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DECEMBER/JANUARY 2007 $3.99 U.S./$4.99 Canada

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Cooking Magazine in North America!

Edited by a thousand country cooks!

Celebrate an

Old-Fashioned

Christmas


December/January 2007

24 “Go Nuts” Contest Winners 39 Cooking for a Crowd

16 Snacks & Appetizers Served on

Our Cover... Winter delights you’ll make again and again— Yuletide Pound Cake, Cranberry-Topped Lemon Tarts and Cappuccino Truffles—are on p. 49.

Features 6 Cookie Classics

22 My Mom’s Best Meal

8 Nostalgic Sweets

24 ‘Go Nuts’ Contest

Readers share festive favorites

Treats that evoke warm memories

10 Celebrate with Cranberries Very-berry bread, coffee cake and more

12 Gifts from the Kitchen Wrap up some delectable presents

18 A Healthy New Year Count down to a great menu!

A twist on holiday turkey

Take a crack at our top picks

54 Brunch with ‘Rudolph’ Theme brightens fun gathering

66 Dog ‘Bone’ Treats

Bake ’em for your favorite pooch

68 Frosty Finale

Cool, colorful peppermint pie


Departments New Recipe Contest

43

Touring Country Kitchens

44

Time-Saving Tips

47

Ask Our Test Kitchen Team 57

18 Good Food That’s Good for You

6 Cookie Classics

Does Anyone Have…?

58

My “Secret” Ingredient

60

Our Family’s Favorite Grace 60 Stirring Comments

62

1,000 Taste of Home Field Editors

63

Here’s Part of Our Staff

63

Ted’s Toothpick Contest

65

Recipe Index

67

66 Dog “Bone” Treats

More Recipes 14 Editor’s Favorite Meal Spectacular roast is so easy

16 Super Snacks & Appetizers Savory ideas for merry munching

14 Editor’s Favorite Meal

21 Potluck Pleasers Christmas brunch buffet

24 Clip & Keep Recipe Cards Lip-smacking seasonal fare

46 A Complete Meal in Minutes Quick steak dinner satisfies

48 Just Desserts Prepared with festive touches

56 Feed Your Family for $1.90 a Plate Chicken stands in for ribs

59 Cooking for One or Two A couple of irresistible entrees

10 Celebrate with Cranberries

61 My Recipe Won Luscious layered pumpkin dessert

PLUS Means More for You! For subscriber-only BONUS recipes and features, visit www.tasteofhome.com/plus. You’ll find… • Top 10 Christmas cookies • More cranberry recipes and tips • A healthy New Year’s brunch • A 30-minute meal menu • More holiday desserts • A fast, frugal meal


Table Talk

Celebrate

an old-fashioned Christmas with this festive issue as your guide! Every page is sparkling with holiday cheer… • Bite into wonderful Christmas cookies! You’ll find a selection of readers’ favorites starting on page 6.

Editor Ann Kaiser Managing Editor Barbara Schuetz Senior Art Director Sandra L. Ploy Associate Food Editors Diane Werner RD, Coleen Martin Assistant Food Editor Karen Scales Senior Home Economist Patricia Schmeling

• Gifts from the kitchen are sure to please. Find just the right goodies for relatives, friends, teachers and others you want to remember on pages 12-13 and scattered throughout the issue.

Senior Recipe Editor Sue A. Jurack

• “Go Nuts” with prize-winning recipes from our contest. Pecans, pistachios, cashews and more star in the luscious lineup.Turn to page 24 for a taste.

Copy Editor S.K. Enk

Yum! Halloween Family Fun Spirited by the spooky fun in our last issue, Jeff and Lisa Voisin and their kids created a sweet plot.“Our family spent some quality time in the kitchen making the wonderful Tombstone Treats (Nov/Dec),” Lisa writes from Muskego,Wisconsin.“While Dad decorated the cookies, Sara melted chocolate and Eric made the coconut green. Mom supervised and had a fantastic time. The treats were a hit at a Girl Scout Halloween party!” Faraway Holiday Tasted Like Home Taste of Home helped warm up “an uncommon Christmas” last year for Jennifer and Ben Burkholder of La Mirada,California.“We’d recently moved here from Pennsylvania for graduate school and could not travel home for Christmas due to jobs and finances. “Knowing the day would be a little lonely, I wanted to make it special,” Jennifer recalls.“So, before I left for work on Christmas Eve, I made Christmas Breakfast Casserole (Dec/Jan ’06) and Effortless Eggnog (Dec/Jan ’06) as well as a trusted cherry tea cake recipe from my mom. “Ben put the casserole in the oven,set the table and put the finishing touches on our little apartment, so it was festive and ready for Christmas brunch when I got home in the morning.” After a delicious meal, the couple went to church, then to the beach! “We missed our families,” Jennifer says,“but had a memorable day thanks to the warm southern California weather,each other’s company and a few recipes that made it taste like home!” Come See Us in Greendale You’ll discover mountains of Taste of Home cookbooks at bargain prices…great values on kitchen gear…and see a TOH Test Kitchen in action at the new Taste of Home Outlet. Part of the Reiman Publications Visitor Center in charming Greendale,Wisconsin,the TOH Outlet is a great place to shop for last-minute Christmas gifts. Stop in later this winter for a “cabinfever cure” or plan a spring visit (Greendale’s Spring Festival is May 19). Click on “Visitor Center” at www.reimanpub.com for more information. Groups are welcome! Have a Tasteful Christmas Tree? If you decorate a tree with a food or cooking theme, we’d love to see it. Do you hang cookies, cranberry garlands, kitchen miniatures? Shelley Wiltshire of Olney, Maryland decks a holiday tree with a collection of silver tea balls her mother started years ago. Please send us photos and a description of your tree. (see Contributor Guidelines on page 62).

