carmel Village 9 Dwyer St, Maitland 2320

1800 222 000

ID 21347

W

XaT

Calvary St Luke's Village 204-206 Darby St, Cooks Hill 2300

1800 222 000

ID 12936

W

Xa

1300 590 590

ID 22298

W

XaT

Aquinas Court Retirement Village 2 Hawkesbury Rd, Springwood 2777

1800 225 474

ID 18569

W

Bishop McCabe Retirement Village 23 Ziems Ave, Towradgi 2518

1800 225 474

ID 13884

W

Charles O'Neill Retirement Village 35 Vineyard St, Mona Vale 2518

1800 225 474

ID 20811

W

Emmaus Retirement Village 85 Bakers Lane, Kemps Creek 2178

1800 225 474

ID 20808

W

X4 aT 4 a 7T 4 X4 aT

McQuoin Park Retirement Village 35 Pacific Highway, Wahroonga 2076

1300 221 271

ID 20812

W

4T

St Hedwig Village Self Care Units 138-140 Reservoir Rd, Blacktown 2148

02 8822 9903

ID 21049

W

St Mary's Retirement Village 211 Northcliffe Dr, Berkeley 2506

1800 225 474

ID 20809

W

St Peter's Green Retirement Village 5 Felton Ave, Lane Cove North 2066

1800 225 474

ID 20814

W

The Bailly Retirement Village 85-89 Clinton St, Orange 2800

1800 225 474

ID 20810

W

The Brighton Retirement Village 17-23 Croydon Ave, Croydon 2132

1800 225 474

ID 20607

W

The Haven Retirement Living 156 Bourke St, Wagga Wagga 2650

1800 225 474

ID 39052

W

X 4T HP X4 aT X4 aT a 7T 4 X4 aT a Pr 7T H 4

13 44 78

ID 13092

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ID 13133

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13 44 78

ID 14230

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ID 13228

W

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13 44 78

ID 14202

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ID 13108

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Calvary Community Care

K

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133

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129, 139, 163

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Carrington Care Carrington Retirement Living 90 Werombi Rd, Grasmere 2570

Catholic Healthcare

IRT Birch Villa 47-49 Underwood St, Corrimal 2518 Braeside 155-161 Gipps Rd, Keiraville 2500 Culburra Beach 976 Culburra Rd, Culburra Beach 2540 Dalmeny 4 Ruth Pl, Dalmeny 2546 Diment Towers 39-45 Staff St, Wollongong 2500 Edwina 4-8 Underwood St, Corrimal 2518

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D Donor Funded L Lease LO Licence to Occupy R Rental RF Resident Funded ST Strata Title

See Terms and Definitions on page 126. Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au for a complete overview of providers and services in each State and Territory.

YourRetirementLiving.com.au

135


Adding Adding Addinglife life life tototoyears years years Adding and and and years years yearslife tototolife life life to years and years to life

Since Since Since Since 1911, 1911, 1911, 1911, not-for-profit not-for-profit not-for-profit not-for-profit RSL RSL RSL RSL LifeCare LifeCare LifeCare LifeCare Since Since 1911, 1911, not-for-profit not-for-profit RSL RSL LifeCare LifeCare has has has has been been been been developing developing developing developing connected connected connected connected and and and and has has been been developing developing connected connected and and vibrant vibrant vibrant vibrant communities, communities, communities, communities, for for for for veterans veterans veterans veterans and and and and vibrant vibrant communities, communities, for for veterans veterans and and seniors seniors seniors seniors with with with personalised personalised personalised personalised care care care care and and and and Sincewith 1911, not-for-profit RSL LifeCare seniors seniors with with personalised personalised care care and and services services services services that that that that suit suit suit suit your your your your lifestyle. lifestyle. lifestyle. lifestyle. and has been developing connected services services that that suit suit your your lifestyle. lifestyle.

vibrant communities, for veterans and seniors with personalised care and Throughout Throughout Throughout Throughout our our our our 25 25 25 25 Retirement Retirement Retirement Retirement Villages, Villages, Villages, Villages, Throughout Throughout our our 25 25 Retirement Retirement Villages, Villages, services that suit your lifestyle. 26 26 26 26 Residential Residential Residential Residential Aged Aged Aged Aged Care Care Care Care facilities, facilities, facilities, facilities, and and and and

26 26Residential ResidentialAged AgedCare Carefacilities, facilities,and and via via via via Home Home Home Home Care Care Care Care services services services services across across across across NSW NSW NSW NSW and and and and via via Home HomeCare Care services services across acrossNSW NSW and and Throughout our 25 Retirement Villages, ACT ACT ACT ACT we we we help help help help you you you you stay stay stay stay independent independent independent independent and and and and 26we Residential Aged Care facilities, and ACT ACT we we help help you you stay stay independent independent and and safe safe safe safe in in in your in your your your own own own own home home home home or or or one or one one one of of of ours. of ours. ours. ours. via Home Care services across NSW safe safeininyour yourown ownhome homeororone oneofofours. ours. and

ACT we help you stay independent and safe in yourremains own home orto one of ours. RSL RSL RSL RSL LifeCare LifeCare LifeCare LifeCare remains remains remains true true true true to to its to its its its mission mission mission mission

RSL RSLLifeCare LifeCareremains remainstrue truetotoits itsmission mission –– – to to – to provide to provide provide provide peace, peace, peace, peace, security security security security and and and and care care care care to to ––to toprovide provide peace, peace, security security and and care care toto toto RSL LifeCare remains true to its mission veterans veterans veterans veterans and and and and all all all all senior senior senior senior Australians. Australians. Australians. Australians. – to provide peace, security and care to veterans veterans and and all all senior senior Australians. Australians. veterans and all senior Australians.

136

For For For Formore more more moreinformation information information information For For more more information information For more information call call call call1300 1300 1300 1300232 232 232 232 564 564 564 564or or or or 252 call call 1300 1300 232 232 564 564 or or call 1300 232 564 or visit visit visit visitrsllifecare.org.au rsllifecare.org.au rsllifecare.org.au rsllifecare.org.au visit visit rsllifecare.org.au rsllifecare.org.au visit rsllifecare.org.au

HOME HOME HOME HOME CARE CARE CARE CARE •••RETIREMENT •RETIREMENT RETIREMENT RETIREMENT LIVING LIVING LIVING LIVING •••RESIDENTIAL •RESIDENTIAL RESIDENTIAL RESIDENTIAL AGED AGED AGED AGED CARE CARE CARE CARE •••VETERANS •VETERANS VETERANS VETERANS SERVICES SERVICES SERVICES SERVICES HOME HOME CARE CARE RETIREMENT LIVING LIVING RESIDENTIAL AGED AGED CARE CARE VETERANS SERVICES SERVICES HOME CARE•••RETIREMENT RETIREMENT LIVING•••RESIDENTIAL RESIDENTIAL AGED CARE•••VETERANS VETERANS SERVICES


Retirement Villages – New South Wales Features

Organisation

Village Name Physical Address

Extras

ILU s/V il Ser las vic ed Ap Sup art po me rte nt dL De ivin s fer red g Ma Pur nag cha e se and ment Co -Lo Fee E ntr cat y ed Co Ag de e dK eyp d Car Din e ad ing En Ro t r o y Ha m ir a nd Be Ho aut tel yS Ser alo vic Per n e s s on al C Re are sta ura nt/ Sm Ca all fé Pet sW Vill elc age om Ce e Vill ntr e age Bu s Bo at Sto r age Ca rav an S tor Bo wli age ng G Sw r e en imm ing Ad v Po o Pg ert l

Type

Web ID – Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au and type this number in the search field (top right) for more details on Retirement Villages

IRT continued

134, 155

13 44 78

ID 13148

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Lp

13 44 78

ID 13161

W

Xa

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13 44 78

ID 38993

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13 44 78

ID 13151

W

13 44 78

ID 19168

W

13 44 78

ID 13072

W

13 44 78

Xa H X6 aT a HP X7 P aT

ID 13718

W

XaT

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13 44 78

ID 21489

W

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13 44 78

ID 14043

W

13 44 78

ID 13531

W

13 44 78

Xa X7 4T X7 aT

ID 13156

W

Xa

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ID 13158

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ID 13761

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02 9545 4799

ID 19829

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ID 13346

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ID 20914

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ID 13175

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13 44 78

ID 13090

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13 44 78

ID 13073

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13 44 78

ID 13120

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Bayside @ Byron 184 Broken Head Rd, Suffolk Park 2481

02 6639 2313

ID 21938

W

Bimbimbie Park 10 Short St, Merimbula 2548

02 6495 1421

ID 20952

W

Chauvel Village 1 Star Ave, Goonellabah 2480

02 6624 5010

ID 18574

W

Cherrybrook Gardens 10 Casuarina Dr, Cherrybrook 2126

02 9481 0578

ID 18935

W

Dumaresq Village 124 Wallace St, Nowra 2541

02 4422 4488

W

Greenwell Gardens 4 Brereton St, Nowra 2541 Harbourside 6 Terralong St, Kiama 2533 Henry Brooks Estate at IRT Kanahooka 260 Kanahooka Rd, Kanahooka 2530 Howard Court at IRT Pioneer Place 27A Stewart St, Wollongong 2500 Links Seaside 1 Ross St, Wollongong 2500 Macarthur 1 Hyde Pde, Campbelltown 2560 Moruya 35-39 River St, Moruya 2537 Parkside at IRT Pioneer Place 27B Stewart St, Wollongong 2500 Peakhurst 24 Turpentine Ave, Peakhurst 2210 Sarah Claydon 130 Princes Hwy, Milton 2538 Seaview 49-53 Park Rd, Woonona 2517 St Georges Basin Cnr Meriton St & Loralyn Ave, St Georges Basin 2540 Tarrawanna Gardens 2 Foothills Rd, Tarrawanna 2518 The Clyde 3 Beach Rd, Batemans Bay 2536 Thomas Holt Kilpatrick Court 539 The Boulevarde, Sutherland 2232 Thomas Holt Kirrawee 1-25 Acacia Rd, Kirrawee 2232 Thomas Holt Stafford Court 492-496 Box Rd, Jannali 2226 Towradgi Park Lodge 43-47 Towradgi Rd, Towradgi 2518 Towradgi Park 17A Murranar Rd, Towradgi 2518 William Beach Gardens at IRT Kanahooka 286 Kanahooka Rd, Kanahooka 2530 Woonona 4 Popes Rd, Woonona 2517

RSL LifeCare

ID 20799

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D Donor Funded L Lease LO Licence to Occupy R Rental RF Resident Funded ST Strata Title See Terms and Definitions on page 126. Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au for a complete overview of providers and services in each State and Territory.

YourRetirementLiving.com.au

137


Retirement Villages – New South Wales Features

Organisation

Village Name Physical Address

Extras

ILU s/V il Ser las vic ed Ap Sup art po me rte nt dL De ivin s fer red g Ma Pur nag cha e se and ment Co -Lo Fee E ntr cat y ed Co Ag de e dK eyp d Car Din e ad ing En Ro t r om y Ha ir a nd B Ho eau tel ty S Ser alo vic Per n e s s on al C Re are sta ura nt/ Sm Ca all fé Pet sW Vill elc age om Ce e Vill ntr e age Bu s Bo at Sto r age Ca rav an S tor Bo wli age ng G Sw r e en imm ing Ad v Po o Pg ert l

Type

Web ID – Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au and type this number in the search field (top right) for more details on Retirement Villages

RSL LifeCare continued 136, 141

Ironwood Village 5 MacKay St, Dungog 2420

02 4992 2144

ID 21203

W

X4

Kokoda Village 7/7 Hackett Lane, Ballina 2478

02 6681 9000

ID 20797

W

X4T

02 6584 1258

ID 20498

W

X4

Linton Village 15 Glebe St, Yass 2582

02 6226 1899

ID 21939

W

Long Khanh Lakefront Village 1 Village Way, Canton Beach 2263

02 4396 4288

WU

Long Tan Village 510 King St, Newcastle 2300

02 4009 4109

Le Hamel Village Cnr Boundary St & Hastings River Dr, Port Macquarie 2444

ID 12884

4T X4

Ocean Drive - Pozières Retirement Village 02 5555 5014 821 Ocean Dr, Port Macquarie 2444 ID 38466 Retirement Village Dubbo 02 6882 8663 57 Minore Rd, Dubbo 2830 ID 38187

W

X4T

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Retirement Village North Richmond 96 Grose Vale Rd, North Richmond 2754

02 4502 8712

ID 20801

W

Retirement Village Penrith 64B Glebe Pl, Penrith 2750

02 4748 9320

W

4T X6 aT aT

ID 38465

136, 141

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D Donor Funded L Lease LO Licence to Occupy R Rental RF Resident Funded ST Strata Title

McQuoin Park Artist impression

Live a holiday lifestyle without leaving home

Jemalong Artist impression

Now selling McQuoin Park: 35 Pacific Highway, Wahroonga, NSW 2093 | Now selling from just $595,000 Jemalong: 240 Edward Street, Forbes, NSW 2871| Now selling from $309,500

Call 1300 221 271 | catholichealthcare.com.au You may have to pay a departure fee when you leave this village. Please call us for a personal appointment to view a finished residence and discuss your retirement plans.

See Terms and Definitions on page 126. Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au for a complete overview of providers and services in each State and Territory.

