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Developing Coaching Skills for the Workplace: HRP

Section 1 Developing Coaching Skills for the Workplace: HRP Learning Materials

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Developing Coaching Skills for the Workplace: HRP

Developing Coaching Skills for the Workplace: HRP Participant Name My Manager My Mentor My Facilitator My CIPD Number Completion Date CIPD Value

30 hours of workshop time, participant pack exercises, assessment activities, research and reading

Participant declaration: 

I confirm that the work/evidence presented for assessment is my own unaided work.

I have read the assessment regulations and understand that if I am found to have “copied” from published work without acknowledgment, or from other candidates‟ work, this may be regarded as plagiarism which is an offence against the assessment regulations and leads to failure in the relevant unit and formal disciplinary action.

I agree to this work being subjected to scrutiny by textual analysis software if required.

I understand that my work may be used for future academic quality assurance purposes in accordance with the provisions of the Data Protection Act 1998.

I understand that the work/evidence submitted for assessment may not be returned to me and confirm that I have retained a copy for my records.

I understand that until such time as the assessment grade has been ratified by internal and external quality assurance verifiers the grade is not final.

Signature: Date:

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Contents 1

Understand the nature and purpose of coaching ................................. 6 1.1 Introduction ............................................................................................... 6 1.2 Understanding the nature and purpose of coaching ...................................... 6 1.3 The purpose of coaching in meeting organisation objectives ........................ 10 1.4 The difference between coaching and other learning and development techniques ........................................................................................................ 12 1.5 Professional and ethical considerations....................................................... 13 1.6 Links and follow through ........................................................................... 15

Welcome and Introduction Coaching is probably becoming a core skill. Regardless of your role in HR, having the skill to help any learner define their own solutions by raising their awareness and generating responsibility will help you become more successful. To support you in this unit there is a whole workshop devoted to skills development; and a reference book, Coaching for Performance by Sir John Whitmore. We expect that you will read John‟s book and keep it as a source of CPD for yourself for many years. We will direct you to specific chapters or sections as a minimum part of your learning. Enjoy.

According to the Behavioural Coaching Institute, New York (2009): “Because organizations are not investing enough in helping their managers/leaders develop cutting-edge performance coaching skills, there are some significant bottomline consequences. In a recent large industry-wide study it was found that most managers reported that they were confident in their ability to coach. However, the study showed that the managers‟/leaders‟ skills levels as coaches were typically poor and that as a consequence they were not nearly as effective in their coaching as they believed themselves to be. Often times, they believed that coaching consisted of just providing 1-to-1 instructional feedback to their staff members on what to do in a given situation to perform better. However, a well-trained Manager/Leader as Coach also supports their staff by using advanced developmental and learning tools and providing them with personalized self-coaching strategies to achieve sustainable levels of performance.”

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Making best use of your time on this unit Like every unit, approach this one in a systematic way. Here is a suggestion that works for many of our participants. Take 10 minutes to skim read the whole pack from start to finish. This Think gives you a sense of its content, exercises and assessment activities. Spend 10 minutes planning how you will go about the pack and the assessment activities. Plan Commit to an estimated timescale for yourself. Go through the pack completing all the exercises that you can tackle immediately. Do Go back through the pack doing the exercises that you need to research. Now you can approach the assessment activities with confidence.

Main Icons and Your Actions Exercise your brain (time estimate 10 minutes)

  

This image tells you that it is an exercise to help you interact with the unit‟s content. There is also a helpful indicator of the time to spend on it. Obviously people are different, however, this is a useful guide. The shaded area has the exercise information

At the bottom of each exercise, you can download a template to complete, discuss the exercise with your peers in an online forum, and then upload your answer to the system. Click here to download your template Click here to discuss this activity with your peers Click here to upload your response

Assessment activity: (time estimate 90 minutes)

This banner tells you it is an assessment activity. Each one gives advice on what‟s required including a template for your response. When an exercise or assessment activity refers to „your organisation‟ you can chose, your current organisation, one that you know well, the organisation of a friend, relative or client, or even the programme case study company, GDP Ltd.

