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The Mission of Downtown Cincinnati Inc. is to build a dynamic metropolitan center valued as the heart of the region.

2

Downtown Cincinnati Inc.

Celebrating

Years

of Downtown Revitalization

2014 State of Downtown • 2013 DOWNTOWN CINCINNATI INC. Annual Report

35 East Seventh Street, Suite 202 Cincinnati, OH 45202 www.downtowncincinnati.com

513.421.4440


Downtown Cincinnati Accolades “An influx of jobs and new residents is reviving the Ohio River shoreline...we are seeing a new Cincinnati.” - New York Times

Cincinnati was named a Top 10 Spring Break destination for families and one of the Top 100 Best Places to Live by Livability in 2013.

Cincinnati’s Queen City Underground Brewery Tour: National Geographic’s Top Five Underground Tours in the U.S. for 2012.

Cincinnati USA was named the Best Walking

First Lady Michelle Obama presented the 2013 National Medal for Museum and Library Service to The Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County. In 2013, the Main Library in downtown

Cincinnati was ranked the busiest central library in the United States for the second year in a row, according to the Public Library Association. Cincinnati’s Convention & Visitors Bureau and Hilton Netherland Hotel won the U.S. 2013

City in Ohio and ranked 20th in the nation in 2011, according to Prevention magazine and the American Podiatric Medical Association. The study ranked 100 cities in the United States on a list of criteria ranging from the number of walking commuters and low crime rates to the number of cultural attractions and pet owners.

Platinum Choice Award for hospitality by Smart Meetings magazine. Founded in 1861, Downtown Cincinnati’s

Oktoberfest Zinzinnati was ranked 3rd “Best

Downtown Cincinnati is ranked as one

of the Top 50 Memorial Day destinations at Priceline.com in 2013.

The Scripps National Spelling Bee, the nation’s

Lonely Planet named Cincinnati No. 3 on their list of top 10 U.S. Travel Destinations

Cincinnati restaurant Boca

Forbes’ Top 15

04 Work Bunbury Music Festival

Downtown Development, Lease Transactions, Office Inventory, Office Rental and Vacancy Rates, Employment

Steve Ziegelmeyer

12 Live

Downtown Population, Residential Units and Occupancy, Residential Unit Sales and Prices, Safe and Clean, Perceptions, Residential Amenities

20 Play

Retail Establishments, Retail Composition and Occupancy, Conventions, Hotel Composition and Occupancy, Entertainment, Walks and Runs

Appointments at Carew Tower

Mark Bowen

32 ACCESS AND TRANSIT

Monthly Parking, Alternative Transportation

36 ANNUAL REPORT

festivals of 2013.”

the world’s first outdoor visual effects and live orchestra show, welcoming director Louis Langree.

Cincinnati was ranked 7th in Emerging Downtowns list.

Partners, About Downtown Cincinnati Inc., About this Report, Letter from the Mayor of the City of Cincinnati, Letter from the Board Chair and President & CEO of DCI

Oktoberfest Parties” in the world by USA Today Travel, and as one of the “10 great beer

21c Museum Hotel Cincinnati ranked 1st on Condé Nast Traveler’s Top 10 U.S. Hotels and Resorts list in 2013.

for 2012. The travel guide says the city has become a “worthy weekend getaway” citing attractions such as the riverfront, Tucker’s Restaurant, Findlay Market and the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center.

01 Introduction

Cincinnati’s revived Washington Park was named a “Frontline Park” by national organization, City Parks Alliance.

Bunbury Music Festival in Cincinnati was listed as a Top 10 National Music Festival by Yahoo Music.

Arnold’s Bar & Grill is named by BuzzFeed among 16 of “The World’s Oldest and Coolest Bars”.

tABLE OF CONTENTS

Marketing and Communications, Safe and Clean, Stakeholder Services, Auditors’ Report, Financial Statements, DCI Board of Directors, DCI Members, Staff

35,000 experienced Cincinnati’s LumenoCity,

largest and longest-running educational program, is headquartered in Cincinnati.

was named a Top French restaurant in the U.S. by Travel and Leisure Magazine in 2013.

Cincinnati “fights above its weight class when it comes to offering a vibrant urban lifestyle at an affordable price”, according to MSN Money,

which ranks Cincinnati fifth on its list of top 10 most affordable, livable cities.

Downtown Ambassadors

Special Insert

Major Milestones from 1994 to 2013

Mark Bowen

SOURCES The data presented in this report is derived from many sources including reports by the media and information collected directly from organizations where available. To provide us with more accurate data on any information contained in this report, to request additional information, or to place your name on our e-mail list for future mailings, please send an email to SODreport@downtowncincinnati.com. Please visit downtowncincinnati.com for more publications from Downtown Cincinnati Inc. Also visit these websites for additional information on downtown Cincinnati: • choosecincy.com • cincinnati-oh.gov • cincinnatichamber.com

• cincinnatiUSA.com • cincyusa.com • ilivedowntown.com

• myfountainsquare.com • otrchamber.com • washingtonpark.org


introduction

introduction

partners

ABOUT THIS REPORT

Downtown Cincinnati Inc. thanks the following individuals and organizations for their assistance in compiling this report:

This year’s report is a special edition in honor of Downtown Cincinnati Inc.’s (DCI) twentieth anniversary. We have combined two reports into one publication – the State of Downtown and the Downtown Cincinnati Inc. Annual Report.

Apartment Realty Advisors Barnes Dennig Taste of Cincinnati

Courtesy of the Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber

CBRE Cincinnati’s arts, culture, sports & entertainment organizations Cincinnati Business Courier Cincinnati Center City Development Corporation (3CDC)

Cincinnati Metro/ Southwest Ohio Regional Transit Authority (SORTA) Cincinnati Multiple Listing Service Cincinnati USA Convention & Visitors Bureau

Downtown Residents’ Council Enquirer Media Game Day Communications Amy Smith Xceligent, Inc.

Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber of Commerce City of Cincinnati Colliers International

The 2014 State of Downtown is a compilation of most recently available data pertinent to our stakeholders and visitors: residential; safety and cleanliness; development, office and employment; retail and restaurants; convention and hotels; arts, culture and entertainment; plus access and parking. The information presented in this year’s report encompasses ten to twenty years of historical information and references the first State of Downtown Report published in 2004. The 2013 Annual Report provides an overview of the accomplishments of Downtown Cincinnati Inc. during 2013 for each area of service: Safe and Clean, Communications and Marketing, and Stakeholder Services. Financial statements, board, staff, and member lists are also provided. We hope you find this special edition to be interesting reading. We are always happy to hear from you if you have questions or comments.

Dear Downtown Cincinnati Inc.,

About Downtown Cincinnati Incorporated (DCI) Formed in 1994, DCI is a non-profit organization with a mission to build a dynamic metropolitan center valued as the heart of the region. DCI supports this mission by providing unique services in three areas: safe and clean, marketing and communications, and stakeholder services. The organization is funded by the property owners in the Downtown Cincinnati Improvement District, which includes property within the boundaries of Eggleston Avenue, Central Parkway, Central Avenue, and the Ohio River. DCI provides leadership and information regarding community and development issues, working together with public and private partners to ensure long-term downtown vitality.

I am honored and thrilled to be named Honorary Board Chair for Downtown Cincinnati Inc. As a member of City Council, I worked closely with DCI and now, as Mayor of Cincinnati, I will continue to be a strong, active partner.

Mayor John Cranley City of Cincinnati DCI Honorary Board Chair

A main focus of my administration is job creation. We know that Cincinnati is a magnet for national and international companies, who are attracted to our smart, capable, and diverse workforce. Businesses, both start-ups and established companies, want to be a part of the energy created by our vibrant downtown at the center of the region. We know that increased development hinges on having a clean and safe city center, and DCI’s work is crucial to our region meeting those demands. Cincinnati has incredible momentum right now. We will work together with DCI and other civic groups to champion our city, accelerate our progress and strengthen inclusion for all. Congratulations to DCI on your 20 year anniversary!

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2014 state of downtown report

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work

introduction

Close to $3.9 billion has been invested in downtown Cincinnati

by private and public developers since 1994. In that time, downtown has been transformed by projects such as the Aronoff Center for the Arts, the Contemporary Arts Center, Great American Ball Park, Duke Energy Convention Center, Great American Tower at Queen City

Dear Friends,

But first, a look at 2013. 2013 was a year of unprecedented progress and change for downtown—from the openings of Boca, Sotto, Booksellers on Fountain Square, and Horseshoe Casino Cincinnati, to the relocations of Kao USA and Kolar Design to downtown. We see the promise of an exciting future with new Mayor John Cranley, new City Council Members, new Chief of Police Jeffrey Blackwell, as well as many other new civic leaders. With progress and change, we also sharpened our focus on what has worked so well. The Downtown Cincinnati Improvement District was renewed for another 4-year term with record support from property owners. This ensures the focus on “safe and clean,” as the “price of entry” for development does not stop. Anyone who has recently traversed the streets of downtown can see the promise of the future— dunnhumbyUSA, Mabley Place, Renaissance Hotel, and the Streetcar—there is construction just about everywhere. And soon the second phase of The Banks will begin. How we manage, execute, and communicate all of these projects will be important to sustaining our progress. Downtown Cincinnati has become an internationally recognized symbol of urban progress. In 2013, delegations from Indianapolis, Louisville, Jacksonville, Washington D.C., Fort Wayne, Russia, and Ontario have visited to observe first-hand downtown’s accomplishments. The Annual Report offers more details about our successes in 2013. In the next year, we look to the promise of the future as we develop a strategic plan for DCI, led by former Board Chair Jill Meyer and DCI Board member Greg Otis.

Downtown Cincinnati will soon be receiving even more exposure as we get ready to host the 2014 National Urban League conference this summer and the 2015 All-Star Game next summer.

2014 state of downtown report

northeast corner of downtown. In recent years, companies such as Nielsen, Omnicare, Kao USA, First Financial Bank, and dunnhumbyUSA have chosen downtown as their home, adding more workers to a growing weekday population in the Central Business District (CBD).

It is important to recognize and thank the many partners who have worked diligently over the long-term to develop the downtown we see today. We thank the City of Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Cincinnati Center City Development Corporation, Downtown Cincinnati Improvement District, Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber, Cincinnati Police, Cincinnati USA Convention & Visitors Bureau, Regional Tourism Network, and many others. We also recognize the hard work and skilled service of the DCI Board of Directors and the DCI Staff—especially the DCI Ambassadors who have helped make downtown a safe, clean and welcoming experience during one of the most challenging winters in years. Finally, we want to thank former Mayor Mark Mallory (honorary Chair of DCI) and City Manager Milton Dohoney, Jr. for their years of leadership and support. They truly made a difference and their partnership is deeply appreciated. At the same time, we congratulate new Mayor John Cranley and his acceptance of the role of honorary Chair of DCI. John is a passionate advocate for Cincinnati and was a key downtown partner during his years on City Council. We look forward to working with Mayor Cranley, the new City Council and the Administration to help them achieve their vision for downtown. We know 2014 is going to be a banner year!

Mark T. Reitzes

David N. Ginsburg

Board Chair President and Downtown Cincinnati Inc. Chief Executive Officer Downtown Cincinnati Inc. PG. 3

Casino alone invested $400 million, creating a popular destination and new gateway at the

dunnhumbyUSA construction at Fifth and Race Thadd Fiala

Downtown Cincinnati Incorporated has reached an important milestone, celebrating its 20th anniversary in 2014. This special edition of the Annual Report is combined with our Annual State of Downtown Report to provide you with an important overview of downtown, including a fold-out timeline highlighting 20 years of revitalization.