138

Your Retirement Living – 8 th edition


Retirement Villages – New South Wales Features

Extras

ILU s/V il Ser las vic ed Ap Sup art po me rte nt dL De ivin s fer red g Ma Pur nag cha e se and ment Co -Lo Fee E ntr cat y ed Co Ag de e dK eyp d Car Din e ad ing En Ro t r o y Ha m ir a nd Be Ho aut tel yS Ser alo vic Per n e s s on al C Re are sta ura nt/ Sm Ca all fé Pet sW Vill elc age om Ce e Vill ntr e age Bu s Bo at Sto r age Ca rav an S tor Bo wli age ng G Sw r e en imm ing Ad v Po o Pg ert l

Type

Web ID – Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au and type this number in the search field (top right) for more details on Retirement Villages

Organisation

Village Name Physical Address

RSL LifeCare continued Robert White Village 2 Madline St, Condobolin 2877

02 6895 6500

ID 38185

W

Rowland Village 301 Galston Rd, Galston 2159

02 9653 4920

ID 20796

W

RSL ANZAC Retirement Village 4 Colooli Rd, Narrabeen 2101

02 8978 4200

ID 38184

W

Sanananda Park 2B Tura Beach Dr, Tura Beach 2548

02 6495 9923

ID 20962

W

Soldier Settlers Villages Various locations in, Griffith 2680 Taara Gardens 25 Estonian Rd, Thirlmere 2572 Tea Gardens Grange 33-93 Spinifex Ave, Tea Gardens 2324 The Grange Lifestyle Village 74 Gregadoo Rd, Wagga Wagga 2650 The Lakes of Cherrybrook 10 Kenburn Ave, Cherrybrook 2126 Tobruk Village 120 Tenth Ave, Austral 2179

0419 781 701

ID 20553

W

0418 265 416

ID 20798

W

02 4997 2262

ID 20214

W

02 6926 4400

ID 19888

W

02 9875 3146

ID 12890

W

02 8777 2000

ID 20802

Cardinal Gilroy Village 45 Barcom St, Merrylands West 2160 Cootamundra Village 14 Scott Ave, Cootamundra 2590 Fatima Court 127 Caringbah Rd, Caringbah 2229

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1800 870 427

ID 13455

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ID 38631

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ID 13474

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Freemason Village Lot 6 Swift St, Harden 2587

1800 870 427

ID 38635

W

Karinya Village 125 Guy St, Corowa 2646 Kildare Court 216 Maroubra Rd, Maroubra 2035 Marsfield Village 14 Vincentia St, Marsfield 2122

1800 870 427

ID 38637

W

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1800 870 427

ID 38647

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1800 870 427

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Southern Cross Care (NSW & ACT)

ID 38649

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D Donor Funded L Lease LO Licence to Occupy R Rental RF Resident Funded ST Strata Title

Choose your own care with Calvary Home Care Services | Retirement Living | Residential Aged Care

1800 222 000 www.calvarycare.org.au

The Hunter Valley’s Premier Over 55’s Village Luxury Villas at a fraction of Sydney prices. 28 Waterworks Rd, Rutherford NSW 2320 P: 0409 805 422  E: sales@walkagrange.com.au  www.walkagrange.com.au See Terms and Definitions on page 126. Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au for a complete overview of providers and services in each State and Territory. IFC Inside Front Walka Grange YRL 2020 strip.indd 1

8/10/20 10:47 am

YourRetirementLiving.com.au

139


Retirement Villages – New South Wales Features

Extras

ILU s/V il Ser las vic ed Ap Sup art po me rte nt dL De ivin s fer red g Ma Pur nag cha e se and ment Co -Lo Fee E ntr cat y ed Co Ag de e dK eyp d Car Din e ad ing En Ro t r om y Ha ir a nd B Ho eau tel ty S Ser alo vic Per n e s s on al C Re are sta ura nt/ Sm Ca all fé Pet sW Vill elc age om Ce e Vill ntr e age Bu s Bo at Sto r age Ca rav an S tor Bo wli age ng G Sw r e en imm ing Ad v Po o Pg ert l

Type

Web ID – Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au and type this number in the search field (top right) for more details on Retirement Villages

Organisation

Village Name Physical Address

Southern Cross Care (NSW & ACT) continued IFC, 91

1800 870 427

ID 38648

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ID 38650

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ID 13475

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ID 38633

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1800 632 314

ID 38484

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ID 19281

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ID 38636

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ID 38634

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St Joseph's Village 1800 870 427 1-9 Blundell Blvd, Tweed Heads South 2486 ID 38629

W

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St Martha's Village 81-83 Leisure Dr, Banora Point 2486

1800 870 427

ID 38630

W

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Temora Village 129 Victoria St, Temora 2666

1800 870 427

ID 18855

W

Thirroul Village 10 Raymond Rd, Thirroul 2515

1800 870 427

ID 19280

Thomas Dunlea Court 88-90 Flora St, Kirrawee 2232

Mawson Court 80 Caves Beach Rd, Caves Beach 2281 Palm Villa 287 Warren St, Lavington 2641 Patrick Minahan Village 89A Livingstone Rd, Marrickville 2204 Plumpton Village 122 Hyatts Rd, Plumpton 2761 Reynolds Court 7 Bias Ave, Bateau Bay 2261 Santa Monica Village 8-14 King St, Manly Vale 2093 South Coogee Village 39 Gregory St, South Coogee 2034 Southern Cross Care Village, Parkes 2-10 Middleton St, Parkes 2870 St Aloysius Village 32 Echuca St, Moama 2731

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ID 13465

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Thornton Park Village 72-78 Empire Cct, Penrith 2750

1800 958 003

ID 38371

W

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Young Village 60-65 Demondrille St, Young 2594

1800 870 427

ID 38632

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Auburn Independent Living 21 Alice St, Auburn 2144

1800 778 767

ID 21418

W

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Heathcote 15 The Avenue, Heathcote 2233

1800 778 767

ID 14032

W

02 4933 0004

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St Vincent's Care Services

Walka Grange Lifestyle Village Walka Grange Lifestyle Village 28 Waterworks Rd, Rutherford 2320

ID 21003

ID 21895

H P

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D Donor Funded L Lease LO Licence to Occupy R Rental RF Resident Funded ST Strata Title

We help you achieve well-being and fullness of life 90 Werombi Road, Grasmere NSW 2570 Call: 1300 590 590 | customerservice@carringtoncare.com.au See Terms and Definitions on page 126. Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au for a complete overview of providers and services in each State and Territory IFC Inside Front.

140

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Resources - Northern Territory

NORTHERN TERRITORY

Northern Territory useful phone numbers and websites Advocacy

Department of Veterans’ Affairs 1800 838 372 dva.gov.au

Carers Australia 02 6122 9900

carersaustralia.com.au

Carers Helpline 1800 242 636

carersaustralia.com.au

Carers NT 08 8944 4888

arqrv.org.au

COTA NT 08 8941 1004

cotant.org.au

Elder Abuse Helpline 1300 651 192 eapu.com.au/helpline

Medicare 13 20 11 servicesaustralia.gov.au/ individuals/medicare My Aged Care 1800 200 422

myagedcare.gov.au

Services Australia (formerly Department of Human Services) 13 24 68 servicesaustralia.gov.au

Health

Older Persons Advocacy Network 1800 700 600 opan.com.au

Arthritis Australia 1800 011 041 arthritisaustralia.com.au

Cultural

Beyond Blue 1300 224 636

CatholicCare NT Alice Springs 08 8958 2400 catholiccarent.org.au Multicultural Council of Northern Territory 08 8945 9122 mcnt.org.au

Government Aged Care Quality and Safety Commission 1800 951 822 agedcarequality.gov.au Carer Gateway 1800 422 737

carergateway.gov.au

Centrelink – Disability, Sickness & Carers Line 13 27 17 servicesaustralia.gov.au/ individuals/centrelink Centrelink – Older Australians Line 13 23 00 servicesaustralia.gov.au/ individuals/centrelink

YourRetirementLiving.com.au

Dementia Australia 1800 100 500

beyondblue.org.au dementia.org.au

Dementia Support Australia 1800 699 799 dementia.com.au Diabetes Australia 1800 637 700 diabetesaustralia.com.au Hearing Australia 13 44 32

hearing.com.au

National Continence Helpline 1800 330 066 continence.org.au National Dementia Helpline 1800 100 500 dementia.org.au

Legal Darwin Community Legal Service 08 8982 1111 or 1800 812 953 dcls.org.au Legal Aid Helpline (NT) 1800 019 343 legalaid.nt.gov.au/need-help/helpline Northern Territory Consumer Affairs Enquiry Service 1800 019 319 consumeraffairs.nt.gov.au Northern Territory Office of the Public Guardian 08 8922 7116 publicguardian.nt.gov.au Public Trustee (NT) 08 8999 7271 nt.gov.au/law/processes/ about-public-trustee

Other Independent Living Centres Australia 1300 885 886 ilcaustralia.org.au NT Seniors Card 1800 441 489

ntseniorscard.org.au

Relationships Australia 1300 364 277 relationships.org.au Translating and Interpreting Service (TIS) 13 14 50 tisnational.gov.au Volunteering NT 08 8963 5624

volunteeringsa-nt.org.au

Seniors Health Card 13 23 00 servicesaustralia.gov.au/individuals/ services/centrelink/commonwealth seniors-health-card

AgedCareGuide.com.au/home-care

145


Retirement Villages – Northern Territory Features

Extras

ILU s/V il Ser las vic ed Ap Sup art po me rte nt dL De ivin s fer red g Ma Pur nag cha e se and ment Co -Lo Fee E ntr cat y ed Co Ag de e dK eyp d Car Din e ad ing En Ro t r om y Ha ir a nd B Ho eau tel ty S Ser alo vic Per n e s s on al C Re are sta ura nt/ Sm Ca all fé Pet sW Vill elc age om Ce e Vill ntr e age Bu s Bo at Sto r age Ca rav an S tor Bo wli age ng G Sw r e en imm ing Ad v Po o Pg ert l

Type

Web ID – Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au and type this number in the search field (top right) for more details on Retirement Villages

Organisation

Village Name Physical Address

Greenfields Living Durack Gardens Retirement Village 91 Packard Avenue, Durack 0830

1300 669 755

ID 21976

W

Tiwi Gardens Retirement Village 135 Tiwi Gardens, Tiwi 0810

1300 669 755

ID 18503

W

1800 852 772

W

Southern Cross Care (SA, NT & VIC) Pearl Retirement Resort 11 Waratah Cres, Fannie Bay 0820

ID 20431

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D Donor Funded L Lease LO Licence to Occupy R Rental RF Resident Funded ST Strata Title

Greenfields Living are the operator of two unique lifestyle communities in the Northern Territory, committed to providing safe and secure retirement villages for over 55s.

Ali-Curung Aged Care

8964 1580

Calvary Community Care Alice Springs

1300 660 022

Calvary Community Care Darwin

1300 660 022

Calvary Mulakunya Flexible Aged Care Service COTA Home Maintenance Service

8978 3721 1300 658 842

East Arnhem Regional Cncl Aged & Disability Serv integratedliving Northern Territory

8986 8986 1300 782 896

Kakadu Community Care

8979 9478

Life Without Barriers Alice Springs

8955 6400

Life Without Barriers Darwin

8930 2300

Life Without Barriers Katherine

8930 2300

Mable

1300 736 573

Nauiyu Daly River Aged Care Service

8977 8900

Pulkapulkka Kari Flexible Aged Care Service

8962 1222

Regis Home Care Darwin

1300 188 740

Southern Cross Care (SA, NT & VIC) Home Support Service Darwin

1800 852 772

TeamHEALTH

8943 9600

Victoria Daly Regional Cncl Aged & Dis Services

8972 0777

Yarralin Walangeri Aged Care Service

8975 0839

Note:  1.  NESB; Pages 129, 139, 163 2.  ATSI; Pages 129, 139, 163

CHS

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Web ID – Visit AgedCareGuide.com.au/home-care and type this number in the search field (top right) for more details on providers and their services

re P a

Home Care Services

cka ge l eve P Fu l n Priv ded ate S erv l y Dem Fun ices en ded Dom tia Ca Servi re ces es Hom tic Ass i s eM ta Me ainte nce als n a n Med &/or S ce / Ga icat hopp rden Pall ion S ing ing upe iati Per ve Car rvision e son Pha al Care rma Res ceut pite ical Soc Care Delive ial ry Tran &/or R e sp crea tion Cul ort al tura l Se rvic es

Call to arrange a private inspection or to talk to one of our friendly Village Managers. Discover the Greenfields Living difference today! 1300 669 755

1–4 • 1–4 1–4 2

• • • • • • • • •

• • •

• • • • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • • • • • • 1–4 • • • • • • • • • • • • 1–4 • • • • • • • • • 12 • 1–4 1–4 • • • • • • • • • • • • •

• • • • 1–4 • 1–4 • • 1–4 • • 1–4 1–4

• • • • • •

• • • • • • • • • • •

• • • • • •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • • • • • •

• •

Advert Notes  Page ATSI 129, 139, 163 Note 1 Note 2

Web ID 19654 19214 19625 19652 37738 19939 ATSI 38340 19667 ATSI 20752 21992 Note 3 21994 Note 3 81D-81 22109 19651 ATSI 18883 ATSI 154 18500

• ATSI, CALD

21236

Note 4 ATSI ATSI

19629 38397 19648

• •

3.  Includes services for Veterans’ Home Care (VHC) & DVA clients 4.  Packages for clients with mental health needs

See Terms and Definitions on page 126. Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au for a complete overview of providers and services in each State and Territory.  D Divider

146

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Home Care Guide 2021


Resources – Queensland

QUEENSLAND

Queensland useful phone numbers and websites Advocacy Aged and Disability Advocacy Australia (ADA Australia) 07 3637 6000 or 1800 818 338 adaaustralia.com.au Carers Australia 02 6122 9900 carersaustralia.com.au Carers Helpline 1800 242 636 carersaustralia.com.au Carers QLD 07 3900 8100 carersqld.com.au COTA QLD 07 3316 2999 cotaqld.org.au Elder Abuse Helpline 1300 651 192 eapu.com.au/helpline Elder Abuse Prevention Unit 1300 651 192 eapu.com.au Older Persons Advocacy Network 1800 700 600 opan.com.au Seniors Enquiry Line 1300 135 500 seniorsenquiryline.com.au

Cultural Ethnic Communities Council of Queensland (ECCQ) 07 3844 9166

eccq.com.au

Government Aged Care Quality & Safety Commission 1800 951 822 agedcarequality.gov.au Carer Gateway 1800 422 737 carergateway.gov.au

YourRetirementLiving.com.au

Centrelink – Disability, Sickness & Carers Line 13 27 17 servicesaustralia.gov.au/ individuals/carers Centrelink – Older Australians Line 13 23 00 servicesaustralia.gov.au/ individuals/centrelink Department of Veterans’ Affairs 1800 838 372 dva.gov.au My Aged Care 1800 200 422 myagedcare.gov.au Services Australia (formerly Department of Human Services) 13 24 68 servicesaustralia.gov.au

Health Alzheimer’s Queensland Helpline 1800 639 331 alzheimersonline.org Arthritis Australia 1800 011 041 arthritisaustralia.com.au Beyond Blue 1300 224 636 beyondblue.org.au Dementia Australia 1800 100 500 dementia.org.au Diabetes Australia 1800 637 700 diabetesaustralia.com.au Dementia Support Australia 1800 699 799 dementia.com.au Hearing Australia 13 44 32 hearing.com.au National Continence Helpline 1800 330 066 continence.org.au National Dementia Helpline 1800 100 500 dementia.org.au

Seniors Health Card 13 23 00 servicesaustralia.gov.au/ individuals/services/centrelink/ commonwealth-seniors-health-card

Legal Consumer Affairs and Fair Trading (QLD) 13 74 68 qld.gov.au/law/fair-trading Legal Aid QLD (Legal Information Service) 1300 651 188 legalaid.qld.gov.au Medicare 13 20 11 servicesaustralia.gov.au/ individuals/medicare Office of the Public Advocate (QLD) 07 3738 9513 justice.qld.gov.au/ public-advocate Public Trustee (QLD) 1300 360 044 pt.qld.gov.au

