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Short Portfolio of Architecture

Davis Riley Peck

2013


Content School

Dwelling: Generation Y 03 Imagining: Mercer Museum 07

Work AIA SWO: Willard Dixon Climbing Wall: Lamphere

11 13

Thought Beauty and Making

15


PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATION

Dw e l l i n g i n t h e 2 1 s t C e n t u r y

Designing for Gen-Y; Working With Your Home

My Generation, particularly

those on an academic track, know little of practical construction and maintenance techniques. This was driven home in the Habitat For Humanity practical course I took at the University of Colorado. Even me, growing up building tree forts and skateboard ramps and helping my dad with home construction projects am not prepared to even maintain a house. And I am more skilled than most. This building is designed to be more than just a kit. It is designed to catapult our

generation into construction and building assembly. Furthermore, it enables the homeowner to maintain the structure. It does this through a careful selection of simple materials and building techniques. While a step more than “Some assembly required,� it encourages the building process to be rewarding. Minimal and clean detailing is employed to appeal to a younger generation. It may not be MacBook or iPod clean, but I would definitely put it up against a top end Sony Vaio. Below are some examples of construction and finish details.

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT


This Page: Vertical sec-

tion detail of wall assembly including integrated gutter. Scale: 1” = 1’-0”


Above: Horizontal section

detail of SIP Panel corner including extruded aluminium trim and rainscreen siding. Scale: 1” = 1’-0”

The interior floor plan is less than 400 square feet. Living space was extended to the outside of the building and to into the site, making it functionally similar to a larger, more expensive design. Most equivalent structures were in the 900-1200 square foot range. The foundation is ICF. The walls are nine-inch SIPs tilted into place, and the roof is of truss construction with raised heals creating a superinsulated dwelling. All walls are clad in fiber cement products to the exterior. These were selected to lower utility and maintenance costs. They can also be simply assembled. However, the materials are not light, the structure weighs 125 tons. Bucky wouldn’t be impressed. The trained eye may notice a miniramp in the yard. Skateboarding is a common pastime that brings Gen-Yers together. It is located in a spot that promotes active and passive participation (viewing). Architecture is not the object(s) or formal plastic, but the events and life that happens between them.


[ H a nd ] C r a f t i n g W h o l e n e s s

Re-Imagining the Addition to the Mercer Museum

Left: A cast concrete

model from a plaster mold of the original museum built by Mercer. This model was essential to understanding the process of making as well as the proportion of the architecture.

First day of studio Prof. Jim Givens

had the class charette individually. “You have two hours to imagine the most beautiful form you can imagine; draw a picture and build a model.� We knew next-to-nothing about the site, little about the museum, and even less about the programmatic requirements. It was a totally foreign and awkward way of designing, but eager to learn some knew design skills; I jumped in head first. This studio marked a point of significance in my growth as a designer. It was here that I was not only introduced, but mildly forced to design from the experiential point of view, heavily influenced by Christopher Alexander.

1916, Henry Chapman Mercer built his castle to preserve his collection of hand tools made obsolete by the industrial revolution. It was in the spirit of the collection to produce an entirely hand-made design focused heavily on process of design. More specifically, the way the process of making an object informs the overall design. This is why all I ended up with 200 lbs of concrete models and all hand free-hand sketch drawings. I challenged myself to get inside Mercer’s mind, understand his use of critical imagery, hand craft, and spacial sense to produce a design that was complementary to his own because they were concieved through the same process.


Left: Open space on the site

was critical to the vitality of the museum, It is used for fund raising and festivals. It is also the best snow sledding spot in Doylestown, PA.

Below: Diagrams describing

the project approach. The evolution of a sympathetic exterior massing played a huge role in the design of the museum extension.


Te n an t Imp r o v emen t

Design Document Set; AIA South The Octagon as it was affectionately called could not have been a more appropriate title. As it was to be home for the new South West chapter of the AIA, there was a design review process open to all member architects, a kind of battleground as it were. Will Dixon Architecture, with whom I was doing a practicum, had the commission for the drawing set. I got the opportunity to work on this throughout my three months at the office. Duties included Autocad drawings, renderings, and 3d model of proposed design. I was thrilled at the amount of designing I was able to contribute. The ‘Bling Ring’ design and detail intent was my main contribution to the project, other than producing the drawings and assembling them into a set. I was also responsible for the renderings seen to the left. These images strongly influenced in the decision to have a linear suspended lighting scheme to a radial one.


2x2 linear LED fixture - fastener between planks - 2" below ceiling

10" flat stock, bolted brackets above, centered on structure -possible 1x wood

Left: Section detail of the

GLASS

DISPLAY ASSEMBLY 6'-0" Tall

scale:

1

8"

= 1' - 0"

DATE: 05-03-13

REV:

DRF: TMS/AB

(P) REFLECTED SITE LIGHTING PLAN

WILLARD C. DIXON Architect, AIA

(P) REFLECTED CEILING LINEAR LIGHTING PLAN (30°)

92 E. Broadway, Eugene, OR 97401

DES: WCD

A

4-5 SEATS per Bench Section

PHONE: 541.689.3548

DISPLAY SPACE

SOFFIT (Above)

SOFFIT (Above)

