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An ITP Business Publication

NEWS, DATA, ANALYSIS AND STRATEGIC INSIGHTS FOR ARCHITECTS IN THE GCC

MARCH 2009 |VOLUME 3 | ISSUE 3

MARCH 2009 | VOLUME 3 | ISSUE 3 NEWS, DATA, ANALYSIS AND STRATEGIC INSIGHTS FOR ARCHITECTS IN THE GCC

GOLDEN OPPORTUNITY

UNITING CULTURES SHOULD PROVE LUCRATIVE FOR FUJAIRAH’S GOLDEN BEACH

An ITP Business Publication

LIVING IN GLASS HOUSES

The who, what, why & how much of architectural glass

TOP OF THE CLASS

A look at some of the world’s best architecture universities


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Draw Link Architecture, the fulcrum organization of the Draw Link Group of companies is ably supported by divisions such as Draw Link Interior for interior design, Draw Link Technical Works for project management, 90One Projects for IT and media based marketing tools, and a dedicated furniture line. Our approach to architecture differentiates us from the competition. Extensive research on topography, climate, expected return on investment, marketability and innovation sets the tone for our concepts. We offer end to end solutions for residential, commercial and hospitality projects in the region. Draw Link Architecture offers a balanced approach to incorporate design-innovation to complement your project's objectives. We adopt green designs, an eco-friendly resource-efďŹ cient process to harmonize architecture with nature. At Draw Link Architecture, each project is a challenge that draws a unique yet compelling treatment.

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CONTENTS MARCH

MARCH 2009 ISSUE 3 VOLUME 3

14 12

18

07 REGIONAL & INTERNATIONAL NEWS

X-architects sets benchmarks, KEO simplifies sustainability and Cairo is being transformed. All that plus the latest news from around the globe

12 POST SHOW REPORT: MADEexpo ‘09 Twice as big as the UAE’s Cityscapes, Milan’s MADEexpo is the new ‘must-attend’ in Europe

18 FEATURED FIRM: ATKINS

From its engineering work on Dubai Creek to Burj Al Arab to BWTC, Atkins is a Middle East mainstay

21

21TOP OF THE CLASS

A brief look at 10 of the world’s top postgraduate architecture universities

33

27 Q&A: FRANZ KOOK, DURAVIT, CEO

Lauren Hills speaks to Franz Kook about working with some of the worlds top bathroom desginers

30 STUDENT UNION

Princeton graduate students work with dxb.lab and Jesse Reiser through pr0gress design studio

33ARCHITECTURE UNDER REVIEW

ARCHITECT mainstay M Alaa Mandour analyses the parallelism of Frank Lloyd Wright’s architecture

48

38COVER STORY: GOLDEN BEACH

Burt Hill architects John Kim and Mohammed Zannouneh present their new Fujairah project

48ARCHITECTURAL GLASS

Architects and LEED APs talk to Jeff Roberts about the who, what, when & why of glass for buildings

56BATTLE OF THE...

Guggenheim Museums: Frank Lloyd Wright (New York City) vs. Frank Gehry (Bilbao, Spain)

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EDITOR’S LETTER

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Registered at Dubai Media City PO Box 500024, Dubai, UAE Tel: 00 971 4 210 8000 Fax: 00 971 4 210 8080 Web: www.itp.com Offices in Dubai & London ITP Business Publishing CEO Walid Akawi Managing Director Neil Davies Deputy Managing Director Matthew Southwell Editorial Director David Ingham Publishing Director Jason Bowman EDITORIAL Senior Group Editor Stuart Matthews Group Editor Jeff Roberts Tel: +971 4 435 6269 email: jeff.roberts@itp.com Assistant Editors Lauren Hills, Selin Arkut Emails lauren.hills@itp.com; selin.arkut@itp.com. ADVERTISING Commercial Director Michael Stansfield Tel: +971 4 435 6350 email: michael.stansfield@itp.com Group Advertising Manager Keiron Gallagher Tel: +971 4 435 6349 email: keiron.gallagher@itp.com STUDIO Group Art Editor Daniel Prescott Designer Lucy McMurray, Gurpreet Jhita PHOTOGRAPHY Director of Photography Sevag Davidian Chief Photographer Nemanja Seslija Senior Photographers Valeriano Handumon,Alan Desiderio, Efraim Evidor,Khatuna Khutsishvili Staff Photographers Khaled Termanini,Thanos Lazopoulos, John Pocock, George Dipin, Samin Abarqoi, Leila Cranswick, Rajesh Raghav, Ruel Pableo, Louis Savage PRODUCTION & DISTRIBUTION Group Production Manager Kyle Smith Production Manager Eleanor Zwanepoel Production Coordinator Louise Schreiber General Manager - Regional Distribution Shaded Ali Shaded Distribution Manager KarimaAshwell Distribution Executive NadaAlAlami CIRCULATION Head of Database & Circulation Gaurav Gulati MARKETING Head of Marketing Daniel Fewtrell Marketing Executive Masood Ahmad ITP DIGITAL Director Peter Conmy Internet Applications Manager Mohammed Affan Internet Design Manager Hitesh Uchil Web Designer Meghna Rao ITP GROUP Chairman Andrew Neil Managing Director Robert Serafin Finance Director Toby Jay Spencer-Davies Board of Directors K M Jamieson, Mike Bayman, Walid Akawi, Neil Davies, Rob Corder, Mary Serafin Circulation Customer Service Tel:+971 4 286 8559 Certain images in this issue are available for purchase. Please contact itpimages@itp.com for further details or visit www.itpimages.com

Printed by Emirates Printing Press L.L.C Dubai Subscribe online at www.itp.com/subscriptions The publishers regret that they cannot accept liability for error or omissions contained in this publication, however caused. The opinions and views contained in this publication are not necessarily those of the publishers. Readers are advised to seek specialist advice before acting on information contained in this publication which is provided for general use and may not be appropriate for the reader’s particular circumstances.The ownership of trademarks is acknowledged. No part of this publication or any part of the contents thereof may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form without the permission of the publishers in writing. An exemption is hereby granted for extracts used for the purpose of fair review. BPA Worldwide Business Publication Audit Membership Applied for August 2008.

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LEARNING FROM NATURE In early February, while attending Milan’s MADEexpo 2009, I found myself sitting in the audience during a presentation on applying the concepts of biomimicry to the built environment (check out p. 12-13 for the full post-show report). Dr Denise DeLuca, LEED AP and representative of The Biomimicry Institute (TBI), was speaking passionately about using nature to address the challenges of our personal and professional lives. At first, I’ll admit, I was skeptical. Reading the title of her presentation, Biomimicry: innovation inspired by nature, I expected to be confronted by a daisy-chain donning hippie encouraging me to use vegetable oil in my Jeep’s straight-6. But, from the moment she read that first quote from Janine Benyus, TBI founder and president, I was fascinated. It went like this: “The more our world functions like the natural world, the more likely we are to endure on this home that is ours, but not ours alone.” Let me pause. For those unfamiliar with the concept, biomimicry is: “The practice of developing sustainable technologies inspired by ideas from nature.” I understand how it sounds and I can imagine the images it evokes in the heads of my readers—a bunch of really intelligent, really eccentric scientists gathered round a table trying to devise better, more intimate ways of hugging trees or speaking to flowers. If that’s how you’re thinking, hold on. Let me at least offer some concrete examples of just how important this science is to the built environment. The Eastgate Building in Harare, Zimbabwe, features an HVAC system modeled on the self-cooling mounds of Macrotermes michaelseni, termites that maintain the temperature inside their nest to within one degree while ambient temperatures fluctuate between 3ºC and 42ºC. Another example is how engineers and scientists have studied humpback whales to learn to create efficient wind power. Using science much too complex to describe here, scientists have studied the tubercules on the humpback’s fins to achieve an 8% increase in lift, a 32% reduction in drag and a 40% increase in angle of attack—all of which is being used by a company called WhalePower to design more efficient wind turbines. TBI analyses trees and bones to optimise safety and gas mileage in automobiles; it uses the Golden Ratio to create ultra-efficient fans and water mixers; it studies how chimpanzees cope with illness to devise new medications; it studies prairies to learn to grow food sustainably and the forest canopy to develop green roofing systems. All of these are examples of how biomimicry has helped advance human civilisation. Biomimicry is, at the same time, incredibly simple and incredibly complex. It’s about slowing down, getting over ourselves and our status as ‘dominant species’ and looking to nature for answers. Longtime biomimicry advocate William McDonough designed a building that mimics every function of a tree except reproduction. If more of us paid attention to the basic precepts of biomimicry in our projects, we’d move well past green buildings and into the realm of living, breathing ones. I can’t wait to experience it when we it happens.

Jeff Roberts, Group Editor jeff.roberts@itp.com

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REGIONAL NEWS

LOCAL ARCHITECTS GET SHOT TO SET GLOBAL BENCHMARK AL AIN, UAE // Al Naseem, a

desert masterplan in Al Ain (Dubai), designed by X-architects, was chosen to be a pilot project for Abu Dhabi’s Estidama sustainability assessment tool. Considered a very stringent set of guidelines for achieving environmental, social, cultural and economic sustainability, Estidama was designed by Abu Dhabi’s Urban Planning Council to address the specific challenges facing the region’s built environment. “The basic environmental elements – sun, wind, sand – are very specific for this part of the world,” explained X-architects’ founding partner, Farid Esmaeli. “For example, how can you use wind to reduce the use of energy? How can you use the sun to do the same? These are the things we’re focusing on.” Al Naseem is a mixed-used development that incorporates all of the necessary amenities to allow residents to live, work, stay, play and pray. The masterplan addresses the needs of its

IN NUMBERS

25

The percent of Deyaar’s projects scheduled to continue as planned in 2009. Ironically, this is also the percent of Deyaar projects scheduled to be postponed indefinitely during the same period.

US residents while maintaining a community-based identity and low-density architecture. “In Al Ain, you cannot build higher than approximately 20m, which is only G+3 or G+4,” explained Esmaeil. “[Al Naseem] is a compact city and hence it is more sustainable.” Due to north/south-facing facades, the windows of the buildings will be exposed to less direct sunlight. Likewise, the east/west-facing facades will take advantage of vast expanses to control thermal bridging, increase energy-efficiency and control light. Orientation is just one of many considerations considered by X-architects to maximise the level of sustainability of Al Naseem. “[Al Naseem] is sustainable from the perspectives of

technology, society and context,” explained X-architects’ founder and CEO, Ahmed Al Ali. “Starting from scratch, we considered the wind and how it shapes the dunes around the original site. Then, we looked at the sun and orientation. We also had to address the lack of water and the need for water-saving strategies. We considered climate, energy and soil.” Al Naseem – currently entering the detailed masterplanning stage – is one of the first projects to have successfully met all requirements for Estidama approval. Providing everything runs smoothly, the development will serve as a functioning benchmark against which other projects seeking Estidama approval will be measured.

Abu Dhabi, with multi-billion dollar long term plans for continued infrastructure development, is providing the world with remarkable opportunities that simply do not exist elsewhere. What is becoming clear in the new global economic climate is that Abu Dhabi is fast establishing itself as a beacon of cultural renaissance as well.