Square, The Banks and the renovation of Fountain Square. In the last year, Horseshoe


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development BY PROJECT STATUS

downtown developMEnt Downtown Cincinnati developers reported completed projects totaling over $491 million last year. Redevelopment in the CBD and Over-the-Rhine continues with more than $930 million in projects under construction and proposed as of year-end 2013.

$491M

$566M

$382M

Central Business District Over-The-Rhine

completed under Construction

44 3 36 9 32 4 6 27 1 31 11 26 22 42 20 30

$4.20 $29.00 $40.00 $32.20 $12.20 $133.00 $13.60 $129.00 $1.00 $34.00

2014 2015 2014 2014 2015 2016 2014 2015 2014 N/A

$17.50 $7.00 $47.60 $7.80 $21.00 $25.40 $3.10 $8.60

2015 2014 2014 2014 2015 2015 2014 2014

32 15th & Vine 1425 - 1437 Vine Street & 5 West 15th Street MIX N/A 33 15th & Race 15th and Race Streets MIX N/A 34 4th and Race Tower 411 Race Street MIX $97.00 35 Abington Flats 33 Green Street RES $4.00 36 Beasley Place 1405 Republic Street RES $2.80 37 City of Cincinnati Parking Garage Sycamore Street between Seventh and Eighth Streets MIX $11.50 38 Cutter Apartments Scattered Site, Broadway, 12th and 13th Streets RES $5.50 39 Fountain Place Apartments Fifth and Vine Streets RES N/A 40 Holiday Inn Hotel Broadway and Seventh Streets CEE $14.00 41 Lytle Tunnel Renovation Lytle Park & I-71 ACC $31.60 42 Music Hall Revitalization 1243 Elm Street CEE $95.00 43 Smale Riverfront Park (Phase 5) Riverfront CEE $15.00 44 Taft’s Ale House 1429 Race Street CEE $8.00 45 The Banks (Hotel) Riverfront CEE N/A 46 The Banks (Phase 2) Riverfront MIX $70.00 47 YMCA 1105 Elm Street MIX $27.50

N/A N/A N/A 2015 2014 N/A 2015 N/A N/A 2017 2016 2015 2014 N/A 2015 2015

38 18

47 5

40 37

24 10

15 21

16

39

7 25 34

19

23

17

41

8

46 45

43

29

28

2

13

Proposed Projects

14 1500 Elm Street 1500 Elm Street RES 15 617 Vine Street (Former Enquirer Building) 617 Vine Street CEE 16 AT580 580 Walnut Street MIX 17 Bartlett Building 36 East Fourth Street CEE 18 Broadway Square Phase I Broadway and Twelfth Streets RES 19 Cincinnati Streetcar CBD/OTR ACC 20 Cintrifuse 1311-1315 Vine Street MIX 21 dunnhumbyUSA Centre Fifth and Race Streets MIX 22 Emanuel Community Church 1308 Race Street OFF 23 John Weld Peck Federal Building 550 Main Street OFF 24 Lancaster Building, Oskamp Nolting Building (Mill End Drapery), Robertson Building 22-26 and 106 West Seventh Street RES 25 Mabley Place Fourth and Race Streets MIX 26 Mercer Commons Vine Street, between 13th and 14th Streets MIX 27 Park Haus Scattered RES 28 Seven at Broadway Seventh and Broadway Streets RES 29 Smale Riverfront Park (Phase 3-4) Riverfront CEE 30 Tea Company Townhomes 18-20 West 13th Street, 1307 Republic Street MIX 31 Westfalen II 1426-1438 Race Street MIX

12 33

Under Construction Projects

Project Name Address Type Investment Completion/ ($M) Anticipated Completion 1 Bakery Lofts 1421-1423 Race Street RES $2.45 2013 2 Boca/Sotto/Igby’s 114, 118 & 122 East Sixth Street CEE $17.80 2013 3 B-Side Apartments 1437 Republic & 13 West 15th Street RES $2.80 2013 4 Core Resources 1404 Vine Street MIX $1.70 2013 5 Horseshoe Casino 1000 Broadway CEE $400.00 2013 6 Hummel Building 1401 Elm Street MIX $1.70 2013 7 Hyatt Regency Hotel 151 West Fifth Street CEE $23.00 2013 8 Kao USA Office Expansion 312 Plum Street OFF $15.00 2013 9 Nicolay 14th & Republic Streets MIX $2.34 2013 10 Pure Romance 655 Plum Street OFF $1.20 2013 11 Republic Street Lofts 1406 & 1412 Republic Street RES $2.40 2013 12 Rothenberg Preparatory Academy 241 East Clifton Avenue CEE $16.90 2013 13 Smale Riverfront Park (Phase 2) Riverfront CEE $3.80 2013

35

14

Completed Projects

pre-developMEnt/proposed

Pendleton

ACC = Access & Parking

CEE = Cultural/Entertainment

MIX = Mixed Use

RES = Residentail (only)

OFF = Office

Note: Includes projects with an estimated investment amount of $1 million or more that are completed, under construction or proposed as of year-end 2013. Mixed Use (MIX) categorizes developments with multiple uses, for instance, a building with retail on the ground floor, and office or residential above.

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2014 state of downtown report

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Lease Transactions

OFFICE INVENTORY

Top lease transactions listed by Xceligent in 2013 included commitments from Pure Romance, APG Office Furnishings and Kolar Design, all new to downtown Cincinnati. Creative agency, Possible renewed its lease on West Third Street and several downtown companies, such as Raymond James & Associates, moved to new downtown locations.

Colliers International reports that the inventory of rentable office space in the Central Business District, including owner-occupied offices, totaled 20,109,960 sq. ft. by year-end 2013. A positive net absorption for Class A and B office properties was reported and average rental rates increased slightly from the previous year.

major lease transactions: cENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT

CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT INVENTORY

Company

Location

Sq. Ft.