Other Association of Residents of QLD Retirement Villages (ARQRV) 0437 906 074 arqrv.org.au Independent Living Centres Australia 1300 885 886 ilcaustralia.org.au Relationships Australia 1300 364 277 relationships.org.au Seniors Card (QLD) 13 74 68 qld.gov.au/seniors/ legal-finance-concessions/seniors-card Translating and Interpreting Service (TIS) 13 14 50 tisnational.gov.au Volunteering QLD 07 3002 7600 volunteeringqld.org.au AgedCareGuide.com.au/home-care

147


Retirement Villages – Queensland Features

Organisation

Village Name Physical Address

Extras

ILU s/V il Ser las vic ed Ap Sup art po me rte nt dL De ivin s fer red g Ma Pur nag cha e se and ment Co -Lo Fee E ntr cat y ed Co Ag de e dK eyp d Car Din e ad ing En Ro t r om y Ha ir a nd B Ho eau tel ty S Ser alo vic Per n e s s on al C Re are sta ura nt/ Sm Ca all fé Pet sW Vill elc age om Ce e Vill ntr e age Bu s Bo at Sto r age Ca rav an S tor Bo wli age ng G Sw r e en imm ing Ad v Po o Pg ert l

Type

Web ID – Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au and type this number in the search field (top right) for more details on Retirement Villages

Aveo Albany Creek 61 Explorer Dr, Albany Creek 4035

07 3556 4401

ID 14479

W

XaT

HP

Amity Gardens 5 Lochinvar Ct, Ashmore 4214

07 3556 4401

ID 14379

W

07 3556 4401

ID 14370

WU

Bridgeman Downs 42 Ridley Rd, Bridgeman Downs 4035

07 3556 4401

ID 14430

WU

Xa X4 a Xa

HP

Aspley Court 100 Albany Creek Rd, Aspley 4034

Carindale 19 Banchory Ct, Carindale 4152

07 3556 4401

ID 14387

W

Xa

Cleveland Gardens 83 Freeth St West, Ormiston 4160

07 3556 4401

ID 14410

W

Cleveland 148 Smith St, Cleveland 4163

07 3556 4401

ID 14532

Durack 356 Blunder Rd, Durack 4077

E

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07 3556 4401

ID 14534

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Lindsay Gardens 35 Lindsay Rd, Buderim 4556

07 3556 4401

ID 14378

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Manly Gardens 112 Whites Rd, Manly West 4179

07 3556 4401

ID 14380

W

Newmarket 24 Free St, Newmarket 4051

07 3556 4401

ID 14438

W

I

Newstead 50 Longland St, Newstead 4006

07 3556 4401

ID 21923

WU

Xa HP FLp 4 P FL a X aT a HPrEKFL

Palmview 58 Harmony Bvd, Palmview 4553

07 3556 4401

W

ID 38524

Peregian Springs Country Club 07 3556 4401 21 Gracemere Blvd, Peregian Springs 4573 ID 19456 Robertson Park 07 3556 4401 7 Braddock St, Robertson 4109 ID 14389

WU W

Robina 1-33 Glenside Dr, Robina 4226

07 3556 4401

ID 14398

W

Southport Gardens 4 Beryl St, Southport 4215

07 3556 4401

W

ID 14383

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Springfield 07 3556 4401 2 Symphony Way, Springfield Central 4300 ID 21924 Sunnybank Green 07 3556 4401 239 McCullough St, Sunnybank 4109 ID 14397

WU

Taringa 1 Moore St, Taringa 4068

07 3556 4401

ID 14463

WU

Xa X4 a Xa

The Clayfield 469 Sandgate Rd, Albion 4010

07 3556 4401

ID 14533

W

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The Domain Country Club 74 Wardoo St, Ashmore 4214

07 3556 4401

ID 14385

WU

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The Parks 1 Telford St, Earlville 4870

07 3556 4401

ID 14388

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Tranquility Gardens 5 Mildura Dr, Helensvale 4212

07 3556 4401

ID 14377

W

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Northside 259 Handford Rd, Taigum 4018

07 3419 9200

ID 18469

W

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Sequana 2 Cater St, Upper Coomera 4209

1800 911 989

W

X6 a X6 a

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Baldwin Living

ID 21142

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D Donor Funded L Lease LO Licence to Occupy R Rental RF Resident Funded ST Strata Title See Terms and Definitions on page 126. Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au for a complete overview of providers and services in each State and Territory.

148

Your Retirement Living – 8 th edition


Resources –

149


Resources –

150


Retirement Villages – Queensland Features

Organisation

Village Name Physical Address

Extras

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Type

Web ID – Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au and type this number in the search field (top right) for more details on Retirement Villages

BallyCara BallyCara Village, Residential Care & Wellness 16B Oyster Point Esp, Scarborough 4020

1300 272 222

ID 14644

WU

Brookfield Green 139 Gold Creek Rd, Brookfield 4069

07 3202 3877

ID 20703

W

Brownesholme 109 Highfields Rd, Highfields 4352

07 4696 8281

ID 14392

W

Elim Estate 123 Cemetery Rd, Raceview 4305

0438 149 959

ID 14546

W

Kepnock Grove 28 Jocumsen St, Kepnock 4670

07 4131 2222

W

Shalom 07 4923 9500 121 Maloney St, North Rockhampton 4701 ID 20702 Wishart Gardens 07 3550 3728 14 Glasford St, Wishart 4122 ID 20704

W W

7T 4 4 a 4 a a 7 X4T a 4T X4 aT

Maranatha Retirement Village 1582 Anzac Ave, Kallangur 4503

1800 246 637

ID 17306

W

X4T

07 3357 7028

ID 14408

WU

07 3129 9075

ID 20016

WU

X4 aT a HPr

Parklands 242 Parklands Blvd, Currimundi 4551

13 44 78

ID 20550

W

Xa

The Palms 22 Power Rd, Buderim 4556

13 44 78

ID 20549

W

Xa

The Ridge 131 Quinlan St, Bracken Ridge 4017

13 44 78

ID 20548

W

Woodlands 22 Lacebark St, Meridan Plains 4551

13 44 78

ID 20904

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Carinity

ID 20705

Christadelphian Aged Care

Delamore Retirement Community Delamore Retirement Community 115 Turner Rd, Kedron 4031

Greengate St Luke's Green 43 Taylor St, Woolloongabba 4102

IRT

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0431 714 699

ID 38624

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Bribie Cove Retirement Village 199-213 Goodwin Dr, Bongaree 4507

07 3400 1010

ID 14374

W

Glasshouse Views Retirement Village 96-104 Peachester Rd, Beerwah 4519

07 5439 2425

ID 18001

W

6T a 6T a

07 4046 1941

WU

Kewarra Lifestyles Kewarra Retirement Village 80 Kewarra St, Kewarra Beach 4879

McKenzie Aged Care Group

Mercy Health Coral Sea Gardens Retirement Village 252–258 Lyons St, Westcourt 4870

Odyssey Lifestyle Care Communities Odyssey Lifestyle Care Communities 1 The Crestway, Robina 4226

ID 21205

07 5551 6720

ID 54397

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D Donor Funded L Lease LO Licence to Occupy R Rental RF Resident Funded ST Strata Title

See Terms and Definitions on page 126. Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au for a complete overview of providers and services in each State and Territory.  IBC Inside Back Cover.

YourRetirementLiving.com.au

151


Retirement Villages – Queensland Features

Extras

ILU s/V il Ser las vic ed Ap Sup art po me rte nt dL De ivin s fer red g Ma Pur nag cha e se and ment Co -Lo Fee E ntr cat y ed Co Ag de e dK eyp d Car Din e ad ing En Ro t r om y Ha ir a nd B Ho eau tel ty S Ser alo vic Per n e s s on al C Re are sta ura nt/ Sm Ca all fé Pet sW Vill elc age om Ce e Vill ntr e age Bu s Bo at Sto r age Ca rav an S tor Bo wli age ng G Sw r e en imm ing Ad v Po o Pg ert l

Type

Web ID – Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au and type this number in the search field (top right) for more details on Retirement Villages

Organisation

Village Name Physical Address

Ozcare Currimundi Gardens Retirement Village 28 Saffron Dr, Currimundi 4551

1800 692 273

ID 21738

W

De Paul Manor Estate 1 Edmund Rice Dr, Ashmore 4214

1800 692 273

ID 20276

W

X4T 4T a

Palm Lake Resort Bargara 39 Wearing Rd, Bargara 4670

1800 501 119

ID 19929

W

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Palm Lake Resort Beachmere Bay 145 Bishop Rd, Beachmere 4510

1800 246 677

ID 22353

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Palm Lake Resort Bethania 43 Goodooga Dr, Bethania 4205

1800 774 866

ID 20019

W

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1800 725 652

ID 20269

W

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Palm Lake Resort Toowoomba 149 Hogg St, Cranley 4350

1800 246 677

ID 38638

W

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Palm Lake Resort Deception Bay 2-12 George St, Deception Bay 4508

Regis Barambah Villas 50 Alford St, Kingaroy 4610

1300 998 100

ID 21417

W

7

Regis Bramble Bay Retirement Village 60 Wakefield St, Sandgate 4017

07 3869 6100

W

X4T a

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Regis Corinthian Court Retirement Village 07 4789 9733 1 Emerald St, Kirwan 4817 ID 21006 Regis Farris Villas 1300 352 353 52 Breakspear St, Gracemere 4702 ID 21416

W

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Regis McDonald Court Retirement Village 1300 998 100 14 Alma St, Atherton 4883 ID 20648

W

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154

Regis Tallowwood Lodge Retirement Village 07 3869 6100 25 James St, Crows Nest 4355 ID 20647 Regis Woodward Retirement Village 07 4053 5999 82-120 McManus St, Whitfield 4870 ID 21005

W

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Eastern Heights 44 Grange Rd, Eastern Heights 4305

1300 732 766

ID 20227

W

Redbank Plains 15 Argyle St, Redbank Plains 4301

1300 732 766

ID 18713

W

7 4 7 4

07 3204 7911

ID 20354

W

6T a

Caloundra Retirement Estate 57 Village Way, Little Mountain 4551

07 5492 6866

ID 61981

W

Edens Landing Retirement Estate 20 Loane Drive, Edens Landing 4207

07 3805 1844

ID 61980

W

Noosa Waters Retirement Estate 39 Lake Weyba Dr, Noosaville 4566

07 5474 4480

ID 18414

W

ParqueVista on Seville 85 Seville Rd, Holland Park 4121

07 3422 3866

ID 21455

W

Stretton Gdns Retirement Estate 209 Illaweena St, Drewvale 4116

07 3373 9000

ID 61982

W

X6 aT X6 aT X6 a X6 aT X6 aT

1800 778 767

W

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Palm Lake Care

Regis Aged Care

ID 21004

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Seasons Aged Care

Sir James Terrace Sir James Terrace Villas 11 Stamp St, Deception Bay 4508

Southern Cross Care (QLD)

St Vincent's Care Services Bardon Independent Living 59 Main Ave, Bardon 4065

ID 20629

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See Terms and Definitions on page 126. Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au for a complete overview of providers and services in each State and Territory.

152

Your Retirement Living – 8 th edition

D Donor Funded L Lease LO Licence to Occupy R Rental RF Resident Funded ST Strata Title


Comfortable retirement living

in welcoming communities Our independent living communities offer an enviable retirement lifestyle. Enjoy private, maintenance-free living with the comfort and security of on-site support, including 24-hour emergency call systems and options for in-home support services. Set in beautifully landscaped village environments, our independent living units are fully self-contained and complemented by well-appointed community amenities. Relax in the privacy of your own home, take advantage of the many social activities on offer, or enjoy a shopping trip on our community bus — the choice is yours. Contact us today to arrange an inspection or find out more about our properties: 1800 778 767 | svcs.info@svha.org.au www.svcs.org.au

St Vincent’s Care Services Auburn 21 Alice Street, Auburn NSW One- and two-bedroom apartments available

St Vincent’s Care Services Bardon 59 Main Avenue, Bardon QLD One- and two-bedroom apartments available

St Vincent’s Care Services Boondall 2141 Sandgate Road, Boondall QLD Two- and three- bedroom apartments available

St Vincent’s Care Services Carseldine 736 Beams Road, Carseldine QLD One-, two- and three-bedroom apartments available

St Vincent’s Care Services Enoggera 133 South Pine Road, Enoggera QLD One- and two-bedroom apartments available

St Vincent’s Care Services Mitchelton 46 Church Road, Mitchelton QLD One-, two- and three-bedroom apartments available

St Vincent’s Care Services Southport 32 Bauer Street, Southport QLD One- and two-bedroom apartments available

J2900 0719

At St Vincent’s Care Services, we make you the priority.

153


Retirement Villages – Queensland Features

Extras

ILU s/V il Ser las vic ed Ap Sup art po me rte nt dL De ivin s fer red g Ma Pur nag cha e se and ment Co -Lo Fee E ntr cat y ed Co Ag de e dK eyp d Car Din e ad ing En Ro t r om y Ha ir a nd B Ho eau tel ty S Ser alo vic Per n e s s on al C Re are sta ura nt/ Sm Ca all fé Pet sW Vill elc age om Ce e Vill ntr e age Bu s Bo at Sto r age Ca rav an S tor Bo wli age ng G Sw r e en imm ing Ad v Po o Pg ert l

Type

Web ID – Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au and type this number in the search field (top right) for more details on Retirement Villages

Organisation

Village Name Physical Address

St Vincent's Care Services continued Boondall 2141 Sandgate Rd, Boondall 4034

1800 778 767

ID 19917

W

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Carseldine 736 Beams Rd, Carseldine 4034

1800 778 767

ID 14840

W

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1800 778 767

ID 14442

W

Mitchelton Independent Living 46 Church Rd, Mitchelton 4053

1800 778 767

ID 14858

W

Southport Independent Living 32 Bauer St, Southport 4215

1800 778 767

ID 20630

W

4T 7 4 4T 7T 4

P

Enoggera Independent Living 133 South Pine Rd, Enoggera 4051

07 3282 1000

W

X6 aT

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X6 a X6 aT 6T a

The Salvation Army Aged Care Riverview Gardens Retirement Village 25 Endeavour Road, Riverview 4303

TriCare

ID 17423

Compton Gardens Retirement Community 07 3263 2788 97 Albany Creek Rd, Aspley 4034 ID 14431 Cypress Gardens Retirement Community 07 5579 9311 Gooding Dr, Clear Island Waters 4226 ID 14594 James Ommaney Retirement Community 146 Capitol Dr, Mount Ommaney 4074

07 3376 1336

ID 14583

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D Donor Funded L Lease LO Licence to Occupy R Rental RF Resident Funded ST Strata Title

IT TAKES A VILLAGE TO MAKE A RETIREMENT Regis Retirement Villages give you the feeling of security you need to embrace the life you want. Rediscover the simple joys that make life worth living new friends, quiet comforts and a feeling of genuine security. It’s why we call it Retirement Living. To find out more, or to book a tour of one of our villages, please call 1300 998 100

Regis McDonald Court Atherton

Regis Corinthian Court Kirwan

Regis Farris Villas Gracemere

Regis Bramble Bay Sandgate

Regis Tallowwood Lodge Gracemere

Regis Woodward Whitfield

Regis Barambah Villas Kingaroy

See Terms and Definitions on page 126. Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au for a complete overview of providers and services in each State and Territory.

