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2 — Hurricane Storm Guide 2015 • An advertising supplement to the Daily Press


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Hurr icane Sea so n 2015:

Emergency Kit

“While shopping, gradually pick up what you need for a tropical storm or hurricane”

Things you should have ready:

First-aid kit Keep items in waterproof container. • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Various sizes of sterile, adhesive bandages. Sterile gauze pads and roller bandages in a variety of sizes. Hypoallergenic adhesive tape. Scissors and tweezers. Needle, for sewing. Bars of soap in plastic bags. Antiseptic spray. Hydrogen peroxide. Rubbing alcohol. Iodine. Thermometer. Ointments for burns and cuts. Latex gloves. Aspirin, ibuprofen and antacid.

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Shopping suggestions • • • • • • • • • •

Canned food. Manual can opener. Pudding, applesauce, fruit. Individually packaged drinks. Raisins and other dried fruits. Nuts. Energy bars. Ready-made baby formula. Baby food in jars. Unscented bleach.

• •

• • • •

Water: At least 1 gallon daily per person for 3 to 7 days; also, make extra ice before the storm hits. Food: At least enough for 3 to 7 days, mostly nonperishable packaged or canned food, juices. Blankets, pillows, etc. Items for infants or the elderly. Snacks. Nonelectric can opener. Cooking tools, fuel. Paper plates, plastic utensils. Clothing. Rain gear. First-aid kit, medicines, prescription drugs. Sturdy shoes. Toys, books and games. Toiletries. Hygiene items. Moisture wipes. Flashlight, batteries. Battery-operated, NOAA weather radios. Keys. Cash: Banks and automatedteller machines may not be open for a while. Important documents in waterproof container. Insurance, medical records, bank-account numbers, Social Security card, etc. Videotape that documents all valuables. Tools: Keep a set with you. Vehicle fuel tanks filled. Proper IDs, immunization records for pets.

4 — Hurricane Storm Guide 2015 • An advertising supplement to the Daily Press

© 2015 Tribune Newspapers


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How to file an insurance claim ■

Try to call your insurance agent immediately.

Begin making temporary repairs to prevent further damage.

SAVE ALL RECEIPTS. Do not attempt to make permanent repairs until an insurance adjuster has inspected the home.

Most homeowner-insurance policies provide for removal of trees or branches that have fallen on your home.

If your home is uninhabitable or you move somewhere else temporarily, let your insurer know where you can be reached.

Don’t assume that adjusters will know what street they are on; street signs may have blown away. Industry officials say spray-painting important

information on homes after a hurricane is effective. Your name and correct address should be sufficient for an adjuster to match you and your policy. Don’t include your policy number; someone else may take advantage of that. Insurers usually send adjusters to the worst-hit homes first.

Confused about your policy? Get moving. With hurricane season here, homeowners need to find out what’s covered and what’s not. Experts say you should take a thorough look at your policy, and if you have any questions, call your insurance agent. It’s no fun poring through fine print, but that’s the only way to find out, for example, whether you’d have to replace damaged carpet yourself.

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Equip your home with a sump pump and backup battery

H

omeowners who live in areas prone to flooding can protect their homes with sump pumps. In 2012, hundreds of miles of coastline along the northeastern United States were battered and decimated due to Hurricane Sandy. More than a year later, many homeowners were still dealing with the consequences of the devastating storm. Hurricane Sandy illustrated just how destructive water can be. Each year, storms across North America

have the potential to flood homes or cause water to enter the basement or first floor. According to the National Flood Insurance Program, a mere six inches of water in a 2,000 square foot home can cause around $40,000 in damage. Homeowners looking to avoid such damages can rely on sump pumps and backup emergency systems to keep sublevels dry and safe.

8 — Hurricane Storm Guide 2015 • An advertising supplement to the Daily Press

Continues on page 10


R U Ready? Start early to make sure your property is protected and properly insured. • Cut dead or loose limbs from nearby trees. • Remove any standing dead trees from your property. • Repair loose shingles, guttering, window shutters and fence boards • Take an inventory of your personal property. • Put together an emergency kit with non-perishable food and water for 3 days, a battery-operated radio and prescriptions medications. • If a storm is approaching, put outdoor items like lawn chairs, grills, or gardening tools in a safe place.

Review your insurance policies to ensure you have adequate protection and appropriate coverages. Homeowners, Farmowners, and Mobile Homeowners insurance policies do not cover loss from flooding, but most do cover wind damage, another common occurrence with a hurricane.

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Continued from page 8

Sump pumps are frequently used in homes at risk of flooding or in homes where the water table is above the foundation of the home. Sump pumps remove water that has accumulated in a water collecting sump basin built into the foundation of the home. Water may enter through perimeter drains (French drains) built into the basement or directly through the sump basin itself. The pump will send the water away from the house through a series of pipes that could drain into a dry well, into a municipal storm drain or at the curb. Many sump pumps are hard-wired into a home’s electrical system and will automatically turn on when the water level in the sump basin has risen enough to trigger the pump. A flotation device built into the pump will rise enough to turn on the pump, which will then dispel the water until the device returns to its regular level.

unless there is a backup battery attached to the sump pump. Having a battery hooked up to a sump pump, or a backup sump pump that is battery-powered, can give homeowners peace of mind in any storm. A backup plan ensures the pump will still be able to remove water for a certain period of time until electricity is restored to the home. Another option is to make sure the sump pump is connected to a power generator should the main power supply go out. As long as the generator is running, the sump pump will expel the water. Water damage to a home can cost thousands of dollars in repairs, particularly when it is not covered by standard home insurance policies. Sump pumps can help keep homes dry and safe. SH142908