Type

Pure Romance 655 Plum Street Possible 302 West Third Street Regus PNC Center Promotion Execution Partners 151 West Fourth Street (Fourth & Elm) Daymon Worldwide 125 East Court Street Ritter & Randolph One East Fourth Street DeCosimo PNC Center Raymond James & Associates PNC Center APG Office Furnishings, Inc. The Edge SparkPeople The Edge Kolar Design 332 East Eighth Street Vorys, Sater, Seymour and Pease LLP Great American Tower at Queen City Square

30,000 New 23,030 Renewal 14,465 New 12,500 Expansion 12,500 Relocation (L)* 11,323 Relocation (L) 9,909 Relocation (L) 9,896 Relocation (L) 8,000 New 7,500 New 7,224 Relocation 6,867 Expansion

TOTAL

153,214

Class A

Class B

Class c

$22.23 per sq. ft.

$15.61 per sq. ft.

$13.30 per sq. ft.

78%

8,824,601 total sq. ft. 7,777 sq. ft. Net Absorption

Total Occupied

2014 state of downtown report

8,472,035 total sq. ft. 145,027 sq. ft. Net Absorption

2,813,324 total sq. ft. (29,565) sq. ft. Net Absorption

Inventory of Vacancy Average Rentable Sq. Ft. Rate Rental Rate

Blue Ash CBD CBD - Periphery East I-71 Corridor North (of I-275) I-75 Corridor North (of I-275) Kenwood/Montgomery Midtown Northern KY Riverfront Northern KY Tri-County West

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91%

Total Vacant

87%

regional office INVENTORY

Source: Xceligent, Inc. Listed are the top twelve leases signed in the CBD in 2013, according to square feet. Start dates of occupancy vary. *(L) = Local (within downtown)

APG Office Furnishings

9%

13%

22%

Brandi Goins

2013 Net Absorption

5,403,807 12.51% $16.18 156,305 20,109,960 16.29% $19.51 123,239 4,364,016 22.20% $17.81 (34,035) 3,420,243 14.56% $14.03 16,751 5,124,897 16.52% $15.96 125,953 2,631,935 4.90% $13.95 108,837 2,361,522 8.62% $16.33 43,164 5,158,928 12.42% $17.92 116,574 2,565,596 28.80% $19.52 42,605 7,072,277 15.42% $16.14 42,159 7,193,021 21.21% $13.74 63,116 1,282,722 17.10% $17.84 83,590

Data provided by Colliers International, Q4 2013 The Knowledge Report

2014 state of downtown report

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Office rental rates

Office vacancy rates

The average rental rate in the Central Business District in 2013 was $22.23 for Class A properties, $15.16 for Class B properties, and $13.30 for Class C properties. The overall average rental rate in the CBD was $19.51, compared to an average of $17.17 across the region.

Vacancy rates for office space in the Central Business District averaged 17.4% in 2013, compared to 18.3% in Cincinnati suburban markets, 13% in CBDs across the U.S. and 14.8% in U.S. suburban markets.

OFFICE RENTAL RATES

OFFICE VACANCY RATES $25

CBD CLASS A CBD CLASS B

Cincinnati CBD

25%

$20

Cincinnati Suburban

20%

$15

US CBD

CBD CLASS C Average Regional Rental ALL Classes*

15% 10%

US Suburban

$10

2004 2004

2013 U.S. RENTAL RATES

Washington, DC $55.45 New York City (Downtown Manhattan) $51.62 Boston $49.57 Houston $38.16 Chicago $37.79 Los Angeles $36.84 Denver $32.12 Philadelphia $26.74 Portland $25.92 Raleigh/Durham $23.92 Nashville $22.99 Detroit $22.94 Dallas $22.60 Cincinnati $22.23 Atlanta $21.95 Cleveland $20.72 Columbus $19.66 Indianapolis $18.95 Kansas City $18.86 St. Louis $18.01 Memphis $17.56

Source: Colliers International Knowledge Report Q4 2013 Cincinnati Office and North America Highlights. *Avg. Regional Rental Rate estimated for years 2004-2006.

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2014 state of downtown report

2013

2013

2013 U.S. VACANCY

Dallas 26.4% Los Angeles 19.7% Memphis 18.8% Detroit 18.1% Cincinnati 17.4% St. Louis 17.4% Cleveland 17.2% Atlanta 16.5% Kansas City 14.4% New York City (Downtown Manhattan) 14.3% Nashville 13.7% Chicago 12.9% Houston 12.8% Denver 12.4% Boston 11.9% Philadelphia 11.5% Columbus 11.2% Washington, DC 10.4% Portland 9.6% Indianapolis 8.9% Raleigh/Durham 5.5%

Source: Colliers International Knowledge Report Q4 2013 Cincinnati Office and North America Highlights

2014 state of downtown report

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live

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The residential population in the Central Business District, Over-the-

Rhine and Pendleton neighborhoods is currently estimated at over 13,500, nearly double the estimate reported in the first State of Downtown Report published in 2004 by Downtown Cincinnati Inc. Developments such as the Gramercy on Garfield, The Lofts at Shillito Place, Sycamore Place at St. Xavier Park, The McAlpin on Fourth, The Banks, The Reserve at Fourth

EMPLOYMENT

and Race, and loft-style redevelopment in Over-the-Rhine have converted existing buildings,

The downtown Cincinnati work force has grown by 3,085 jobs in the last two years. This includes over 1,850 new full and part-time permanent positions created by the opening of two new entertainment destinations, Horseshoe Casino, and 21c Museum Hotel. Expanding downtown companies dunnhumbyUSA and E.W. Scripps Company added close to 700 employees to their staffs. And businesses relocating to downtown such as KAO USA, Pure Romance, and Jedson Engineering brought nearly 500 jobs, contributing to an estimated current total of 64,400 positions in downtown Cincinnati.

