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[Ebook pdf] The Merchant of Venice

The Merchant of Venice Gareth Hinds audiobook | *ebooks | Download PDF | ePub | DOC

#671459 in Books Gareth Hinds 2008-05-22 2008-05-22Original language:EnglishPDF # 1 10.45 x .30 x 6.72l, .73 #File Name: 076363025X80 pagesThe Merchant of Venice | File size: 41.Mb Gareth Hinds : The Merchant of Venice before purchasing it in order to gage whether or not it would be worth my time, and all praised The Merchant of Venice: 1 of 5 people found the following review helpful. A high dollar comic book.By Mr. RayI thought it was a simplified version; not Shakesspears old English. Its pictures with subtitles. A high dollar comic book.0 of 0 people found the following review helpful. Such beautyBy M. HeissI'm an illustration fanatic. We are living in a golden age of book publishing. This book deserves a sixth star, for the historical yet modern illustrations Gareth Hinds delivers. In the


scenery and costuming for this book, he goes one better than in his extraordinary "Romeo and Juliet." Romeo and JulietThis book is an adaptation of the Shakespeare. Not every scene is included, nor every character, yet the book reads just right. So much of the original Shakespeare is here - the beautiful memorized passages. "Signor Antonio, many a time and oft..." "Hath not a Jew...?" "The quality of mercy is not strained..."After studying the original play, and performing it or seeing it done, why not give this gift to your favorite theater-goer? It makes a wonderful keepsake and a beautiful gift.Extraordinary work. More books like this, please.1 of 1 people found the following review helpful. Not your father's "Classics Illustrated"By Michael K. Smith"Based on the play by William Shakespeare," it says, so I guess I was expecting a "Classics Illustrated" vanila version of the story, but I was wrong. Hinds sticks closely to the original plot, even occasionally using some of the Bard's own words, but his Venetians are all in modern dress and speak colloquial 21st-century English. He also leaves out a few scenes here and there, to tighten things up, and the comic relief characters of Launcelot Gobbo and his aged father are completely missing. (That's okay, they don't really add much to the story.) All in all, if you haven't read _Merchant_ in the decades since you left school, this adaptation will bring it all back to you, and in both an entertaining and an educational way. With elegant, contemporary artwork and a faithful but succinct adaptation, this graphic novel casts a classic drama in a provocative new light.Here is the tale of young Bassanio, who, to win the love of fair Portia, entangles his dearest friend, Antonio, in a dangerous bargain with the moneylender Shylock. Only Bassanios heartfelt efforts and a clever intervention by Portia will save Antonio from paying Shylock "a pound of flesh." Moody and mesmerizing, this graphic novel adaptation of one of Shakespeares more controversial plays boasts a chic modern cast, high drama, and all the dark, familiar beauty of Venice. From Publishers WeeklyFans of the play will find this an intriguing adaptation. Hinds sets his version in modern dress and dramatically edits the text to the basics while keeping the Shakespearean flavor of the dialogue (increasingly as the book goes on). The coloring in shades of slate blue and pale gray gives it an antique patina that's counterbalanced by the way Hinds leaves construction lines visible. That makes it feel like reading someone's unpolished sketchbook, as though the characters were observed, not created. It's always a benefit to see Shakespeare acted out, to make the universal situations clear to the modern viewer, and that benefit extends to the graphic medium, especially when the characters have a sense of motion, as here. Some aspects of the original are still discomforting; Hinds is faithful to the play in its treatment of the bloodthirsty, money-hungry Shylock, and some readers may be put off by the inclusion of lines such as "you may be pleased to collect whatever usurious interest pleases your Jew heart." An author's note encourages further research on that matter and clarifies some of Hinds's creative decisions. (May) Copyright Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.From School Library JournalGrade 7 UpShakespeare's original play has been modernized and recast in a graphic format with characters drawn from posed models, creating a realistic feel. The cover depiction of a casket, embossed with images of the courtroom scene, sets the stage for the multiple layers of meaning embedded within this drama, and beautiful endpapers with the fish map of Venice foreshadow the opening scene. The careful use of color to signal scene changes and page headings helps readers follow the action and refer to the original play. As the author's note explains, the decision to modernize the story creates visual and textual anachronisms. The men are attired in dress shirts and business suits. Portia wears an evening gown, even while traveling. Shylock sports a neatly trimmed beard and a slightly off-center bow tie, making it hard to envision him brandishing a knife in the courtroom. Even more jarring is the shift between modernized speech and the original Shakespearean language. For example, in Act I, Nerissa tells Portia, Your father was a pretty sharp guy. In contrast, Nerissa announces in Act II, My lord and lady, we that have stood by and seen our wishes prosper wish you joy. Despite the inconsistency, readers looking for an accessible introduction to the plot, major characters, and themes of The Merchant of Venice will enjoy this visually appealing book.Barbara M. Moon, Suffolk Cooperative Library System, Bellport, NY Copyright Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.From BooklistCandlewicks graphic-format Shakespeare adaptations, with glossy paper and lavish art, seem diametrically opposed to the fast, energetic retellings of Abrams Manga Shakespeare line. In this follow-up to King Lear (2007), Hinds(Beowulf, also 2007) cleaves to the darker elements of Shakespeares comedy, usingrealistic, rougharound-the-edges figures (Shylock looks like Al Pacino) and ink-and-chalk shades of grey. Certainly young, contemporaryreaders wont findmany laughs in a story centeringon a Jewish moneylenders attempt at merciless revenge against a youngman in his debt, nor in themoneylenders shockingly anti-Semitic (by todays standards) comeuppance. The romantic elementin theoriginal has survivedabridgement, but by excising large portions of the play (including characters devoted to comic relief) and settingthe talein modern times, Hinds has, instead, invited readers to engage with the most controversial notions of the play. Anoccasional incongruous passage of contemporary language aside, this is a powerful visual showcase for Shakespeares workthough by no means a definitive one. Grades 8-12. -Jesse Karp

THE-MERCHANT-OF-VENICE  

THE MERCHANT OF VENICE SUMMARY , THE MERCHANT OF VENICE MOVIE , THE MERCHANT OF VENICE PDF , THE MERCHANT OF VENICE SPARKNOTES , THE MERCHAN...

THE-MERCHANT-OF-VENICE  

THE MERCHANT OF VENICE SUMMARY , THE MERCHANT OF VENICE MOVIE , THE MERCHANT OF VENICE PDF , THE MERCHANT OF VENICE SPARKNOTES , THE MERCHAN...

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