When operating correctly, sump pumps are effective at removing water and keeping basements and crawl spaces dry. However, in the event of a power outage, which is common when strong winds accompany flooding rains, a sump pump is rendered useless 10 — Hurricane Storm Guide 2015 • An advertising supplement to the Daily Press


NEW KENT

1 301

8

95

106

17

Exit 231

60

155

95

Exit 238

JAMES CITY

144

Exit 242

31

Exit 255

17

40

SURRY

95

31

NEWPORT NEWS

Bacon’s Castle

156

Waverly

DINWIDDIE

N

POQUOSON

10

85

HAMPTON 143

SMITHFIELD

460 35

40

Benn’s Church

WIGHT

SUSSEX

Zuni

17

564

664

264

58 58 460

Walters

58 460

Exit 13

Exit 1 & 299

Exit 296

58 35

SUFFOLK

Exit 22

Exit 17

149

Exit 1 & 291

Princess Anne

165

Great Bridge

Holland

264

464

64

Atlantic Ocean

Exit 14 & 284

Exit 6 &8

165 58

58

poria

60

PORTSMOUTH

35 460

The Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel is not an evacuation route. For closure information, visit www.cbbt.com.

60

Exit 276

Driver 664

Windsor

L NE UN E-T DG RI

NORFOLK

Exit 9

Chuckatuck

SOUTHAMPTON

Fort Monroe Hampton Roads Bridge-Tunnel Willoughby Spit

64

Exit 273

Monitor Merrimac Memorial Bridge-Tunnel

OF

Ivor

Exit 1 & 264

17 258

ISLE

40

Kiptopeke

60

James River Bridge

10

Capron

South Bay

13

Coleman Bridge

r ve Ri

Scotland

GEORGE 460

Cobb Island Bay

es m Ja

Spring Grove

PRINCE

Exit 247

Hog Island Bay

Cape 184 Charles

GLOUCESTER POINT

YORK 143

10

460

199

WILLIAMSBURG

5

HESTERFIELD

r ve Ri rk Yo

10

14

Exit 234

Toano

CHARLES CITY

145

MATHEWS

Ark

Exit 227

Providence Forge

Exmore

P TO

30

64

156

Chesapeake Bay AM

295 5

GLOUCESTER

RTH

Exit 220

NO

60

198

Adner

249

Exit 214

B

HENRICO

Exit 211

CHESA PEA KE BA Y

Exit 205

195 60

33

33

RICHMOND

CHESAPEAKE

VIRGINIA BEACH Hickory

Back Bay

32

GREENSVILLE

Evacuation Routes If officials order an evacuation for your area, use one of these designated routes to leave the Hampton Roads region. Get familiar with these routes and plan to leave early to avoid major traffic delays. Peninsula ■ Interstate 64 ■ Interstate 664 North ■ U.S. Route 17 North ■ U.S. Route 60 West ■ Route 143 During severe weather, the Jamestown-Scotland Ferry is removed from service and should not be considered part of a reliable evacuation plan.

Southside (South of I-264) ■ Interstates 64 & 264 ■ Interstate 664 North Monitor Merrimac Memorial Bridge-Tunnel ■ U.S. Route 17 North ■ U.S. Route 58 West ■ U.S. Route 460 West ■ Route 10 West Eastern Shore All Eastern Shore residents will use U.S. Route 13 North toward Salisbury, Maryland.

The Chesapeake Bay BridgeTunnel is not an evacuation route. For closure information, visit www.cbbt.com

Evacuating Norfolk and Virginia Beach (North of I-264)

Lane reversal Interstate 64 is the only route with a lane reversal plan, but it is not the only way out of the area. In the event of a hurricane or other disaster, the governor can order a lane reversal of the eastbound lanes on I-64 to help evacuate Hampton Roads. During a lane reversal, traffic will travel west on I-64 from Norfolk to Richmond beginning just east of the Hampton Roads Bridge-Tunnel in Norfolk (Exit 273), and continue to the I-295 interchange in Richmond (Exit 200). For more information on the I-64 lane reversal and emergency hurricane gates, please visit the online guide at www.virginiadot.org.

Reversing I-64 ■ All traffic entering I-64 at 4th View Street (Exit 273) will travel in the reversed eastbound lanes to travel westbound. ■ Motorists traveling westbound on I-64 before 4th View Street

will be directed onto the reversed eastbound lanes. ■ All traffic entering I-64 west of the Hampton Roads BridgeTunnel will travel in the normal westbound lanes. There are only two possible exits from the reversed lanes between Norfolk and I-295 in Richmond: ■ Exit 234 in Williamsburg (Route 199) for gas, food, lodging and hospital ■ Exit 205 in Bottoms Bridge for gas and food Without exiting, motorists on the reversed lanes can also access a temporary comfort station on I-64 near Jefferson Avenue (near Exit 255) and the rest areas in New Kent County (between exits 214 and 211). Motorists exiting the reversed lanes at Exit 234 or Exit 205 cannot re-enter the reversed lanes. If motorists exit the reversed lanes, they can re-enter I-64 using only the normal westbound ramps. Motorists traveling in the I-64 westbound lanes can exit and enter the interstate as usual, though some entrance and exit ramps could be closed for traffic control. Source: Virginia Department of Emergency Management