21c Museum Hotel Staff, in front of Do Ho Su installation

CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT Fortune 500 companies

as well as brought new construction to downtown. More than 380 additional units are in the pipeline as demand for rental and for-sale units has exceeded supply in recent years. Many of the factors contributing to the renewed interest in downtown living include the success of Findlay Market in providing groceries, the dedication of the Cincinnati Police Department, and the Downtown Ambassadors in enhancing the clean and safe environment, as well as the efforts of the Downtown Residents’ Council in promoting the interests of residents.

Tony Soluri

The Kroger Company (No. 23) Procter & Gamble (No. 28) Macy’s, Inc. (No. 109) Fifth Third Bancorp (No. 361) Omnicare (No. 416) Western & Southern Financial (No. 471)

Sources for employment estimates are the City of Cincinnati Department of Trade & Development and OntheMap, an application from the U.S. Census Bureau Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics (LEHD) program, in partnership with state labor market information agencies. OntheMap data was available for year 2011 at the time of publication of this report.

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2014 state of downtown report

The Reserve at 4th and Race

Courtesy of same

American Financial Group (No. 485)


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DOWNTOWN POPULATION

RESIDENTIAL units AND OCCUPANCY

Since Downtown Cincinnati Inc. began tracking the residential population in 2004, the estimated population has increased from 6,962 to over 13,500. As of 2013, 41% of all residents live in the CBD, 52% live in Over-the-Rhine, and 7% live in the Pendleton neighborhood.

There were an estimated 8,777 total residential units downtown, with 618 units under construction at year-end 2013. Occupancy and average rent for rental developments remained steady in 2013, according to a survey of major downtown rental developments by Apartment Realty Advisors.

ESTIMATED POPULATION* DOWNTOWN RESIDENTIAL UNITS

8% 6%

7,0 2 3

39% 67% 8,777

900

27%

618

53%

UNDER CONSTRUCTION

5, 59 8

Central Business District

Pendleton

The Banks Road Closed

completed UNITS

Over-The-Rhine

Joe Nuxhall Way

y Way

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Central Business District

Central Business District Rental properties

Over-The-Rhine Pendleton

Total Number of Properties Surveyed

16

Total Number of Units Surveyed

2,424

Average Number of units/property

Population History

152

Average rent/unit

$1,210.00

Average rent/sq. ft.

53%

41%

6,962 47%

$1.28

13,521 59%

Rental OCCUPANCY

96%

2004 Central Business District Periphery

2013

*2013 Downtown Population is based on the 2010 U.S. Census, with the addition of new units completed in years 2011-2013 x average residents per unit.

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2014 state of downtown report

Source: Apartment Realty Advisors semiannual survey of the multifamily investment market, reported October 2013. 11 of 16 surveyed properties shared occupancy information. Central Business District includes six properties in NKY and Mt. Adams. Weighted occupancy is 95.8%.

2014 state of downtown report

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RESIDENTIAL unit SALES

RESIDENTIAL unit PRICES

The Multiple Listing Service of Greater Cincinnati reports that residential unit sales remained steady in the CBD in 2013, while there was an increase in sales of condominiums in Over-theRhine and Pendleton over the previous year.

Sale prices increased over 2012, with an average price of $327,740 for condominium sales in the Central Business District. Home sales in Over-the-Rhine averaged $291,034.

CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT

120

CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT

$450,000 $400,000

100

$327,740

$350,000 80 60

44

$300,000 $250,000 $200,000

40

$150,000 $100,000

20

2004

Single Family Homes

2013

OVER-THE-RHINE

80

67

$50,000

Condominiums

0

Single Family Homes

0

OVER-THE-RHINE

$350,000

70

$300,000

$228,841

60 50 40 30

14

Single Family Homes

2004

2013

PENDLETON

12

$50,000

Condominiums Single Family Homes

2004

$0

2013

PENDLETON

$300,000

$250,000

8

6

Source: Cincinnati Multiple Listing Service (MLS)

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2014 state of downtown report

$150,000

$100,000

2

$50,000

Condominiums 2004

2013

$200,000

4

Condominiums Single Family Homes

$228,963

6

$239,707

10

8

$200,000

$100,000

20

0

$250,000

$150,000

10

Condominiums

$0

2013

2004

$291,034

0

Condominiums

0

Single Family Homes

$0 2004

2013

Source: Cincinnati Multiple Listing Service (MLS)

2014 state of downtown report

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SAFE AND CLEAN

PERCEPTIONS

There were 39% fewer crimes in the CBD in 2013 than in 1999, as reported by the Cincinnati Police Department. Positive results of the Litter Index performed by Keep Cincinnati Beautiful for the CBD, Over-the-Rhine, and Pendleton are consistent with previous years.

Key perceptions of downtown remain high. Of survey respondents, 82% have an overall positive impression of downtown and 84% say downtown Cincinnati is somewhere they like to take out-of-town guests, according to the 2013 survey conducted by LaVerdad Marketing.

CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT CRIME

perceptions of downtown

2,500

2,000

100%

80%

1,500

IMPROVING YEARLY

ENTERTAINMENT VARIETY

GUEST DESTINATION

0%

welcoming diversity

Part 1 Crime: More serious crimes, but includes crimes such as shoplifting, with no use of force or violence

AMBASSADOR VISIBILITY

20%

0

POLICE VISIBILITY

2013

SAFE

1999

500

HUGE POTENTIAL

40%

454

CLEAN

1,000

POSITIVE IMPRESSION

60%

1,153

Percentage of Survey Respondents

Part 2 Crime: Quality of life crimes, which include aggressive panhandling and vandalism

DOWNTOWN Litter Index CBD

OTR

PENDLETON

1.0 1.1 1.1 1.0 NOT LITTERED

4.0 EXTREMELY LITTERED

Fountain Square

Note: Litter Index developed and conducted by Keep Cincinnati Beautiful, Inc., an affiliate of Keep America Beautiful, Inc. Indices performed monthly; data reflects yearly averages.