$10.4 MILLION

The cost of design and construction of Metito’s state-of-the-art water treatment plant, which is to be built in the Jebel Ali Power Complex. Metito’s first water treatment plant in Jebel Ali is one of the UAE’s only LEED Gold building.

AED

20.7 BILLION

Value of Emaar Misr’s total development portfolio in Egypt, which includes several smaller, smarter and cost-competitive mixed-use developments.

3

The number of masterplans currently breaking ground in Cairo’s ‘New Cairo City’ district. The masterplans include Marassi, Uptown Cairo & Mivida.

AED

8.48 BILLION

Value of Dubai’s non-oil trade with Singapore including free zone and customs warehouse trade at the end of 2008.

US

$8.3 BILLION

Estimated losses by Kingdom Holding Company (KHC) during Q4 2008, which is the reason cited for postponing construction on KSA’s planned Mile-High Tower.

3500

The official – but presumed to be understated – number of jobs lost in the region’s building sector since the onset of the financial downturn

ROHAN MARWAHA, MANAGING DIRECTOR OF CITYSCAPE EVENTS

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On Time Save Control Improve


REGIONAL NEWS

16 MILLION

Reported population of Cairo in 1997

SOROUH CITY TO HELP MEET SPACE SHORTAGE CAIRO, EGYPT // To meet the growing demand for residential and office space in the greater Cairo area, UAEbased developer Sorouh has appointed Callison to master plan and design Sorouh City. The 42.3 million ft² development – sited just outside the Cairo city centre and a central part of the developing New Cairo City – will be in close proximity to schools, hospitals and the Cairo International Airport. Callison recently released

its design plan, which features an integrated mixed-use development that holds 30.7 million ft² of residential units including town houses and apartments, 4.3 million ft² of office space and 1.85 ft² of space designated for retail. Sorouh City will be located along the banks of a large, man-made lake and is surrounded by lush parks, public squares and tree-lined boulevards; providing a dramatic green respite from the bustling Cairo city centre.

We believe that the fundamentals of the [Egyptian] market are robust and continue to present an attractive investment opportunity for both local and international markets. By offering well-designed units that suit smaller families we are offering customers quality homes in an integrated community. SAMEH MUHTADI, CEO OF EMAAR MISR ON EXTENSIVE DEVELOPMENTS IN EGYPT

EMAAR FINDS FUTURE IN EGYPT WITH AED 20.7 BILLION INVESTMENT CAIRO, EGYPT // The Spanish

colonial architecture that typifies Santa Barbara, California (USA) is the design inspiration behind Emaar Misr’s Mivida masterplan in Cairo’s ‘New Cairo City’ district. Moving away from the vernacular architecture of Cairo and driven by the overpopulation of the city, the Emaar Misr has launched the sprawling, Mediterranean-flavoured mixed-use development Mivida. “The construction of the Business Park and other infrastructure work is already underway, and the masterplanning has been completed… sales of homes within the community will start shortly,” said Sameh Muhtadi, CEO of Emaar Misr. A 3.8 million m² masterplan, Mivida encompasses an integrated neighbourhood of 5000 apartments, townhouses, villas, office and retail space, as well as healthcare facilities, schools and hospitality venues. Landscaped parks and community complexes are to create public meeting points that infuse continuity

throughout the master plan. Introducing smaller, more technologically advanced housing that suits smaller families, the project is introducing a suburban lifestyle into an urban setting, and the Santa Barbara-inspired design style is set to be translated throughout the built environment and outdoor space, providing a relaxedyet-lavish, Mediterranean,

community atmosphere. Following the EGP 12 billion (AED 7.9 billion) Up Town Cairo, and the EGP 9.92 billion (AED 6.5 billion) Marassi currently under construction, Emaar Misr’s Mivida raises the firms investment portfolio by EGP 5.75 billion (AED 3.8 billion); cementing the developer’s confidence in the growth of the real estate industry in Egypt.

46 MILLION

Estimated population of Cairo in 2009

www.constructionweekonline.com | 03.09 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT

009


REGIONAL NEWS

KEO OFFERS WORKABLE MODEL FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT ABU DHABI, UAE // The Moham-

med Bin Zayed City Towers designed by KEO as part of Mohammed Bin Zayed City is an example of working sustainability in the region. This is according to Uwe Nienstedt, the Managing Director of KEO International Consultants’ Urban Development Division in Abu Dhabi, who insists that KEO’s masterplan for sustainability can be followed and implemented by

developers and end-users will very little effort. “The completed development will cater to the middle-income tenant market, which is currently highly underserved in Abu Dhabi… the development has been designed taking many of the principles of Estidama into account,” said Nienstedt. The residential towers will encourage a more pedestrian lifestyle as the development is surrounded

by shaded pedestrian walkways and parks. District cooling and double glazing have been employed to maximise energy efficiency, Nienstedt continues. The AED 25 billion Mohammed Bin Zayed City development is at once addressing the significant shortage of residential space in Abu Dhabi while also providing end-users and investors with affordable, sustainable housing.

AUTODESK LOOKS TO EGYPT IN BID FOR REGIONAL SUPREMACY CAIRO, EGYPT // As the building

industry begins to boom in Egypt, Autodesk appointed Hazem Nabil Khaled to grow the company’s position in the burgeoning market. Autodesk products have long been the software of choice for architects looking to visualize and simulate the performance of their designs, and Khaled’s mandate is to focus specifically on growing the business in

a largely untapped market. Managing Autodesk’s Cairo office, Khaled is looking to offer new customer-oriented divisions and enhance technical support and implement an educational division in conjunction with the Egyptian Government. “Despite the global financial crisis, I am very optimistic about the future of the Egyptian market due

to the stable atmosphere and solid economic status enveloping the country... Egypt is an attractive zone for IT and communication industries,” said Khaled.

Expanding to the Middle East gives us the opportunity to remain competitive in an area of the world that has seen exponential growth in recent years. This new office will operate with a multidisciplinary team serving the diverse business culture in the Middle East, with our awardwinning building design geared to furthering a global ‘green’ society. ISMAEL LEYVA, DIRECTOR OF ISMAEL LEYVA ARCHITECTS ON OPENING AN OFFICE IN QATAR

010

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 03.09 | www.constructionweekonline.com

AED

5.578 BILLION

Emaar Properties’ reported net profit for 2008

TWIN ELEVATORS TO REVOLUTIONISE LIFTS DUBAI, UAE // ThyssenKrupp’s new TWIN elevator system is a revolutionary compact vertical transport system that offers greater capacity than traditional systems. With a total of four cabs and 17 conventional elevators, TK’s TWIN is set to be used in the 210-metre-high mixed-use Latifa Tower in Dubai, which is scheduled for completion in 2010. As one of the latest innovations in vertical transport technology, the TWIN system comprises two or more independently-operable elevator cars within one elevator shaft. The TWIN design has been embraced by architects and developers in Germany, the Netherlands, Spain, Saudi

Arabia and the UK, and is now being used in the UAE. “The increasing number of TWINs around the world shows that architects and developers have been won over by the elevator system and its advantages – including reductions in building volume and greater capacity,” said Monica Soffriti, communications manager for ThyssenKrupp Elevator AG.


POST SHOW REPORT MADEexpo 2009

MADE expo 2009 FIERA MILANO, RHO FEBRUARY 4-7

TODAY, COMPUTERS THINK FOR US, AND THEY THINK TOO FAST…. NOWADAYS, FORM SWALLOWS FUNCTION.

ALEXANDROS N. TOMBAZIS

Nowadays, Italy is probably most famous for fine fashion, football and food. The mere mention of the Mediterranean peninsula conjures up images of open-air cafés set amidst cobblestone piazzas and starry-eyed lovers bent on romantic liaisons. Milan in particular evokes images of ridiculously attractive models stalking catwalks practicing faces of brooding intensity. Milan is stylistic brilliance. Milan is retail bliss. Milan is haute couture. Relatively speaking, Milan is not generally considered a hotbed of Italian architecture. Rome? Of course. Florence? Def-

012

initely. Venice? Absolutely. Milan? Not so much...until now. Upon arriving at Milan’s 2nd Edition of the Milano Architettura Design Edilizia (MADEexpo), held from February 4-7, 2009, it quickly became clear that Italy’s fashion capital, long overshadowed by its more architecturally endowed sister cities, has officially announced its presence on the world’s architecture stage.

SIZE AND SCALE Italy’s foremost international trade show for building and architecture, the MADEexpo showcased an extraordinary and comprehensive range of products and technologies for building, renovation and redevelopment. Massive in scale and scope, MADEexpo boasted separate halls for each of the following industry subsections: structures/construction systems/materials, building envelope, interior architecture, installations/renewable energy, construc-

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 03.09 | www.constructionweekonline.com

tion supply chain planning, construction IT, worksite equipment/technologies and sports facilities/fitness/urban finishings. The four-day event saw 200,126 visitors from 118 different countries. For readers more familiar with the Cityscape brand of architecture/development exhibition these numbers put MADEexpo into perspective: Cityscapes Abu Dhabi and Dubai both reported record turnouts in 2008, the total number of visitors to those shows were 48,354 and 51,885 respectively. In four days, the Milan event attracted double what the UAE Cityscapes get in five days.

BIOMIMICRY AND ECO-DESIGN Sustainability, energy efficiency, safety. As one might have expected, these were the buzzwords of the event and were the main issues around which MADEexpo and its 100+ conferences revolved. Among the most popular and highly-attended conference was CITYFUTURES; an academic conference, jointly organized by


POST SHOW REPORT MADEexpo 2009 posed an altogether different question: Is the trend toward ecologically sensitive design any different from what we’ve been doing since the origin of buildings? In Tombazis’ estimation, vernacular architecture cannot be quantified, classified or copied, and that quality is what makes it inherently ‘ecological’. “Vernacular architecture is an adherence to social rules and a reflection of social needs, usually built by people with limited means but unlimited intelligence,” he says. However, the current state of the industry reflects a much different reality. “After post-modernism, the rule became ‘anything goes’,” explained Tombazis. “Too often those cultures with unlimited means, have limited brains. Today, computers think for us, and they think too fast…. Nowadays, form swallows function.” Despite his assertion that mainstream architecture is about the 15 minutes of fame that comes with building the largest, tallest, broadest or deepest structure, Tombazis conceded that now, practitioners are much more aware of ecological issues. “Things have changed. We are starting to smell spring in the air, but we have to move from words to works.” From the Baths of Diocletian to the Basilica of Santa Croce; from Bruneschelli and Albertini to Palladio and Piano, architecture has been interwoven into the fabric of Italy ever since the first Roman coveted the vaults and arches of ancient Greece. This year’s MADEexpo was just the second iteration of what has become one of Europe’s ‘must-attend’ events in the architecture world. Much like the fashion, food and football that so stereotypically characterises the Milan experience, MADEexpo is a wonderful example of how an industry trade show should be done. MADEexpo and the Italian Organization of Architectural Technology during which engineers, scientists, administrators and architects presented challenges and solutions for building cities of the future. Of particular interest were presentations given by Denise DeLuca (Biomimicry Institute) entitled “Biomimicry: innovation inspired by nature” and Alexandros N. Tombazis (UNESCO/UIA & PLEA member) entitled “Eco-technologies in architectural design: Is ecological design something different?” DeLuca’s message was simple: “Organisms in nature face the same challenges humans face, but they meet them sustainably.” Using this rationale, DeLuca challenged her audience to use nature to solve the problems of the built environment. DeLuca offered several examples of human problems that have been solved

through the use of biomimicry—velcro mimics the function of a burr; corrugated steel mimics the texture of a shell; PV panels mimic the process of photosynthesis in plants—and urged scientists, engineers and architects to study nature more closely. She reminded building professionals that thus far, humans still haven’t managed to manufacture materials that handle force as well as the horn of the rhinoceros; or distribute energy as efficiently as the electric eel; or adhere to dry surfaces like the gecko; or displays brilliant colour variation without pigment like the peacock. “Biomimicry is about learning from the natural world, not extracting from it,” explained DeLuca. “If you have a problem, ask nature, then try to emulate its genius.” In examining the ‘genius’ behind ecological design, Alexandros N. Tombazis