Recipe Editors Mary King, Christine Rukavena Assistant Editor Melissa Phaneuf Editorial Assistants Jane Stasik, Mary Ann Koebernik Graphic Art Associates Ellen Lloyd, Kathy Crawford Test Kitchen Home Economists Ann Liebergen, Peggy Fleming RD, Tina Johnson, Marie Parker, Annie Rose, Wendy Stenman, Amy Welk-Thieding RD; Contributing: Dot Vartan Test Kitchen Assistants Rita Krajcir, Kris Lehman, Sue Megonigle, Megan Taylor Photographers Rob Hagen (Senior), Dan Roberts, Jim Wieland Associate Photographer Lori Foy Set Stylists Jenny Bradley Vent; Assistant: Melissa Haberman; Contributing: Stephanie Marchese, Julie Ferron, Nancy Seaman, Grace Natoli Sheldon, Gail Engeldahl Food Stylists Joylyn Trickel (Senior), Sarah Thompson; Assistants: Kate Baumann, Kaitlyn Besasie; Contributing: Diane Armstrong, Suzanne Breckenridge, Sue Draheim, Mary Franz, Julie Herzfeldt, Jennifer Janz, Jim Rude Photo Studio Coordinator Suzanne Kern President Barbara Newton Senior Vice President, Editor in Chief Catherine Cassidy Creative Director Ardyth Cope Vice President, Advertising Sponsorship Director J.P. Perkins Founder Roy Reiman Vol. 14, No. 6, December/January 2007 © Reiman Media Group, Inc., 2006. “TASTE OF HOME” (ISSN 1071-5878) (USPS 010-444) (Canadian GST No. 876052820 RT). (Canadian Distribution) Publications Mail Agreement No. 40065693. “Periodicals postage paid at Greendale, WI and additional mailing offices.” Published bimonthly, by Reiman Publications, for people who love practical cooking. Printed in USA. Taste of Home is a registered trademark of Reiman Media Group, Inc. Editorial offices: 5400 S. 60th St., Greendale WI 53129-1404. Send stamped return envelope with photos, manuscripts and inquiries. Material in this publication may not be reproduced in any form without permission. “ POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Taste of Home, P.O. Box 992, Greendale WI 53129-0992.” Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to: Customer Service, P.O. Box 905, Niagara Falls ON, L2E 7L1. Subscription prices in U.S.: $19.98 for 1 yr., $29.98 for 2 yrs., $39.98 for 3 yrs. (Canada: 1 yr., $23.98 CDN plus 6% GST or 14% HST, where applicable; international subscriptions: $25.98 per year, U.S. funds prepaid.) Send new subscriptions to P.O. Box 5294, Harlan IA 515930794. Allow 4-6 weeks. Questions About Your Subscription? Write to Taste of Home Customer Service, P.O. Box 991, Greendale WI 53129-0991; call 1-800/3446913; or E-mail subscriberservices@reimanpub.com. For address changes, include both old and new addresses. If the Post Office alerts us that your magazine is undeliverable, we have no further obligation unless we receive a corrected address within 1 year. Notice About Continuous Renewal: As a service to subscribers, we recently tried offering Continuous Renewal Service. If you are among the subscribers who signed up, please be advised that we have discontinued Continuous Renewal Service until further notice. To renew your subscription, please return one of the renewal notices you receive by mail or with your issues, or call 1-800/344-6913. Consumer Information: Reiman Publications may share information about you with reputable companies in order for them to offer you products and services of interest to you. If you would rather we not share information, please write to Reiman Publications Customer Service Mailing List, P.O. Box 991, Greendale WI 53129-0991.

Wishing you a delicious holiday season! —The Taste of Home Staff 4

Taste of Home • December/January 2007


Celebrate an

Gaily decorated cookies, fragrant gingerbread boys and steamed holiday pudding are among the tasty traditions that evoke memories—and inspire new ones! On the following pages, Taste of Home readers share treasured family recipes that make spirits merry year after year.


Cookie Classics These tempting cookie-plate choices include Cherry Almond Cups (left), Mincemeat Cookies and Chocolate Linzer Cookies.

From ovens

across America, these favorite Christmas cookies make a merry assortment. From frosted cutouts to standout stars, they bring sweet greetings.

Sour Cream Cutouts (Pictured on page 5)

Get 10 more of our editors’ favorite Christmas cookie recipes FREE at www.tasteofhome.com/plus.

❧ PREP: 30 min. + chilling ❧ BAKE: 15 min. per batch + cooling Rich and tender with a lovely vanilla flavor, these cute cutouts are sure to catch Santa’s eye! It wouldn’t be Christmas for Jane Grosvold of Holcombe, Wisconsin without them. 1 2 3 1 1 5-3/4 2 1/2 1/2 2

cup butter, softened cups sugar eggs cup (8 ounces) sour cream teaspoon vanilla extract cups all-purpose flour teaspoons baking powder teaspoon baking soda teaspoon salt cans (16 ounces each) vanilla frosting Gel food coloring of your choice In a large mixing bowl, cream butter and sugar. Beat in eggs, sour cream and vanilla. Combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt; gradually add to creamed mixture

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and mix well. Cover and refrigerate overnight. On a lightly floured surface, roll out dough to 1/8-in. thickness. Cut with floured cookie cutters. Place 1 in. apart on ungreased baking sheets. Bake at 375° for 12-15 minutes or until lightly browned. Remove to wire racks to cool. Tint some of the frosting with food coloring; decorate cookies as desired. Yield: about 6-1/2 dozen.

Lemon Butter Spritz (Pictured on page 5)

❧ PREP: 20 min. ❧ BAKE: 5 min. per batch + cooling Field editor Iola Egle of Bella Vista, Arkansas is a veteran baker who counts this lemony spritz variation among her best-loved recipes. 1 1-1/4 1 1 1 2-1/2 1/4 Glaze: 1 2 1/2 2

cup butter, softened cups confectioners’ sugar egg tablespoon lemon juice tablespoon grated lemon peel cups all-purpose flour teaspoon salt cup confectioners’ sugar tablespoons baking cocoa teaspoon vanilla extract to 3 tablespoons milk

In a large mixing bowl, cream butter and confectioners’ sugar. Beat in the egg, lemon juice and peel. Combine flour and salt; gradually add to creamed mixture and mix well. Using a cookie press fitted with a bar disk, form dough into long strips on ungreased baking sheets. Cut each strip into 2-1/4-in. pieces (do not separate pieces). Bake at 400° for 5-7 minutes or until set (do not brown). Cut into pieces again if necessary. Remove to wire racks to cool. For glaze, in a small bowl, combine confectioners’ sugar, cocoa, vanilla and enough milk to achieve desired consistency. Drizzle over cookies. Let stand until set. Yield: 4-1/2 dozen.

Cherry Almond Cups ❧ PREP: 25 min. + cooling ❧ BAKE: 20 min. per batch + cooling “To create these attractive mini tarts, I adapted a bar cookie recipe I had been making for many years,” writes Christine Kneebone of Hilbert, Wisconsin. “If you like almond flavor, this cookie is for you!” 1/2 1/2 1/2 1-1/4 1/4

cup butter, softened cup sugar teaspoon vanilla extract cups all-purpose flour teaspoon salt

Taste of Home • December/January 2007


In a small mixing bowl, cream butter and sugar. Beat in vanilla. Combine the flour and salt; gradually add to creamed mixture. Roll into 1-in. balls. Press dough onto the bottoms and up the sides of well-greased miniature muffin cups. Bake at 350° for 8-10 minutes or until lightly browned. Cool in pans on wire racks. In a small mixing bowl, beat almond paste, butter and sugar until smooth. Beat in eggs. Spoon 2 teaspoonfuls into each cooled cup; top each with a cherry. Bake at 350° for 16-18 minutes or until lightly browned and filling is set. Cool for 10 minutes before removing from pans to wire racks to cool completely. In a microwave-safe bowl, melt butter and chocolate; stir until smooth. Add the confectioners’ sugar, vanilla and enough milk to achieve desired consistency. Drizzle over cookies. Yield: 3 dozen.

Chocolate Linzer Cookies ❧ PREP: 30 min. + chilling ❧ BAKE: 10 min. per batch + cooling Living in the town of North Pole, it’s no surprise that Heather Peters enjoys Christmas baking! “My mom and I used to make these together,” she recalls. “Now that I’m married and live in Alaska, they remind me of home!” 3/4 1 2 1/2 2-1/3 1 1/2 1/2 1

cup butter, softened cup sugar eggs teaspoon almond extract cups all-purpose flour teaspoon baking powder teaspoon salt teaspoon ground cinnamon cup (6 ounces) semisweet chocolate chips, melted

www.tasteofhome.com

Confectioners’ sugar 6 tablespoons seedless raspberry jam In a small mixing bowl, cream butter and sugar. Add eggs, one at a time, beating well after each addition. Beat in extract. Combine the flour, baking powder, salt and cinnamon; gradually add to creamed mixture and mix well. Refrigerate for 1 hour or until easy to handle. Divide dough in half. On a lightly floured surface, roll out one portion to 1/8-in. thickness; cut with a 2-1/2-in. round cookie cutter. Roll out the remaining dough; cut with a 2-1/2-in. doughnut cutter so the center is cut out of each cookie. Place 1 in. apart on ungreased baking sheets. Bake at 350° for 8-10 minutes or until edges are lightly browned. Remove to wire racks to cool. Spread melted chocolate over the bottoms of solid cookies. Place cookies with cutout centers over chocolate. Sprinkle with confectioners’ sugar. Spoon 1/2 teaspoon jam in center of each cookie. Yield: 2 dozen.