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2014 state of downtown report

Courtesy of the Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber

Taste of Cincinnati

Courtesy of the Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber

Source: 2013 Perceptions Survey conducted by LaVerdad Marketing & Media for Downtown Cincinnati Inc. For more detailed findings, visit downtowncincinnati.com

2014 state of downtown report

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play

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Downtown Cincinnati has become increasingly popular as a destination

for visitors since 1994. The Aronoff Center for the Arts, the Duke Energy Convention Center, the Contemporary Arts Center, new stadiums for the Reds and the Bengals, the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center, The Banks, 21c Museum Hotel, and a redeveloped Fountain

RESIDENTIAL AMENITIES

Square, have expanded offerings for locals and out-of-town guests in the last twenty years. In 2013, Horseshoe Casino and the new Washington Park, hosting Lumenocity among many

The Downtown Residents’ Council meets monthly, connecting residents to resources and leading volunteer efforts in downtown beautification projects such as the holiday decoration of Piatt Park. Fido Field, the Strauss Troy Market on the Square, and Smale Riverfront Park have added to the amenities for residents who have helped to make downtown a 24/7 neighborhood in recent years.

Piatt Park holidays

Brian Spitzig

Smale Riverfront Park

5chw4r7z, Courtesy of 5chw4r7z.blogspot.com

Collective Espresso

Travis Estell

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2014 state of downtown report

in 2013 such as Boca, Sotto, Obscura, and Booksellers on Fountain Square added to a unique retail mix. Having welcomed guests from around the world for the 2012 World Choir Games, downtown fans look forward to 2015 when the All-Star Game promises to shine a national spotlight on a transformed downtown.

Hyatt Regency Cincinnati Thadd Fiala

Thadd Fiala

Strauss Troy Market on the Square

diverse events, attracted new audiences to downtown. Newly opened retailers and restaurants


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NEW RETAIL

2013 NEW DOWNTOWN ESTABLISHMENTS

Over 40 new retail, restaurant, and service establishments opened downtown in 2013, including a poster gallery, a bookstore, a fitness club and medical care facility, a men’s fashion store, a brewery, a French café, an upscale cocktail lounge, and an all-you-can-eat buffet large enough to seat 400 hungry guests.

dining

22 18

25 39 28 35 9 10 29 40 6

38

23

17

36

30 27

4

11 2

5

24 13

8

19 15 20 3 1 43 7 26 32 21 41

37

31 42

16

shopping

14 12 34

33

services

1

601 Nightclub

1000 Broadway Street

3 Boca

114 E. Sixth Street

4 Burrito El Charco

52 E. Court Street

5

Cafe Italia

1000 Broadway Street

6

Cafe Lang Thang

1106 Race Street

7 El Coyote

41 E. Sixth Street

8 French Crust

915 Vine Street

9 Graeter’s

1401 Vine Street

10 Holtman’s Donuts

1332 Vine Street

11

Jack Binion’s Steak

1000 Broadway Street

12

Jefferson Social

101 E. Freedom Way

13

Jimmy Buffett’s Margaritaville Restaurant

1000 Broadway Street

14

Jimmy John’s

171 E. Freedom Way

15 Lala’s Blissful Bites

619 Main Street

16 Lori Beth’s

720 E. Pete Rose Way

17 Lucy Blue Pizza

1126 Main Street

18

1801 Race Street

Mimi’s Egg Rolls

19 Obscura

645 Walnut Street

20 Prime 47

580 Walnut Street

21

Red Roost Tavern

151 W. Fifth Street

22

Rhinegeist

1910 Elm Street

23

Rhinehaus

119 E. Twelfth Street

24

Rock Bar and Lounge

1000 Broadway Street

25

Salazar

1401 Republic Street

26

Sotto

118 E. Sixth Street

27

Starbucks Coffee

1000 Broadway Street

28

Sweet Petit Desserts

1426 Race Street

29 The Eagle OTR

1342 Vine Street

30 The Spread Buffet

1000 Broadway Street

31 Top of The Park

506 E. Fourth Street

32 Vyrsd Social Room

435 Elm Street

33 WG Kitchen & Bar

161 E. Freedom Way

34 Yard House

55 E. Freedom Way

35

1400 Race Street

Zula

36 Article

1150 Vine Street

37 Booksellers on Fountain Square

505 Vine Street

38

Cheers to Art

1109 Vine Street

39

Jack Wood Gallery

1413 Vine Street

40

Rookwood Pottery Company Store

1209 Vine Street

41 The Market

151 W. Fifth Street

42

221 E. Fourth Street

Downtown Mercy HealthPlex

43 Frenchman’s Shoe Repair

PG. 21

2014 state of downtown report

601 Main Street

2 Bobby’s Burger Palace

602 Main Street

2014 state of downtown report

PG. 22


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DINING

RETAIL COMPOSITION AND OCCUPANCY There were over 570 retail establishments in all of downtown Cincinnati in 2013, a 38% increase over establishments tracked by Downtown Cincinnati Inc. in 2004. According to CBRE, retail occupancy in the Central Business District was 97%, with sales per square foot averaging $93 and average rent per square foot at $17.59.