ORGANISMS IN NATURE FACE THE SAME CHALLENGES HUMANS FACE, BUT THEY MEET THEM SUSTAINABLY.

www.constructionweekonline.com | 03.09 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT

DENISE DELUCA

013


GLOBAL NEWS

NEW YORK CITY, NEW YORK//

Lehman College’s new science building, designed by Perkins+Will, is the first groundbreaking in the City University of New York’s ‘Decade of the Sciences’ initiative. Embracing the concept of ‘living classrooms’,

Perkins+Will are revolutionising the classroom experience by going beyond just housing academic programmes, and using the new building itself to facilitate teaching and research. Dubbed an ‘urban wetland’, the building provides

a space from which scientists can conduct ecological, life science research, and will also feature displays that provide real-time information on building operations, including energy and water usage. City University of New

York has long been known for its rich architectural heritage, with architects like David Todd and Jan Pokorny shaping the college and surrounding landscape, and the new Lehman College building aims to be a striking addition to the campus.

SAO PAULO, BRAZIL//

Once complete, the building will feature 62 elevated homes, each complete with their own garden space, which are not balconies but rather the larger outdoor living spaces you would enjoy in the backyard of a ground level development. The judges of the competition were most impressed by “the way in which the architecture of a pinwheel plan arrangement had been combined with a construction proposition to produce an exemplary series of apartment layouts with generous open space in the form of ‘yards’, attached to apartments on every floor.”

Isay Weinfield and Domingos Pascali’s 360º building has won the MIPIM Architectural Record’s Future Project Award. 360º Building is situated on the ridge separating the districts of Alto de Pinheiros and Alto da Lapa, a location that offers great sights of the city. Mindful of the bustling, overcrowded urban environment, the architects have introduced the 360º Building as a compact, very green alternative to the low, vertical multi-family housing model that is typically seen in the region.

014

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30th March 2009, Dubai Standard delegate rate: $995

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GLOBAL NEWS

REGGIO CALABRIA, SICILY//

Zaha Hadid Architects have recently released their designs for the Museum of the Mediterranean, as well as a multifunctional building for the performing arts; both are to be situated on the Regium Waterfront. In a step towards defining Reggio Calabria as a Mediterrean capital of culture, the projects have been designed to complement the topography of the area while injecting cultural energy into the space. Situated on the narrow sea strait that separates Italy from Sicily, the museum draws inspiration from the organic shapes of the starfish; the symmetry of the shape differentiate the different sections of the museum, providing space for exhibitions, restoration facilities, an archive, an aquarium and a library. The performing arts building will house a gym, craft laboratories, shops and a cinema, as well as three auditoriums that can join to form one large performance space.

BAKU, AZERBAIJAN//

After the award-winning Mountain Dwelling project, the Bjarke Ingels Group are reaching new peaks in manmade mountain designs with their Seven Peaks of Azerbaijan masterplan. As Central Asia’s first carbon neutral master plan,

the one million m2 development resembles an illuminated mountain range from a distance, however up close the development functions as a fully inhabited space for residential, cultural and recreational living. Located within a crescent shaped bay, the masterplan

is designed to be a sustainable urban environment that creates a striking skyline that is recognisable along the city’s coastline. “What we propose for the Zira Zero Island is an architectural landscape based on the natural landscape of Azerbaijan,” said a spokesperson

from Bjarke Ingels Group. “This new architecture not only recreates the iconic silhouettes of the seven peaks, but more importantly creates an autonomous ecosystem where the flow of air, water, heat and energy are channeled in almost natural ways. A mountain creates

biotopes and eco-niches, it channels water and stores heat, it provides viewpoints and valleys, access points and shelter space. The Seven Peaks of Azerbaijan are not only metaphors, but actual living models of the mountainous ecosystems of Azerbaijan.”

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FEATURED FIRM

ATKINS EST. 1967

018

1994 Atkins’ portfolio includes urban planning, transport studies of Dubai Creek, police stations, Officers’ Sports Club, Dubai Police College, a Police Academy, Al Mussalla Tower, the Taj Palace Hotel and Al Salam Tower.

1992 Demand for Atkins services grows and in this decade, three permanent offices are established across the Middle East. The Abu Dhabi office opens in 1976, Kuwait in 1977 and the regional head office in Dubai on March 28th, 1979.

While engineering work continues with projects like roads in Satwa and strengthening of quay walls at Jebel Ali, Atkins receives more building design commissions, starting with the Standard Chartered Bank Building, followed by numerous design projects for the municipal authority.

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 03.09 | www.constructionweekonline.com

Shaun Killa has over 16 years experience, seven in the Middle East, and specialises in urban design projects. He has won many awards for his designs including Bahrain World Trade Center and DIFC Lighthouse tower.

Opening of Atkins office in Sharjah, whose focus is design and project management to the oil and gas industry. The business diversifies and grows and now includes a thriving Rail business.

Atkins’ future is altered dramatically when, following a limited competition with some of the world’s best design-led practices, the company is appointed lead architect & engineering consultant for Jumeirah Beach Hotel, Wild Wadi and the official icon of Dubai, the Burj Al Arab.

1999

1987

Atkins acquires it’s first architectural commission - a private villa design in Dubai.

1970S

1960S

A small team of Atkins engineers carries out design and supervision commissions in Dubai, Muscat, RAK, UAQ, Abu Dhabi. The early work is exclusively engineering and involved dredging the Dubai Creek, laying pipeline, surveying, water-related engineering projects and road design.

Simon Crispe was recently appointed the first Ambassador for RIBA’s newly formed Gulf Chapter. Currently Commercial Director for the Middle East, he has been involved in several projects including the Jumeirah Beach Resort.

Joe Tabet is design Director in Abu Dhabi and has over ten years design experience across the gamut of building sectors, specializing in hotel design and is currently overseeing the design of Al Ajlan Tower in Riyadh.

END OF THE 1980S

Jim Carless, AILA, manages a dynamic landscape design team, bringing over 15 years experience in outdoor design to projects including Durrat Al Bahrain, Iris Bay and The Wave in Oman.

1985

Tim Askew has over 30 years or practice in the construction industry and has been Managing Director for Atkins in the Middle East and India Region, since 1999, overseeing all operations as well as staff across nine offices.

Burj Al Arab and Wild Wadi open in time for the Millenium celebrations to worldwide interest, setting the scene for dramatic growth in the region over the next decade.


FEATURED FIRM

Paula Hirst brings over a decade of experience working on large scale mixed use regeneration projects and now oversees the regional Masterplanning and urban design business.

2009

Nicholas Lander specialises in Sustainable Design and Building Physics. As Regional Head of Sustainability, he brings extensive experience in passive design, operation and master planning.

2004

2002

2006

Lee Morris is a Design Director in Dubai. He has worked on global projects including the Sales Centre in Business Bay, Museum of Sydney, the Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club and Dubai’s Trump Hotel & Tower.

Nakheel appoints Atkins to undertake comprehensive masterplanning, design and delivery of ‘Coral Island’ a 270,000sq m luxury resort on The World.

2009

2007

Atkins first major job out of the Bahrain office is to masterplan and provide design consultancy services for Durrat Al Bahrain, a 20km2 sustainable residential, commercial and leisure resort for a population of 60,000, consisting of 13 man-made islands.

2005

2003

Atkins’ opens its office in Doha, Qatar. This is closely followed by a major infrastructure commission when the Qatar Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Agriculture appoints the company as lead consultant for the 42km Doha-Dukhan Highway.

21st Century tower is complete, which at this time is the tallest residential building in the world at 269metres.

In Oman, Barr Al Jissah is completed. The project involves roads, tunnels, environmental impact studies, coral relocation and building design. In Dubai, work completes on Arabian Ranches & Zabeel Park.

A plethora of projects set for completion across the region including Dubai Metro red line, Doha Dukhan Highway, Al Mas, The Address, DSEC Tower, Indigo Tower, Tiffany Towers, and the Bahrain World Trade Center - the first commercial building to harness wind power for energy.

RTA appoint Atkins to the Dubai Metro project (red and green lines), to provide full multidisciplinary design, design coordination of civil works (including geotechnical and site investigations), and construction supervision of tracks, underground stations and maintenance depots.

Atkins receives its trade license for Saudi Arabia, and work continues on the 220m, 40 storey Abdullah Fahad Al Ajlan office tower in Riyadh.

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Mandaly Bay Hotel, Las Vegas, USA

light

Pier House Resort and Caribbean Spa, Key West, USA

te o & e

The Jumeirah Beach Hotel, Chicago Beach Resort, Dubai, United Arab Emirates

& ambience

Dubai Airport Free Zone Authority · Bldg. 6 West A – Office 731 · P.O. Box 54744, Dubai – UAE Tel. +971 4 609 1033 · Fax +971 4 609 1016 · operations@targettipoulsenme.ae

The Fullerton, Singapore


FEATURE TOP ARCHITECTURE XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX UNIVERSITIES

ARCHITECT EXPLORES SOME OF THE BEST POSTGRADUATE ARCHITECTURE UNIVERSITIES FROM AROUND THE WORLD f undergraduate architecture training provides a groundwork of theory and practice that gives architects the skills and confidence to enter the working world, it is postgraduate studies that hone these skills furher through in depth specialisation; giving practitioners cutting edge ideas and proficiency to approach the everchanging built environment. Design is at the core of architecture, but professionals have long felt—and research has supported this notion—that once architects are in the field, working on similar projects day in and day out, their growth as an architectural designer is often diminished. Architects already working in the field can benefit greatly from mid-career architecture courses designed to reinvigorate their design skills and allow them to remain at the top of their game. And similarly, if you have completed your BA in Architecture and you wish to complete your Masters straight away, many universities offer programmes that are designed specifically to make a smooth transition from undergraduate level into the working world.

“Given the pressing need for postgraduate-level training in order to prepare local practitioners for their respective professions, universities like the British University in Dubai allow students to conclude their Masters with a work-based project,” says Richard Smith, the Technical Director for Atkins in the Middle East and Asia.