Mincemeat Cookies ❧ PREP: 20 min. + chilling ❧ BAKE: 10 min. per batch Shhh! “Don’t reveal the ‘secret ingredient’ in this tender, chewy old-time cookie until after they take a taste,” suggests Lucie Fitzgerald of Spring Hill, Florida. cup butter, softened cup sugar, divided egg teaspoon vanilla extract cups all-purpose flour teaspoons baking powder teaspoon salt package (9 ounces) condensed mincemeat, cut into small pieces 1 egg white, lightly beaten

1/2 1 1 1 1-3/4 1-1/2 1/4 1

In a large mixing bowl, cream butter and 3/4 cup sugar. Beat in egg and vanilla. Combine the flour, baking powder and salt; gradually add to creamed mixture and mix well. Stir in mincemeat. Cover and refrigerate for 2 hours. Roll dough into 1-in. balls; dip into egg white and remaining sugar. Place sugar side up 2 in. apart on greased baking sheets. Bake at 375° for 10-12 minutes or until set. Remove to wire racks. Yield: 4 dozen.

Festive Stars (Above) ❧ PREP: 50 min. + chilling ❧ BAKE: 10 min. per batch + cooling Adding delightful dimension to a Christmas cookie assortment, these clever interlocking stars are shared by Caren Zimmerman of Franklin, Wisconsin. See the illustrations below for their easy assembly. 1/2 1/4 1 2 1 2-1/2 1 1/4 3/4

cup butter, softened cup shortening cup sugar eggs teaspoon vanilla extract cups all-purpose flour teaspoon baking powder teaspoon salt cup red colored sugar

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter, shortening and sugar. Beat in eggs and vanilla. Combine the flour, baking powder and salt; gradually add to creamed mixture and mix well. Chill for 1 hour or until easy to handle. On a lightly floured surface, roll out dough to 1/8-in. thickness. Cut with a floured 2-1/2in. five-point star-shaped cookie cutter. Cut a vertical slit between two points on each star to just above the center; spread dough apart to form a 1/4-in. opening. Place 1 in. apart on ungreased baking sheets. Sprinkle with colored sugar. Bake at 400° for 6-7 minutes or until edges begin to brown. Remove to wire racks to cool. Assemble by placing two stars together at slits. Yield: about 3 dozen.

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Food for Thought: An egg is always an adventure; the next one may be different. —Oscar Wilde

Filling: 1 can (8 ounces) almond paste, cut into cubes 1/4 cup butter, softened 1/4 cup sugar 2 eggs 18 each red and green maraschino cherries, patted dry Topping: 1 tablespoon butter 1 square (1 ounce) unsweetened chocolate 1/2 cup confectioners’ sugar 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 to 2 tablespoons milk


Festive treats that evoke warm memories are more than welcome this time of year.



Nostalgic Sweets Simple Stollen (Above) ❧ PREP: 25 min. ❧ BAKE: 40 min. + cooling “When it comes to seasonal sweets, this easy Christmas stollen is a recipe I can count on,” notes field editor Shirley Glaab of Hattiesburg, Mississippi. “It’s made with baking powder instead of yeast, so it requires no rising.” 2-1/4 1/2 1-1/2 1/4 7 1 1/2 1/2 1/3 1 1/2 1/2

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cups all-purpose flour cup sugar teaspoons baking powder teaspoon salt tablespoons cold butter, divided cup ricotta cheese cup chopped mixed candied fruit cup raisins cup slivered almonds, toasted teaspoon vanilla extract teaspoon almond extract teaspoon grated lemon peel

1 egg 1 egg yolk Confectioners’ sugar In a large bowl, combine the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Cut in 6 tablespoons butter until mixture resembles fine crumbs. Stir in the ricotta, candied fruit, raisins, almonds, extracts, lemon peel, egg and yolk just until moistened. Turn onto a floured surface; knead five times. Roll dough into a 10-in. x 8-in. oval. Fold a long side over to within 1 in. of opposite side; press edge lightly to seal. Place on a greased baking sheet; curve ends slightly. Bake at 350° for 40-45 minutes or until golden brown. Melt remaining butter; brush over loaf. Remove to a wire rack to cool completely. Dust with confectioners’ sugar. Yield: 1 loaf. Editor’s Note: This recipe does not contain yeast.

Steamed Chocolate Pudding (Left)

❧ PREP: 15 min. ❧ COOK: 2 hours + cooling Warm and comforting, this dessert from Mary Kelley of Minneapolis, Minnesota is timeless. You’ll love its chocolaty goodness and moist, tender texture. 2 tablespoons butter, softened 1 cup sugar

Taste of Home • December/January 2007


In a large mixing bowl, beat butter and sugar until crumbly, about 2 minutes. Beat in egg. Stir in chocolate. Combine the flour, salt, cream of tartar and baking soda; add to creamed mixture alternately with milk. Beat just until combined. Pour into a well-greased 7-cup pudding mold; cover. Place mold on a rack in a deep kettle; add 1 in. of hot water to pan. Bring to a gentle boil. Cover; steam for 2 to 2-1/4 hours or until top springs back when lightly touched, adding water as needed. Remove mold to a wire rack; cool for 15 minutes. Meanwhile, in a small saucepan, combine the sugar, cornstarch and salt. Stir in water until smooth. Bring to a boil; cook and stir for 2 minutes or until thickened. Remove from the heat; stir in the butter, vanilla and nutmeg. Unmold pudding onto a serving plate; cut into wedges. Serve warm with sauce. Yield: 6-8 servings (1-1/2 cups sauce).

Decorative Ginger Cookies ❧ PREP: 45 min. + chilling ❧ BAKE: 10 min. per batch + cooling Field editor Cheryl Maczko of Reedsville, West Virginia adds colorful ribbon to her gingerbread boys. They can be hung on a tree or displayed in other creative ways. “Use different shapes of holiday cookie cutters for variety, if you wish,” she adds. 1 1 1/2 1/3 1 5-1/2 3

cup sugar cup molasses cup water cup vegetable oil egg cups all-purpose flour teaspoons baking soda

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3 teaspoons cream of tartar 3 teaspoons ground ginger 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon Frosting of your choice, optional In a large mixing bowl, combine the sugar, molasses, water, oil and egg. Combine the flour, baking soda, cream of tartar, ginger and cinnamon; add to molasses mixture and beat until combined. Cover and refrigerate for 1 hour or until easy to handle. On a well-floured surface, roll out dough to 1/8-in. thickness. Cut with floured cookie cutters of your choice. Using a floured spatula, place the cookies 1 in. apart on greased baking sheets. If cookies will be hung, use a plastic straw to make a hole about 1/2 in. from the top of each. Bake at 375° for 10-12 minutes or until edges are lightly browned. Use straw to reopen holes. Remove to wire racks to cool completely. Decorate with frosting if desired. Let dry completely. Thread ribbon through holes. Yield: 4 dozen.