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Developing Coaching Skills for the Workplace: HRP

Links to CIPD Standards By fully completing this unit‟s Participant Pack and delivering assessment activities that „Meet CIPD Standards‟ you will cover the following learning outcomes and assessment criteria. Learning outcomes You will: 1 Understand the nature and purpose of coaching.

Assessment criteria You can: 1.1 Identify and explain different types and styles of coaching. 1.2 Explain the difference between coaching and other learning and development methods. 1.3 Explain how coaching can be used to meet organisational objectives.

2 Know how to use a coaching style to improve performance in the workplace.

2.1 Identify and explain the role of the coach in the coaching relationship. 2.2 Identify and explain the role of the coachee in the coaching relationship. 2.3 Demonstrate a minimum of three coaching models or techniques that can be used. 2.4 Identify and explain the benefits of coaching to the individual and the organisation.

3 Be able to identify the ways in which coaching can be implemented in an organisation.

3.1 Identify ways in which a coaching culture could be developed within an organisation. 3.2 Identify and analyse the advantages and disadvantages of developing coaching inhouse.

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1 Understand the nature and purpose of coaching 1.1

Introduction

In this first chapter we will look at what coaching is and offer some essential background to what is becoming, if it is not already, a core skill of the modern HR professional. Being an effective coach mirrors the way the profession and businesses are going. Through coaching we can help people commit to resolving problems themselves. The 2009 CIPD Learning and Development Survey had this to say about coaching: “The use of coaching in learning and development has seen significant growth over the past few years and is perceived to be a very effective tool by many organisations. Indeed, more than two thirds of respondents in this survey make use of coaching within their organisation.”

1.2

Understanding the nature and purpose of coaching

First things first; we need to set some ground rules and this means defining coaching and some of its main terminology.

Exercise your brain (time estimate 5 minutes)

What does coaching mean to you? Click here to download your template Click here to discuss this activity with your peers Click here to upload your response Here are a number of definitions. The IIC International Institute of Coaching defines it as: “Fundamentally coaching is an interactive, results orientated, enlightening process that brings about change. Coaching provides each person with the opportunity to live a happier, healthier and peaceful life while maximising their personal and professional potential.”

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Wikipedia (I know it can be inaccurate) says coaching is: “a method of directing, instructing and training a person or group of people, with the aim to achieve some goal or develop specific skills.” Sir John Whitmore in Coaching for performance defines it as: “Unlocking a person‟s potential to get the most out of their performance.”

Example The Team Coach In this call centre there are people whose job title is Team Coach. They are the experts and have their positions through demonstrating their expertise in the other jobs of the team. When a team member has a question they raise their hand and the Team Coach will go over to them and give them the answer. The team coach will also have other roles that involve sharing or using their expertise to help the team. In this organisation every manager of people assumes a coaching role. Wherever possible the manager will not simply give the answer but instead find out what the staff member wants and asks them questions so that the staff member arrives at their own solution. In each of the situations in the above example the activities were described as coaching and yet the approach was quite different.

1.2.1

Directive and non directive methods

Directive Non-directive

Here the coach tells you what to do. Their advice and suggestions comes from their knowledge and they are effectively a consultant to you. Here the coach asks you questions. All the insights, timescales, actions come from you.

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Exercise your brain (time estimate 10 minutes)

Directive Approach Who does the success belong to? Where does responsibility lie? Whose fault if the solution doesnâ€&#x;t work? Where does success lead? Non-Directive Approach Who does success belong to? Where does the responsibility lie? Whatâ€&#x;s likely to happen if it starts to go wrong? Where does success lead? Click here to download your template Click here to discuss this activity with your peers Click here to upload your response The business world is now full of coaches because of its popularity. There are even discussions across Europe about it becoming a regulated activity like insurance. Executive coaching is a one-to-one session between a coach Executive and an executive. The aim is to enhance the on-the-job Coaching performance of the executive Life Coaching A practice with the stated aim of helping clients determine and achieve personal goals. Life coaches use multiple methods that may help clients with the process of setting and reaching goals Coaching with an individual, working on personal issues with a Personal client Coaching

Sports Coach

In sports, a coach is an individual involved in the direction, instruction and training of the operations of a sports team or individual.