BRITISH UNIVERSITY IN DUBAI, UAE The Faculty of Engineering at the British University in Dubai (BUiD) provides both practical and research programmes to support the development needs of the Middle East. The university offers full-time and parttime Masters programmes in Sustainable Design of the Built Environment and Systems Engineering in collaboration with the Welsh School of Architecture in Cardiff and The University of Manchester. “Essentially, BUiD was the region’s first research-based postgraduate university and they offer specialised MSc programmes across several fields of academia. Atkins works closely with BUiD students and faculty to encourage practical, industry-based research, shared educational tools and market data,” says Smith.

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FEATURE XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX TOP ARCHITECTURE UNIVERSITIES

Speciality: Sustainable design Featured postgraduate course: Master of Science, Sustainable Design of the Built Environment Head of department: Professor Bassam Abu-Hijleh, head of Sustainable Design of the Built Environment

Speciality: Spatial information architecture through computer aided design Featured courses: Short courses in computer aided design Head of department: Melanie Dodd, Professor of Practice Coordinator and Senior Lecturer of design and social context

CARDIFF UNIVERSITY, WALES The Welsh School of Architecture (WSA) was voted as the UK’s top school of architecture in the Times Higher Education Supplement, and its holistic approach to design embraces all aspects of architecture. WSA is currently expanding its taught Masters programme, offering course options in Environmental Design of Buildings, Theory and Practice of Sustainable Design, Urban Design, Sustainable Energy and Environment, Building Energy and Environmental Performance Modelling. The Design Research Unit within the WSA is a nurturing space where design and research come together to produce innovative and sustainable built solutions. Real, workable design projects are carried out, producing buildings designs that can are pushing the envelope in practical solutions. Speciality: Sustainable design Featured postgraduate course: Master of Science, Sustainable Energy and Environment Head of Department: Professor Phil Jones, chair of Architectural Science and Head of School at the Welsh School of Architecture, Cardiff University.

ROYAL MELBOURNE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY (RMIT), AUSTRALIA RMIT focuses on exploring the emergence of innovative practices in the context of international architectural debate, promoting a constructive environment for learning through project-based research and critique. What differentiates RMIT’s Masters programme from other universities is the Urban Architecture Laboratory in which students undertake urban architectural electives in conjunction with spatial information architecture electives. The RMIT mission is “to provide a rich and challenging scholarship environment for students, academics and creative practitioners engaged in the activity of designing.” RMIT also offers short courses in 3D Max, AutoCAD, Photoshop and Rinoceros to keep architects’ computer aided design skills at the forefront.

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UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE, UK Architecture has been studied at Cambridge University since 1912, and the Faculty of Architecture is respected for pushing boundaries and diversifying to address issues within the built environment. The university’s Master of Philosophy in Engineering for Sustainable Development was launched in 2002 and now, in its seventh year, this course has been aiding architects and engineers to find the best possible sustainable solutions. Especially designed to attract topflight engineers early in their careers, the course enables professionals to engineer buildings for sustainable development through enhanced technical skills and a holistic understanding of a sustainable development. Similarly, a part-time Masters in Interdisciplinary Design, built especially for architects, is a course for design, strategy, leadership and sustainability in architecture, ensuring a multiple-voiced approach to built solutions. Speciality: Sustainable engineering and interdisciplinary design Featured course: Master of Studies, Interdisciplinary Design for the Built Environment Head of department: Sebastian Macmillan, Course Director of Interdisciplinary Design for the Built Environment.

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF LONDON, UK The Bartlett Faculty of the Built Environment was opened at the University College of London (UCL) in 1841, and has since then been a prominent force in international architectural debate. Students, staff and alumni contribute to architecture around the globe through designs, buildings and books. Through a stimulating teaching environment, new waves of architecture have been explored throughout the years; “This is a school where people constantly design, invent, explore, write, draw, teach, speculate, theorise, map, film, critique, analyse and imagine,” says Professor Iain Borden,


FEATURE TOP ARCHITECTURE XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX UNIVERSITIES

the Director of the Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL. The Masters programmes include Master of Architecture, Master of Architectural Design, Master of Architectural History, Master of Architecture Urban Design and Master of Science Urban Studies. The Master of Architecture, Urban Design employs a programme of design-based research that brings together the latest theoretical research on the spatial structure of the urban environment in conjunction with the built form. Speciality: Urban design Featured course: Master of Architecture, Urban Design Head of department: Professor Iain Borden, the Director of the Bartlett School of Architecture

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY, NEW YORK, USA The Graduate School of Architecture, Preserving and Planning (GSAPP) of Columbia University has offered a number of specialised architecture programmes since it opened in 1881. All programmes stress the need for analysing and understanding historical trends in architecture in order to move forward with new ideas. The school’s preservation programme,

which was America’s first, continues to train professionals in the understanding of historic architecture, artefacts and landscape. “The architect’s buildings are placed in the city like the books of a thoughtful novelist might be placed in a news stand in a railway station, embedding the possibility of a rewarding detour amongst all the routines... the architect crafts an invitation to think and act differently,” says Mark Wigley the dean of GSAPP. GSAPP offers Master of Architecture, Master of Advanced Architectural Design, Master of Architecture and Urban Design, Master of Historic Preservation, Certificate in Conservation of Historic Buildings among others. Speciality: Restoration and conservation Featured courses: Master of Science, Historic Preservation Head of Department: Mark Wigley, Dean of the School of Architecture

MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, BOSTON, USA MIT’s School of Architecture + Planning (SA+P) is recognised as a top school of architecture and design in the USA; pushing boundaries in the built environment through its graduate and postgraduate courses.

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FEATURE XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX TOP ARCHITECTURE UNIVERSITIES

GOOD DESIGN RESULTS FROM A COMBINATION OF A DEEP UNDERSTANDING OF CULTURE, AN ETHICAL ENGAGEMENT IN SOCIETY AND RESPECT FOR THE CREATIVE SKILLS NEEDED TO ESTABLISH A SUSTAINABLE BUILT ENVIRONMENT. THE AMERICAN UNIVERSITY OF SHARJAH’S DESIGN PHILOSOPHY There are many masters programmes available at MIT, including the Master of Architecture and the Master of Science in Architecture Studies; which includes courses Architecture and Urbanism, Building Studies, Design and Computation and the Aga Khan Programme for Islamic Architecture. The programme was established in 1978 at both MIT and Harvard University and the course is recognised as being at the forefront of urbanism in the Islamic world. The course is dedicated to the study of Islamic architecture, urbanism, visual culture and conservation. Speciality: Islamic Architecture Featured course: The Aga Khan Programme for Islamic Architecture Head of department: Nasser Rabbat, Aga Khan Professor of Islamic Architecture, MIT

THE AMERICAN UNIVERSITY OF SHARJAH, UAE The School of Architecture and Design (SA+D) forms part of the American

024

University of Sharjah and is committed to ensuring that graduates have the skills and design philosophy to make significant contributions to the Gulf region within a broader global context. “Good design results from a combination of a deep understanding of culture, an ethical engagement in society and respect for the creative skills needed to establish a sustainable built environment,” states SA+D within its design philosophy. The Master of Urban Planning is an interdisciplinary course that is rooted in architecture, engineering, public health, law and social sciences, enabling urban planners to combine design, analytical and communication skills to manage a sustainable development. The MUP seeks to empower students with the application of multidisciplinary knowledge in the field of architecture and urban planning. Speciality: Urban planning Featured course: Master of Urban Planning University representative:

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George Katodrytis, Associate Professor, Director of Scholarship and Outreach

WASEDA UNIVERSITY, JAPAN Waseda boasts the oldest Architecture Department of all the private universities in Japan, and each year the Waseda alumni contribute to the talent within large design firms such as Nikken Sekei, NTT Facilities and the Ishimoto Design Office. Through a variety of postgraduate programmes, Waseda deals with the relationship between architecture, urban design and engineering, providing specialised courses that enable architects to reach expertise in seismic design, vibration engineering, seismology/wind engineering and advanced disaster prevention planning, among many other specialisations. Speciality: Seismic architecture and engineering Featured course: Postgraduate studies in seismology/wind engineering Head of department: Shigeru Satoh, Professor of Urban Design and Planning


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ARCHITECT PROFILE FRANZ KOOK

ROOM FOR

THOUGHT

DESIGN MASTERS LIKE NORMAN FOSTER AND PHILIPPE STARCK HAVE KEPT DURAVIT AT THE PEAK OF BATHROOM DESIGN. LAUREN HILLS TALKS TO FRANZ KOOK, CEO OF DURAVIT, TO EXPLORE THE ARCHITECTURE OF BATHROOMS www.constructionweekonline.com | 03.09 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT

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ARCHITECT PROFILE FRANZ KOOK

Product designers produce several iterations before their designs see the manufacturing floor

Duravit collaborates will several of the world’s top designers

028

“Is it design, or is it architecture”, people asked when they saw the bathroom series by Norman Foster. So faultless in its functionality that the combination of ceramics and metal finishing was not commonplace, but was rather, extraordinary. Foster’s design was inspired by the humble archetype of two cupped hands scooping water; two adjacent circles define the geometry of the whole range. Duravit has embraced their ‘living bathroom’ philosophy since it began creating sanitary ware in 1842, creating bathroom products that are driven, not only by function and quality, but by design. With bathrooms emerging as an important living space for relaxation and revitalisation, a well designed bathroom is a valuable asset, and often a showpiece within a development.