154

Your Retirement Living – 8 th edition


Retirement Villages – Queensland Features

Extras

ILU s/V il Ser las vic ed Ap Sup art po me rte nt dL De ivin s fer red g Ma Pur nag cha e se and ment Co -Lo Fee E ntr cat y ed Co Ag de e dK eyp d Car Din e ad ing En Ro t r o y Ha m ir a nd Be Ho aut tel yS Ser alo vic Per n e s s on al C Re are sta ura nt/ Sm Ca all fé Pet sW Vill elc age om Ce e Vill ntr e age Bu s Bo at Sto r age Ca rav an S tor Bo wli age ng G Sw r e en imm ing Ad v Po o Pg ert l

Type

Web ID – Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au and type this number in the search field (top right) for more details on Retirement Villages

Organisation

Village Name Physical Address

TriCare continued Mt Gravatt Retirement Community 1748 Logan Rd, Mount Gravatt 4122

07 3849 4358

ID 14595

WU

Runaway Bay Retirement Community 98 Bayview St, Runaway Bay 4216

07 5500 2300

ID 14592

WU

Stafford Lakes Retirement Community 682 Rode Rd, Chermside West 4032

07 3864 4500

ID 20020

W

Willow Glen Retirement Community 11 Donahue St, Toowoomba 4350

07 4635 4000

ID 17990

W

X6 aT 6T a X6 aT 6 a

07 3843 4735

W

X 4T a HPrEKF

Aldersgate at Red Hill (Wesley Mission Qld) 07 3621 4558 12 Upper Clifton Tce, Red Hill 4059 ID 14403

W

Rosemount Retirement Community 620 Seventeen Mile Rocks Rd, Sinnamon Park 4073

0 X4 a

07 3737 7500

ID 21837

W

X6T

07 3621 4558

W

X6T

Vacenti Con Noi Apartments 30 Scrub Rd, Carindale 4152

Wesley Mission Queensland

Wheller on the Park 25 The Boulevard, Chermside 4032

ID 20637

ID 18382

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D Donor Funded L Lease LO Licence to Occupy R Rental RF Resident Funded ST Strata Title

Retirement Villages Home Care You’re in good company. IRT is a community-owned provider with over 50 years’ experience improving the lives of older Australians. Enjoy independent living with IRT at one of our retirement villages located throughout South-East Queensland or receive home care services from our trusted Queensland home care team.

QLD

Sunshine Coast

Brisbane

Retirement villages Active and independent living for over 55s.

Home care Support at home to live independently.

For more information call 134 478 or visit irt.org.au See Terms and Definitions on page 126. Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au for a complete overview of providers and services in each State and Territory.

YourRetirementLiving.com.au

155


Resources – South Australia

SOUTH AUSTRALIA

South Australia useful phone numbers and websites Advocacy Aged Rights Advocacy Service 08 8232 5377 or 1800 700 600 sa.agedrights.asn.au Carers Australia 02 6122 9900 carersaustralia.com.au Carers Helpline 1800 242 636 carersaustralia.com.au Carers SA 08 8291 5600 carerssa.com.au Catalyst Foundation (SA) 08 8168 8776 or 1800 636 3680 catalystfoundation.com.au COTA SA 08 8232 0422 cotasa.org.au Dementia Support Australia 1800 699 799 dementia.com.au Elder Abuse Helpline 1300 651 192 eapu.com.au/helpline Older Persons Advocacy Network 1800 700 600 opan.com.au

Cultural Ethnic Link Services (SA) 08 8241 0201 or 1800 648 598 unitingsa.com.au/ aged-care/ethnic-link-services Multicultural Communities Council of SA 08 8345 5266 mccsa.org.au

Government Aged Care Quality & Safety Commission 1800 951 822 agedcarequality.gov.au Carer Gateway 1800 422 737 carergateway.gov.au

YourRetirementLiving.com.au

Centrelink – Disability, Sickness & Carers Line 13 27 17 servicesaustralia.gov.au/ individuals/carers Centrelink – Older Australians Line 13 23 00 servicesaustralia.gov.au/ individuals/centrelink Department of Veterans’ Affairs 1800 838 372 dva.gov.au Medicare 13 20 11 servicesaustralia.gov.au/ individuals/medicare My Aged Care 1800 200 422 myagedcare.gov.au Services Australia (formerly Department of Human Services) 13 24 68 servicesaustralia.gov.au

Health Arthritis Australia 1800 011 041 arthritisaustralia.com.au Beyond Blue 1300 224 636 beyondblue.org.au Dementia Australia 1800 100 500 dementia.org.au Dementia Support Australia 1800 699 799 dementia.com.au Diabetes Australia 1800 637 700 diabetesaustralia.com.au Hearing Australia 13 44 32 hearing.com.au National Continence Helpline 1800 330 066 continence.org.au National Dementia Helpline 1800 100 500 dementia.org.au

Seniors Health Card 13 23 00 servicesaustralia.gov.au/ individuals/services/centrelink/ commonwealth-seniors-health-card

Legal Consumer & Business Services 13 18 82 cbs.sa.gov.au Legal Services Commission: Legal Helpline 1300 366 424 lsc.sa.gov.au Office of the Public Advocate (SA) 08 8342 8200 opa.sa.gov.au Public Trustee (SA) 08 8226 9200 publictrustee.sa.gov.au South Australian Civil and Administrative Tribunal (SACAT) 1800 723 767 sacat.sa.gov.au

Other Independent Living Centres Australia 1300 885 886 ilcaustralia.org.au Relationships Australia 1300 364 277 relationships.org.au Seniors Card (SA) 1800 819 961 sa.gov.au/topics/ family-and-community/seniors/seniors-card South Australia Retirement Villages Residents Association (SAVRA) 08 8232 0422 sarvra.asn.au Translating and Interpreting Service (TIS) 13 14 50 tisnational.gov.au Volunteering SA 08 8221 7177 volunteeringsa-nt.org.au

AgedCareGuide.com.au/home-care

157


Retirement Villages – South Australia Features

Organisation

Village Name Physical Address

Extras

ILU s/V il Ser las vic ed Ap Sup art po me rte nt dL De ivin s fer red g Ma Pur nag cha e se and ment Co -Lo Fee E ntr cat y ed Co Ag de e dK eyp d Car Din e ad ing En Ro t r om y Ha ir a nd B Ho eau tel ty S Ser alo vic Per n e s s on al C Re are sta ura nt/ Sm Ca all fé Pet sW Vill elc age om Ce e Vill ntr e age Bu s Bo at Sto r age Ca rav an S tor Bo wli age ng G Sw r e en imm ing Ad v Po o Pg ert l

Type

Web ID – Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au and type this number in the search field (top right) for more details on Retirement Villages

ACH Group Angove Park Drive 1 Angove Park Dr, Tea Tree Gully 5091

08 8159 3418

ID 38221

W

Xa

Bridge Street 8 Bridge St, Salisbury 5108

08 8159 3418

ID 38226

W

Xa

Brighton Parade 9 Brighton Pde, Blackwood 5051

08 8159 3480

ID 38208

W

Broad Street 3-7 Broad St, Marden 5070

08 8159 3418

ID 38207

Cator Street Cator St, Glenside 5065

F

Note 1

F

Note 1

Xa

F

Note 1

W

Xa

F

Note 1

08 8159 3418

ID 38218

W

Xa

Cornish Street 5 Cornish St, Stepney 5069

08 8159 3418

ID 38203

W

Xa

F

Note 1

East Terrace 55 East Tce, Kensington Gardens 5068

08 8159 3418

ID 38219

W

Xa

F

Note 1

Elkanah Village 50 Woodcroft Dr, Morphett Vale 5162

08 8159 3480

ID 14934

W

Elliot Court 127 Montacute Rd, Campbelltown 5074

08 8159 3418

ID 38220

W

First Avenue 132 First Ave, Joslin 5070

08 8159 3418

W

a X5 4 Xa

ID 38222

Note:  1.  Pages 162, 164, 166, 175

a

Note 1

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F

Note 1

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D Donor Funded L Lease LO Licence to Occupy R Rental RF Resident Funded ST Strata Title

See Terms and Definitions on page 126. Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au for a complete overview of providers and services in each State and Territory.

158

Your Retirement Living – 8 th edition


Retirement Villages – South Australia Features

Organisation

Village Name Physical Address

Extras

ILU s/V il Ser las vic ed Ap Sup art po me rte nt dL De ivin s fer red g Ma Pur nag cha e se and ment Co -Lo Fee E ntr cat y ed Co Ag de e dK eyp d Car Din e ad ing En Ro t r o y Ha m ir a nd Be Ho aut tel yS Ser alo vic Per n e s s on al C Re are sta ura nt/ Sm Ca all fé Pet sW Vill elc age om Ce e Vill ntr e age Bu s Bo at Sto r age Ca rav an S tor Bo wli age ng G Sw r e en imm ing Ad v Po o Pg ert l

Type

Web ID – Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au and type this number in the search field (top right) for more details on Retirement Villages

ACH Group continued

F

Note 1

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Note 1

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X5 4 X5 4 X5 4

F

Note 1

08 8159 3418

ID 38227

W

Xa

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Note 1

High Street 21 High St, Willunga 5172

08 8159 3480

ID 38204

W

Xa

F

Note 1

Hub Drive 155 Hub Dr, Aberfoyle Park 5159

08 8159 3480

ID 38205

W

F

Note 1

Ian Wilson Court 45 Fuller St, Walkerville 5081

08 8159 3480

ID 38206

W

F

Note 1

James Evans Court 122 St Bernards Rd, Magill 5072

08 8159 3418

ID 21010

W

Xa 5 4 4

a

F

Note 1

Kapara Mews 80 Moseley St, Glenelg South 5045

08 8159 3480

ID 38209

W

XaT a

F

Note 1

Knighton Road 32 Knighton Rd, Elizabeth North 5113

08 8159 3480

W

Xa

Fred McCallum Court 142 Marian Rd, Glynde 5070

08 8159 3418

ID 38224

W

Genders Court 7 Weymouth St, Campbelltown 5074

08 8159 3418

ID 38223

W

Hamlyn Court 30 Fuller St, Walkerville 5081

08 8159 3418

ID 38229

Hampden Street 5 Hampden St, Firle 5070

ID 38210

Note:  1.  Pages 162, 164, 166, 175

Note 1

D Donor Funded L Lease LO Licence to Occupy R Rental RF Resident Funded ST Strata Title

Creating Independence, not losing it...

Barossa Village is a fully integrated aged care provider offering in-home care, independent living units, supported accommodation & residential care. Being part of Barossa Village means accessing the care & support of our qualified staff, when & how you need us. We offer a full program of lifestyle activities & transport to get you there. Our new and refurbished one, two and three bedroom independent living units range from $165,000 to $350,000 in small and large clusters within the neighbourhoods of Nuriootpa, Tanunda and Angaston, keeping you connected to your town and its community. Contact our enquiry team about in-home care or accommodation to suit your lifestyle and goals.

p. (08) 8562 0300 | www.barossavillage.org See Terms and Definitions on page 126. Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au for a complete overview of providers and services in each State and Territory.

YourRetirementLiving.com.au

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Retirement Villages – South Australia Features

Extras

ILU s/V il Ser las vic ed Ap Sup art po me rte nt dL De ivin s fer red g Ma Pur nag cha e se and ment Co -Lo Fee E ntr cat y ed Co Ag de e dK eyp d Car Din e ad ing En Ro t r om y Ha ir a nd B Ho eau tel ty S Ser alo vic Per n e s s on al C Re are sta ura nt/ Sm Ca all fé Pet sW Vill elc age om Ce e Vill ntr e age Bu s Bo at Sto r age Ca rav an S tor Bo wli age ng G Sw r e en imm ing Ad v Po o Pg ert l

Type

Web ID – Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au and type this number in the search field (top right) for more details on Retirement Villages

Organisation

Village Name Physical Address

ACH Group continued Loveday Street 4 Loveday St, Goolwa 5214

08 8159 3480

ID 38211

W

Mackie Court 75 Wattlebury Rd, Lower Mitcham 5062

08 8159 3480

ID 38225

W

Main Road 192 Main Rd, Blackwood 5051

08 8159 3480

ID 38212

W

Manson Court 2 Sparks Tce, Rostrevor 5073

08 8159 3480

ID 38213

W

McKay Avenue 16-18 McKay Ave, Christies Beach 5165

08 8159 3480

ID 38214

W

Menzies Marden 22 Kent St, Marden 5070

08 8159 3418

ID 38215

W

Millikan Grove 51 Marden Rd, Marden 5070

08 8159 3418

ID 38216

W

Moir Court 6 Moir Ct, Magill 5072

08 8159 3418

ID 38228

Penzance Street 89 Penzance St, Glenelg 5045 Perry Park Village 100 Murray Rd, Port Noarlunga 5167

Xa 5 4 Xa 7 4 X7 4

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Note 1

F

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F

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08 8159 3480

ID 38217

W

Xa

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Note 1

08 8159 3480

W

F

Note 1

ID 20683

Note:  1.  Pages 162, 164, 166, 175

4T a

D Donor Funded L Lease LO Licence to Occupy R Rental RF Resident Funded ST Strata Title

UNITS AVAILABLE NOW! Warner Close is the perfect place to call home. Give yourself peace of mind and discover the ultimate Murray Mallee Lifestyle with comfortable units, a secure gated-community, warm and inviting on-site managers, all on an affordable rental agreement. Call us on (08) 8532 2255 to book a tour today!

warnerclose.com.au 18 Warner Road, Murray Bridge SA 5253 Warner Close is a part of the Murray Mallee Aged Care Group Inc. See Terms and Definitions on page 126. Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au for a complete overview of providers and services in each State and Territory.