Hurricane Storm Guide 2015 • An advertising supplement to the Daily Press — 11


How hurricanes affect the ecosystem H

urricanes and other strong storms can have a profound impact on communities. Power outages, flooding and interruption of communication systems can interrupt everyday life. But storms and natural disasters can wreak havoc on animals, ecosystems and coastal habitats. Although parts of the world have been subjected to hurricanes, typhoons, tornadoes and other storms for millenia, experts at the United States Department of the Interior and the U.S. Geological Survey say that today’s storms may be more detrimental to animal life and ecosystems than ever before. That’s because periodic disturbances on plants and animals that result from storms are compounded by consistent environmental changes brought on

by human development and industry. Animals that could once bounce back from a weather event may find it harder to rebound because their habitats have already been weakened by human interference. In 1998, Hurricane Georges was the most destructive hurricane to strike the island of Puerto Rico since 1932. Georges further stressed the habitat of rare species such as the sea turtle and the highly endangered Puerto Rican parrot, cutting the parrot population in half. Conservation specialists estimate there are fewer than 50 of these parrots currently living in the wild and roughly 140 in captivity. Thousands of animals live in coastal regions. In addition to high, damaging winds taking down trees

12 — Hurricane Storm Guide 2015 • An advertising supplement to the Daily Press

Continues on page 15


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Continued from page 12

and defoliating forest canopies, wind can cause powerful storm surges that displace sand. Ultimately, entire coastal landscapes may be reshaped or reduced. Information from the University of Rhode Island estimates that hurricanes such as Ivan, Katrina, Rita, Gustav, and Ike have changed shoreline positions of about 328 feet (100 meters) in certain areas. Northeastern coastal areas in New York, New Jersey and Connecticut have been entirely reshaped in the

end up suffocating insects and other animals in areas where it has been dumped, and may impede the growth of grasses and other plants that feed a wide variety of animals. Hurricanes can affect marine life as well. Hurricanes can destroy oyster beds and crab habitats and displace fish that feed many other large marine creatures. Flood waters can transport sewage and untreated chemicals from land into the water, harming marine

Debris from storms can litter coastal areas, releasing hazardous waste into the ecosystem aftermath of Hurricane Sandy. Wildlife that may have been living in the dunes or coastal channels of areas impacted by hurricanes and other storms may have been obliterated or forced to relocate to other, less tolerable locations. Barrier islands, important for protecting areas of the coast, shift or erode, taking out forests that are resting places for migratory birds. Should a storm take place during a period of mating or egg-laying, entire generations of animal life can be wiped out. Coastal areas are not the only places impacted by such storms. During Hurricane Sandy, seawater breached many areas that had never before seen such a surge in water levels. Saltwater intrusion can change other wetland ecosystems, making them inhabitable for some organisms not acclimated to salty conditions. Displaced sand can

life as a result. Fish and crustaceans may be tossed on shore, where they are unable to return to the safety of the water. Furthermore, discharge of boat fuel and oil from wrecked vessels can infiltrate marine ecosystems, further damaging delicate species. Hurricanes can cause structural changes, interruption of food sources and destruction of homes while slowing down communication methods. But hurricanes affect the animals that live in and around stormravaged areas as well. TF137334

Hurricane Storm Guide 2015 • An advertising supplement to the Daily Press — 15


SPCA: Make Plans Now To Protect Your Pet During Hurricanes, Storms By Leslie Magner

The Peninsula SPCA urges pet owners to include pets in hurricane season preparations. Hurricanes are nothing new to the Virginia Peninsula and can be expected each year from June to the end of November. However, pet owners need to take these necessary steps, also found on humanesociety.org, to properly protect their pets during nature’s disasters.

PUT TOGETHER A SAFETY KIT

START GETTING READY NOW

• Transport pets safely using sturdy leashes and carriers. Carriers should be big enough for pets to stand, turn and rest comfortably for hours. Bring blankets and toys for comfort.

• Make sure your pet is wearing an up-to-date and visible ID tag. • You’ll increase your chances of being re-united with your pet by having him or her microchipped. Microchips are tiny transponders inserted between the shoulder blades that use radio frequency waves to transmit crucial identification information about your pet. Call your local veterinarian for more information. • List your cell phone number on your pet’s ID tag.

• Gather food and water for at least five days for each animal. Keep an extra gallon of water for your pets, bowls and manual can openers. • Medications, all medical records and a pet first aid kit. • Clean up after your pet. Pack cat boxes, litter scoops, litter and poop bags to keep all areas free of waste. This also decreases chances of spreading potential illness.

• Bring a picture of you with your pet for proper identification. • Written information about your pet’s feeding schedules, medical conditions, and behavior issues along with the name and number of your veterinarian in case you have to board your pets or place them in foster care.

16 — Hurricane Storm Guide 2015 • An advertising supplement to the Daily Press

Continues on page 27


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When did the practice of naming hurricanes begin and where does the word hurricane come from? Native Americans called these storms Hurakons, after “a great spirit who commanded the east wind.” Spanish explorers adopted the word and then began giving hurricanes the names of patron saints on whose feast days the storms occurred. Later, hurricanes were identified by their longitude and latitude. A weatherman in Australia is credited with being the first person to name a tropical storm after a female. By World War II, meteorologists in the U.S. military named storms after their girlfriends and wives. The first storm in the Atlantic Ocean named for a man was Hurricane Bob. Hurricane names are selected by the World Meteorological Organization. Every six years, the list of names begins again! However, the names of especially destructive hurricanes are usually retired.