Duravit is one of the first sanitary ware companies to collaborate with architects. Can you tell me about these collaborations? Kook: We first collaborated with Philippe Starck 15 years ago, however the collaboration started before that as it always takes about two years to fully develop a product. We started first with the design of Starck 1, then Starck 2 and 3. From there we moved to Starck X, which was more expensive and of even higher quality. With Norman Foster we have one series, which we extended last year. Foster had an idea for a washbasin that he wanted to implement in one of his own projects, so we collaborated with him to create the design, and as it was so well received we made it available to the public. When Norman Foster sketches his architectural concept for his customers he also draws the bathroom; and his clients will often follow his design ideas. Is it important for architects to consider fittings in a bathroom before they design a space? Kook: While the interior designer is predominantly involved when the bathroom space is discussed, the design of

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a bathroom should be considered at the architectural stage too. In great buildings, the bathroom design is not accidental; architects are in collaboration with interior designers and clients will think about the best possible solution for the bathroom. What should architects keep in mind when designing a bathroom? Kook: Looking at commercial projects like hotels, for example, the design of a bathroom is a key factor that customers are looking for. The bathroom can enhance the style and architecture of a building; people pay far more attention to good bathroom design than they did 20 years ago. What value does good bathroom design add to the end user? Kook: I think that people might have lost money through speculation over the last year, so they are thinking about what is truly valuable; thinking about what can enhance their lives. We are convinced that the bathroom plays an important role in a person’s lifestyle. It is more than just a cleaning room; it is not only for taking a shower, it is a room for relaxation and enjoying your personal space. It is the last


ARCHITECT PROFILE FRANZ KOOK room before you go to the bedroom and the first room you enter when you start your day; it is a very important space. Do you think that architects and developers consider the bathroom as an important space? Kook: I do think that they recognise that the bathroom is an important living space, but often they might be restricted because of a client’s budget or the space constraints. But architects are most definitely concerned with designing a good shape for the bathroom, giving enough space for a shower and bath, a nice wash basin area with a mirror and cabinet. However, there can be limitations; if an apartment is only 100 metres2 you have to be clever with how you utilise the space. Do architects communicate with Duravit with regards to their bathroom design intent? Kook: Yes, if you look at our guest list for the Duravit Design Days, we have many architects from all over the world coming to view our latest products and to discuss the latest trends. For Duravit Design Days 2009 I have spoken with architects from Scandinavia, Tunisia, Dubai, Saudi Arabia, the UK and Belgium. Architects are interested in collaboration and they profit from the discussions as they can see what designs are available and how they can be installed in there own projects. Duravit has had great success working with different architects who will specify products for their projects, or even develop their own range as Norman Foster and Philippe Starck did. How has bathroom design changed in the last 20 years? Kook: Bathroom design is more liberal today; you cannot say that there is just Bathroom designers require as much creative inspiration as architects and engineers

one trend out there as there are many ideas and products available for different settings. When I started working in this profession it was not usual to have a series of sanitary ware; we would design individual units and the customers would combine the elements themselves. What we have developed is a range of different design styles to complement any development; a series gives the developers one design language. For example our new PuraVida range is curved and feminine, and before this Duravit has developed many strong, rectangular minimalist shapes; for example, our rectangular design of Vero still is very successful. The designs of Starck 1, 2 and 3 moved away from the rectangular shapes. In the competitive market what do you think your company offers to architects and developers? Kook: Our strength at Duravit, which appeals to architects, is that we are not just selling bathrooms, we are selling design. The architect or interior designer wants to have a good bathroom that will enhance the design, but often they don’t have a deep knowledge of the bathroom. We have so many different series and different options that the architect can specify something that will complement a project. Every design series has its own philosophy and personality, so you can create a certain identity and theme in line with what an architect desires. We have strong competition, but we have an advantage because of our ‘designed’ concepts and the fact that we can offer full solutions for bathroom - ceramics, bathtubs and fittings - so we can give one design language to a developer. What do you see as the future of bathroom design? Kook: The bathroom, as an increasingly important living space, will move towards greater use of technology. Electronics, light and sound, electronic pictures and cleaning systems will advance the bathrooms. The technological advancement will need to be incorporated into the design; the bathroom needs to look good and function well. Is water conservation an important element of bathroom design? Kook: Yes. Especially in the Middle East, where water is expensive and it goes through a long process to get clean. On the other hand, people are willing to invest in water when it helps to revitalise the body. You mustn’t use water when it is unnecessary, but with a water-saving shower you can use less water and still feel refreshed.

Early concept designs for a prefabricated bathroom

Duravit products have been specified for the Burj Dubai, can you tell me more about this? Kook: The architects have specified products from the Starck 1 series predominantly, with a special focus on the so called “barrel”, a vanity unit designed for Duravit by Philippe Starck. We have delivered more than 1,000 barrels to Dubai, as well as almost 4,000 WCs and bidets and more than 1,600 baths and whirlpools. How has collaboration with architects benefited Duravit? Kook: We profit from the contact with architects; we discuss their needs. Some products are developed after a specific requirement from an architect. When you talk about bowls, that is the wash basins and the plate, and they can be cylindrical or conic and we have several forms. These designs first came about with of the architecture for hotels, as it suited the structure, and we developed them accordingly for other projects. Architects might want to have a different approach to the bathroom design of their project, and we try to listen and come up with the best possible solution; it is a win-win situation because we are pushed to create innovative designs and the end product is something that complements the architecture. Duravit was one of the first bathroom companies to collaborate with designers; We have collaborated with Sieger Design, Norman Foster, Philippe Starck, Phoenix Design, Michael Graves, Massimo Iosa Ghini, James Irvine, Frank Huster, Jochen Schmiddem, EOOS, Andreas Struppler and Herbert Schultes. We profit greatly from this collaboration. Absolutely!

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STUDENT UNION PRINCETON UNIVERSITY

STUDENT UNION

CREATING CONNECTIONS BETWEEN DESIGN PROFESSIONALS AND THE GULF’S ARCHITECTURE STUDENTS WITH POTENTIAL The following projects are two of many done by graduate students from Princeton University, New Jersey in 2007. The studio was hosted in Dubai by architecture firm dxb.lab and taught by Jesse Reiser, who designed the O14 Tower currently under construction in Business Bay. Under the title “Islands” the students were asked to chose from 5 potential geographical sites in Dubai (offshore,

coastline, city, desert or mountains) and were asked to develop alternative design strategies challenging the classical model of over-arching zoning in Dubai. Assisting students like these to share their fantastic concepts with the public in Dubai is part of the mission of the pr0gress initiative, a newly-founded educational project in the Emirates striving to create content for exhibition and discus-

sion. Pr0gress recently evolved out of a public forum for emerging voices and cultural dialogue, and has since determined the need for an independent research institute and platform aiming to support cross-cultural education in the gulf region and compliment the intellectual discourse with a new range of activities. For more info please contact Adina Hempel and Richard Wagner (info@pr0gress.com).

DESIGNER: GIANCARLO VALLE PROJECT: F-1 URBANISM A DENSELY SETTLED, SELF-CONTAINED BUILDINGCITY HYBRID. ACCOMMODATING MEGA-SCALE ENTERTAINMENT VENUES & VARIOUS FORMS OF AUTOMOBILE RACING, THE PROJECT IS A ‘VERTICAL MONACO’.

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MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 03.09 | www.constructionweekonline.com


STUDENT UNION PRINCETON UNIVERSITY

H IG H TID E (0.00m) LO W TID E (-4.00m)

GREEN SPACE

DIVE AREA

PRT TRA N SI T H UB

DESIGNER: WENDY FOK PROJECT: ECO-LUX DUBAI VILLA + DIVE RESORT WAVE TRAPPING ARTIFICIAL REEF + SALT WATER DESALINATION INTEGRATED SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITY.

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ARCHITECTURE UNDER REVIEW PARALLELISM OF TIME

THE PARALLELISM OF TIME FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT’S DREAM COMES TRUE

1/

The interior of Gehry’s Bilbao Guggenheim (right) is almost a carbon copy of Wright’s in NYC (left)

Frank Lloyd Wright intended his Mile High Illinois skyscraper to be the focal point of Broadacre City—a theoretical city he began planning in the 1920s. While a one-mile-high skyscraper might have seemed fantastically out of place in Wright’s era, The Illinois skyscraper project was an exploration of horizontal space because, as he put it, some cities are simply “incorrigible” and Broadacre could use a tall building to act as a cultural and social hub, which would address some of the sprawl issues associated with growing urban spaces. The foundation of Wright’s building was a massive column, shaped like an inverted tripod, sunk deeply into the ground. This supported a slender, tapering tower with cantilevered floors. In keeping with his belief that architecture ought to be organic, Wright likened this system to a tree trunk with branches. He planned to use gold-tinted metal on the facade to highlight angular surfaces along balconies and parapets and specified Plexiglas for window glazing. Inside the building, mechanical systems were to be

housed inside hollow cantilevered beams. To reach the building’s upper floors, Wright proposed atomic-powered elevators that could carry 100 people per trip. Wright believed that it would have been technically possible to construct such a building even at the time it was proposed. At the time, the tallest skyscraper in the world was New York’s Empire State Building, which stood at less than a quarter of the proposed height for The Illinois. It probably would have been possible to erect a self-supporting steel structure of the required height, but, of course, steel comes with a host of strength-to-weight challenges that arise when building structures of such great heights. Not surprisingly, Dubai’s Burj Dubai clearly resembles the original design of Frank Lloyd Wright’s ‘The Illinois’—the only difference being is that The Illinois was designed 50 years earlier. Architecture critics always cite a handful of stories of unbuilt skyscrapers as the best of the style and, in doing so, completely neglect the vast majority of completed projects.

The folklore surrounding classic skyscrapers that never saw completion tells us much about what motivates both architects and their clients. These tales beg the question, what is it about working in the tall building genre that compels architects to produce such interesting work? My hypothesis is this: Perhaps that which motivates architects to go taller and taller is a fantastic wish to be free of gravity’s limitations and to build something that inspires 1/ clients, investors and other architects as it seems to soar into the sky. Another, albeit more down-to-earth theory, is an appeal to rationality: Perhaps architects design tall buildings simply to create cities that make logical use of available land. If The Illinois had been built in Chicago 50 years ago, would SOM still have had to blaze new trails in terms of technology in construction, MEP works, HVAC and even window cleaning mechanisms—all of which were designed and tailored specifically for this tower—in the Burj Dubai? Fifty years ago, would Frank Lloyd Wright be faced with the same challenges

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ARCHITECTURE UNDER REVIEW PARALLELISM OF TIME

Frank Lloyd Wright’s 1950s design for ‘The Illinois’ has clearly been mimicked in SOM’s Burj Dubai (middle)

that existed for SOM in its quest for the world’s tallest tower? Would his solutions have differed significantly? Would they have differed at all? From its inception, The Illinois was designed to stand 1,609 meters (5,280 ft) and aimed to provide solutions to the eversprawling city of Chicago. Had it been built, The Illinois would have incorporated 528 stories and a gross area of 18.46 million ft² (1.71 million m²/171 hectares). Wright’s is arguably the most famous of the visionary buildings that never came to fruition. All of them aimed at addressing the increasing urban sprawl occurring in cities throughout the world. Before mile-high towers projects were launched in Kuwait, KSA and Dubai, the very concept was never considered financially viable. But now, however, as Burj Dubai becomes simply a symbol of luxury with little concern for reason or the challenges of urban sprawl, it is the project that has come to most closely resemble Frank Lloyd Wright’s concept of a vertical city. It provides yet another example of the relation-

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ship between iconography and financial feasibility: Those with money, build high. A similar situation occurred when the wealthy Guggenheim Foundation hired Frank Gehry to design a museum for the architectural playground of Bilbao, Spain. While their exterior forms differed somewhat, the interior architecture of Guggenheim Bilbao was designed to be almost a carbon copy of that of the Solomon R. Guggenheim museum in New York City. This is not a criticism of the buildings, but instead a celebration of the designer’s aim and the relationship between himself and his building. For great architects, that relationship has never been a commercial one, but instead a relationship built on a mastery of art, design, building and style. With regard to any of these relationships, and considering that for over 60 years his work has been recreated, regurgitated and downright copied, Frank Lloyd Wright proved it then as he continues to prove it today with the inspiration he provides to contemporary students and architects, he is still the master.

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NOT SURPRISINGLY, DUBAI’S BURJ DUBAI CLEARLY RESEMBLES THE ORIGINAL DESIGN OF FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT’S ‘THE ILLINOIS’—THE ONLY DIFFERENCE BEING IS THAT THE ILLINOIS WAS DESIGNED 50 YEARS EARLIER.