WATER & FOOD Service

DISPLAY SPACE WATER & FOOD Service Optional Conference Table Storage

Optional Conference Table Storage

1 " 4

1 " 4

= 1'-0"

1 " 4

= 1'-0"

= 1'-0"

Optional Conference Table Storage / Information Kiosk Retractable PROJECTION SCREEN Lowered '9-Wood' CEILING (Above)

11

DISPLAY SPACE

DISPLAY SPACE

PROJECTOR (Above)

SOFFIT (Above)

WATER & FOOD Service

Optional Conference Table Storage

1 " 4

A

(P) FLOOR PLANS s c a l e : 18" = 1' - 0"

= 1'-0"

FAX: 1.541.982.2273 (all #'s)

7' Ø Conference TABLE

SOFFIT (Above)

4-5 SEATS per Bench Section

WATER & FOOD Service

PHONE: 541.689.3548

EUGENE, OR. 97402-4150

SOFFIT (Above)

CELL: 541.868.5960

Lowered '9-Wood' CEILING (Above)

7' Ø Conference TABLE

4-5 SEATS per Bench Section

DISPLAY SPACE WATER & FOOD Service

Lowered '9-Wood' CEILING (Above)

300 BLAIR BLVD.

Foldable / Stackable TABLET CHAIRS

DES: WCD

PHONE: 541.689.3548

FAX: 1.541.982.2273 (all #'s)

EUGENE, OR. 97402-4150

s c a l e : 12" = 1' - 0"

© 2013 WILLARD C. DIXON Architect, LLC

4

11 11

(P) TYPICAL SECTION

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT ction onstru for C TING A NOT STIM NLY ForrpEoses O Pu

OCTAGON T.I. Optional Conference Table Storage / Information Kiosk

© 2013 WILLARD C. DIXON Architect, LLC

9"

Lowered '9-Wood' CEILING (Above)

CELL: 541.868.5960

300 BLAIR BLVD.

812"

WILLARD C. DIXON Architect, AIA

STORAGE & UTILITY CABINETRY

REV:

29"

Optional Conference Table Storage

DATE: 05-03-13

CARPENTRY (Beyond) at COLUMN Typ. w/ Power and Comm.)

OCTAGON T.I.

DRF: TMS/AB

= 1' - 0"

(P) FLOOR PLAN

SIGNAGE

Stairs DOWN from 2nd floor

FAX: 1.541.982.2273 (all #'s)

EUGENE, OR. 97402-4150

ction onstru G for C IN NOT TIMATLY S N E O Forrposes Pu

20"

92 E. Broadway, Eugene, OR 97401

COUNTERTOP/ BENCH

scale: 1

REV:

COLUMN (Beyond)

(P) DETAIL SECTION INTENT 1 2"

DATE: 05-03-13

Mecho Shade "Electro/3" - 48 in wide (2 per panel) - motors placed on column / mullion centers

DES: WCD

West Oregon Chapter

Below: Examples of two pages from the Design Document Set.

9"

DRF: TMS/AB

‘Bling Ring’ incorporating roller shades and display lighting for artwork and poster displays.

Adj. LED Linear Lights

(P) TYPICAL SECTION

4x2 channel

92 E. Broadway, Eugene, OR 97401

zip tied wiring out of view

CELL: 541.868.5960

WILLARD C. DIXON Architect, AIA

"9 Wood" ceiling typ.

Metal Angle

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

300 BLAIR BLVD.

OCTAGON T.I.

1 " 4

= 1'-0"

ction onstru for C TING A NOT TIMONLY S E Forrposes Pu

© 2013 WILLARD C. DIXON Architect, LLC

8

11


H o me G r o w n

Climbing Wall; Design and Build, 2010 Cord Lamphere is a neighbor and has been an employer since early-high school. I take care of his yard and help on small building projects. A couple years ago he asked if I would consider designing and building a climbing wall for him. Climbing had been a life long interest for him. I was definitely interested, and with the help of my younger brother we did the design and build. My brother and I began by brainstorming different shapes and climbing features. We generated a quick massing model in Google SketchUp to get an approval from Cord. After modifying the design to be able to park an RV in the space, I began to build a detailed model to estimate the amount of lumber required and the most efficient use of material. After two trips to the lumber yard and some on-line shopping for specialty parts we started construction. The build required three full days including paint and assembly of climbing holds.


Above: Something strange happens when

you work with an engineer on their own home. Pre drilling for an absurd amount of lag bolts, upwards of 90 lags. Completed and climbing.

Right: Cord and his two children are very pleased with the progress.


Ta lk is Che a p

On Making

This passage was written by Jerome Tryon, a colleage of mine at the U of O. I admire his work and shared the same mentor.

I Believe beautiful objects come about through beautiful processes, and that the art of making a design is just as important as the design itself. Therefore, working with my hands has always been an important part of my life. I love to create, to build, and to sculpt. When I am able to build my own designs I find that work absolutely invigorating as well as deeply educational and fulfilling. My goal as a designer is to reveal beauty that unfolds through the process of creating and I hope that the making of my designs will add to the beauty, life, and vitality of the world around them.


Ski.Bike. Draw.Run. Skate.Climb. Paddle.Build.

see resume for more information

davis.peck@colorado.edu

916.303.0194

issuu.com/davis.riley.peck


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