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Hurricane tracking chart Hurricane advisories are issued at six-hour intervals – at midnight, 6 a.m., noon and 6 p.m. Each message gives the name, center (eye) position, intensity and forecast movement of the storm. Positions are given by latitude and longitude. When the storm moves within radar range, the center position might also be given in statute miles and compass direction from a specified point.

Atlantic City

Baltimore Washington, D.C.

When you receive a hurricane advisory, note the center position, intensity, barometric pressure (if given) and forecast direction and movement. Then mark the center position on the tracking chart. Because hurricanes change direction very quickly, you should listen more carefully to where the storm will go, rather than where it has been.

Newport News

Cape Hatteras Wilmington

Myrtle Beach

See bottom right of the chart for an example of how to plot a storm from a position given in latitude and longitude.

Charleston BERMUDA

Savannah Mobile

Pensacola

Jacksonville

Atlantic Ocean New Orleans

2015

Daytona Beach

Storm Names † † † † † † † † † † † † † † † † † † † † †

Tampa

Gulf of Mexico Miami Nassau

THE BAHAMAS

Key West Havana

Cancun Hurricanes originate as tropical Veracruz North storms America from either Atlantic Africa the Gulf of Ocean Mexico or the west coast of Gulf of Africa. South America Mexico

CUBA

Grand Cayman HAITI

N

20 — Hurricane Storm Guide 2015 • An advertising supplement to the Daily Press

DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

San Juan PUERTO RICO

Kingston Scale of statute miles

Caribbean Sea

0

100

200

300

U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS LEEWARD ISLANDS

JAMAICA Jamaica

BELIZE

GUATEMALA

Ana Bill Claudette Danny Erika Fred Grace Henri Ida Joaquin Kate Larry Mindy Nicholas Odette Peter Rose Sam Teresa Victor Wanda

400

Example: Read west to 65.0° west. Read north to 18.0° north.

Hurricane Storm Guide 2015 • An advertising supplement to the Daily Press — 21


Hurricane tracking chart Hurricane advisories are issued at six-hour intervals – at midnight, 6 a.m., noon and 6 p.m. Each message gives the name, center (eye) position, intensity and forecast movement of the storm. Positions are given by latitude and longitude. When the storm moves within radar range, the center position might also be given in statute miles and compass direction from a specified point.

Atlantic City

Baltimore Washington, D.C.

When you receive a hurricane advisory, note the center position, intensity, barometric pressure (if given) and forecast direction and movement. Then mark the center position on the tracking chart. Because hurricanes change direction very quickly, you should listen more carefully to where the storm will go, rather than where it has been.

Newport News

Cape Hatteras Wilmington

Myrtle Beach

See bottom right of the chart for an example of how to plot a storm from a position given in latitude and longitude.

Charleston BERMUDA

Savannah Mobile

Pensacola

Jacksonville

Atlantic Ocean New Orleans

2015

Daytona Beach

Storm Names † † † † † † † † † † † † † † † † † † † † †

Tampa

Gulf of Mexico Miami Nassau

THE BAHAMAS

Key West Havana

Cancun Hurricanes originate as tropical Veracruz North storms America from either Atlantic Africa the Gulf of Ocean Mexico or the west coast of Gulf of Africa. South America Mexico

CUBA

Grand Cayman HAITI

N

20 — Hurricane Storm Guide 2015 • An advertising supplement to the Daily Press

DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

San Juan PUERTO RICO

Kingston Scale of statute miles

Caribbean Sea

0

100

200

300

U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS LEEWARD ISLANDS

JAMAICA Jamaica

BELIZE

GUATEMALA

Ana Bill Claudette Danny Erika Fred Grace Henri Ida Joaquin Kate Larry Mindy Nicholas Odette Peter Rose Sam Teresa Victor Wanda

400

Example: Read west to 65.0° west. Read north to 18.0° north.

Hurricane Storm Guide 2015 • An advertising supplement to the Daily Press — 21


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Hurricane Storm Guide 2015 • An advertising supplement to the Daily Press — 23


HURRICANE DOS & DON’TS 10 THINGS TO DO BEFORE the Hurricane: Know what you have. Take photos of your property, inside and out. Use a camera or an app with a time-stamp so you have proof for your insurance company. Make sure you have an insurance company and that your policies are up to date and cover you for hurricanes or other related storm events like flooding and tornadoes. Clear your property. Secure all outdoor items that could start flying around in high winds and don’t underestimate those winds. Something heavy may still get airborne if wind can get underneath it. Make sure loose branches and unstable trees are removed well before the storm gets close. Plan for darkness. The power will likely go out. Get a generator if you can. If you can’t, have bottled gas on hand for camp stoves, grills and lanterns so you can cook and see when the power is off. Batteries are also a necessity — for flashlights, radios and those battery-powered fans that can be a life-saver in hot weather. Prepare your refrigerator. Cook all raw meats in your refrigerator and freeze them. Put all the ice in your freezer into plastic bags and fill all spaces

in your freezer with them. Freeze water bottles, too. The meat will help keep the other items cold and can be consumed without cooking. The water also will help keep things cold until thawed for drinking. Plan for drought. There may be water everywhere, but none to drink if you aren’t prepared. Have bottled water on hand or food-safe containers filled with tap water in case the city turns off your water supply. Fill bathtubs and barrels with water for flushing toilets and cleaning. Also know that the hot-water tank contains 50-75 gallons of fresh drinking water, enough to keep one person alive and healthy for a month. Prepare your vehicle. Make sure the tank is full. If a whole region loses electricity, as happened after Hurricane Isabel, stations have no way to pump the gas. Park your car on higher ground if you are in a floodprone area. If your battery is old or weak, make sure it gets replaced along with any worn-out windshield wipers. Store important papers. And not in your home or car. Put them in a bank safety deposit box if you can. Mail copies to a trusted relative for safe-keeping if you can’t. Create a “take” box. If you have to evacuate, you want to make sure you have everything you need — any important papers not stored at the bank, passports and IDs, medication, address books and phone numbers and important keepsakes that can be carried. Family photos can be scanned to a CD or thumbdrive and placed in the box just in case.