Apple Butter Cake Roll ❧ PREP: 35 min. ❧ BAKE: 15 min. + chilling “This is a new take on a pumpkin roll,” notes Debbie White from Williamson, West Virginia. Her spicy gingerbread cake might make you think back fondly to Christmas at Grandma’s! 3 eggs, separated 1 cup all-purpose flour, divided 2 tablespoons plus 1/2 cup sugar, divided

2 1 1 1 1/4 1/4 1/4 2 1 2

teaspoons ground cinnamon teaspoon baking powder teaspoon ground ginger teaspoon ground cloves teaspoon baking soda cup butter, melted cup molasses tablespoons water tablespoon confectioners’ sugar cups apple butter

Place egg whites in a small mixing bowl; let stand at room temperature for 30 minutes. Line a greased 15-in. x 10-in. x 1-in. baking pan with waxed paper and grease the paper. Sprinkle with 1 tablespoon flour and 2 tablespoons sugar; set aside. In a large mixing bowl, combine remaining flour and sugar; add the cinnamon, baking powder, ginger, cloves and baking soda. In another bowl, whisk the egg yolks, butter, molasses and water. Add to dry ingredients and beat until blended. Beat egg whites on medium speed until soft peaks form; fold into batter. Pour into prepared pan. Bake at 375° for 12-14 minutes or until cake springs back when lightly touched. Cool for 5 minutes. Turn cake onto a kitchen towel dusted with confectioners’ sugar. Gently peel off waxed paper. Roll up cake in the towel jelly-roll style, starting with a short side. Cool completely on a wire rack. Unroll cake; spread apple butter to within 1/2 in. of edges. Roll up again. Cover and chill for 1 hour before serving. Refrigerate leftovers. Yield: 10 servings. Editor’s Note: This recipe was tested with commercially prepared apple butter.

Fresh from the oven, the spicy-sweet aroma of Decorative Ginger Cookies and Apple Butter Cake Roll will make your mouth water!

Food for Thought: Anytime someone says, “Ooh, this is so good—what’s in this?” the answer invariably comes back, “Cinnamon.” Cinnamon.Again and again. —Jerry Seinfeld

1 egg 2 squares (1 ounce each) unsweetened chocolate, melted and cooled 1-3/4 cups all-purpose flour 1 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon cream of tartar 1/4 teaspoon baking soda 1 cup milk Vanilla Sauce: 1/2 cup sugar 1 tablespoon cornstarch Dash salt 1 cup cold water 2 tablespoons butter 1 teaspoon vanilla extract Dash ground nutmeg


White Chocolate Cranberry Bread, Cream Cheese Cranberry Muffins and Walnut Cranberry Butter (clockwise from top) deliver sweet-tart goodness.

Celebrate with

Cranberries For more great cranberry recipes and tips on using cranberries, visit www.tasteofhome.com/plus.

Refreshing, White Chocolate Cranberry Bread jewel-toned cranberries add personality and color to make the season bright.They sparkle in these recipes from readers and field editors.

❧ PREP: 15 min. ❧ BAKE: 55 min. + cooling Tangy cranberries accent the appealing vanilla-citrus flavor of this quick bread shared by Ruth Burrus, a field editor from Zionsville, Indiana. The fine texture of her holiday loaf is similar to a pound cake’s. 1/2 1 3 1/2 3 1 1 1/2 2-1/4 1/2 1/4 1

cup butter-flavored shortening cup sugar eggs cup buttermilk tablespoons orange juice teaspoon grated lemon peel teaspoon vanilla extract cup vanilla or white chips, melted and cooled cups all-purpose flour teaspoon salt teaspoon baking soda cup dried cranberries

In a large mixing bowl, cream shortening and sugar. Add eggs, one at a time, beating well after each addition. Beat in the buttermilk, orange juice, lemon peel and vanilla. Stir in melted chips. Combine the flour, salt

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and baking soda; gradually add to creamed mixture. Stir in cranberries. Pour into a greased and floured 9-in. x 5-in. x 3-in. loaf pan. Bake at 350° for 55-60 minutes or until a toothpick inserted near the center comes out clean. Cool for 10 minutes before removing from pan to a wire rack to cool completely. Yield: 1 loaf.

Cream Cheese Cranberry Muffins ❧ PREP: 15 min. ❧ BAKE: 20 min. per batch Moist and chock-full of bright berries, these marvelous muffins are a seasonal specialty of Mrs. Leonard Keszler of Bismarck, North Dakota. “They are light and tasty, and they freeze very well,” she points out. 1 cup butter, softened 1 package (8 ounces) cream cheese, softened 1-1/2 cups sugar 1-1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract 4 eggs 2 cups all-purpose flour 1-1/2 teaspoons baking powder 1/2 teaspoon salt 2 cups fresh or frozen cranberries 1/2 cup chopped pecans In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter, cream cheese, sugar and vanilla. Add eggs, one at a time, beating well after each addition. Combine the flour, baking powder and salt; stir into creamed mixture just until moistened. Fold in cranberries and pecans. Fill greased or paper-lined muffin cups three-fourths full. Bake at 350° for 20-25 minutes or until a toothpick comes out clean. Cool for 5 minutes before re-

Taste of Home • December/January 2007


moving from pans to wire racks. Serve warm. Yield: 2 dozen.

Walnut Cranberry Butter ❧ PREP: 20 min. + chilling “This pretty cranberry butter is wonderful on warm bread or biscuits,” says Corky Huffsmith of Indio, California. “Be sure to use real butter —low-fat substitutes have added water, so they won’t give the same results.” 3/4 2 2 1 2

cup butter, softened tablespoons brown sugar tablespoons honey cup chopped fresh cranberries tablespoons chopped walnuts, toasted

In a small mixing bowl, beat the butter, brown sugar and honey until fluffy, about 5 minutes. Add cranberries and walnuts; beat 5 minutes longer or until butter turns pink. Transfer to a sheet of plastic wrap; roll into a log. Refrigerate until chilled. Unwrap and slice or place on a butter dish. Yield: 1-1/3 cups.

Cranberry Almond Coffee Cake (Below)

❧ PREP: 20 min. ❧ BAKE: 45 min. + cooling “Cranberries add a delightful tartness to this coffee cake that’s a Christmas morning tradition for my family,” writes Anne Keenan from Nevada City, California. “I make my own almond paste (see recipe at right) to use in this treat.” 1/2 cup almond paste 6 tablespoons butter, softened 1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons sugar, divided

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eggs cups all-purpose flour, divided teaspoon baking powder teaspoon almond extract teaspoon vanilla extract cups fresh or frozen cranberries

In a small mixing bowl, cream almond paste, butter and 1/2 cup sugar until fluffy. Add two eggs, beating well after each addition. Combine 1 cup flour and baking powder; add to creamed mixture. Beat in the remaining egg and flour. Stir in extracts. Gently fold in cranberries. Spread evenly into a greased 8-in. square baking dish; sprinkle with remaining sugar. Bake at 325° for 45-55 minutes or until a toothpick inserted near the center comes out clean. Cool on a wire rack. Yield: 9 servings.