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Retirement Villages – South Australia Features

Extras

ILU s/V il Ser las vic ed Ap Sup art po me rte nt dL De ivin s fer red g Ma Pur nag cha e se and ment Co -Lo Fee E ntr cat y ed Co Ag de e dK eyp d Car Din e ad ing En Ro t r o y Ha m ir a nd Be Ho aut tel yS Ser alo vic Per n e s s on al C Re are sta ura nt/ Sm Ca all fĂŠ Pet sW Vill elc age om Ce e Vill ntr e age Bu s Bo at Sto r age Ca rav an S tor Bo wli age ng G Sw r e en imm ing Ad v Po o Pg ert l

Type

Web ID – Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au and type this number in the search field (top right) for more details on Retirement Villages

Organisation

Village Name Physical Address

ACH Group continued Pickering Court 25 Kapoola Ave, Felixstow 5070

08 8159 3418

ID 38230

W

X5 4

F

Note 1

Princes Road 23-27 Princes Rd, Kingswood 5062

08 8159 3480

ID 38231

W

Xa

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Note 1

Pullin Court 5 Sparks Tce, Rostrevor 5073

08 8159 3418

ID 38232

W

4

F

Note 1

Riverview Drive 29-35 Riverview Dr, Port Noarlunga 5167

08 8159 3480

ID 38233

W

XaT

F

Note 1

Sir Keith Wilson Court 67 St Bernards Rd, Magill 5072

08 8159 3418

ID 20682

W

4

a

FL

Note 1

St George's Court 2 Murray Ave, Magill 5072

08 8159 3418

ID 20681

W

4

a

FL

Note 1

Strathmore Terrace 4 Strathmore Tce, Brighton 5048

08 8159 3480

ID 38234

W

Xa

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Note 1

Sturdee Street 2A Sturdee St, Linden Park 5065

08 8159 3480

ID 38236

W

Xa

F

Note 1

Sydney Street 111 Sydney St, Glenunga 5064

08 8159 3418

ID 38235

W

Xa

F

Note 1

Taeuber Court 12 Taeuber Ct, Wynn Vale 5127

08 8159 3418

W

Xa

F

Note 1

ID 38237

Note:  1.  Pages 162, 164, 166, 175

STHAVEN E R

19 35

- 202

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Independent Living Units Safety and security with peace of mind Affordable Independent Retirement Living Units at Marion, Bellevue Heights, Port Elliot, Paradise and Malvern. Luxury apartments at Leabrook. For further details or to arrange an inspection please call 8370 3756 or email retirement@resthaven.asn.au

Trust. Dignity. Choice. See Terms and Definitions on page 126. Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au for a complete overview of providers and services in each State and Territory.

YourRetirementLiving.com.au

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Retirement Villages – South Australia Features

Extras

ILU s/V il Ser las vic ed Ap Sup art po me rte nt dL De ivin s fer red g Ma Pur nag cha e se and ment Co -Lo Fee E ntr cat y ed Co Ag de e dK eyp d Car Din e ad ing En Ro t r om y Ha ir a nd B Ho eau tel ty S Ser alo vic Per n e s s on al C Re are sta ura nt/ Sm Ca all fé Pet sW Vill elc age om Ce e Vill ntr e age Bu s Bo at Sto r age Ca rav an S tor Bo wli age ng G Sw r e en imm ing Ad v Po o Pg ert l

Type

Web ID – Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au and type this number in the search field (top right) for more details on Retirement Villages

Organisation

Village Name Physical Address

ACH Group continued Third Street 22 Third St, Magill 5072 Waite Street 21 Waite St, Blackwood 5051 Yankalilla Mews 175 Main South Rd, Yankalilla 5203 Spence on Light - Retirement Living 69 Light Sq, Adelaide 5000

Allity Hillside Gardens Retirement Living 88 Cricklewood Rd, Heathfield 5153

08 8159 3418

ID 38238

W

08 8159 3480

ID 38239

W

08 8159 3480

ID 22385

W

Xa 6 a XaT

1300 224 477

ID 61883

W

4

08 8339 4815

ID 18504

W

08 8562 0300

ID 18523

W

7 4

08 8404 8200

ID 38900

W

4

08 8404 8200

ID 19768

W

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08 8404 8200

ID 38901

W

08 8404 8200

ID 38902

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Note 1

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Barossa Village Barossa Village Retirement Living 14 Scholz Ave, Nuriootpa 5355

Clayton Church Homes Balhannah 13 Junction Rd, Balhannah 5242 Beulah Terraces 144-148 Beulah Rd, Norwood 5067 Crafers 2 Station St, Crafers 5152 Gumeracha 5 Albert St, Gumeracha 5233 Lobethal 3 Jeffery St, Lobethal 5241 Magill 43 Fisher St, Magill 5072 Percival Street 2-6 Percival St, Norwood 5067

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08 8404 8200

ID 38903

W

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158, 165

08 8404 8200

ID 19685

W

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158, 165

08 8404 8200

W

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158, 165

ID 21925

Note:  1.  Pages 162, 164, 166, 175

a

X4T X4 a a

D Donor Funded L Lease LO Licence to Occupy R Rental RF Resident Funded ST Strata Title

Smart move for retirement living Get the most out of life with a home that demands less of you. Offering peace of mind and access to health and home support services if you need them now, or in the future. Choice of village settings, small groups or individual homes. Plus, connections to your local community. Priced from $79,000 – $550,000.

Let’s talk 08 8159 3418 Visit achgroup.org.au/retirement-living See Terms and Definitions on page 126. Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au for a complete overview of providers and services in each State and Territory.

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Retirement Villages – South Australia Features

Organisation

Village Name Physical Address

Extras

ILU s/V il Ser las vic ed Ap Sup art po me rte nt dL De ivin s fer red g Ma Pur nag cha e se and ment Co -Lo Fee E ntr cat y ed Co Ag de e dK eyp d Car Din e ad ing En Ro t r o y Ha m ir a nd Be Ho aut tel yS Ser alo vic Per n e s s on al C Re are sta ura nt/ Sm Ca all fé Pet sW Vill elc age om Ce e Vill ntr e age Bu s Bo at Sto r age Ca rav an S tor Bo wli age ng G Sw r e en imm ing Ad v Po o Pg ert l

Type

Web ID – Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au and type this number in the search field (top right) for more details on Retirement Villages

Clayton Church Homes continued Pinoak Tiers (Stirling) 6 Bilney Rd, Stirling 5152 Queen Street 24-26 Queen St, Norwood 5067 Uraidla Village Kidney St, Uraidla 5142 Woodside 11 Nairne Rd, Woodside 5244

08 8404 8200

ID 20448

W

X4

F

08 8404 8200

ID 19173

W

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08 8404 8200

ID 21542

W

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08 8404 8200

ID 38904

W

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College Green Retirement Village 17-23 Grenfell St, Kent Town 5067

08 8274 3633

ID 18138

W

Cottage Grove Court 17 Winston Cr, Woodcroft 5162

08 8274 3633

ID 20422

W

Kingsborough Retirement Village 79-81 William St, Norwood 5067

08 8274 3633

ID 14958

W

Mount Barker Retirement Villages Various Locations in, Mount Barker 5251

08 8274 3633

ID 18142

W

Mulberry Grove 55 Briar Rd, Felixstow 5070 Old Oxford Court 29 Hulbert St, Hove 5048

08 8274 3633

ID 19777

W

08 8274 3633

ID 19776

W

Oxford Retirement Village 44 Wattle Ave, Hove 5048

08 8274 3633

ID 18506

W

The Village Retirement Village 10 Centenary Ave, Maitland 5573

08 8274 3633

W

Eldercare

ID 18507

Gawler Grande Views Aged Care Gawler Grande Views 3 Duffield Street, Gawler East 5118

Japara

08 7221 9160

The Homestead Serviced Apartments 08 8222 1222 15 Homestead Ave, Walkley Heights 5098 ID 21159

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D Donor Funded L Lease LO Licence to Occupy R Rental RF Resident Funded ST Strata Title

Choose your own care with Calvary Home Care Services | Retirement Living | Residential Aged Care

1800 222 000 www.calvarycare.org.au

See Terms and Definitions on page 126. Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au for a complete overview of providers and services in each State and Territory.

YourRetirementLiving.com.au

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Retirement Villages – South Australia Features

Extras

ILU s/V il Ser las vic ed Ap Sup art po me rte nt dL De ivin s fer red g Ma Pur nag cha e se and ment Co -Lo Fee E ntr cat y ed Co Ag de e dK eyp d Car Din e ad ing En Ro t r om y Ha ir a nd B Ho eau tel ty S Ser alo vic Per n e s s on al C Re are sta ura nt/ Sm Ca all fé Pet sW Vill elc age om Ce e Vill ntr e age Bu s Bo at Sto r age Ca rav an S tor Bo wli age ng G Sw r e en imm ing Ad v Po o Pg ert l

Type

Web ID – Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au and type this number in the search field (top right) for more details on Retirement Villages

Organisation

Village Name Physical Address

Life Care

X4 aT 7 4T a X4 a X4 a X4 a 7 X4T a 7 X4T a Xa X7 aT

Aldinga Beach Court ILUs 6 Pridham Blvd, Aldinga Beach 5173

1800 555 990

ID 19690

W

Glenrose Court ILUs 1 Gilles Rd, Glen Osmond 5064

1800 555 990

ID 19691

W

Hayfield Plains ILUs 7 Diekman Tce, Balaklava 5461 Marion Rose ILUs 7 Shaun Cr, Mitchell Park 5043 Murlali Village ILUs 1 McKinna Rd, Christie Downs 5164

1800 555 990

ID 18166

W

1800 555 990

ID 15036

W

1800 555 990

ID 15065

W

Parkrose Village ILUs 34 Norman Tce, Everard Park 5035

1800 555 990

ID 19692

W

Reynella Village ILUs 278 Old South Rd, Old Reynella 5161

1800 555 990

ID 19693

WU

Rosehaven ILUs 953 North East Rd, Modbury 5092 Roselin Court ILUs 1A & 1B First Ave, Joslin 5070

1800 555 990

ID 15026

W

1800 555 990

ID 20479

W

08 8532 2255

ID 17495

W

08 8370 3756

ID 19450

W

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08 8370 3756

ID 21221

W

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08 8370 3756

ID 19451

W

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ID 19452

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08 8370 3756

ID 19453

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08 8370 3756

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Murray Mallee Aged Care Group Warner Close Retirement Living 18 Warner Rd, Murray Bridge 5253

Resthaven Bellevue Heights Independent RLU 47 Eve Rd, Bellevue Heights 5050 Leabrook Apartments 334 Kensington Rd, Leabrook 5068 Malvern Independent Retirement Living Units 43 Marlborough St, Malvern 5061 Marion Independent Retirement Living Units 12 Township Rd, Marion 5043 Paradise Independent Retirement Living Units 61 Silkes Rd, Paradise 5075 Port Elliot Independent Ret Living Units 52 & 54 North Tce, Port Elliot 5212

ID 38861

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161, 164

D Donor Funded L Lease LO Licence to Occupy R Rental RF Resident Funded ST Strata Title

Do you need help to navigate the aged care system?

Call for free information

See Terms and Definitions on page 126. Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au for a complete overview of providers and services in each State and Territory.

164

Your Retirement Living – 8 th edition


Resources – Tasmania

TASMANIA

Tasmania useful phone numbers and websites Advocacy Advocacy Tasmania 03 6224 2240 or 1800 005 131 advocacytasmania.org.au Carers Australia 02 6122 9900 carersaustralia.com.au Carers Helpline 1800 242 636 carersaustralia.com.au Carers Tasmania 03 6231 5507 carerstas.org COTA (TAS) 03 6231 3265 cotatas.org.au Elder Abuse Helpline 1300 651 192 eapu.com.au/helpline Older Persons Advocacy Network 1800 700 600 opan.com.au

Cultural Equal Opportunity Tasmania 03 6165 7575 or 1300 305 062 equalopportunity.tas.gov.au Multicultural Council of Tasmania 03 6170 9196 mcot.org.au People in Culturally Appropriate Care (PICAC) 03 6221 0999 mrctas.org.au

Government Aged Care Quality & Safety Commission 1800 951 822 agedcarequality.gov.au Carer Gateway 1800 422 737 carergateway.gov.au

YourRetirementLiving.com.au

Centrelink – Disability, Sickness & Carers Line 13 27 17 servicesaustralia.gov.au/ individuals/carers Centrelink – Older Australians Line 13 23 00 servicesaustralia.gov.au/ individuals/centrelink Department of Veterans’ Affairs 1800 838 372 dva.gov.au Medicare 13 20 11 servicesaustralia.gov.au/ individuals/medicare My Aged Care 1800 200 422 myagedcare.gov.au Service Tasmania 1300 135 513 service.tas.gov.au Services Australia (formerly Department of Human Services) 13 24 68 servicesaustralia.gov.au

Health Arthritis Australia 1800 011 041 arthritisaustralia.com.au Beyond Blue 1300 224 636 beyondblue.org.au Dementia Australia 1800 100 500 dementia.org.au Dementia Support Australia 1800 699 799 dementia.com.au Diabetes Australia 1800 637 700 diabetesaustralia.com.au Hearing Australia 13 44 32 hearing.com.au National Continence Helpline 1800 330 066 continence.org.au

National Dementia Helpline 1800 100 500 dementia.org.au Seniors Health Card 13 23 00 servicesaustralia.gov.au/ individuals/services/centrelink/ commonwealth-seniors-health-card

Legal Consumer Building & Occupational Services (Consumer Affairs) 1300 654 499 cbos.tas.gov.au Guardianship & Administration Board 1300 799 625 guardianship.tas.gov.au Legal Aid Advice Line 1300 366 611 legalaid.tas.gov.au Office of the Public Guardian 03 6165 3444 publicguardian.tas.gov.au Public Trustee (TAS) 03 6235 5200 or 1800 068 784 publictrustee.tas.gov.au

Other Independent Living Centres Australia 1300 885 886 ilcaustralia.org.au Relationships Australia 1300 364 277 relationships.org.au Seniors Card (TAS) 1300 135 513 communities.tas.gov.au/csr/ programs-and-services/seniors_card Translating and Interpreting Service (TIS) 13 14 50 tisnational.gov.au Volunteering Tasmania 1800 677 895 volunteeringtas.org.au

AgedCareGuide.com.au/home-care

167


Retirement Villages – Tasmania Features

Extras

ILU s/V il Ser las vic ed Ap Sup art po me rte nt dL De ivin s fer red g Ma Pur nag cha e se and ment Co -Lo Fee E ntr cat y ed Co Ag de e dK eyp d Car Din e ad ing En Ro t r om y Ha ir a nd B Ho eau tel ty S Ser alo vic Per n e s s on al C Re are sta ura nt/ Sm Ca all fé Pet sW Vill elc age om Ce e Vill ntr e age Bu s Bo at Sto r age Ca rav an S tor Bo wli age ng G Sw r e en imm ing Ad v Po o Pg ert l

Type

Web ID – Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au and type this number in the search field (top right) for more details on Retirement Villages

Organisation

Village Name Physical Address

Aveo Derwent Waters 57 Cadbury Rd, Claremont 7011 Mowbray Links 30 Janefield St, Mowbray 7248