THE SKETCHBOOK VAUXHALL SKY GARDENS

VAUXHALL SKY GARDENS Architect: Amin Taha, Sarah Griffiths and Richard Cheesman Practice: Amin Taha Architects Location: London Status: On-site Completion: 2012

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THE SKETCHBOOK VAUXHALL SKY GARDENS

THE AIM OF THE PROPOSAL IS TO DYNAMICALLY ENHANCE THE LOCAL ENVIRONMENT, IMPROVING BOTH THE VISUAL APPEARANCE OF THE SITE AS WELL AS PROVIDE A RANGE OF BENEFITS FOR THE EXISTING AND DEVELOPING COMMUNITY THROUGH A SUSTAINABLE APPROACH. OBJECTIVES TO ACHIEVE SUSTAINABILITY THROUGH DESIGN WERE CONSIDERED AND ESTABLISHED THROUGH CAREFULLY LOCATED AND ARTICULATED SKY GARDENS AND ROOF AREAS. SARAH GRIFFITHS, DIRECTOR, AMIN TAHA ARCHITECTS

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CASE STUDY GOLDEN BEACH

Golden Beach will be a gathering point for visitors from Fujairah and Sharjah

GOLDEN OPPORTUNITY BURT HILL’S BEACH RESORT IN FUJAIRAH AIMS TO UNITE EXPATS AND NATIONALS IN A SEARCH FOR TRANQUILITY Words: John Kim, AIA Images: Mohammed Zannouneh

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Some travel to escape life, others to invigorate it and still others travel to simply experience a life they never knew existed. But a truly transformative trip has the power to do all three. When Burt Hill set out to design an exclusive resort development in Fujairah, UAE, on a coastal site where the Hajar Mountains and Indian Ocean meet, it was not without challenges. But in the case of Golden Beach Resort, Burt Hill found that the opportunity to create a truly transformative experience far outmatched the cultural challenges of the region. A resort development differs from other projects because, by its very nature, it is designed to deliver an escape; a ‘world apart’. The design challenges that an architect faces when taking on a resort project are also a world apart from those encountered in more typical projects. The features of a vacation site that distinguish it as an escape from the real world make the architect’s role invaluable—it is the

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architect’s design and vision that ultimately create the inspiring, eye-opening experience for which travellers yearn.

VISION: LOOKING TO THE PAST TO SHAPE THE FUTURE For Golden Beach to deliver a ‘world apart’ to its guests, it took a critical analysis of the existing culture, but also, an analysis of the world the way it once was in Fujairah. The first thing the Burt Hill design team examined in shaping the future of the resort was in fact the history of the region. The team learned that the most common and oldest profession in an emirate that boasts more than 90km of coastline was, not surprisingly, fishing. But in Fujairah, fishing was historically much more than just business; it was a social foundation that shaped the emirate. Thus, the Burt Hill vision emerged from studying old fishing villages where a sense of intimacy was created by incorporating narrow alleyways and closely set buildings to bring it down to human scale.


CASE STUDY GOLDEN BEACH

In studying these fishing villages, Burt Hill learned that the density of the buildings and the low building height allowed residents to sense the gradual movement in space from narrow passageways to larger piazzas. Above all, it inspired a sense of discovery within the space. This sense of discovery would be a key element in creating a resort that was truly transformational. In addition to studying Fujairah’s fishing tradition, the Burt Hill design team took a deeper look at the city and its land formation. The city is a composition of several mountain chains and a dramatic coastline along the Arabian Sea. This blend was the inspiration behind designing a cascading or ‘stepped’ building rather than building a Dubai-like high-rise tower, which had the potential to disrupt the city’s natural context. The cascaded terraces resemble the stepping of the mountains at the background of the site and create a link between the soaring mountain chain and the beach front. Accordingly, the vision began to take form with the idea of a stepping fishing village. By stepping, we were able to use

Draft after draft of concept sketches allowed Burt Hill to design the right combination of low-density and contextual architecture

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CASE STUDY GOLDEN BEACH

different dimensions and different levels to help break the banal rhythm of repetitive buildings. While it was important for the design to meld well with the context of the site, it was equally important that it provide an inspiring experience for end users. The differing levels of terraces provide intimacy and privacy to guests who desire panoramic views and serenity in the midst of the ocean and mountains. By designing the resort in a village-like cluster, we were able to establish a strong relationship between the traditional character of the fishing villages that once dominated the region and the contemporary living that accommodates our present living style.

The modern interior design perfectly contrast the vernacular architecture of the exterior

VISION: MODERN, YET VERNACULAR In articulating the vision for this project, it was essential that Burt Hill not only look to the past to see what was built, but also to see how it was built in terms of the architectural elements used in the facade design. This level of analysis would allow the team to truly convey the vernacular architecture of UAE. While this is one aspect that architects and developers often ignore in resort design, in the case of Golden Beach, it seemed counterproductive to disrupt the natural beauty of the surrounding context. With a goal of preserving this beauty, we embraced the vernacular style of tradi-

THE CITY IS A COMPOSITION OF SEVERAL MOUNTAIN CHAINS AND A DRAMATIC COASTLINE ALONG THE ARABIAN SEA. THIS BLEND WAS THE INSPIRATION BEHIND DESIGNING A CASCADING OR ‘STEPPED’ BUILDING RATHER THAN BUILDING A DUBAI-LIKE HIGH-RISE TOWER, WHICH HAD COULD DISRUPT THE CITY’S NATURAL CONTEXT.

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CASE STUDY GOLDEN BEACH

In its design, Burt Hill had to bear in mind the very different lifestyles and traditions of residents of Sharjah versus those of Fujairah residents

tion to the emirate and we infused it with modern features so as to bring lavishness into the interior space. While aiming to strike a balance between modern and vernacular design, the modern aspects of the design concentrate on the type of local materials used, converting exterior design elements such as pergolas, niches and archways into a simpler edition that is more representative of Fujairah’s vernacular. On the other hand, for the interiors, luxurious and contemporary elements that are more commonly associated with modern design—including the use of marble, chandeliers and stylistic frosted glass for most of the handrails— would be more appropriate. The design must retain the essence of Fujairah’s traditions, yet it should deliver a contemporary feel that maintains a distinct character. For instance, we simplified and ‘modernized’ the traditional screens,

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still using wood to represent the lattice work, as well as keeping its original function as a shading device.

CHALLENGES: DESIGNING FOR DIFFERENT LIFESTYLES Resort design is unique in that the needs of the local population must be met as well as those of the hundreds of nationalities that will inevitably visit the resort. In the case of Golden Beach, there was an added challenge in that the nationals are divided into two very different groups: residents of Fujairah and residents of Sharjah. In Fujairah, for example, the local residents enjoy a very private lifestyle. Natives of Fujairah are oriented towards large families and are committed to family life from an early age. Hence, they prefer to spend the weekends with a larger group of relatives rather than with friends. In addition, Burt Hill had to consider that the

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 03.09 | www.constructionweekonline.com


CASE STUDY GOLDEN BEACH

emirate of Fujairah is almost dissected by Khor Fakkan, which geographically surrounds Fujairah and is part of the Emirate of Sharjah, which strictly prohibits the consumption of alcohol. While cultural differences certainly played a role in its design, the common thread of creating an oasis in Golden Beach, unified the groups and allowed Burt Hill to create a seamless design despite having practically two separate resorts to accommodate the local population. Burt Hill designed alcohol-free, serviced hotel apartments—including large dining rooms, several bedrooms and bathrooms, kitchenettes and living rooms—on one end of the resort. These apartments are designed to be a ‘home away from home’, for nationals who enjoy relaxing, cooking and socialising with other family members away from everyday life. The ‘Fujairah nationals’ section of the resort needed to also cater to the expatriates, so from a design standpoint, this meant understanding the dichotomy of locals and expats. While locals are often seeking a new fashionable lifestyle that maintains some of the old traditional character of the region, expatriate life can often seem short-term, fast-paced and stressed out. In summary, Burt Hill’s solution was to divide the resort into two sections, one to meet the diverse demands of nationals and residents, and the other section to cater

BY DESIGNING THE RESORT IN A VILLAGE-LIKE CLUSTER, WE WERE ABLE TO ESTABLISH A STRONG RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE TRADITIONAL CHARACTER OF THE FISHING VILLAGES THAT ONCE DOMINATED THE REGION AND THE CONTEMPORARY LIVING THAT ACCOMMODATES OUR PRESENT LIVING STYLE.

The cascading design of Golden Beach was inspired by the nearby Hajjar Mountains

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CASE STUDY GOLDEN BEACH

to UAE tourists travelling to Fujairah. This design incorporates hotel suites that resemble a typical hotel, which will serve as a place of respite.

All rooms have either an oceanview or a view of the Hajjar Mountains

OPPORTUNITY: ENHANCING LIVES THROUGH CONSCIENTIOUS DESIGN With any project, architects have the opportunity to enhance the lives of the people that will live, learn or work within the structure, but with resort design there is a limited opportunity to deliver that ‘world apart’ experience. The hotel location is considered one of the most essential locations in the district of Faqait. It is edged by quiet farmlands, stunning mountain chains and a picturesque coastline. The hotel entrance, on the other hand, is located directly on a main street. This unique positioning provided an opportunity to use design to create a barrier between the noisy street and the calm beach and to ensure that all guests experience the restorative pleasures of the site’s location. Moreover, most of the rooms have an ocean view, yet some of them also incorporate a view of the adjacent farmlands and distant Hajar Mountains. When designing a resort, one must always consider all the elements that surround the site and work with them in the design to extend their value to the hotel room and beyond. In an effort to beckon guests to what is, to most people, the main attraction at Golden Beach, the Burt Hill team designed a diving centre on the beach to encourage

THE ‘FUJAIRAH NATIONALS’ SECTION OF THE RESORT NEEDED TO ALSO CATER TO THE EXPATRIATES, SO FROM A DESIGN STANDPOINT, THIS MEANT UNDERSTANDING THE DICHOTOMY OF LOCALS AND EXPATS. WHILE LOCALS ARE OFTEN SEEKING A NEW FASHIONABLE LIFESTYLE THAT MAINTAINS SOME OF THE OLD TRADITIONAL CHARACTER OF THE REGION, EXPATRIATE LIFE CAN OFTEN SEEM SHORT-TERM, FAST-PACED AND STRESSED OUT.

Golden Beach’s location is considered one of the most essential in Faqait

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CASE STUDY GOLDEN BEACH

Burt Hill saw Golden Beach as an opportunity to enhance people’s lives through its design use of what will become the site’s worldrenowned coral reefs and bio-diversity.

MARKET: ON THE BRINK OF A BOOM Development in Fujairah is in its infancy but is expected to explode in the next few years. Several new developments are occurring along the coast, which is about 50km from Fujairah City. Golden Beach is located within the ‘developing market’ area and should benefit from the newly developing infrastructure in the area as well. The most recent population data indicates that Fujairah attracts about 214,000 tourists each year and has an additional 120,000 residents from which to draw interest. The Burt Hill design team worked closely with Economics Research Associates (ERA) to better understand the market for this type of development. Its research showed that 11 new hotels—3,300 rooms in total—are planned to enter the market by 2011. While there is a lack of existing infrastructure, it is a harbinger of what lies ahead for a location that has been called one of the “Jewels of Arabia”.