Homemade Almond Paste (Below) ❧ PREP/TOTAL TIME: 10 min. When a recipe she wanted to try called for almond paste, Anne Keenan of Nevada City, California decided to make her own. She says, “It saves the expense of the store-bought kind and results in a lighter baked product.” 1-1/2 1-1/2 1 1-1/2 1/4

cups blanched almonds cups confectioners’ sugar egg white teaspoons almond extract teaspoon salt

Place almonds in a food processor; cover and process until smooth. Add the confectioners’ sugar, egg white, extract and salt; cover and process until smooth. Divide almond paste into 1/2-cup portions; place in airtight containers. Refrigerate for up to 1 month or freeze for up to 3 months. Yield: 1-1/2 cups.

Fun with Berries Sugared fresh cranberries and orange peel strips make a pretty garnish for cheesecakes and other desserts. Combine 1/3 cup cranberries, several orange peel strips and 1/2 cup sugar. Stir gently to combine. Cover and refrigerate for 1 hour. Arrange on or alongside dessert just before serving.


When you’re struggling with what to give the person who has everything— why not get busy in the kitchen?

Christmas Hard Candy ❧ PREP: 10 min. ❧ COOK: 30 min. + cooling A dusting of confectioners’ sugar gives a frosty look to this old-fashioned candy from field editor Amy Short of Lesage, West Virginia. “The color is beautiful, and people are surprised by the wonderful watermelon flavor!” Amy says. 3-3/4 1-1/2 1 2

cups sugar cups light corn syrup cup water to 3 drops red food coloring or color of your choice 1/4 teaspoon watermelon flavoring or flavoring of your choice 1/2 cup confectioners’ sugar

Festive & Flavorful

Gifts Kitchen from the

For gifts in good taste, consider Christmas Hard Candy (left), Apple Snack Mix and a mix for Pistachio Cranberry Biscotti (above).

Butter two 15-in. x 10-in. x 1-in. pans; set aside. In a large heavy saucepan, combine the sugar, corn syrup, water and food coloring. Cook and stir over medium heat until sugar is dissolved. Bring to a boil. Cook, without stirring, until a candy thermometer reads 300° (hard-crack stage). Remove from the heat; stir in flavoring. Immediately pour into prepared pans; cool. Dust with confectioners’ sugar; break into pieces. Store in airtight containers. Yield: 2 pounds. Editor’s Note: We recommend that you test your candy thermometer before each use by bringing water to a boil; the thermometer should read 212°. Adjust your recipe temperature up or down based on your test.

Apple Snack Mix ❧ PREP/TOTAL TIME: 15 min. “This fun mix, with its apple-cinnamon cereal and apple chips, makes a cute gift for a teacher…or anyone,” suggests Rosemary Pacha of Brighton, Iowa. To package her mix, Rosemary fills clear, cone-shaped plastic bags and ties them with holiday ribbon. 3 2 2 1-1/2 1-1/2 1-1/2 1-1/2

cups French Toast Crunch cereal cups miniature pretzels cups dry roasted peanuts cups Frosted Cheerios cups Apple Cinnamon Cheerios cups yogurt-covered raisins cups small apple-flavored red and green jelly beans 2 packages (3 ounces each) dried apple chips 2/3 cup sunflower kernels

In a large bowl, combine all ingredients. Store in an airtight container. Yield: 4 quarts.

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Taste of Home • December/January 2007


Layered Mint Fudge (Below)

Pistachio Cranberry Biscotti

❧ PREP: 15 min. ❧ COOK: 20 min. + chilling

❧ PREP: 15 min. + chilling ❧ BAKE: 35 min. + cooling

“I make this festive fudge year-round, but especially at Christmastime,” writes Denise Hanson from Anoka, Minnesota. “I’ve brought it to many different occasions and am asked for the recipe every time. I’ve also entered it in our local fair and won the blue ribbon!”

Field editor Dawn Fagerstrom of Warren, Minnesota says friends are delighted to receive her fruit-and-nut biscotti mix. “Layer the dry ingredients in a clear jar, add a bow and attach the instructions for preparation and baking,” she notes. To print your own gift cards and the biscotti instructions, see the box below.

Line a 9-in. square pan with foil; grease the foil with butter and set aside. In a heavy saucepan, melt chocolate chips and 1 cup milk over low heat; cook and stir for 5-6 minutes or until smooth. Remove from the heat. Add vanilla; stir for 3-4 minutes or until creamy. Spread half of the mixture into prepared pan. Refrigerate for 10 minutes or until firm. Set remaining chocolate mixture aside. In a heavy saucepan, melt vanilla chips and remaining milk over low heat; cook and stir for 5-6 minutes or until smooth (mixture will be thick). Remove from the heat. Add peppermint extract and food coloring; stir for 3-4 minutes or until creamy. Spread evenly over chocolate layer. Refrigerate for 10 minutes or until firm. Heat reserved chocolate mixture over low heat until mixture achieves spreading consistency; spread over mint layer. Cover; refrigerate overnight or until firm. Using foil, lift fudge out of pan. Gently peel off foil; cut fudge into 1-in. squares. Store in the refrigerator. Yield: 1-3/4 pounds.

Peanut Butter Pretzel Bites (Above)

❧ PREP: 1-1/2 hours + standing “My daughter and I came up with this recipe that our family and friends really liked,” relates Lois Farmer of Logan, West Virginia. Bite into these sweets to discover delicious peanut flavor and a salty pretzel crunch. 1 1/4 2 5 1

package (14 ounces) caramels cup butter, cubed tablespoons water cups miniature pretzels jar (18 ounces) chunky peanut butter 26 ounces milk chocolate candy coating

In a microwave-safe bowl, melt caramels with butter and water; stir until smooth. Spread one side of each pretzel with 1 teaspoon peanut butter; top with 1/2 teaspoon caramel mixture. Place on waxed paper-lined baking sheets. Refrigerate until set. In a microwave-safe bowl, melt candy coating. Using a small fork, dip each pretzel into coating until completely covered; shake off excess. Place on waxed paper. Let stand until set. Store in an airtight container in a cool, dry place. Yield: 8-1/2 dozen. Editor’s Note: This recipe was tested in a 1,100watt microwave.

2 cups all-purpose flour 2 teaspoons baking powder 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon 2/3 cup sugar, divided 3/4 cup pistachios 3/4 cup dried cranberries or cherries Additional Ingredients: 1/3 cup butter, softened 2 eggs Combine flour and baking powder; pour into a wide-mouth 1-qt. glass container with a tight-fitting lid. Sprinkle cinnamon around edge of container. Layer with 1/3 cup sugar, pistachios and cranberries, packing each layer tightly (do not mix). Pour remaining sugar down the center. Cover and store in a cool, dry place for up to 6 months. To prepare biscotti: In a large mixing bowl, beat butter and eggs. Gradually stir in biscotti mix (dough will be sticky). Chill for 30 minutes. Divide dough in half. On an ungreased baking sheet, shape each half into a 10-in. x 2in. rectangle. Bake at 350° for 25-30 minutes or until firm. Cool for 5 minutes. Transfer to a cutting board; cut diagonally with a serrated knife into 3/4-in.-thick slices. Place cut side down on an ungreased baking sheet. Bake for 5 minutes. Turn and bake 5-6 minutes longer or until golden brown. Remove to wire racks to cool. Store in an airtight container. Yield: 16 cookies.