03 6236 7600

ID 19026

WU

03 6325 1600

ID 21177

W

1800 911 989

ID 15440

WU

X6 a

03 6277 8800

ID 19561

W

X4T a

03 6344 5566

ID 19498

W

6T a

1300 988 203

ID 18086

W

03 6282 5200

ID 19538

WU

1300 988 203

ID 18087

W

1300 988 203

ID 18090

W

X6 aT X0 aT X6 aT X6 a

03 6257 9100

ID 21427

W

7T a

03 6208 0800

ID 21438

W

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ID 15498

W

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HP

03 6345 2101

HP

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03 6243 3100

W

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Regis Retirement Living Tasmania - Norwood 1300 998 100 8 Blenheim St, Norwood 7250 ID 15492

W

7T 3

Tyler Village 320 Westbury Rd, Prospect Vale 7250

03 6343 2757

ID 15437

W

X7 4T

AA Lord Retirement Village 131 Hill St, West Hobart 7000

03 6282 5400

ID 15445

W

Ainslie Units Westbury 87 Meander Valley Rd, Westbury 7303

03 6344 7911

ID 19154

W

Ainslie Village Low Head 196-224 Low Head Rd, Low Head 7253

03 6344 7911

ID 19541

W

Ainslie Village Launceston 5 Waveney St, South Launceston 7249

03 6344 7911

W

Baldwin Living Vaucluse Gardens 319 Macquarie St, South Hobart 7004

Glenview Community Services Glenview Close 2-10 Windsor St, Glenorchy 7010

Japara Cosgrove Cottages 25 Waveney St, South Launceston 7249

Masonic Care Tasmania Garden Village 177 Penquite Rd, Norwood 7250 Lindisfarne Various locations in, Lindisfarne 7015 Newstead Courts Various locations in, Newstead 7250 Tamar Valley Court 144 Main Rd, Exeter 7275

May Shaw Health Centre Swansea Living Bridge St, Swansea 7190

OneCare Barossa Park Independent Living Units 33A Clydesdale Ave, Glenorchy 7010 The Manor Gardens Independent Living Units 2 Guy St, Kings Meadows 7249

Queen Victoria Care Queen Victoria Care Village 13 Milford St, Lindisfarne 7015

ID 21841

Regis Aged Care Respect Aged Care

Southern Cross Care (TAS)

ID 18073

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See Terms and Definitions on page 126. Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au for a complete overview of providers and services in each State and Territory.

168

Your Retirement Living – 8 th edition


Living well with choice and peace of mind

Care and support tailored just for you with Uniting AgeWell Independent living Maintain an independent lifestyle in one of our vibrant retirement living communities

Community support and wellbeing Remain connected with social groups, outings, and carer services

Help at home

Residential care

Get assistance with personal and clinical care, household chores, assistive technology and transport

Specialist 24/7 care and support, including dementia and palliative care and respite stays, within safe and caring communities

With services across Tasmania, Uniting AgeWell’s expert team can help you find the care and support to meet your needs. 1300 783 435 unitingagewell.org 4739 DPS

169


Retirement Villages – Tasmania Features

Extras

ILU s/V il Ser las vic ed Ap Sup art po me rte nt dL De ivin s fer red g Ma Pur nag cha e se and ment Co -Lo Fee E ntr cat y ed Co Ag de e dK eyp d Car Din e ad ing En Ro t r om y Ha ir a nd B Ho eau tel ty S Ser alo vic Per n e s s on al C Re are sta ura nt/ Sm Ca all fé Pet sW Vill elc age om Ce e Vill ntr e age Bu s Bo at Sto r age Ca rav an S tor Bo wli age ng G Sw r e en imm ing Ad v Po o Pg ert l

Type

Web ID – Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au and type this number in the search field (top right) for more details on Retirement Villages

Organisation

Village Name Physical Address

Southern Cross Care (TAS) continued Fairway Rise Lifestyle Village 55 Gordons Hill Rd, Lindisfarne 7015

03 6282 5400

ID 20381

W

Glenara Lakes Lifestyle Village 390 Hobart Rd, Youngtown 7249

03 6344 7911

ID 19543

W

Guilford Young Grove Lifestyle Village 13 St Canice Ave, Sandy Bay 7005

03 6225 0216

W

Mary's Grange Villas (Southern Cross Care) 03 6227 7000 26 Channel Hwy, Taroona 7053 ID 15449 Saint Canice Lifestyle Village 03 6225 0216 15 St Canice Ave, Sandy Bay 7005 ID 18778

W

Sandown Lifestyle Village 1 Southerwood Dr, Sandy Bay 7005

03 6216 7100

ID 19544

W

Taroona Villas 100 Channel Hwy, Taroona 7053

03 6225 0216

ID 15433

W

Yaraandoo Village 1A Cardigan St, Somerset 7322

03 6343 0240

ID 19542

W

Aldersgate Village Units 3 Tallentire Rd, Newnham 7248

03 6341 1400

ID 18091

W

Denison Court Units 59 Goulburn St, George Town 7253

03 6341 1400

ID 18092

W

Glenrowan Village Units 64-68 Drummond St, Perth 7300

03 6341 1400

ID 15447

W

Independent Retirement Living TAS Various locations in, Tasmania 7000

1300 783 435

ID 21523

W

Kingston Units 57 Channel Hwy, Kingston 7050

03 6208 3208

ID 15505

W

Montrose Units 19 Montrose Rd, Montrose 7010

03 6208 3208

ID 15431

W

Mornington Units 281 Cambridge Rd, Mornington 7018

03 6208 3208

ID 15425

W

New Town Units 51 Cross St, New Town 7008

03 6208 3208

ID 15428

W

Queenborough Rise Units 3 Peel St, Sandy Bay 7005

03 6208 3208

ID 19500

W

Sorell Units 45 Arthur St, Sorell 7172

03 6208 3208

ID 15427

W

Strathdevon Units 50 Percival St Latrobe 7307

03 6341 1400

ID 15485

W

Strathglen Mews 13 Chardonnay Dr, Berriedale 7011

03 6208 3208

ID 20678

W

Strathglen Units 13 Chardonnay Dr, Berriedale 7011

03 6208 3208

ID 18093

W

03 6341 1400

W

Uniting AgeWell

Wesley Court Units 11-13 Normanstone Rd, South Launceston 7249

ID 19545

ID 15443

Note:  1.  Pages 54, 169, 172, 179

W

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D Donor Funded L Lease LO Licence to Occupy R Rental RF Resident Funded ST Strata Title

See Terms and Definitions on page 126. Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au for a complete overview of providers and services in each State and Territory.

170

Your Retirement Living – 8 th edition


Leading the way The Queen Victoria village is set in a beau�ful loca�on with sweeping water views of Hobart's River Derwent and blooming gardens. In this enviable se�ng, we provide for our residents' needs and offer both residen�al aged care and independent living and addi�onal services; hairdressing, wellness centre pool & gym, daily recrea�onal and leisure ac�vi�es, access to visi�ng allied health professionals, resident & family technology services and cafe. The Queen Vic Way is the essence of our community, where respect and compassion for people ma�ers , and we deliver progressive and accountable care and service for the individual.

Respect CompassioN Accountability Progressive

If it's �me to consider aged care services, talk to our admission specialist, we are here to support your journey. 13 Milford Street, Lindisfarne, TAS, 7015 P 03 6243 3100 E admin@qvcare.com.au W www.qvcare.com.au Facebook www.facebook.com/QVCare/ Celebrating 129 years 1891 - 2020

The view from the Queen Victoria Care Main Lounge

171


Resources – Victoria

VICTORIA

Victoria useful phone numbers and websites Advocacy Carers Australia 02 6122 9900 carersaustralia.com.au Carers Helpline 1800 242 636 carersaustralia.com.au Carers Victoria 03 9396 9500 or 1800 514 845 carersvictoria.org.au COTA VIC 03 9654 4443 cotavic.org.au Elder Abuse Helpline 1300 651 192 eapu.com.au/helpline Elders Rights Advocacy 03 9602 3066 or 1800 700 600 era.asn.au Older Persons Advocacy Network 1800 700 600 opan.com.au Senior Rights Victoria 1300 368 821 seniorsrights.org.au

Cultural Ethnic Communities Council of Victoria 03 9354 9555 eccv.org.au

Government Aged Care Quality & Safety Commission 1800 951 822 agedcarequality.gov.au Carer Gateway 1800 422 737 carergateway.gov.au Centrelink – Disability, Sickness & Carers Line 13 27 17 servicesaustralia.gov.au/ individuals/carers

174

Your Retirement Living – 8 th edition

Centrelink – Older Australians Line 13 23 00 servicesaustralia.gov.au/ individuals/centrelink Department of Veterans’ Affairs 1800 838 372 dva.gov.au Medicare 13 20 11 servicesaustralia.gov.au/ individuals/medicare My Aged Care 1800 200 422 myagedcare.gov.au Services Australia (formerly Department of Human Services) 13 24 68 servicesaustralia.gov.au

Health Arthritis Australia 1800 011 041 arthritisaustralia.com.au Beyond Blue 1300 224 636 beyondblue.org.au Diabetes Australia 1800 637 700 diabetesaustralia.com.au Dementia Australia 1800 100 500 dementia.org.au Dementia Support Australia 1800 699 799 dementia.com.au Hearing Australia 13 44 32 hearing.com.au National Continence Helpline 1800 330 066 continence.org.au National Dementia Helpline 1800 100 500 dementia.org.au

Seniors Health Card 13 23 00 servicesaustralia.gov.au/ individuals/services/centrelink/ commonwealth-seniors-health-card

Legal Consumer Affairs Victoria 1300 558 181 consumer.vic.gov.au Office of the Public Advocate 1300 309 337 publicadvocate.vic.gov.au State Trustees 03 9667 6466 statetrustees.com.au Victoria Legal Aid Legal Helpline 1300 792 387 legalaid.vic.gov.au

Other Independent Living Centres Australia 1300 885 886 ilcaustralia.org.au Relationships Australia 1300 364 277 relationships.org.au Residents of Retirement Villages Victoria 03 9015 8402 residentsofretirementvillagesvic.org.au Translating and Interpreting Service (TIS) 13 14 50 tisnational.gov.au Victorian Seniors Card Program 1300 797 210 seniorsonline.vic.gov.au Volunteering Victoria 03 8327 8500 volunteeringvictoria.org.au

Home Care Guide 2021


Retirement Villages – Victoria Features

Organisation

Village Name Physical Address

Extras

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Type

Web ID – Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au and type this number in the search field (top right) for more details on Retirement Villages

ACH Group Bedford Heights Estate 16-36 Bedford St, Box Hill 3128

03 9890 8514

ID 16007

W

St Thomas Community Village 97 Hawthorn Rd, Forest Hill 3131

03 9802 8118

ID 16281

W

03 9850 8877

ID 15748

W

03 9377 2000

ID 19358

W

03 9795 9166

ID 21224

W

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Campbell Place Retirement Community 2 Carramar Ave, Glen Waverley 3150

1300 294 536

ID 21376

W

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54

Drummond Place Retirement Community 500 Drummond St, Carlton 3053

0409 616 613

ID 21129

W

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54

Geelong Grove Retirement Community 50 Barwarre Rd, Marshall 3216

1300 295 834

ID 20667

W

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54

Morven Manor Retirement Community 77 Tanti Ave, Mornington 3931

1300 271 389

W

FL

54

Peninsula Grange Retirement Community 1300 295 763 431 Racecourse Rd, Mornington 3931 ID 21130

W

The Oaks Retirement Community 110 Hull Rd, Croydon 3136

W

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Allity Templestowe Manor Retirement Living 410-418 Thompsons Rd, Templestowe Lower 3107

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Ardmillan Ardmillan Retirement Living Derby Place, 11-45 Derby St, Moonee Ponds 3039

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Arton Group Cumberland View Retirement Living 101 Whalley Dr, Wheelers Hill 3150

Australian Unity Independent & Assisted Living

ID 20668

1300 859 303

ID 18790

Note:  1.  Pages 162, 164, 166, 175

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54 54

D Donor Funded L Lease LO Licence to Occupy R Rental RF Resident Funded ST Strata Title

Smart move for retirement living Get the most out of life with a home that demands less of you in a friendly, genuine community. Offering peace of mind without worry of home and garden maintenance. Plus, connections to your local community. Priced from $385,000 – $899,000. Let’s talk 03 9890 8514 Visit achgroup.org.au/retirement-living See Terms and Definitions on page 126. Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au for a complete overview of providers and services in each State and Territory.

YourRetirementLiving.com.au

175


ILU s/V il Ser las vic ed Ap Sup art po me rte nt dL De ivin s fer red g Ma Pur nag cha e se and ment Co -Lo Fee E ntr cat y ed Co Ag de e dK eyp d Car Din e ad ing En Ro t r om y Ha ir a nd B Ho eau tel ty S Ser alo vic Per n e s s on al C Re are sta ura nt/ Sm Ca all fĂŠ Pet sW Vill elc age om Ce e Vill ntr e age Bu s Bo at Sto r age Ca rav an S tor Bo wli age ng G Sw r e en imm ing Po o l

Type

176 Features Extras


Retirement Villages – Victoria Features

Organisation

Village Name Physical Address

Extras

ILU s/V il Ser las vic ed Ap Sup art po me rte nt dL De ivin s fer red g Ma Pur nag cha e se and ment Co -Lo Fee E ntr cat y ed Co Ag de e dK eyp d Car Din e ad ing En Ro t r o y Ha m ir a nd Be Ho aut tel yS Ser alo vic Per n e s s on al C Re are sta ura nt/ Sm Ca all fé Pet sW Vill elc age om Ce e Vill ntr e age Bu s Bo at Sto r age Ca rav an S tor Bo wli age ng G Sw r e en imm ing Ad v Po o Pg ert l

Type

Web ID – Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au and type this number in the search field (top right) for more details on Retirement Villages

Australian Unity Independent & Assisted Living continued Victoria Grange Retirement Community 1300 282 617 502-514 Burwood Hwy, Vermont South 3133 ID 20666

W

Walmsley Retirement Community Greeves Dr, Kilsyth 3137

1300 859 303

ID 20665

W

Affordable Independent Living Units Various locations in, Canterbury 3126

03 8809 0007

ID 16286

W

Hester Canterbury 9-15 Chatham Rd, Canterbury 3126

03 8809 0300

W

Morgan Glen Iris 14 Elizabeth St, Glen Iris 3146

1300 667 444

BASScare

ID 20912

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ID 61649

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97 97 97

Benetas

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1300 147 147

ID 16273

W

7 a

Doutta Galla Queens Park IL Units 13 The Strand, Moonee Ponds 3039

03 9680 3311

ID 15595

W

Harmony Village IL Units Shepparton 34 Zurcas Lane, Shepparton 3630

03 5822 4995;

ID 15917

W

X6 aT a HP X6 aT HP

03 5623 2752

ID 38202

WU

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Lucas Lifestyle Estate 21 Harris Dr, Lucas 3350

03 5334 1105

ID 21916

W

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Wodonga Gardens Retirement Estate 2 Flinders Way, West Wodonga 3690

02 6059 2690

ID 20981

W

Xa

Balmoral Mews Lifestyle Villas 36 Hollows Ct, Grovedale 3216

03 5243 6733

ID 20659

W

Barongarook Gardens Retirement Village 8-32 Murray St, Colac 3250

03 5231 9999

ID 20660

W

Sydney Williams Apartments 31 Blackburn Rd, Doncaster East 3109

03 9841 1600

W

X6 aT X6 aT X6 aT

John Atchison - Retirement Living 03 8573 4888 312-318 Derrimut Rd, Hoppers Crossing 3029 ID 22386

W

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Dalkeith Heights Independent Living (Benetas) 03 5175 0955 49-53 Hazelwood Rd, Traralgon 3844 ID 20605

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Brotherhood Aged Care Fitzroy Independent Living Units Various locations in, Fitzroy 3065

Doutta Galla Aged Services

Fairview Homes for the Aged Fairview Village Retirement Living 30 Sargeant St, Warragul 3820

Gannon Lifestyle Communities

Japara

ID 20658

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Medical and Aged Care Group Casey Manor Retirement Village 03 9703 0188 445 Ormond Rd, Narre Warren South 3805 ID 15946

D Donor Funded L Lease LO Licence to Occupy R Rental RF Resident Funded ST Strata Title

See Terms and Definitions on page 126. Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au for a complete overview of providers and services in each State and Territory.