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THE MOST RECENT POPULATION DATA INDICATES THAT FUJAIRAH ATTRACTS ABOUT 214,000 TOURISTS EACH YEAR AND HAS AN ADDITIONAL 120,000 RESIDENTS FROM WHICH TO DRAW INTEREST....RESEARCH SHOWS THAT 11 NEW HOTELS—3,300 ROOMS IN TOTAL—ARE PLANNED TO ENTER THE [FUJAIRAH] MARKET BY 2011.

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FEATURE ARCHITECTURAL GLASS

Solar power is one resource in which the Gulf is not lacking

LIVING IN A GLASS HOUSE EXAMINING WHO, WHAT, WHY AND HOW MUCH OF GLASS IN ARCHITECTURE Words: Jeff Roberts

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Architecture is about creating space. Whether its space to live, work or play, architects design structures to be experienced. To remove the experiential element from a structure is to render it a sculpture rather than a piece of architecture. Few materials are as directly responsible for influencing the way in which users experience a structure than the glass used in its facade. Whether its intent is form or function – and especially if it’s being combined with cutting-edge technology – the versatility of glass is unparalleled. But none of this is new information. There’s an ancient Chinese proverb that says: “You want your horse to look good, but you also don’t want him to have to eat grass.” In an architectural context, this simply means that a pretty building may look nice, but a building that functions efficiently is equally important. While state-of-the-art materials, including glass, may be more expensive initially, contractors, developers and value engineers would do well to approve those higher glass budgets, especially if they want a building that considers the comfort of its users. ARCHITECT caught up with building professionals around the world to talk about the importance of using the ‘right’ glass for the right project in the Gulf.

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 03.09 | www.constructionweekonline.com

WHO’S MAKING THE DECISION? Richard Wagner, architect at dxb lab and former vice president of the Architecture Association of the UAE (aaUAE), describes an ideal scenario. “In an ideal nutshell, the architect specifies the type of glass, the engineer verifies that choice, the contractor builds it, and the developer sells a quality project as desired by the clients.” It doesn’t take an astrophysicist to know that in Gulf architecture, things don’t often work that way. In a region where quality can quickly be supplanted by quantity, architects often struggle with contractors and value engineers convincing clients that using a less advanced product will have little influence on how the building looks or performs. Thom Bohlen, (AIA, NCARB) chief technical officer at the Middle East Centre for Sustainable Development (MECSD), understands the importance of consulting with qualified professionals when considering glass. “Architects normally specify glazing for their buildings, but typically they get input from structural engineers, glazing contractors, glazing suppliers and, of course, from the green building consultant,” says Bohlen. “The appropriateness of the Uvalues of the system, transmittance factors and shading coefficients can all greatly


FEATURE ARCHITECTURAL GLASS

Germany has set the standard throughout Europe in harnessing solar energy

IN AN IDEAL NUTSHELL, THE ARCHITECT SPECIFIES THE TYPE OF GLASS, THE ENGINEER VERIFIES THAT CHOICE, THE CONTRACTOR BUILDS IT, AND THE DEVELOPER SELLS A QUALITY PROJECT AS DESIRED BY THE CLIENTS. RICHARD WAGNER SOMFY Somfy’s internal blinds allow users to alter the look and feel of any setting. The blinds help control heat transfer, reduce glare and help protect your furniture and floor coverings from fading – all at the touch of a button. Somfy’s internal blinds come in several styles including: aluminium/wooden venetian blinds, pleated blind, roller blind, fabric Roman blind, nets or curtains. For the full range of products/services, check out www.somfy.com.

SCHÜCO Schüco’s fully integrated PV systems turn sunlight into electricity, delivering free electricity to your home. It’s third-generation, highly integrated thermal systems captures heat from the sun, uses it to heat water and then stores the water in a highefficiency tank for use in the home. For the full range of products/services, check out www.schueco.com.

SCHEUTEN By applying advanced coating technology, Scheuten can now develop and produce coatings which combine ample light penetration with effective solar control. Scheuten Glass offers a combination of solar and efficient heat reflecting properties with Isolide Brilliant glazing, representing the latest in technology in this area. Every combination of Isolide Brilliant possesses a U-value equal to that of the superior Low-E categories. Isolide Brilliant affords architects almost unlimited possibilities for designing transparent facades without making concessions to interior climate control. The colour of this insulating glass product appears neutral from the outside. For the full range of products and services, check out www.scheuten.com.

affect energy consumption in buildings.” All too often, however, developers or contractors in the Gulf decide on a type of glass or facade system depending on budget or preference of origin. Specialty engineers are consulted only in the most complex scenarios and architects are left voiceless in the great debate about money.

HOW IMPORTANT IS THE ‘RIGHT’ GLASS FOR THE RIGHT PROJECT? Matching the glass system with the style of the building and the context in which it sits is extremely important. The quality of the glass, in terms of structural/physical/thermal properties, is paramount to achieving a building that looks and functions properly. “Especially in hot regions like the Gulf, the energy performance and comfort levels of a building clothed in glass are totally dominated by the choice of glass,” explains

James Law, chairman and founder of Hong Kong-based James Law Cybertecture International (JLCI). Having designed several projects for the Middle East and India – and employing a highly futuristic brand of architecture that melds the form and function of a building with cutting-edge technology – using glass that does what it promises is crucial for JLCI. “Using the wrong glass can have disastrous outcomes, including making the building inefficient and unpleasant as well as using unnecessary levels of energy to keep occupants cool,” adds Law. Because glass can range from fully transparent to fully opaque or reflective, and can be specified in virtually any tint or colour, aesthetics is less of an initial concern than function. As Kareem Negm, LEED AP and architect at Dar Al-Handasah (Shair and Partners), points out, ‘function’ in the Middle East means more

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FEATURE ARCHITECTURAL GLASS

Japan is one of the largest consumers of solar glass solutions. Image: Scheuten

than just energy-efficiency. Of course, double glazed, low-U glass should be specified externally to reduce solar gain but because of religious and cultural privacy issues, residential projects will almost always opt for fully reflective or very dark tints, regardless of efficiency levels of the glass. Internally, however, aesthetics take priority. “Fritted glass for shower enclosures can be used in hotel room to deliver light and maintain privacy,” explains Negm. “For commercial applications, sandblasted logos and engravings enhance branding and corporate identity.” Wagner agrees that the choice of glass is important where aesthetics are concerned, but given the architectural trend of using massive curtain walling in the UAE, the environmental and climatological aspects of glass cannot be ignored and the building standards need to follow suit. “Standards for thermal insulation of building envelopes – which includes glass – are far too tolerant given the harsh summer climate we endure,” explains Wagner.

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ESPECIALLY IN HOT REGIONS LIKE THE GULF, THE ENERGY PERFORMANCE AND COMFORT LEVELS OF A BUILDING CLOTHED IN GLASS ARE TOTALLY DOMINATED BY THE CHOICE OF GLASS. JAMES LAW “This allows for many loopholes during the construction process and ultimately can cause buyers and operators horrendous long-term running costs.”

IS GLASS A LIABILITY IN GULF ARCHITECTURE? In the more moderate climates of Europe, North America and parts of Asia, glass can be an extremely versatile material that can simultaneously addresses efficiency and design challenges. But, climates in the Gulf

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 03.09 | www.constructionweekonline.com

are harsher; they require materials that function at higher levels and, therefore, require careful consideration during design and specification. Chad Oppenheim, founder and principal of Miami-based Oppenheim Architecture + Design, often says: “Building glass refrigerators in the desert doesn’t make a lot of sense.” His logic is doubly poignant given his experience working in a solar-heavy climates and the number of projects OA+D has completed in Miami.


FEATURE ARCHITECTURAL GLASS

Central Station in Berlin displays solar glass solutions by Scheuten

SAINT-GOBAIN Be it thermal insulation, acoustics, safety/security, self-cleaning or solar control, Saint-Gobain Glass has an extensive range of high performance solutions for the construction market. Products directly related to solar control include: Planitherm Total, Planitherm 45, Cool-Lite, Bioclean Cool-Lite and Priva-Lite. For a complete list of products and services, check out www.saint-gobain-glass.com.

EnergyGlass Specialists in building integrated photovoltaics (BiPV), EnergyGlass uses poly vinyl butyral (PVB) for its PV modules. PVB is typically used for layering the safety glass in curtain walls, glazing for roofs, parapets/balconies, shading windows, greenhouses and noise barriers. EnergyGlass products have been researched, developed and supported by the Universities of Milan and Turin. For a complete list of products and services, check out www.energyglass.eu.

ROMAG Romag is a UK-based manufacturer of specialist transparent composites to the security, renewable energy, architectural and specialist transportation markets. Romag’s key areas of activity are the supply of PV solar panels and glass and glazing products to the renewable energy, architectural, safety/security and transportation markets. For a complete list of products and services, check out www.romag.

So, the obvious question remains, is glass a liability in the Gulf? The architects, engineers and LEED APs interviewed for this article suggest it just might be. “I think any material can be a ‘liability’ if used improperly or unwisely, or where all considerations in the use of that material are not considered,” says Bohlen. “Well if you look at it from an environmental point of view then yes. We’re creating glass boxes that are heat magnets. They look nice but often trap the heat inside and thus cost a lot of money to cool. This cooling process harms the environment in a tremendous way,” agrees Negm. Wagner takes the argument a step further to suggest that the ‘liability’ aspect of glass doesn’t rest wholly with the material itself. “There is always an element of liability in glass, no matter where you are located,” he explains. “The reason that there appears to be a lack of versatility in this market can be largely attributed to the fact that the local manufacturing industry has not developed a diverse and feasible enough repertoire,

which in return has hampered construction of avant-garde designs.... At the same time we have to consider the environmental aspect of shipping tonnes of products halfway around the globe, which adds another great liability,” adds Wagner.

THE FINAL WORD It seems clear that the key to using glass correctly and responsibly lies in the ability of architects, contractors, developers and engineers to be collectively mindful of its climatic challenges and specify the product in conscientious ways. “Just like any where else, glass can be a versatile material in the Middle East, but it must be used in conjunction with the correct application and specification to meet the specific requirements of the region,” Bohlen insists. “The [challenges] include high heat and humidity, blowing sand particulates and plenty of solar gain. Anytime you can avoid the sun’s rays from directly striking the glass you have gone a long way towards making the facade and interior more efficient.”