Bars/Nightclubs

Private Dining Facilities

Coffee/Bakeries/Ice Cream

Full Fare Restaurants

277 Lunch Restaurants Fast Casual Dining

3,031,712

96.9%

3,500,000

3,000,000

3,000,000

Square Feet

dOWNTOWN RETAIL OCCUPANCY

2013 SHOPPING Antiques/Auction Houses

Pharmacies/Newsstands

2,500,000

Apparel/Shoes/Accessories

Grocery/Convenience Markets

2,000,000

Beer/Wine/Liquor

1,500,000

186 1,000,000

Jewlery/Furs

Base Square Feet 2004

Occupied Square Feet

2013

Galleries

Home Furnishings/Art

500,000

Department Stores/Malls

Gifts/Books/Novelty

0

2013 CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT RETAIL SERVICES Pets

33%

28% 44%

417 48%

574

Services

Bike Repair

Funeral

111

Beauty Fitness/Health

City Tours

19% Shopping

Libraries

Florists/Wedding

28% 2004

Pets

Eyewear

Car/Bike Rentals Auto/Bike/Home Repair

2013

2013

Dining

Source: CBRE, Data provided for zip code 45202 for retail occupancy

PG. 23

2014 state of downtown report

2014 state of downtown report

PG.24


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Room Economic Impact NIGHTS (in millions)*

Educational Testing Service

21,562

$6.43

Fraternal Order of Police Grand Lodge

15,429

$4.60

American Counseling Association

5,985

$1.78

Society of Plastics Engineers

2,973

$0.89

Cincinnati Insurance Companies

2,935

$0.87

The Procter & Gamble Company

2,763

$0.82

Group

Room Event NIGHTS Date

150

Educational Testing Service

23,174

2017

100

Educational Testing Service

23,174

2018

50

Church of God in Christ

10,101

2016

0

National Square Dance Convention

5,974

2017

Full Gospel Baptist Church Fellowship International, Inc.

5,060

2017

The Church of the Brethren

4,406

2018

Rejuvenate

4,057

2017

The Cincinnati USA Conventions & Visitors Bureau hosted 204 meetings and conventions which resulted in 219,855 hotel room nights booked in 2013, with an economic impact of $66 million. The number of downtown Cincinnati meetings and conventions per year has increased by 28%, while hotel room nights booked has increased by 75%, since 2004.

ROOM NIGHTS AND MEETINGS BOOKED

450,000 400,000 350,000

204

250

219,855

300,000 250,000 200,000 150,000

200

100,000 Meeting Booked Room Nights

Convention Highlights in 2013 (by Total Hotel Room Nights)

Group

CONVENTIONS

50,000 0 2004

2013

economic impact

$66M

$80M $70M

FUTURE COnventions booked in 2013

$60M $50M $40M $30M $20M  conomic Impact of CVB E room nights booked

$0M 2004

2013

Source: Economic Impact (or Estimated Direct Attendee Spending) is calculated by the Conventions & Visitors Bureau as the product of room nights booked and the estimated spending rate per person provided by DMAI (Destination Marketing Association International).

Duke Energy Convention Center

PG. 25

2014 state of downtown report

Courtesy of the Cincinnati USA Convention & Visitors Bureau

2014 state of downtown report

PG. 26


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Hotels

Hotel Occupancy and Rates

Downtown Cincinnati offers nine full-service hotels ranging in size from the unique six-room Symphony Hotel near Music Hall to the Millenium Hotel Cincinnati, which features 872 rooms and is connected to the Duke Energy Convention Center. The 21c Museum Hotel is the newest addition to downtown, following the 2011 opening of the Residence Inn Cincinnati Downtown at the renovated Phelps Building. In 2013, the Hyatt Regency Cincinnati completed a $23 million interior renovation, adding new rooms, the Red Roost Tavern, and The Market. Currently under construction are the Renaissance Hotel, Hampton Inn, and Homewood Suites, which will provide an additional 575 rooms, all scheduled to open by 2015.

Downtown hotel occupancy fell just below the national average in 2013, while rates and revenue per available room continued to lead the regional market, averaging $79.30 in downtown Cincinnati. The average rate for a downtown Cincinnati hotel room in 2013 was $131.64, compared to $95.15 in Greater Cincinnati, $90.54 in Cincinnati USA, and $110.33 in hotels across the U.S. Hotel occupancy

100%

Downtown 90%

Gr. Cincinnati

DOWNTOWN HOTEL ROOMS 156

70%

60%

456

Westin Hotel Cincinnati

872

The Residence Inn Cincinnati Downtown The Symphony Hotel

National

21c Museum Hotel

80%

60% 57% 58% 62%

Cincinnati USA (OH-KY-IN)

50%

Millenium Hotel Cincinnati

2004

2013

132

2,972

6

Hotel room rates

146

The Cincinnatian Hotel

$132 $95 $91 $110

Downtown

Hyatt Regency Cincinnati

561

491

Garfield Suites Hotel

Gr. Cincinnati

Hilton Cincinnati Netherland Plaza

$160

$140

$120

Cincinnati USA (OH-KY-IN)

$100

National

152

$80 2004

2013

hotel Occupancy — year end 2013 Hotel REVPAR*

$79 $54 $52 $69

Downtown Gr. Cincinnati

60%

Downtown

57%

Gr. Cincinnati

58%

Cincinnati USA (OH-KY-IN)

62%

National

$100

$80

Cincinnati USA (OH-KY-IN)

$60

National

$40

2004

2013

Source: Local hotel occupancy and rate data provided by Cincinnati USA Convention & Visitors Bureau through year 2013. National rates provided by PricewaterhouseCoopers Hospitality Directions Report, Jan 2014, *RevPAR, or revenue per available room, is a performance metric in the hotel industry, which is calculated by multiplying a hotel’s average daily room rate (ADR) by its occupancy percentage.