24 — Hurricane Storm Guide 2015 • An advertising supplement to the Daily Press


Get your house ready. Know where the gas and water shut-offs are at your home and how to work them. Have storm shutters installed or plywood on hand to protect windows (taping them is pointless so save your energy for other things.) Make sure your doors are firmly attached to the frame of your house by at least three hinges. Stay on top of the news. Listen to the radio. Read your newspaper. If you have electricity or Internet service, or if cell phone service hasn’t been disrupted, regularly check dailypress.com for key information and regular updates.

10 THINGS NOT TO DO AFTER the Hurricane: Don’t fall. Deaths and injuries occur when people fall from roofs, ladders and trees as they try to clean up. Don’t get hit. Dangling tree branches, signs or siding may let go when you least expect it. Stay safe and wear a hard hat. Don’t cut your feet. Make sure you wear safety shoes and be careful of broken glass and sharp metal. Don’t asphyxiate. Never run a generator indoors. Carbon monoxide will quickly kill you in your sleep. Don’t overdo it. Know your limits and don’t push yourself into a heart attack. Don’t drive distracted. Don’t stare agog at the damage around you and forget that traffic lights may be out, roads may be flooded and trees and power lines may be blocking your way. Don’t burn. Make sure candles, lanterns, gas camp stoves and grills are a safe distance from anything

flammable. Never leave candles and lanterns unattended. Don’t think you know better. Listen to the authorities and do what they tell you. Roads may be blocked, flooding may be widespread and tap water may be unsafe to drink. Have a radio and do what emergency workers tell you to do. Don’t get electrocuted. Stay away from downed power lines and don’t let children or pets play in flood waters or puddles. Make sure all appliances are dry before you plug them back in. Don’t get poisoned. If in doubt, throw it out. Food can be kept in an unopened refrigerator for up to 24 hours, maybe longer if it is frozen. Stick to canned food and water stored in food-safe containers. All other water should be boiled before drinking. Information from the National Hurricane Preparedness Center and wikihow.com. Compiled by Karen Morgan, Daily Press

Hurricane Storm Guide 2015 • An advertising supplement to the Daily Press — 25


RIDE OUT THE STORM in safety and style when you stay at the newly renovated Newport News Marriott at City Center. Whether you are looking for overnight accommodations for yourself or your family, planning a wedding or retirement party, or hosting a meeting or reunion, the Marriott at City Center in Oyster Point has everything you’re looking for, rain or shine. • 256 spacious, renovated, and well-appointed guest rooms and suites; • Restaurant and bar serving breakfast, lunch and dinner 7 days a week; • Fitness Center / Indoor Pool; • High-speed Internet; • Ballrooms and meeting rooms accommodating 10-1000 guests.

Let us be your shelter in your time of need.

740 Town Center Drive Newport News, VA 23606 757-873-9299 marriott.com/phfoy 26 — Hurricane Storm Guide 2015 • An advertising supplement to the Daily Press


SPCA - Continued from page 16

FIND A SAFE PLACE TO STAY • Call the local Department of Emergency Management office for evacuation plans and pet-friendly shelters. • Contact hotels and motels outside the immediate area to find out if they accept pets. Ask about any restrictions on the number, size and species. Inquire if the “no pet” policies would be waived in an emergency. Keep a list of animalfriendly places handy, and call ahead

for a reservation as soon as you think you might have to leave your home. • Make arrangements to stay with friends or family out of town with your pet. • Organize a list of boarding kennels or veterinarian offices to shelter your pet in case of emergency. • Establish an emergency care plan with a friend or neighbor to keep your pet safe if a disaster strikes while you are out of town or unreachable. Magner is community outreach coordinator for the Peninsula SPCA.

DISASTER RULES Here are two easy rules to follow in the event of a disaster. Disaster rule one: If it is not safe for you, it’s not safe for your pet. Pets are easily disoriented, scared and endangered during natural disasters. Animals left behind are easily injured, lost and killed by deadly debris, starvation or predators. Disaster rule two: Don’t wait to evacuate. Those who wait for official evacuation orders risk being forced to leave their pets behind. If you stay home, be careful and keep your pets with you at all times.

Hurricane Storm Guide 2015 • An advertising supplement to the Daily Press — 27


Power Outage CHECKLIST Energy Conservation Recommendations

❏ Turn off lights and computers when not in use. ❏ Wash clothes in cold water if possible; wash only full loads and clean the dryer’s lint trap after each use. ❏ When using a dishwasher, wash full loads and use the light cycle. If possible, use the rinse only cycle and turn off the high temperature rinse option.When the regular wash cycle is done, just open the dishwasher door to allow the dishes to air dry. ❏ Replace incandescent light bulbs with energy-efficient compact fluorescent lights.