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SPOTLIGHT DRAW LINK GROUP

SERVICE PROVIDER SPOTLIGHT ON ARCHITECTURE Daousser Chennoufi Chairman Draw Link Group Have you worked on anything our readers would recognize? Draw Link is busy working on several projects – some of which are still under construction – but once finished, they will be easily recognisable for the originality of their concept. Some examples include: the Bab B’Har hotel resort in Fujairah – which won an architectural award from Cityscape – Boutique Hotel Maison D’Hotel in Jumeirah and a small boutique hotel in Deira. What inspires you in your work? My inspiration comes from the experience of living life and travelling. Architecture is constantly evolving and boundaries are always being pushed so there is no limit to our creative potential. Do you feel that there is a lack of context throughout some Middle Eastern cities? Throughout the Middle East, there are very few projects with concept, mostly due to the construction boom and shortened timelines. In my opinion, Dubai is the only city that has context in its organization. Dubai is an exemplar of the ‘modern’ Middle Eastern city. A lot of other cities lack concept in their development.

What are the benefits of working for an organisation like Draw Link that provides services to so many sectors? No matter which service we’re providing, we start with the original concept. Then we materialise it in architecture and execute all the construction and MEP works. Our final step is to finish the interior and ensure the quality of the final product. We can also provide our clients with marketing consultation, as we obviously know the strong points of the project. In some cases, we arrange an opening event to monitor first reactions to our project. We’re also trained to deal with a large network of suppliers and contractors. In the case of Draw Link Group, it’s much easier when you have all the capabilities in-house. Because we all work together as a team and all of our competencies are interrelated, it makes the work less complicated and improves overall quality. In an industry full of challenges, connecting skill sets helps you learn from different fields and increase your professional capacity. Our biggest advantage is that we can offer our clients a complete range of services. For every project, we don’t just offer a simple drawing or a consultation, we offer a complete concept.

ARCHITECTURE IS CONSTANTLY EVOLVING AND BOUNDARIES ARE ALWAYS BEING PUSHED SO THERE IS NO LIMIT TO OUR CREATIVE POTENTIAL.

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SPOTLIGHT DRAW LINK GROUP

THE BEST INTERIORS ARE THOSE THAT MAKE PEOPLE FEEL GOOD. PERHAPS THEY COME IN THE FORM OF AN OLD COFFEE SHOP IN TUNIS OR AN APARTMENT IN PARIS.

ON INTERIOR DESIGN Salma Aloulu & Fahda Barrak Senior Interior Designers Draw Link Group What inspires you in your work? Our main inspiration comes from nature and history, we also draw from that which we see or learn or know. Everything we see and experience has the potential to inspire us. And, the best way to derive new inspirations is by travelling. Have you worked on anything our readers would recognize? For example, we did Mosque Abu Manara in Jumeirah as well as series of local restaurants – one of which won a Commercial Interior Design award. We’re also doing the JAL Hotel in Dubai and several luxury villas around the city. With the tight timelines, how sophisticated is interior design in the ME? Are you always able to do your best work? Here is the challenge: doing your best despite such a timeline; working fast and reaching perfection. We always do everything to protect and define the concept. We treat every project as the biggest and most important. Above all, the most important element is to ensure the integrity of the concept and the quality of the project. Are there benefits to working so closely with project managers, graphic designers and architects at

a comprehensive service provider like the Draw Link Group? The work we do in our teams allows us to exchange thoughts and share experiences – ultimately it helps all of us do our jobs better. As architects and designers, we can switch from working with design teams to architecture teams quite seamlessly. At the end of the day, we all work very closely; it is a very creative atmosphere. Do you think the economic slowdown with create fewer projects and thus, better quality? The slowdown will allow us to provide better service to our clients and spend more time elaborating concepts. While other regions are seeing slowdowns, in the Middle East, it simply allows us to work at normal speed and achieve the best quality. So the slowdown might actually be beneficial for the market and the client. What is your favourite interior that you didn’t design? The best interiors are those that make people feel good. Perhaps they come in the form of an old coffee shop in Tunis or an apartment in Paris. Projects like these might be done without professional designers but with a lot of human intelligence. In projects likes these, there is poetry and sophistication.

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SHOWCASE SERVICE PROVIDERS

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The Waterman Group is a multi-disciplinary engineering and environmental consultancy, delivering small and large projects around the world. Over the course of half a century, Waterman’s successfully engineered projects and ingenious design solutions have been based on providing practical and costeffective solutions to clients. Waterman’s regional offices are in Dubai and Abu Dhabi.

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Halcrow specialises in the provision of planning, design and management services for infrastructure development worldwide. With interests in transportation, water, maritime and property, the company is undertaking commissions in over 70 countries from a network of global offices. In the Middle East, Halcrow provides transport, water, property, development, environmental and energy consultancy services across a geographic region extending from

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MOTT MACDONALD

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From energy, buildings, transport, water and the environment to health and education, industry and communications, Mott MacDonald has experience in civil, structural, mechanical and electrical engineering disciplines, with a number of staff considered to be authorities in their fields. Transforming ideas into reality is our forte, and the holistic approach to engineering consultancy is rooted in the full range of skills covering all stages of the development cycle.

BeyonDesigns Inc, a Dubai relocated enterprise, is a premier polyurethane manufacturer of architectural features, bringing to life, a unique blend of artistic beauty coupled with technical excellence. Established in 2004, it offers to its clients, an assortment of embellishments, patterning the essence of coral stone using state-of-the-art molding technology. The company carries with it, several years of extensive experience from Canada.

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Bringing ideas to life Building envelopes made by Kalzip® BurJuman Shopping Mall · Dubai +++ Club House Dubai International Marine Club +++ Deira City Centre · Al Ain +++ Conference Centre and Sports Pavillon - Jumeirah Beach Resort Complex · Dubai +++ Deira City Centre - Cinema Exten. · Dubai +++ Do Centre · Doha - Qatar +++ Nad Al Sheba Grandstand · Dubai +++ Sharjah Mega Mall +++ Dubai International School +++ BMW / Rover Showroom · Kuwait +++ Media City - Phase 3 · Dubai +++ Royal Flight Hangar · Muscat - Oman +++ Dubai Autodrome ness Park +++ Granada Shopping Centre · Riyadh +++ Khalifa Sports City - Sports Hall Building · Doha - Qatar +++ Mall of the Emirates - Ski Slope · Dubai +++ IKEA Hyper Market DFC Zone 4 · Dubai +++ Zayed University Dubai +++ Sharjah Internation ort +++ The Avenues · Kuwait +++ Dubai Mall +++ Dubai Festival City - Crowne Plaza Hotel +++ WP - The Knuckle at Dubai Festival City +++ Sheikh Khalifa Sports City · Manama +++ NOC Building · Bahrain +++ The Avenues Extension, the Lakes · Kuwait + ain City Centre · Manama +++ BurJuman Shopping Mall · Dubai +++ Club House Dubai International Marine Club +++ Deira City Centre · Al Ain +++ Conference Centre and Sports Pavillon - Jumeirah Beach Resort Complex · Dubai +++ Deira City Centr ma Exten. · Dubai +++ Doha City Centre · Doha - Qatar +++ Nad Al Sheba Grandstand · Dubai +++ Sharjah Mega Mall +++ Dubai International School +++ BMW / Rover Showroom · Kuwait +++ Media City - Phase 3 · Dubai +++ Royal Flight Hangar · Musc man +++ Dubai Autodrome & Business Park +++ Granada Shopping Centre · Riyadh +++ Khalifa Sports City - Sports Hall Building · Doha - Qatar +++ Mall of the Emirates - Ski Slope · Dubai +++ IKEA Hyper Market DFC Zone 4 · Dubai +++ Zayed Univers ai +++ Sharjah International Airport +++ The Avenues · Kuwait +++ Dubai Mall +++ Dubai Festival City - Crowne Plaza Hotel +++ WP - The Knuckle at Dubai Festival City +++ Sheikh Khalifa Sports City · Manama +++ NOC Building · Bahrain +++ The Avenu nsion, the Lakes · Kuwait +++ Bahrain City Centre · Manama +++ BurJuman Shopping Mall · Dubai +++ Club House Dubai International Marine Club +++ Deira City Centre · Al Ain +++ Conference Centre and Sports Pavillon - Jumeirah Beach Resort Comp bai +++ Deira City Centre - Cinema Exten. · Dubai +++ Doha City Centre · Doha - Qatar +++ Nad Al Sheba Grandstand · Dubai +++ Sharjah Mega Mall +++ Dubai International School +++ BMW / Rover Showroom · Kuwait +++ Media City - Phase 3 · Dubai + al Flight Hangar · Muscat - Oman +++ Dubai Autodrome & Business Park +++ Granada Shopping Centre · Riyadh +++ Khalifa Sports City - Sports Hall Building · Doha - Qatar +++ Mall of the Emirates - Ski Slope · Dubai +++ IKEA Hyper Market DFC Zone ai +++ Zayed University Dubai +++ Sharjah International Airport +++ The Avenues · Kuwait +++ Dubai Mall +++ Dubai Festival City - Crowne Plaza Hotel +++ WP - The Knuckle at Dubai Festival City +++ Sheikh Khalifa Sports City · Manama +++ NOC Buildi

For further information call T +971 - 4 887 3232 · kalzip@emirates.net.ae · www.kalzip.com

To advertise in this section, please contact Keiron Gallagher at +971.4435.6349 or keiron.gallagher@itp.com

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ARCHITECTURE COMPARE & CONTRAST

BATTLE OF OF... ...

GUGGENHEIM MUSEUMS

SOLOMON R. GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM

GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM BILBAO

Location: New York City, USA Type of building: Museum of modern art Architect: Frank Lloyd Wright Design style: Modernist Construction system: Concrete Inspiration: Overlooking Central Park, New York’s only natural respite, Wright drew inspiration from nature and wished to create a building evocative of the plasticity of the organic form in contrast the built environment of New York. Construction timeline: 1956 to 1959

Location: Bilbao, Spain Type of building: Museum of modern art Architect: Frank Gehry Design style: De-constructivist, expressionist modern Construction system: Steel frame, titanium sheathing Inspiration: The radically sculptured, organic curves of the building have been designed to appear random, and Gehry has expressed that “the randomness of the curves are designed to catch the light.” Construction timeline: 1997

Fact: Wright was against Solomon R. Guggenheim’s choice of location for the museum, believing that New York was overbuilt and lacking architectural merit. “I can think of several more desirable places in the world to build his great museum… but we will have to try New York,” Wright wrote in 1949.

Fact: The Guggenheim Museum Bilbao can be seen in the opening sequence of the 1999 James Bond film, The World is not Enough, where Bond steals money from a corrupt Swiss banker affiliated with the villain Renard’s terrorist network.

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MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 03.09 | www.constructionweekonline.com


Controllable drapery track by Lutron ®

set your design in motion at the touch of a button Add convenience and elegance to the space you design with Lutron controllable drapery track. •

At the touch of a button, create smooth, elegant transitions of light with your window treatments.

Move drapes to your favorite setting with one touch of the silver button.

Options include ripplefold and pinch pleat styles, single or dual track systems, and custom curved tracks.

Sivoia® drapery remote (actual size)

For more information, please visit www.lutron.com/meqed, call +971-4-2991224 or email to mead@lutron.com ©2009 Lutron Electronics Co., Inc.

Design in Living  

Design in Living magazine, Silahkan download klik tautan ini: http://www.ziddu.com/download/12350405/DESIGNinliving4.pdf.html

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