Print Gift Tags for Your Goodies! To make things even easier and more fun when giving Taste of Home food gifts, you can use these decorative tags. Just go to www.tasteofhome.com and print them using your computer! The Pistachio Cranberry Biscotti tag can be attached to jars of the mix made from the recipe above right. The tag includes the additional ingredients needed and the method of preparation. Use the “Happy Holidays” design for any of the goodies made from recipes on these pages or other TOH favorites.

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Get 10 more of our editors’ favorite Christmas cookie recipes FREE at www.tasteofhome.com/plus.

1-1/2 teaspoons butter, softened 2 cups (12 ounces) semisweet chocolate chips 1 can (14 ounces) sweetened condensed milk, divided 2 teaspoons vanilla extract 1 cup vanilla or white chips 3 teaspoons peppermint extract 1 to 2 drops green food coloring


Editor’s Favorite Meal

Roast Crowns


Christmas Dinner Elegant pork is centerpiece of her holiday meal. By Dianne Bettin, Truman, Minnesota

I love to feed people.

And,even though our family has an extremely busy lifestyle, I don’t mind taking time out to cook for family, friends and sometimes even strangers! My husband, Doug, and I have a 350-sow hog operation and grain farm, and I have been volunteering with pork producers’organizations for almost 20 years. So it’s no surprise that pork stars on many of my menus. During the holidays and on other special occasions, I enjoy showcasing an elegant yet easy-to-prepare Crown Roast of Pork. Some of my favorite side dishes to serve with the roast are Wild Rice Pilaf and Cashew-Peach Sweet Potatoes. Devil’s Food Caramel Torte is a great finish! (You’ll find the recipes on p. 33.) A crown roast makes Christmas dinner extra special.I order the roast by how many ribs I want—figure on one per person.Just talk to your butcher or grocery store meat manager a few days ahead. A simple herb rub accents the pork’s flavor. Be sure to use a meat thermometer to guarantee that your roast is done to perfection (see tip below). I like to make the Wild Rice Pilaf a day ahead, which allows the rosemary and other flavors time to blend and makes mealtime preparations go smoother the day of the dinner. The pilaf reheats well in the microwave. I frequently take it to potlucks—the only thing bad about that is I rarely have any leftovers to bring home! Garden Bounty Bonus I ran across the Cashew-Peach Sweet Potatoes recipe while hunting for variations on the old standby sweet potato bake. I plant a large vegetable garden and found the recipe one particularly prolific year. This year, my tomatoes have been bountiful. As I am writing this, I have a

huge pot of jalapeno chili on the stove (Doug’s a big fan of chili). When I cook,I tend to focus on the main meal.The dessert oftentimes is an afterthought.That’s why I was thrilled when my sister-in-law,Nicki,showed up at a gathering with scrumptious Devil’s Food Caramel Torte. It was definitely one of those recipes I had to add to my collection. Tasty Journeys I love food and confess that while most people travel to sightsee, I travel to eat! Even when I go to our famous Mall of America here in Minnesota,I spend more time eating than shopping. My favorite stop is a wonderful sushi bar. As a member of the National Pork Board—an industry-nominated, government-appointed position—I help promote pork across the country and even overseas. I enjoy cooking new foods that I find on my travels, especially if they involve pork! Doug and our children—Tyler, 21, and Marisa, 18—are good sports about trying everything I put in front of them.And they like most of it. Doug and I enjoy traveling and camping.Although the farm doesn’t give him much free time, he manages to accompany me to some of my outof-state meetings.We also enjoy time at the lake and around the campfire! With our youngest off to college,our life will be very different now! I hope to fill some of the void with trying new recipes,especially tried-andtrue ones from Taste of Home. The kids will be home for Christmas, looking forward to this meal I’ve shared with you. I hope you’ll “pick pork” and enjoy it for your own holiday dinner!

Dianne’s Pork Pointers • The old practice of overcooking pork is no longer necessary for food safety. Our improved product is best when left slightly pink in the center, cooked to an internal temperature of 160°. I remove my crown roast (and other cuts, too!) from the oven when it reaches 150° and let it rest for about 10 minutes before carving. This allows the temperature to continue to rise to 160° while sealing in the juices. • New research from the USDA reveals that pork tenderloin contains only 2.98 grams of fat per 3ounce cooked serving. A 3-ounce cooked skinless chicken breast weighs in at 3.03 grams of fat.

www.tasteofhome.com

“While most people travel to sightsee, I travel to eat!”

Field Editor: Dianne Bettin Truman, Minnesota Family: Dianne and husband Doug have a 350sow farrow-to-finish hog operation and raise corn and soybeans. Their two children, Tyler and Marisa, are university students. Jobs: Dianne operates her own financial records firm for farmers and small businesses, works part-time for adult farm management and administers a tech education grant for high schools. Activities: Serving a second term on National Pork Board; state pork organizations. Hobbies: Gardening, cooking, cheering on daughter Marisa at her track meets.

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Appetizers & Snacks Watch guests’ eyes light up when they see these appealing appetizers festively awaiting their arrival. Succulent shrimp poised between chunks of fresh fruit,and savory pastry triangles served with Swiss cheese sauce make a fabulous welcoming committee…as do the other delicious snacks on these pages. Add a few tasty beverages to the mix, and your holiday party is off to a smashing start!

Ham ’n’ Broccoli Triangles ❧ PREP: 40 min. ❧ BAKE: 20 min.

Rebekah Soued of Conifer, Colorado likes making these light and flaky pastry triangles for her family. “I usually use leftover spiral ham for the centers, and the creamy white sauce is sure to please,” she says. 2-1/2 cups diced fully cooked ham 2-1/2 cups chopped fresh or frozen broccoli, thawed 1 cup (4 ounces) shredded mozzarella cheese

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2 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/4

eggs cup heavy whipping cream teaspoon minced fresh basil teaspoon pepper teaspoon Italian seasoning, optional Dash cayenne pepper 1 package (16 ounces, 14-inch x 9-inch sheet size) frozen phyllo dough, thawed 3/4 cup butter, melted Swiss Cheese Sauce: 1/4 cup butter 1/4 cup all-purpose flour 2 cups milk

1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 cup shredded Swiss cheese Minced fresh parsley, optional In a large bowl, combine the ham, broccoli and mozzarella cheese. In a small bowl, beat eggs; stir in the cream, basil, pepper, Italian seasoning if desired and cayenne. Stir into ham mixture; set aside. On a work surface, carefully remove one sheet of phyllo dough and fold in thirds lengthwise (keep remaining phyllo covered with plastic wrap and a damp towel to prevent it from drying out). Lightly brush phyllo strip with butter. Place a rounded tablespoonful of filling in lower right corner of strip. Fold dough over filling, forming a triangle. Fold triangle up, then fold over, forming another triangle. Continue folding, like a Taste of Home • December/January 2007


1 prebaked thin Italian bread shell crust (10 ounces) 1 cup whipped cream cheese 4 ounces smoked salmon (lox), cut into thin strips 1 cup chopped tomato 1/4 cup chopped red onion 2 tablespoons capers, drained 2 tablespoons minced fresh parsley Pepper to taste Place the crust on an ungreased 12-in. pizza pan. Bake at 450° for 8-10 minutes or until heated through. Spread with the cream cheese. Sprinkle with salmon, tomato, onion, capers, parsley and pepper. Cut into slices. Yield: 8 slices.