How do I prepare for a power outage? To help preserve your food, keep the following supplies in your home: ❏ One or more coolers—Inexpensive Styrofoam coolers work well. ❏ Ice—Surrounding your food with ice in a cooler or in the refrigerator will keep food colder for a longer period of time during a prolonged power outage. ❏ A digital quick-response thermometer— With these thermometers you can quickly check the internal temperatures of food to ensure they are cold enough to use safely. Put together an emergency preparedness kit with these supplies in case of a prolonged or widespread power outage: • Water—one gallon per person, per day (3- day supply for evacuation, 2-week supply for home) • Food—non-perishable, easy-to-prepare items (3-day supply for evacuation, 2-week supply for home) • Flashlight (NOTE: Do not use candles during a power outage due to the extreme risk of fire.) • Battery-powered or hand-crank radio (NOAA Weather Radio, if possible) • Extra batteries • First aid kit • Medications (7-day supply) and medical items • Multi-purpose

Sudden power outages can be frustrating and troublesome, especially when they last a long time. If a power outage is 2 hours or less, you need not be concerned about losing your perishable foods. For prolonged power outages, though, there are steps you can take to minimize food loss and to keep all members of your household as comfortable as possible.

tool • Sanitation and personal hygiene items • Copies of personal documents (medication list and pertinent medical information, deed/lease to home, birth certificates, insurance policies) • Cell phone with chargers • Family and emergency contact information • Extra cash ❏ If someone in your home is dependent on electric-powered, life-sustaining equipment, remember to include backup power in your evacuation plan. ❏ Keep a non-cordless telephone in your home. It is likely to work even when the power is out. ❏ Keep your car’s gas tank full.

What should I do during a power outage? Keep food as safe as possible. ❏ Keep refrigerator and freezer doors closed as much as possible. First use perishable food from the refrigerator. An unopened refrigerator will keep foods cold for about 4 hours. ❏ Then use food from the freezer. A full freezer will keep the temperature for about 48 hours (24 hours if it is half full) if the door remains closed. ❏ Use your non-perishable foods and staples after using food from the refrigerator and freezer. ❏ If it looks like the power outage will continue beyond a day, prepare a cooler with ice for your freezer items. ❏ Keep food in a dry, cool spot and keep it covered at all times.

28 — Hurricane Storm Guide 2015 • An advertising supplement to the Daily Press


Electrical equipment ❏ Turn off and unplug all unnecessary electrical equipment, including sensitive electronics. ❏ Turn off or disconnect any appliances (like stoves), equipment or electronics you were using when the power went out. When power comes back on, surges or spikes can damage equipment. ❏ Leave one light turned on so you’ll know when the power comes back on. ❏ Eliminate unnecessary travel, especially by car. Traffic lights will be out and roads will be congested. Using generators safely ❏ When using a portable generator, connect the equipment you want to power directly to the outlets on the generator. Do not connect a portable generator to a home’s electrical system. ❏ If you are considering getting a generator, get advice from a professional, such as an electrician. Make sure that the generator you purchase is rated for the power that you think you will need.

What should I do when the power comes back on? ❏ Do not touch any electrical power lines and keep your family away from them. Report downed power lines to the appropriate officials in your area.

Throw out unsafe food. ❏ Throw away any food that has been exposed to temperatures 40° F (4° C) for 2 hours or more or that has an unusual odor, color or texture.When in doubt, throw it out! ❏ Never taste food or rely on appearance or odor to determine its safety. Some foods may look and smell fine, but if they have been at room temperature too long, bacteria causing food-borne illnesses can start growing quickly. Some types of bacteria produce toxins that cannot be destroyed by cooking. ❏ If food in the freezer is colder than 40° F and has ice crystals on it, you can refreeze it. ❏ If you are not sure food is cold enough, take its temperature with the food thermometer. Throw out any foods (meat, poultry, fish, eggs and leftovers) that have been exposed to temperatures higher than 40° F (4° C) for 2 hours or more, and any food that has an unusual odor, color or texture, or feels warm to touch. Caution: Carbon Monoxide Kills ❏ Never use a generator, grill, camp stove or other gasoline, propane, natural gas or charcoal-burning devices inside a home, garage, basement, crawlspace or any partially enclosed area. Locate unit away from doors, windows and vents that could allow carbon monoxide to come indoors. ❏ The primary hazards to avoid when using alternate sources for electricity, heating or cooking are carbon monoxide poisoning, electric shock and fire. ❏ Install carbon monoxide alarms in central locations on every level of your home and outside sleeping areas to provide early warning of accumulating carbon monoxide. ❏ If the carbon monoxide alarm sounds, move quickly to a fresh air location outdoors or by an open window or door. ❏ Call for help from the fresh air location and remain there until emergency personnel arrive to assist you.

Let Your Family Know You’re Safe If your community experiences a disaster, register on the American Red Cross Safe and Well Website available through RedCross.org to let your family and friends know about your welfare. If you don’t have Internet access, call 1-866-GET-INFO to register yourself and your family.

For more information on disaster and emergency preparedness, visit RedCross.org

Copyright © 2009 by the American National Red Cross Hurricane Storm Guide 2015 • An advertising supplement to the Daily Press — 29


Garden of Hope Mausoleum The beauty and remembrance of memorials are forever, providing inspiration for generations to gather. They’re a permanent reminder of your family legacy. Since 1964, Hampton Memorial Gardens has been a leading provider of compassionate, personalized

cemetery services to Hampton families. We are pleased to introduce our new Garden of Hope Mausoleum, the only twostory mausoleum in Virginia. Families can choose from the above ground mausoleum as well as cremation niches and ground burial.