The above list simply serves to show that there are many variations on a theme. The fundamental thing to find out when people you relate to refer to coaching is whether they mean directive or non-directive coaching.

1.2.2

Coaching and mentoring

If we consider coaching as non-directive, helping the people (performers) arrive at their own solutions, then mentoring is the other end of the scale. (Mentor was Greek. 8 V2

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He was the friend entrusted by Odysseus to teach his son, Telemachus, while Odysseus went off to the Trojan War; hence the name mentoring.)

Coaching

Mentoring

No subject knowledge necessary Asks questions Expert listener Potentially short term Potentially person and job specific

1.2.3

Need to be subject knowledgeable Gives solutions Expert in passing on knowledge More long term More job specific

Coaching models

John Whitmore has a super way of helping us make decisions in our approaches. He asks, “What‟s the difference between a puzzle (like a crossword) and a problem (such as „I want the next promotion‟)?” The answer is that a puzzle has one solution and a problem has many potential solutions. For the rest of this chapter we will concentrate on problem type coaching situations, where we take a non-directive approach. There are several coaching models to use in your coaching conversations. We will briefly have a look at three before we concentrate on one.

1.2.4

COACH

This non-directive model was created by Dr Keith E Webb. In it he refers to the coach and player. The philosophy is, as you would expect, about unlocking people‟s potential through purposeful conversations.

Connect

How have you been?

Outcome

What results would you like to take away from our meeting today? Tell me about the situation

Awareness Course Highlights 1.2.5

What options do you have? What was particularly helpful?

COACH

This alternative COACH model was created by David Brumpton. In it he refers to the coach and player. This model emphasises the emotional state as well as the behaviour of the coach. It also covers a process for use over a longer period rather than a model for a single conversation. Here is a summary:

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C

Concept

O

Outcomes

A

Application

C

H

Establishing Relationships Building Rapport Positive Thinking Addressing Desire Observing Behaviour Assessing performance

Removing Barriers Commitment Changing Behaviours Review Outcomes High-performance Measuring Improvement

1.2.6

Aligning Values Encouraging Vision Defining the Detail Visualising Outcomes Modelling Best Practice Building Skills Changing Beliefs Coaching Continuum 30-day Coaching 60-day Coaching

Generating Enthusiasm

Taking Responsibility.

Practising the Practice

Perfecting Performance

90-day Coaching

GROW

This model understands that the conversation may go back and forth depending on how it unfolds. So it has the following phases

Goals Reality Options Will

1.3

What do you want to achieve? (ultimate goal, plus goal for the conversation) Whatâ€&#x;s happening now? What could you do? What specifically are you going to do, by when, support needed, commitment to actions, etc.

The purpose of coaching in meeting organisation objectives

The notion of unlocking a personâ€&#x;s potential to get the most out of their performance has to be of interest to every organisation that wants to do things better, faster cheaper. So coaching has to be an attractive idea for organisations.

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Other reasons can include: 1. Greater ownership of tasks, which makes sense because if I come up with the solution then I am much more likely to own it 2. Links to discretionary effort, because when I own a solution I am much more likely to put in the effort, maybe beyond what I am paid to do, because I want to do it 3. Each successive generation of new employees is less likely to thrive in a culture of tell, or even worse, command, and control. Many of our children are being educated in a system that is more about discovery, project work and being helped to work out answers for themselves. The commercial organisation Performance Consulting website includes the following benefits of coaching:  Substantially increased motivation and job satisfaction  Increased productivity and progress  Improved creativity and problem solving  Better delegation and ownership of tasks  A wider understanding of the importance of reviewing, feedback, learning and development  The releasing of managers‟ time to focus on critical business issues  Increased involvement and improved team working  Enhanced self esteem and self responsibility – the bedrock to creating empowerment. Looking at the 2006 CIPD Training and Development survey, here is the list of respondents‟ main drivers behind their developing a coaching culture.