Seaside Prawn Kabobs ❧ PREP: 20 min. + marinating ❧ COOK: 10 min. Laura Barrett of Binghamton, New York shares this special holiday treat. The prawns pick up wonderful flavor from a teriyaki marinade, and the pineapple and peppers add color. 1 can (5-1/4 ounces) unsweetened pineapple chunks 3/4 cup roasted garlic teriyaki marinade and sauce 16 uncooked jumbo shrimp, peeled and deveined 1 small sweet red pepper, cut into 1-inch chunks flag, until you come to the end of the strip. Repeat with remaining phyllo sheets and filling. Place triangles on ungreased baking sheets. Brush with butter. Bake at 375° for 20-25 minutes or until golden brown. Meanwhile, in a small saucepan, melt butter over medium heat. Whisk in flour until smooth; add milk and salt. Bring to a boil; cook and stir for 2 minutes or until thickened. Remove from heat; stir in Swiss cheese until melted. Sprinkle with parsley if desired. Serve with triangles. Yield: 40 appetizers.

Smoked Salmon Tomato Pizza ❧ PREP/TOTAL TIME: 25 min. This quick and easy appetizer comes www.tasteofhome.com

Drain pineapple, reserving 3 tablespoons juice; set pineapple aside. In a small bowl, combine teriyaki sauce and reserved juice; pour 3/4 cup into a large resealable plastic bag. Add shrimp; seal bag and turn to coat. Refrigerate for 20 minutes. Set aside remaining marinade for basting. Drain and discard marinade. On 16 small metal or soaked wooden skewers, alternately thread one shrimp, one pineapple chunk and one red pepper chunk. Broil 3-4 in. from the heat for 4-5 minutes on each side or until shrimp turn pink, basting with reserved marinade. Yield: 16 appetizers.

Chorizo Date Rumaki ❧ PREP: 20 min. ❧ BAKE: 15 min. “I got this recipe from my sister-inlaw, who got it from her brother, who’s a chef,” relates Miriam Hershberger from Holmesville, Ohio. “It’s tasty, and it disappears quickly.” 1 package (1 pound) sliced bacon 4 ounces uncooked chorizo or spicy bulk pork sausage 2 ounces cream cheese, cubed 32 pitted dates Cut each bacon strip in half. In a large skillet, cook bacon in batches over medium heat until partially cooked but not crisp. Remove to paper towels; drain drippings. In the same skillet, cook chorizo over medium heat until no longer pink; drain. Stir in cream cheese. Carefully cut a slit in the center of each date; fill with cream cheese mixture. Wrap a piece of bacon around each stuffed date; secure with toothpicks. Place on ungreased baking sheets. Bake at 350° for 12-15 minutes or until the bacon is crisp. Yield: 32 appetizers.

Buffalo Chicken Dip ❧ PREP/TOTAL TIME: 30 min. “This is a great dip for holiday and Super Bowl parties,” says Peggy Foster of Florence, Kentucky. “Everywhere I take it, people ask for the recipe, and it’s one of my family’s favorites.” 1 package (8 ounces) cream cheese, softened 1 can (10 ounces) chunk white chicken, drained 1/2 cup buffalo sauce 1/2 cup ranch salad dressing 2 cups (8 ounces) shredded Colby-Monterey Jack cheese Tortilla chips Spread cream cheese into an ungreased shallow 1-qt. baking dish. Layer with chicken, buffalo wing sauce and ranch dressing. Sprinkle with cheese. Bake, uncovered, at 350° for 20-25 minutes or until cheese is melted. Serve warm with tortilla chips. Yield: about 2 cups.

SNACK ATTACK! See your favorite snack or appetizer recipe in Taste of Home. Check our Contributor Guidelines on page 62 for information on submitting your recipes.

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Food for Thought: Perhaps they call them fast-food restaurants because they spring up like mushrooms.

Celebrate with Chorizo Date Rumaki (far left), Ham ’n’ Broccoli Triangles, Seaside Prawn Kabobs, Buffalo Chicken Dip and Smoked Salmon Tomato Pizza.

in handy when you find yourself in a time crunch. “My ‘honey’ likes this pizza so much that he can almost eat one all by himself,” notes Natalie Lodes of Plantation, Florida.


Good Food That’s Good for You

Celebrate in style with appetizing Roasted Eggplant Spread, Hot Crab Pinwheels and Chicken Taco Cups.

Here’s to a

Healthy NewYear! If you’ve made a resolution Roasted Eggplant Spread to eat better in 2007, why not get a ❧ PREP: 20 min. head start on New Year’s Eve? ❧ BAKE: 45 min. + cooling The mouth-watering menu Black pepper and garlic perk up this and festive appetizers on these out-of-the-ordinary spread submitted by Barbara McCalley of Allison Park, pages are full of flavor but not fat, Pennsylvania. calories and sodium. 2 large sweet red peppers, cut into

✓ 18

These recipes include Nutrition Facts and Diabetic Exchanges.

1-inch pieces 1 medium eggplant, cut into 1-inch pieces

1 medium red onion, cut into 1-inch pieces 3 garlic cloves, minced 3 tablespoons olive oil 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon pepper 1 tablespoon tomato paste Toasted bread slices or assorted crackers In a large bowl, combine the red peppers, eggplant, onion and garlic. Drizzle with the oil; sprinkle with the salt and pepper. Toss to coat. Transfer to a 15-in. x 10-in. x 1-in. baking pan coated with nonstick cooking spray. Bake, uncovered, at 400° for 45-50 minutes or until lightly browned and tender, stirring once. Cool slightly. Place vegetables and tomato paste in a food processor; cover and process until chopped and blended. Transfer to a serving bowl; cool to room temperature. Serve with bread or crackers. Yield: 2 cups. Nutrition Facts: 1/4 cup (calculated without bread or crackers) equals 83 calories, 5 g fat (1 g saturated fat), 0 cholesterol, 153 mg sodium, 9 g carbohydrate, 3 g fiber, 1 g protein. Diabetic Exchanges: 1 vegetable, 1 fat.

Taste of Home • December/January 2007


❧ PREP: 15 min. + chilling ❧ BAKE: 10 min. “I got the recipe for these crabmeat bites from a friend. What amazed me most is that my husband, who does not like seafood, couldn’t stop eating them,” recalls Kitti Boesel of Woodbridge, Virginia. 1 package (8 ounces) reduced-fat cream cheese 1 can (6 ounces) crabmeat, drained, flaked and cartilage removed 3/4 cup finely chopped sweet red pepper 1/2 cup shredded reduced-fat cheddar cheese 2 green onions, finely chopped 3 tablespoons minced fresh parsley 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper 6 flour tortillas (6 inches) In a small mixing bowl, beat cream cheese until smooth. Stir in the crab, red pepper, cheese, onions, parsley and cayenne. Spread 1/3 cupful over one side of each tortilla; roll up tightly. Wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 2 hours. Cut and discard ends of roll-ups. Cut each into six slices. Place on baking sheets coated with nonstick cooking spray. Bake at 350° for 10 minutes or until bubbly. Serve warm. Yield: 3 dozen. Nutrition Facts: 3 appetizers equals 123 calories, 7 g fat (3 g saturated fat), 29 mg cholesterol, 270 mg sodium, 8 g carbohydrate, trace fiber, 8 g protein. Diabetic Exchanges: 1 lean meat, 1/2 starch, 1/2 fat.