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Hampton Memorial Gardens 155 Butler Farm Road | Hampton VA 23666 757-766-1063 | www.hamptonmemorialgardens.com 30 — Hurricane Storm Guide 2015 • An advertising supplement to the Daily Press


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Hurricane Storm Guide 2015 • An advertising supplement to the Daily Press — 31


Storm Surge Map

The map uses color coding to show areas that are low-lying and may flood during a Category 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5 storm. Mobile homes and trailers are especially vulnerable to high winds. If you live in one of these structures, you should evacuate regardless of the threat of flooding.

How to use a Storm Surge map Storm surge maps show the worstcase scenario based on thousands of computer model simulations. Use these maps to assess your risk of storm surge. If your area is highlighted, you are potentially vulnerable to the impacts from storm surge. Areas that are outside the impact area but close to the boundary should also be considered

vulnerable to storm surge. If you find that you live in an area at risk for storm surge, consider purchasing flood insurance. Homeowners and renters insurance policies do not cover flood damage. The only way to protect your property from the impacts of flooding is to purchase flood insurance for your home’s structure and contents.

For more detailed maps, visit: www.vaemergency.gov/readyvirginia/stay-informed/ hurricane/storm-surge Source: Virginia Department of Emergency Management 32 — Hurricane Storm Guide 2015 • An advertising supplement to the Daily Press


GET PREPARED. STAY INFORMED. WWW.DPSTORMCENTER.COM

Important Contact Info National Flood Insurance Program 1-800-427-2419 www.FloodSmart.gov Road Closures and Traffic Conditions Dial 511 www.511Virginia.org www.VirginiaDOT.org/ hurricanes 1-800-367-7623 (VDOT) Public radio station WCVE 88.9 FM East of Williamsburg 89.1 FM on the Middle Peninsula 90.1 FM East of 95 along the VA/NC border Richmond Metropolitan Convention & Visitors Bureau Hotline to find lodging in the Richmond area 1-800-370-9004 1-804-782-277 Emergency Planning To plan for your pets: www.virginiasart.org To plan for your family: www.ReadyVirginia.gov

The Hampton Roads Medical Registry www.hrspecialneeds.org 1-757-420-8300 specialneeds@hrpdcva.gov

Additional Information: Virginia Department of Emergency Management www.VaEmergency.gov 1-866-782-3470 American Red Cross 1-800-733-2767 www.RedCross.org Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) www.fema.gov www.fema.gov/hazard/hurricane www.fema.govkids

Hurricane Storm Guide 2015 • An advertising supplement to the Daily Press — 33


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Hurricane Categories Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale Category 1 74-95 mph Very dangerous winds will produce some damage: Wellconstructed frame homes could have damage to roof, shingles, vinyl siding and gutters. Large branches of trees will snap and shallowly rooted trees may be toppled. Extensive damage to power lines and poles likely will result in power outages that could last a few to several days. Category 2 96-110 mph Extremely dangerous winds will cause extensive damage: Well-constructed frame homes could sustain major roof and siding damage. Many shallowly rooted trees will be snapped or uprooted and block numerous roads. Near-total power loss is expected with outages that could last from several days to weeks. Category 3 (major) 111-129 mph Devastating damage will occur: Well-built framed homes may incur major damage or removal of roof decking and gable ends. Many trees will be snapped or uprooted, blocking numerous roads. Electricity and water will be unavailable for several days to weeks after the storm passes. Category 4 (major) 130-156 mph Catastrophic damage will occur: Well-built framed homes can sustain severe damage with loss of most of the roof structure and/or some exterior walls. Most trees will be snapped or uprooted and power poles downed. Fallen trees and power poles will isolate residential areas. Power outages will last weeks to possibly months. Most of the area will be uninhabitable for weeks or months. Category 5 (major) 157 mph or higher Catastrophic damage will occur: A high percentage of framed homes will be destroyed, with total roof failure and wall collapse. Fallen trees and power poles will isolate residential areas. Power outages will last for weeks to possibly months. Most of the area will be uninhabitable for weeks or months. Sources: National Hurricane Center and Virginia Department of Emergency Management Hurricane Storm Guide 2015 • An advertising supplement to the Daily Press — 35


As we enter hurricane season once again, we want to stress the importance of having a set of emergency paperwork at your fingertips. If you find yourself under orders to evacuate, you should have an emergency paperwork kit that you can have at your disposal in a moment’s notice.

We recommend: 1. Last will and testament 2. Trust Paperwork 3. Social Security Card, Driver’s License or other forms of identification 4. Cemetery Paperwork 5. DD 214 ( Military) 6. Family History Information 7. Physicians’ Information 8. Emergency Contact Information 9. Insurance Policies 10. Bank Account Information

Michael T. Hines, Manager/Director Alice B. Amory, Owner Amory Funeral Home 410 Grafton Drive, Yorktown, VA 23692 (757) 898-5722 (Fax) 898-1576 Locally Owned and Operated since 1929. www.amoryfuneralhome.com • amoryfh@verizon.net 36 — Hurricane Storm Guide 2015 • An advertising supplement to the Daily Press


How to handle hurricanes’ utility and service outages After a big storm, expect utilities and services to be disrupted. Here’s what you need to know:

Adrin Snider/ Daily Press Photo

Debris — Pile debris as neatly and as close to the street as you can. But if you can’t identify it, don’t touch it. Keep debris from piling up around utility poles; repairs may be delayed if pathways are impeded. Take care in handling debris; wear thick gloves, boots and goggles. Try to avoid using a chain saw unless you are experienced using one.