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Exercise your brain (time estimate 30 minutes)

If you have a coaching ethos in your organisation: Speak to some people in your business and add some more reasons as to why coaching is so important to the organisation. If you do not have a coaching ethos in your organisation: Consider some more reasons for coaching being such a popular part of many organisations‟ people management ethos. Click here to download your template Click here to discuss this activity with your peers Click here to upload your response

Exercise your brain (time estimate 20 minutes)

Read Coaching for Performance: chapter one, „What is coaching‟ pages 9 to 19. Summarise below, in two short paragraphs, what you have learnt or had confirmed from this chapter.

Click here to download your template Click here to discuss this activity with your peers Click here to upload your response

1.4

The difference between coaching and other learning and development techniques

One of the key skills of a coach is knowing when coaching is appropriate to use or when it is right to tell. From what you understand about coaching and its place as an HR option, do the following activity.

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Exercise your brain (time estimate 15 minutes)

In this activity you have a development issue and your job is to select an HR solution from: Training course Mentoring e-learning Coaching. Development issue Suggested solution Reason(s) for choice Latest management practice in demonstrating HRâ€&#x;s value Famous management models High potential employee in their first full time job Senior person not adapting to new business realities Employee wanting a better relationship with a key internal contact Health and Safety refresher Employee seeks help to secure next promotion. Negotiation improvements required How to operate a 4-step process machine New transfer to a team: knows company well but not the tasks Experienced employee constantly asking questions Appreciating differences in work styles Click here to download your template Click here to discuss this activity with your peers Click here to upload your response

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1.5

Professional and ethical considerations

We mentioned earlier that the coaching environment may become a regulated one in the future. This is because it is a skilled activity and a poor coach can do damage to their performer‟s confidence, performance and career. Just because you put „coach‟ on your business card doesn‟t mean you are competent. An article in Personnel Today 17, April 2007 states: “The UK coaching market is worth £2bn and still growing, making it highly attractive to unscrupulous operators. "Its size and potential means you are going to get cowboys," says Bob Garvey, professor of mentoring and coaching at Sheffield Hallam University. "Organisations must be cautious in the way they recruit coaches." As Garvey points out, the parameters for good behaviour in coaching extend to all sorts of areas: they refer to the conduct of the coach, the conduct of the organisation and the trust between coach, client and buyer. He says it is crucial for all parties to agree ground rules and ethical practices. "The key question for me is whose agenda is the coach working to? Is it to suit the organisation or the individual?" says Garvey.”

Agreeing to coach someone does require you to honestly say whether you have the skills to take the role, but you also have some ethical considerations to adhere to. For example, during a coaching conversation issues and information that could be deep-rooted and even sensitive for your performer could come to the surface. You ought to be bound not to disclose these to anyone. Or more practical than this, imagine you are coaching a manager of a department when their manager asks you for a report on what was discussed after each session. How would you respond to that? Practitioner Tip 74 Steve Nicklen, ethics expert at European Mentoring and Coaching Council (EMCC) sets out the following guide for the organisational buyer of coaching. Ask the coach: --Which organisation or professional body are you a member of? --In which areas are you competent as a coach? --How do you work and which coaching models do you use? An ethical coach should also demonstrate awareness of the need for: --A level of competence that meets the needs of the client --Understanding the expectations of client and sponsor --Boundary management and conflicts of interest --Integrity and confidentiality --Secure keeping and maintenance of all related records. 14 V2

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1.6

Links and follow through

http://www.internationalinstituteofcoaching.org/coaching_definitions.php A web page with lots of definitions of coaching. http://www.creativeresultsmanagement.com/index.htm More details on the COACH conversation model. http://www.coachingforperformance.com/philosophy.html More details on a different COACH model that is more about a process. Additional resources to support your learning on coaching CLUTTERBUCK, D. and MEGGINSON, D. (2006) Making coaching work: creating coaching culture. 4th ed. London: Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development.

JARVIS, J., LANE, D.A. and FILLERY-TRAVIS, A. (2006) The case for coaching: making evidence-based decisions. London: Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development. LAMPSHIRE, J. and LEWIS, L. (2008) Coaching. Toolkit. London: Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development.

Want to stretch yourself? http://www.emccouncil.org/ Look at the European Mentoring and Coaching Council website and book mark it for the future. If your organisation promotes coaching it will be helpful to periodically review what this influential body has to say about coaching.

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