YourRetirementLiving.com.au

177


Retirement Villages – Victoria Features

Organisation

Village Name Physical Address

Extras

ILU s/V il Ser las vic ed Ap Sup art po me rte nt dL De ivin s fer red g Ma Pur nag cha e se and ment Co -Lo Fee E ntr cat y ed Co Ag de e dK eyp d Car Din e ad ing En Ro t r om y Ha ir a nd B Ho eau tel ty S Ser alo vic Per n e s s on al C Re are sta ura nt/ Sm Ca all fé Pet sW Vill elc age om Ce e Vill ntr e age Bu s Bo at Sto r age Ca rav an S tor Bo wli age ng G Sw r e en imm ing Ad v Po o Pg ert l

Type

Web ID – Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au and type this number in the search field (top right) for more details on Retirement Villages

Mercy Health Mercy Place Aartments Parkville Ret Living 03 9385 9446 62 Cade Way, Parkville 3052 ID 20599

W

Mercy Place Colac Retirement Living 83-99 Queen St, Colac 3250

03 5233 5600

W

Mercy Place Rice Village Retirement Living 03 5247 2202 7 Moylan Loop, Marshall 3216 ID 21231 Shepparton Independent Living Units 03 5831 3000 25 Graham St, Shepparton 3630 ID 21351

W

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St Margaret's Community Retirement Vlg Bridgeton St, Reservoir 3073

W

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Parkglen Parkglen Respite Services - Long Term 360 Cheltenham Road, Keysborough 3173 Parkglen Respite Services - Short Term 360 Cheltenham Road, Keysborough 3173 Parkglen Retirement Community 360 Cheltenham Rd, Keysborough 3173

Regis Aged Care

ID 21230

03 8414 6000

ID 16282

03 9798 1633

ID 61674

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03 9798 1633

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ID 19271

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The Mornington Retirement Village 1800 852 772 150 Mornington-Tyabb Rd, Mornington 3931 ID 20857

WU

Eltham Independent Living 43 Diamond St, Eltham 3095

W

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154

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St Vincent's Care Services

St. Johns Bentleigh Property Management

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Southern Cross Care (SA, NT & VIC)

ID 21491

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74

Regis Inala Village 1800 609 799 220 Middleborough Rd, Blackburn South 3130 ID 20761

1800 778 767

IBC

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ID 61673

03 9798 1633

KFL

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153

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St. Johns Close Bentleigh Independent Living 0424 431 552 150A Tucker Rd, Bentleigh 3204 ID 61676

W

Tabulam & Templer Homes Retirement Living 03 8720 1333 31-41 Elizabeth St, Bayswater 3153 ID 21354

W

X7 aT a HP

Amarco Apartments 9 Edgar St, Kingsville 3012 Condare Court ILUs 8 Joffre St, Camberwell 3124 Kalkee Costa Court Serviced Apartments 48 Settlement Rd, Belmont 3216 Kalkee ILUs 95 Francis St, Belmont 3216 Manningtree 20-26 Manningtree Rd, Hawthorn 3122 Nangare ILUs 1 Ireland St, Burwood 3125 Strathdon ILUs 17 Jolimont Rd, Forest Hill 3131

W

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Tabulam & Templer Homes for the Aged (TTHA) Uniting AgeWell

03 9680 0500

ID 20600

03 9845 3139

ID 16351

03 5243 9566

ID 18609

03 5243 9566

ID 16180

03 8840 2800

ID 38662

03 9845 3139

XaT X7 W aT U X6 aT 0 WUV aT X5 W a

ID 15693

W

03 9845 3139

W

ID 20580

Note:  1.  Pages 54, 169, 172, 179

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D Donor Funded L Lease LO Licence to Occupy R Rental RF Resident Funded ST Strata Title

See Terms and Definitions on page 126. Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au for a complete overview of providers and services in each State and Territory.  IBC Inside Back Cover

178

Your Retirement Living – 8 th edition


Living well with choice and peace of mind

Care and support tailored just for you with Uniting AgeWell Independent living

Help at home

Maintain an independent lifestyle in one of our vibrant retirement living communities

Get assistance with personal and clinical care, household chores, assistive technology and transport

Community support and wellbeing

Residential care

Remain connected with social groups, outings, and carer services

Specialist 24/7 care and support, including dementia and palliative care and respite stays, within safe and caring communities

Strength and resilience Specialist gyms and exercise programs to restore and maintain wellbeing

With services across Victoria, Uniting AgeWell’s expert team can help you find the care and support to meet your needs 1300 783 435 unitingagewell.org 4739 DPS

179


Retirement Villages – Victoria Features

Organisation

Village Name Physical Address

Extras

ILU s/V il Ser las vic ed Ap Sup art po me rte nt dL De ivin s fer red g Ma Pur nag cha e se and ment Co -Lo Fee E ntr cat y ed Co Ag de e dK eyp d Car Din e ad ing En Ro t r om y Ha ir a nd B Ho eau tel ty S Ser alo vic Per n e s s on al C Re are sta ura nt/ Sm Ca all fé Pet sW Vill elc age om Ce e Vill ntr e age Bu s Bo at Sto r age Ca rav an S tor Bo wli age ng G Sw r e en imm ing Ad v Po o Pg ert l

Type

Web ID – Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au and type this number in the search field (top right) for more details on Retirement Villages

Uniting AgeWell continued Valkstone ILUs 576 Centre Rd, Bentleigh 3204 White Hills Haven ILUs 506-510 Napier St, White Hills 3550 Yernga ILUs 32-42 Larch Cr, Mount Waverley 3149

03 9845 3139

ID 15692

W

03 5434 3000

ID 17889

W

03 9845 3139

ID 17890

W

03 5986 4422

ID 16419

W

03 9809 1231

ID 20603

W

03 9816 1100

ID 20910

W

X6 a X6 a

03 8581 0600

ID 18799

W

X aT a HP

03 9926 2000

ID 18328

W

03 9926 2000

ID 20578

W

03 9929 2052

ID 61635

W

X

03 9929 2052

ID 61634

W

X

03 9926 2000

ID 16105

W

Providence Retirement Village 7 Griffith St, Bacchus Marsh 3340

03 5310 6600

ID 16095

W

Shanagolden Retirement Village 153-177 Webster Way, Pakenham 3810 St Catherine's Apartments 1 Clayton Rd, Balwyn 3103 St Joseph's Mews 108 Denham St, Hawthorn 3122 St Joseph's Place 23 Burnell St, Brunswick West 3055 St Thomas' Village 259 Diamond Creek Rd, Greensborough 3088 Star of the Sea Retirement Village 1 Headland Dr, Torquay 3228

03 5945 3800

W

a 0 X4T a 4T a HP

Village Glen Village Glen Retirement Living 34A Balaka St, Capel Sound 3940

VMCH Athelstan Retirement Apartments 450 Camberwell Rd, Camberwell 3124 Barnsbury Apartments 27 Barnsbury Rd, Deepdene 3103 Corpus Christi Retirement Village Music Dr (Cnr Bayview Ave & Clayton Rd), Clayton 3168 Ivanhoe East 163 Lower Heidelberg Rd, Ivanhoe East 3079 Malvern Village 9 The Grange, Malvern East 3145 Marcellin Retirement Village 53 Ebden St, Kyneton 3444 McAuley Retirement Village 1 Bridge St, Trentham 3458 Parkview 862 Main St, Eltham 3095

ID 20243

03 9926 2000 03 9291 5300

ID 20963

W

03 9926 2000

ID 16045

W

03 9422 4040

ID 20245

W

03 5264 3500

W

Note:  1.  Pages 54, 169, 172, 179

Note 1

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ID 20244

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107, 176

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D Donor Funded L Lease LO Licence to Occupy R Rental RF Resident Funded ST Strata Title

Pets Welcome

See Terms and Definitions on page 126. Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au for a complete overview of providers and services in each State and Territory.  IBC Inside Back Cover

180

Your Retirement Living – 8 th edition


Resources – Western Australia

WESTERN AUSTRALIA

Western Australia useful phone numbers and websites Advocacy AdvoCare 08 9479 7566 or 1800 655 566 advocare.org.au Carers Australia 02 6122 9900 carersaustralia.com.au Carers Helpline 1800 242 636 carersaustralia.com.au Carers WA 1300 227 377 carerswa.asn.au COTA WA 08 9472 0104 cotawa.org.au Elder Abuse Helpline 1300 651 192 eapu.com.au/helpline Older Persons Advocacy Network 1800 700 600 opan.com.au WA Elder Abuse Helpline 1300 724 679 communities.wa.gov.au/ strategies/elder-abuse

Cultural Aboriginal Interpreting WA (AIWA) 1800 330 331 aiwaac.org.au Ethnic Communities Council of WA 08 9227 5322 eccwa.org.au

Government Aged Care Quality & Safety Commission 1800 951 822 agedcarequality.gov.au Carer Gateway 1800 422 737 carergateway.gov.au

YourRetirementLiving.com.au

Centrelink – Disability, Sickness & Carers Line 13 27 17 servicesaustralia.gov.au/ individuals/carers Centrelink – Older Australians Line 13 23 00 servicesaustralia.gov.au/ individuals/centrelink Department of Veterans’ Affairs 1800 838 372 dva.gov.au Medicare 13 20 11 servicesaustralia.gov.au/ individuals/medicare My Aged Care 1800 200 422 myagedcare.gov.au Services Australia (formerly Department of Human Services) 13 24 68 servicesaustralia.gov.au

National Dementia Helpline 1800 100 500 dementia.org.au Seniors Health Card 13 23 00 servicesaustralia.gov.au/ individuals/services/centrelink/ commonwealth-seniors-health-card

Health

Other

Arthritis Australia 1800 011 041 arthritisaustralia.com.au Beyond Blue 1300 224 636 beyondblue.org.au Dementia Australia 1800 100 500 dementia.org.au Dementia Support Australia 1800 699 799 dementia.com.au Diabetes Australia 1800 637 700 diabetesaustralia.com.au Hearing Australia 13 44 32 hearing.com.au National Continence Helpline 1800 330 066 continence.org.au

Legal Consumer Protection Division 1300 304 054 commerce.wa.gov.au/ consumer-protection Legal Aid WA Info Line 1300 650 579 legalaid.wa.gov.au Office of the Public Advocate (WA) 1300 858 455 publicadvocate.wa.gov.au Public Trustee 1300 746 212 wa.gov.au/organisation/ department-of-justice/public-trustee Independent Living Centres Australia 1300 885 886 ilcaustralia.org.au Relationships Australia 1300 364 277 relationships.org.au Translating and Interpreting Service (TIS) 13 14 50 tisnational.gov.au WA Senior Card Centre 08 6551 8800 seniorscard.wa.gov.au Seniors Card (WA) 1800 671 233 seniorscard.wa.gov.au State Administrative Tribunal 1300 306 017 sat.justice.wa.gov.au Volunteering WA 08 9482 4333 volunteeringwa.org.au

AgedCareGuide.com.au/home-care

187


Retirement Villages – Western Australia Features

Organisation

Village Name Physical Address

Extras

ILU s/V il Ser las vic ed Ap Sup art po me rte nt dL De ivin s fer red g Ma Pur nag cha e se and ment Co -Lo Fee E ntr cat y ed Co Ag de e dK eyp d Car Din e ad ing En Ro t r om y Ha ir a nd B Ho eau tel ty S Ser alo vic Per n e s s on al C Re are sta ura nt/ Sm Ca all fé Pet sW Vill elc age om Ce e Vill ntr e age Bu s Bo at Sto r age Ca rav an S tor Bo wli age ng G Sw r e en imm ing Ad v Po o Pg ert l

Type

Web ID – Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au and type this number in the search field (top right) for more details on Retirement Villages

Adventist Care Busselton Adventist Retirement Village 20 Pettit Cr, Busselton 6280

08 9354 4133

ID 17099

W

Rossmoyne Waters 31 Webb St, Rossmoyne 6148

08 9253 4456

ID 17098

W

7 4 a X4 aT a HP

Balmoral Retirement Village 29 Gardner St, Como 6152

08 9367 7333

ID 19484

W

X6 aT a

Kitchener Gardens Retirement Village 4 Kitchener Rd, Melville 6156

08 9330 1911

ID 16903

W

XaT

08 6166 6362

ID 61718

W

Amaroo Village Albany 63 Pioneer Rd, Albany 6330

08 9490 3899

ID 20385

W

Amaroo Village Denmark 12 Hardy St, Denmark 6333

08 9490 3899

ID 20116

W

Amaroo Village Gosnells 2 Wreford Crt, Gosnells 6110

08 9490 3899

W

Aegis Aged Care

Alinea Camelia Court Retirement Village 480-482 Guildford Rd, Bayswater 6053

Amaroo Villages

ID 20115

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D Donor Funded L Lease LO Licence to Occupy R Rental RF Resident Funded ST Strata Title

Live your life, love your lifestyle with Juniper Our secure, friendly retirement communities offer a wide variety of accommodation and lifestyle choices at many convenient locations. If your needs change and you require more help, Juniper has many options and services so you can continue to live life your way.