Bag or box items such as broken parts of windows, doors and mirrors separately for safe handling. Spray the insides of the containers with insect repellent to control pests. If the smell becomes unbearable, find a neighbor with a pickup truck who can haul the garbage to a central collection point. Natural gas — Avoid open flames and sparks, and call the fire department or your gas company if you smell or suspect leaking gas.

Cable — Your cable TV service will be out as long as you have no power. If cable service is not restored once power is back on, call your cable company.

Phones — Call your local phone company to report problems and schedule repairs. Be patient; it may take a while. Cordless phones won’t work if the electricity is off, so it’s a good idea to keep a corded phone in your home. It will work in the event power is out but phone lines are open.

Garbage — Call your local trash hauler to find out when pickup will resume. Meanwhile, double-bag all garbage in plastic bags and keep the bags in covered containers.

Cell phones — Cell-phone service can be spotty after a storm. However, text messages often go through even when voice connections can’t be made. © 2015 Tribune Newspapers

Hurricane Storm Guide 2015 • An advertising supplement to the Daily Press — 37


Hurricane

TERMS Familiarize yourself with these terms to help identify a hurricane hazard: Tropical Cyclone: A warm-core nonfrontal synoptic-scale cyclone, originating over tropical or subtropical waters, with organized deep convection and a closed surface wind circulation about a welldefined center. Once formed, a tropical cyclone is maintained by the extraction of heat energy from the ocean at high temperature and heat export at the low temperatures of the upper troposphere. Tropical Depression: A tropical cyclone in which the maximum sustained surface wind speed (using the U.S. 1- minute average) is 38 mph (33 knots) or less. Tropical Storm: A tropical cyclone in which the maximum sustained surface wind speed (using the U.S. 1-minute average) ranges from 39 mph (34 knots) to 73 mph (63 knots). Hurricane: A tropical cyclone in which the maximum sustained surface wind (using the U.S. 1-minute average) is 74 mph (64 knots) or more. Storm Surge: An abnormal rise in sea level accompanying a hurricane or other intense storm, and whose height is the difference between the observed level of the sea surface and the level that would have occurred in the absence of the cyclone. Storm surge is usually estimated by subtracting the normal or astronomic high tide from the observed storm tide. Storm surge can reach heights well over 20 feet and can span hundreds of miles of coastline.

Storm Tide: The actual level of sea water resulting from the astronomic tide combined with the storm surge. Hurricane Warning: An announcement that hurricane conditions (sustained winds of 74 mph or higher) are expected somewhere within the specified area. Because hurricane preparedness activities become difficult once winds reach tropical storm force, the hurricane warning is issued 36 hours in advance of the anticipated onset of tropical-storm-force winds. Hurricane Watch: An announcement that hurricane conditions (sustained winds of 74 mph or higher) are possible within the specified area. Because hurricane preparedness activities become difficult once winds reach tropical storm force, the hurricane watch is issued 48 hours in advance of the anticipated onset of tropical-storm-force winds. Tropical Storm Warning: An announcement that tropical storm conditions (sustained winds of 39 to 73 mph) are expected somewhere within the specified area within 36 hours. Tropical Storm Watch: An announcement that tropical storm conditions (sustained winds of 39 to 73 mph) are possible within the specified area within 48 hours. Short Term Watches and Warnings: These watches/warnings provide detailed information about specific hurricane threats, such as flash floods and tornadoes.

38 — Hurricane Storm Guide 2015 • An advertising supplement to the Daily Press


Be Mobile Ready now with push notifications for emergency alerts. The Ready Virginia mobile app, created by the Virginia Department of Emergency Management is an interactive tool that makes it easier than ever to be prepared for emergencies. The free app for iPhone® and Android™ devices provides emergency planning and guidance and other robust features not previously available in any mobile application. Interactive storm surge risk map “I AM SAFE” functionality Monitor progress of your plan

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Be prepared. #GetReadyVA. Know your plan before the storm hits. Hurricane Storm Guide 2015 • An advertising supplement to the Daily Press — 39


12 WAYS YOU CAN PREPARE

FOR A HURRICANE: IF YOU LIVE IN AN AREA THAT MAY BE AFFECTED BY A HURRICANE OR SEVERE STORM, THE KEY TO REMAINING SAFE IS PROPER PLANNING.

1.

Update your Dominion account phone number at dom.com or call 1-800-222-0401. This will help you quickly report an outage if your lights go out. Be sure to have your account information on hand when you call.

2.

Stock up on non-perishable food, medicine, baby supplies and pet food.

3.

Have at least 3 gallons of fresh water per person on hand.

4.

Make sure you have a battery-operated radio, multiple flashlights and a battery-operated clock and fan along with extra batteries.

5.

Post a list of contents on your freezer door to minimize the number of times you open it.

6.

Monitor official weather bulletins.

7.

Keep extra cash on hand; automatic teller machines or banks don’t operate without power.

8.

Review evacuation routes.

9.

If you have pets, make sure you have provided for them as well.

10. Keep your vehicle’s fuel tank full. 11. If a family member uses life-sustaining medical equipment,

review emergency plans and make arrangements to relocate if necessary.

12. If you lose power, turn off major appliances such as heat pumps, water heaters and stoves. Unplug other appliances such as TVs, stereos, microwaves and computers. This will prevent damage to appliances and possible overloads to the company’s system when power is restored.

For more tips on hurricane and severe storm preparations, visit our website at dom.com/stormpreparation. To report an outage call 1-866-366-4357 40 — Hurricane Storm Guide 2015 • An advertising supplement to the Daily Press

Storm Center - 2015, Daily Press  
Storm Center - 2015, Daily Press  
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