PG. 27 2014 state of downtown report

2014 state of downtown report

PG. 28


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MIDSIZE

ENTERTAINMENT

Children’s Theatre of Cincinnati

20,000 to 99,999

Bunbury Music Festival

Downtown arts, culture, sports, and recreation venues reported an overall annual attendance of more than 16.5 million visitors. Cincinnati favorites like the Cincinnati Opera, the Taste of Cincinnati, and Oktoberfest drew larger crowds than the previous year, while Bunbury Music Festival, Bockfest, and Go OTR 5K Summer Celebration grew in popularity. MOST VISITED 1 million to 5 million

Ensemble Theatre Cincinnati

2,492,059

1,266,580 Main Library/Public Library of Cincinnati & Hamilton County

HIGHLY ATTENDED 100,000 to 999,999

50,999

U.S. Bank Ice Rink

Cincinnati Reds

Cincinnati Opera

27,194

MidPoint Music Festival

27,000

1,086,580

Findlay Market

56,148

Taft Museum of Art

4,200,000

Horseshoe Casino

60,000

Cincinnati Ballet

Contemporary Arts Center

81,002

50,000 48,568

33,384

25,000 Bluesfest

25,000 Macy’s Light Up the Square

22,447 Cincinnati Shakespeare Company

908,534

20,000 Bockfest

Cincinnati Museum Center

800,000

Riverfront Daily Park Users

750,000

Washington Park

713,138

Cincinnati Bengals

600,000

Oktoberfest Zinzinnati

550,000

Taste of Cincinnati

511,220

US Bank Arena

500,000

Riverfront Events/Cincinnati Park Board

250,000

Riverfest

225,648

Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra/Cincinnati POPS

200,000

PNC Summer Music Series

169,660 167,000 135,643

Taft Theatre

125,567 National Underground Railroad Freedom Center

PG. 29 2014 state of downtown report

15,000

Cincinnati Brew Ha-Ha

12,000

Black Family Reunion

11,500

Cincy Cinco

10,000

Second Sundays on Main

10,000

Cincinnati May Festival

9,934

8,449

Cincinnati Arts Association

Huntington Bank New Year’s Blast

Cincinnati Fringe Festival

Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park

15,122 15,000

185,601 175,683

15,371

Macy’s Downtown Dazzle

8,517

Fifth Third Bank Broadway Across America – Cincinnati

Showboat Majestic

Fire Museum of Greater Cincinnati

Cincinnati Art Museum

1,000 to 19,999

School for Creative & Performing Arts

187,666

Krohn Conservatory

Local Favorites

Know Theatre of Cincinnati Go OTR 5K Summer Celebration

7,785 5,000

4,100 Macy’s Art Sampler (hosted by Artswave)

Mercantile Library

3,431

1,530 Lloyd Library 1,430 The Betts House

2014 state of downtown report

PG. 30


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access and transit

Means of access and transit to, from, and around downtown Cincinnati have expanded in recent years. Bus service has improved with the renovation of Government Square in 2006 and new and improved routes and ticketing options from Metro. Megabus now provides express,

WALKS AND RUNS

direct bus service to multiple cities from downtown Cincinnati. The 2001 opening of the Purple

Fundraising walks and runs boosted visitation to downtown Cincinnati on the weekends. Among others, Cincinnati’s renowned Flying Pig Marathon registered more than 35,000 participants for its 15th annual event May 2-4, 2013. The Flying Pig alone raised more than one million dollars for over 200 charities last year.

The redesign of Fort Washington Way, completed in 2000, along with the proposed expansion

Michael E. Anderson, Courtesy of Game Day Communications

TQL Urban Race

5chw4r7z, Courtesy of 5chw4r7z.blogspot.com

Little Kings Mile

Michael E. Anderson, Courtesy of Game Day Communications

PG. 31 2014 state of downtown report

Heart Mini Marathon

The Cincinnati Streetcar, with an expected 2016 opening, is designed to provide easy access to all points along its route, connecting the Central Business District to Over-the-Rhine.

David Long, Courtesy of the American Heart Association

OTR 5K

PurpleStride

of I-75 and rebuilding of the Brent Spence Bridge promise better connectivity by automobile.

Photography for the People

Larry Glaser, Courtesy of the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network

Cincinnati Streetcar Construction Travis Estell

Cincinnati; Flying Pig Marathon

People Bridge and walking routes from Go Vibrant have added to the walkability of downtown.


access

access

MONTHLY Parking

ALTERNATIVE TRANSPORTATION

Downtown Cincinnati Inc. tracked nearly 36,400 total monthly parking spaces in 2013 in the Central Business District, Over-the-Rhine, and Pendleton. Of these, approximately 12% were available at an average of $89 per month.

In 2013, Metro introduced its go*Forward transit plan and Metro*Plus route with faster service and limited stops between Kenwood and downtown. Following a pause in construction as funding was studied, development of the Cincinnati Streetcar resumed with ridership scheduled to start 2016. Plans were set in motion for a new bike share program with 21 stations and 200 bikes in the CBD and Over-the-Rhine, scheduled to begin summer 2014.

40,000

$160

36,398

DOWNTOWN MONTHLY PARKING

35,000 30,000 25,000

Available Monthly Spaces Average Available Monthly Price

$120 $100

$89

20,000

Reserved Monthly Spaces

$140

$80

15,000

$60

10,000

$40

5,000

$20

0

2004

2013

$0

Note: Reflects price per available space at year end for monthly parking in garages and lots surveyed in the Central Business District, Over-the-Rhine and Pendleton.

Metro*Plus

Walkers at Fifth and Vine

Mercer Commons Garage

PG. 33

2014 state of downtown report

Courtesy of Cincinnati Metro

Courtesy of Downtown Cincinnati Inc.

Cincinnati Streetcar

Urban Basin Bicycle Club

Courtesy of Travis Estell

5chw4r7z, Courtesy of 5chw4r7z.blogspot.com

Courtesy of Downtown Cincinnati Inc.

2014 state of downtown report

PG. 34


The Mission of Downtown Cincinnati Inc. is to build a dynamic metropolitan center valued as the heart of the region.

35 East Seventh Street, Suite 202 Cincinnati, OH 45202 www.downtowncincinnati.com

513.421.4440

2014 sod