W G O IN N LL SE

W G O IN N LL SE

W G O IN N LL SE

Juniper Orana Apartments

Juniper RoseMount

Juniper Rowethorpe

Secure gated community, new quality apartments, hair salon, bowling green, pool, gym, café & alfresco dining area

Self-contained villas, heated pool, onsite gym, hair salon, convenient central location

Wide choice of housing options, medical centre and pharmacy onsite, café, bowling green

8 Bradford Street, Menora WA

21 Dianella Drive, Dianella WA

4-10 Hayman Road, Bentley WA

For more information visit juniper.org.au or call 1300 313 000 See Terms and Definitions on page 126. Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au for a complete overview of providers and services in each State and Territory.

188

Your Retirement Living – 8 th edition


Retirement Villages – Western Australia Features

Organisation

Village Name Physical Address

Extras

ILU s/V il Ser las vic ed Ap Sup art po me rte nt dL De ivin s fer red g Ma Pur nag cha e se and ment Co -Lo Fee E ntr cat y ed Co Ag de e dK eyp d Car Din e ad ing En Ro t r o y Ha m ir a nd Be Ho aut tel yS Ser alo vic Per n e s s on al C Re are sta ura nt/ Sm Ca all fé Pet sW Vill elc age om Ce e Vill ntr e age Bu s Bo at Sto r age Ca rav an S tor Bo wli age ng G Sw r e en imm ing Ad v Po o Pg ert l

Type

Web ID – Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au and type this number in the search field (top right) for more details on Retirement Villages

Bethanie Beachside Retirement Village 80 Lindsay Beach Blvd, Yanchep 6035

13 11 51

ID 19476

W

X6 aT

Dalyellup Housing 68 Kambany App, Dalyellup 6230

13 11 51

ID 20744

W

Elanora Retirement Village 37 Hastie St, South Bunbury 6230

13 11 51

ID 19475

W

Esprit Retirement Village 97 Illawarra Dr, Eaton 6232

13 11 51

ID 19478

W

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189

Fields Retirement Village 111 Eaton Dr, Eaton 6232

13 11 51

ID 19471

W

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Geneff Retirement Village 39 Hertha Rd, Innaloo 6018

13 11 51

ID 19472

W

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189

Gwelup Retirement Village 17 Segrave St, Gwelup 6018

13 11 51

ID 21868

W

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189

Gwelup 72-74 Huntriss Rd, Gwelup 6018

13 11 51

ID 21867

W

13 11 51

ID 19473

W

Joondanna Retirement Village 130 Edinboro St, Joondanna 6060

13 11 51

ID 17016

W

on the Park Retirement Village 2 Plantation St, Menora 6050

13 11 51

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on the Park Serviced Apartments 2 Plantation St, Menora 6050

13 11 51

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Illawong Retirement Village 1 Rodd Pl, Hamilton Hill 6163

Peel Housing 18 Maclaggan Turn, Coodanup 6210

13 11 51

ID 20745

W

6

Warwick Retirement Village 98 Ellersdale Ave, Warwick 6024

13 11 51

ID 19479

W

Waters Retirement Village 18 Olivenza Cr, Port Kennedy 6172

13 11 51

ID 18052

W

7 X6 aT

Castledare Retirement Village 108 Fern Rd, Wilson 6107

1300 244 333

ID 16755

W

Ocean Star Retirement Village 1 Mangles Street, South Bunbury 6230

1300 244 333

ID 16788

W

Servite Retirement Village 172-178 Edinboro St, Joondanna 6060

1300 244 333

ID 16712

W

Trinity Retirement Village 7 Beddi Rd, Duncraig 6023

1300 244 333

W

Catholic Homes

ID 19477 ID 38898

ID 17043

6T a 6T a 6T a 6T a

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D Donor Funded L Lease LO Licence to Occupy R Rental RF Resident Funded ST Strata Title

Colin, Bethanie Retirement Village Resident

Freestyle at 73. Bethanie Villages - Still Got It.

Tour a Bethanie Village today. 131 151 | bethanie.com.au See Terms and Definitions on page 126. Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au for a complete overview of providers and services in each State and Territory.

YourRetirementLiving.com.au

189


Retirement Villages – Western Australia Features

Organisation

Village Name Physical Address

Extras

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Type

Web ID – Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au and type this number in the search field (top right) for more details on Retirement Villages

Coolibah Care 08 9535 0300

ID 16822

WU

0T a

08 6462 7200

ID 38893

W

0T a

Boronia Court 31 Townsend St, Lockyer 6330

0437 154 420

ID 16928

W

Carramar Village in Morley 23A Redgum Way, Morley 6062

9378 8200

ID 17019

W

Chrystal Gardens 84 Kitchener St, Trigg 6029

0413 450 624

ID 16897

W

Chrystal Halliday Village 27 Prisk St, Karrinyup 6018

0413 450 624

ID 21554

W

Elimatta Retirement Living 8 Bradford St, Menora 6050

08 9270 4425

ID 21179

W

Euroka 41-51 Flora Tce, Watermans Bay 6020

0413 450 624

ID 16972

W

Noranda Village 11 Walmsley Dr, Noranda 6062

08 9289 2419

ID 18047

W

RoseMount 21 Dianella Dr, Dianella 6059

08 9345 3448

ID 17127

W

Rowethorpe 4-10 Hayman Rd, Bentley 6102

08 6363 6311

ID 16745

W

Salisbury Retreat 135 Salisbury St, Bedford 6052

08 9289 2419

ID 18046

W

St David's Village 17-19 Lawley Cr, Mount Lawley 6050

08 9289 2411

ID 17051

WU

Edgewater Mercy Villas Retirement Living 19 Harvest Loop, Edgewater 6027

08 9291 6314

ID 21229

W

Villa Maria Retirement Living 173 Lesmurdie Rd, Lesmurdie 6076

0438 370 355

ID 21228

W

0415 512 459

W

Regents Garden Bungalows Lake Joondalup 0415 512 459 8 Regents Garden Blvd, Wanneroo 6065 ID 19464

W

6T a HP a 6T a HP a

Hollywood Village (Centennial Close) 118 Monash Ave, Nedlands 6009

08 9380 5211

ID 20714

W

7T a

Australind Rise Christina St, Australind 6233

08 9762 4101

ID 19283

W

Bentley Park 26 Plantation Dr, Bentley 6102

08 6250 0000

ID 16807

W

08 9279 6588

W

Coolibah Grove Independent Living 30 Third Ave, Mandurah 6210

Hall & Prior Aged Care Mertome Village 30 Winifred Rd, Bayswater 6053

Juniper

Mercy Health

Regents Garden Group Regents Garden Bungalows Aubin Grove 155 Gaebler Rd, Aubin Grove 6164

ID 21007

Regis Aged Care SwanCare

Town of Bassendean Hyde Retirement Village 2-10 James St, Bassendean 6054

ID 16944

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See Terms and Definitions on page 126. Visit YourRetirementLiving.com.au for a complete overview of providers and services in each State and Territory.  IBC Inside Back Cover

190

Your Retirement Living – 8 th edition


Index Home Care Index Accessibility. ........................................................................... 86 Alternative transport............................................................ 99 Assessment. ......................................................................... 118 Care agreement. ................................................................. 120 Care At Home. ...............................................................90-103 Case management. ............................................................ 120 Choosing a provider........................................................... 122 Commonwealth Home Support Programme.............. 110 Community support ............................................................ 90 Community Visitors Scheme............................................ 101 Cooking programs................................................................ 98 Cost......................................................................................... 119 Council services................................................................... 108 Domestic assistance ........................................................... 95 Driving...................................................................................... 99 Eligibility ................................................................................ 118 Emergencies........................................................................... 87 Family and friends ............................................................... 92 Financial consultants. ........................................................ 120 Food subscription services. ............................................... 97 Garden maintenance........................................................... 93 Government funded supports........................................ 109 Grocery delivery.................................................................... 96 Home care options............................................................... 85 Home Care Packages......................................................... 112 Home maintenance. ............................................................ 93 Is this you?.............................................................................. 84 Managing supports. ........................................................... 118 Meals........................................................................................ 96 Meals support........................................................................ 96 Men’s sheds.......................................................................... 102 Modifications.......................................................................... 87 Package supplements........................................................ 116 Personal assistance.............................................................. 94 Placement consultants...................................................... 120 Planning and Managing Supports......................... 118-122 Planning supports. ............................................................. 118 Prepared meals..................................................................... 97 Priority.................................................................................... 121 Public transport..................................................................... 99 Questions to ask................................................................. 122 Respite................................................................................... 103 Safety........................................................................................ 86 Safety assessment................................................................ 87 Scams....................................................................................... 88 Self funded supports......................................................... 117 Self-managing HCP............................................................. 116 Social clubs........................................................................... 102 Social support ..................................................................... 101 Support network................................................................... 86 Support Options. ....................................................... 106-117 Taxi Subsidy Scheme......................................................... 100 Technology. ............................................................................ 88 Transport options ................................................................ 99 Understanding home care........................................... 85-89 Volunteering......................................................................... 103 Waitlists. ................................................................................ 121 What is home care?.............................................................. 85 When to consider help........................................................ 89

192

Your Retirement Living – 8 th edition

Resources Index

Abbreviations.......................................................................125 ACT Home Care Services listings....................................130 ACT Retirement Village listings.............................. 128-129 ACT Useful phone numbers and websites...................127 How to read the directory................................................124 NSW Home Care Services listings......................... 141-144 NSW Retirement Village listings............................ 132-140 NSW Useful phone numbers and websites.................131 NT Home Care Services listings......................................146 NT Retirement Village listings..........................................146 NT Useful phone numbers and websites.....................145 QLD Home Care Services listings...................................156 QLD Retirement Village listings............................. 148-155 QLD Useful phone numbers and websites..................147 SA Home Care Services listings............................. 165-166 SA Retirement Village listings................................. 158-164 SA Useful phone numbers and websites.....................157 TAS Home Care Services listings.....................................173 TAS Retirement Village listings.............................. 168-170 TAS Useful phone numbers and websites...................167 Terms and Definitions.......................................................126 VIC Home Care Services listings........................... 181-186 VIC Retirement Village listings............................... 175-180 VIC Useful phone numbers and websites....................174 WA Home Care Services listings.....................................191 WA Retirement Village listings............................... 188-190 WA Useful phone numbers and websites....................187

Retirement index

Accommodation options. ................................................... 56 Accreditation.......................................................................... 56 Active........................................................................................ 46 Blues.................................................................................. 21, 22 Boosting super...................................................................... 13 Boosting mental health....................................................... 53 Budget. ................................................................................ 8, 11 Capital Replacement Fund................................................. 64 Care communities. ............................................................... 60 Career...................................................................................... 24 Centrelink................................................................................ 66 Change of lifestyle. ............................................................... 21 Charges.................................................................................... 63 Checklist.................................................................................. 79 Choosing a village................................................................. 56 Community housing............................................................. 60 Community title..................................................................... 62 Company title......................................................................... 62 Consumer story (retirement)....................................... 58-59 Contract................................................................................... 70 Cooling off............................................................................... 71 Debts........................................................................................... 6 Deferred Management Fee................................................ 64 Deposit. ................................................................................... 63 Diet. .......................................................................................... 42 Disclosure documents......................................................... 69 Donor funded village. .......................................................... 55 Entry payment. ...................................................................... 64 Estate planning......................................................................... 8 Exercise. ........................................................................... 24, 46 Expenses.................................................................................... 6 Experiences............................................................... 31-36, 38 Fall prevention....................................................................... 47 Fee increase........................................................................... 65 Fees. ......................................................................................... 63 Finance. ............................................................................... 5-10 Finance Committees............................................................ 75

Financial advisor....................................................................... 9 Financial issues...................................................................... 66 Financial planner...................................................................... 8 Flexi units................................................................................ 60 Foolproofing.............................................................................. 6 Frequently Asked Questions.............................................. 78 Get help................................................................................... 50 Grey nomads. ........................................................................ 27 Health................................................................................. 42-52 Hobbies................................................................................... 24 Independent Living Units.................................................... 57 Investing............................................................................ 11-12 Investment options. ............................................................. 12 Investment tips...................................................................... 11 Leases............................................................................... 60, 62 Legal structures..................................................................... 60 Levies. ...................................................................................... 66 Licenses................................................................................... 60 Life in a village........................................................................ 72 Lifestyle.............................................................................. 21-40 Maintenance fund. ............................................................... 64 Mental health................................................................... 50-52 Mentally fit. ............................................................................. 52 Moving. .................................................................................... 19 Nutrition............................................................................ 42-52 Occupancy rights.................................................................. 60 Ownership. ...................................................................... 61, 62 Pets.................................................................................... 40, 74 Phases...................................................................................... 22 Photo’s..................................................................................... 37 Physical health....................................................................... 46 Planning...................................................................................... 5 Protection. ................................................................................. 7 Purpose................................................................................... 23 Real estate agents. ............................................................... 18 Relocation specialists........................................................... 20 Rental units............................................................................. 60 Resident associations.......................................................... 69 Resident Committees. ......................................................... 75 Resident funded village....................................................... 55 Residential aged care. ......................................................... 77 Residential parks................................................................... 62 Responsibilities...................................................................... 68 Retirement Living Options............................................ 55-80 Rights........................................................................................ 68 Risks.......................................................................................... 16 Seller advocates.................................................................... 18 Selling tips............................................................................... 19 Selling....................................................................................... 18 Serviced apartments............................................................ 57 Settling in. ............................................................................... 71 Stamp duty. ............................................................................ 64 Strata titled............................................................................. 61 Study. ....................................................................................... 26 Superannuation. ............................................................. 13-17 Supplements.......................................................................... 44 Supported care. .................................................................... 76 Supported services. ............................................................. 77 Supported living.................................................................... 57 Travel.................................................................................. 27-40 Travel plans. ........................................................................... 27 Types of villages. ................................................................... 55 Unit trust................................................................................. 62 Vitamins................................................................................... 44 Volunteering........................................................................... 26 Wellness.................................................................................. 24

Home Care Guide 2021


Your favourite cafe might be ours, too

Living in the same neighbourhood often means shared experiences and knowledge of where to find the best local advice and help. With a large network of experienced and qualified home care workers living around Australia, there’s a good chance that some of your favourite places in the community are shared with our staff. These special connections between carers, clients and the community means that Mercy Health is well placed to help you to continue to live safely and independently at home. Call Mercy Health today to activate your home care package or for help accessing government funding to remain in your home and community for longer.

1300 784 697 home-care.mercyhealth.com.au


At Sequel we are committed to delivering outcomes that are centred around your unique lifestyle. All services are designed with you to support the day to day activities required to assist you maintain your optimum level of independence. Our services are individualised, flexible, supportive and compassionate and are delivered to the highest possible standard. Suite 112, Level 1, 40 Burgundy Street, Heidelberg VIC 3084

info@sequel.com.au (03) 9499 1200 www.sequel.com.au