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5.2 Minimising Material Consumption

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Finally, if a product aggregates the functions of more than one product, it should be compared with the total amount of materials required otherwise. This is why products used more intensively or more extensively have low material intensity. But this will be discussed elsewhere5. Guidelines for material content minimisation: • • • • • • •

Dematerialise the product or some of its components (Examples 5.1) Digitalise the product or some of its components (Examples 5.2) Miniaturise Avoid over-sized dimensions (Example 5.3) Reduce thickness (Example 5.4) Apply ribbed structures to increase structural stiffness Avoid extra components with little functionality

Examples 5.1.1 “Ikea air” is a set of onsite-assembled sofas and armchairs, designed by Jan Dranger, models of seats furnished with inflatable air cells made of plastic (PE) and an external cover. Cells can be inflated with a normal hair dryer, and need not to be re-inflated for 3 years. The inflatable furniture minimises the use of resources dematerialising the product: the quantity of material used is, on average, 15% of that required for a conventional armchair/sofa.

Example 5.1.1 “Ikea air” series

5

Cf. Chap. 7.

Design for Environmental Sustainability  

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Design for Environmental Sustainability  

Download: versi pdf [http://www.ziddu.com/download/12569881/DesignforEnvironmentalSustainability.pdf.html] versi zip [http://www.ziddu.com/...

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