Chicken Taco Cups ❧ PREP: 20 min. ❧ BAKE: 20 min. For holiday parties and summer picnics, field editor Lee Ann Lowe of Gray, Maine stuffs cute wonton cups with a Southwest-style chicken filling. “You can freeze them, too,” she writes. “Just reheat after thawing.” 1 pound boneless skinless chicken breasts, cut into 1-inch pieces 1 envelope reduced-sodium taco seasoning 1 small onion, chopped 1 jar (16 ounces) salsa, divided 2 cups (8 ounces) shredded reduced-fat cheddar cheese, divided

www.tasteofhome.com

36 wonton wrappers Sour cream, chopped green onions and chopped ripe olives, optional Sprinkle chicken with taco seasoning. In a large skillet coated with nonstick cooking spray, cook and stir the chicken over medium heat for 5 minutes or until juices run clear. Transfer chicken to a food processor; cover and process until chopped. In a bowl, combine the chicken, onion, half of the salsa and 1 cup cheese. Press wonton wrappers into miniature muffin cups coated with nonstick cooking spray. Bake at 375° for 5 minutes or until lightly browned. Spoon rounded tablespoonfuls of chicken mixture into cups; top with remaining salsa and cheese. Bake 15 minutes longer or until heated through. Serve warm. Garnish with sour cream, green onions and olives if desired. Yield: 3 dozen. Nutrition Facts: 2 appetizers (calculated without garnishes) equals 124 calories, 3 g fat (2 g saturated fat), 24 mg cholesterol, 408 mg sodium, 12 g carbohydrate, trace fiber, 10 g protein. Diabetic Exchanges: 1 starch, 1 very lean meat, 1/2 fat.

Tomato and Onion Salmon ❧ PREP/TOTAL TIME: 30 min. Tomatoes, onion and lemon juice make this moist, flaky salmon something special. “My husband, Frank, and I really like salmon Light and just right for New Year’s dinner are Tomato and Onion Salmon (above), Two-Tone Potato Wedges and Broccoli with Mock Hollandaise (on page 20).

cooked this way,” writes Lillian Denchick of Peru, New York. “A salad and dinner rolls usually round out our menu.” 4 2 1/4 1/4 2 1 4 1/2 1 2

salmon fillets (5 ounces each) teaspoons olive oil teaspoon dill weed teaspoon pepper medium tomatoes, thinly sliced medium onion, thinly sliced garlic cloves, minced cup reduced-sodium chicken broth tablespoon lemon juice tablespoons minced fresh parsley

Place salmon in a 13-in. x 9-in. x 2-in. baking dish coated with nonstick cooking spray. Brush with oil; sprinkle with dill and pepper. Top with tomatoes; set aside. In a small skillet coated with nonstick cooking spray, saute onion and garlic. Add the broth, lemon juice and parsley. Bring to a boil; cook for 2-3 minutes or until most of the liquid has evaporated. Spoon over salmon. Cover and bake at 350° for 13-18 minutes or until fish flakes easily with a fork. Yield: 4 servings. Nutrition Facts: 1 serving equals 318 calories, 18 g fat (3 g saturated fat), 84 mg cholesterol, 171 mg sodium, 9 g carbohydrate, 2 g fiber, 30 g protein. Diabetic Exchanges: 4 lean meat, 1-1/2 fat, 1/2 starch.

More GOOD FOR YOU…

Start off the New Year with a healthy breakfast or brunch! For recipes, visit www.tasteofhome.com/plus.

Hot Crab Pinwheels


GOOD FOOD THAT’S GOOD FOR YOU continued… Healthy Changes Resolving to eat healthier in 2007? Experts say you can make big strides with even small changes. Here are some easy-to-handle tips to get you started:

Food for Thought: The potato, like man, was not meant to dwell alone. —Sheila Hibben

• If you’re still drinking whole milk, switch to 2% (reduced-fat), 1% (low-fat) or skim (fat-free). • Instead of sipping colas and sweetened juices or teas, choose water or sparkling water with a slice of lemon or lime. • Avoid the vending machine at work. Bring your own healthy snacks to work, such as low-fat yogurt, granola, fresh fruit or raisins. • Add extra vegetables to sandwiches, soups, salads and homemade pizza. Keep cut-up veggies in the fridge to snack on with a low-fat dip.

Two-Tone Potato Wedges (Pictured on page 19)

❧ PREP: 10 min. ❧ BAKE: 40 min. Better than french fries, these tasty potatoes have just the right touch of garlic and Parmesan cheese. “This is the only way my daughter will eat sweet potatoes, and she loves ’em!” notes Maria Nicolau Schumacher of Larchmont, New York. 2 1 1 1/4 1/4 1 2

medium potatoes medium sweet potato tablespoon olive oil teaspoon salt teaspoon pepper tablespoon grated Parmesan cheese garlic cloves, minced

Cut each potato into eight wedges; place in a large resealable plastic bag. Add the oil, salt and pepper; seal bag and shake to coat. Arrange in a single layer in a 15-in. x 10-in. x 1-in. baking pan coated with nonstick cooking spray.

Bake, uncovered, at 425° for 20 minutes. Turn the potatoes; sprinkle with Parmesan cheese and garlic. Bake 20-25 minutes longer or until golden brown, turning once. Yield: 4 servings. Nutrition Facts: 6 wedges equals 169 calories, 4 g fat (1 g saturated fat), 1 mg cholesterol, 182 mg sodium, 31 g carbohydrate, 3 g fiber, 4 g protein. Diabetic Exchange: 2 starch.

Broccoli with Mock Hollandaise (Pictured on page 19)

❧ PREP/TOTAL TIME: 20 min. Field editor Roxana Quarles of Ralph, Alabama dresses up broccoli with a lemony sauce that complements the veggie flavor. Not a fan of broccoli? This dish will change your mind. 2 packages (9 ounces each) frozen broccoli spears 4 ounces reduced-fat cream cheese, cubed 1 egg 2 tablespoons lemon juice

1/4 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon pepper Place broccoli in a steamer basket; place in a saucepan over 1 in. of water. Bring to a boil; cover and steam for 5-7 minutes or until crisp-tender. Meanwhile, in a small saucepan, combine the cream cheese, egg, lemon juice, salt and pepper. Cook and stir over low heat for 3-5 minutes or until sauce is thickened and reaches 160°. Serve with broccoli. Yield: 4 servings. Nutrition Facts: 1 cup broccoli with 3 tablespoons sauce equals 127 calories, 8 g fat (4 g saturated fat), 73 mg cholesterol, 313 mg sodium, 8 g carbohydrate, 3 g fiber, 9 g protein. Diabetic Exchanges: 1-1/2 vegetable, 1-1/2 fat.

Black Cherry Cake (Below left) ❧ PREP: 10 min. ❧ BAKE: 30 min. + cooling “A friend brought this pretty, pink cake to work for a birthday party,” notes Judy Lentz of Emmetsburg, Iowa. “You can use any flavor of yogurt, but the black cherry is so delicious.” 1 package (18-1/4 ounces) white cake mix 1-1/4 cups water 1/3 cup canola oil 4 egg whites 2 cartons (6 ounces each) fat-free reduced-sugar black cherry yogurt, divided 1 carton (8 ounces) frozen fat-free whipped topping, thawed In a large mixing bowl, combine the cake mix, water, oil and egg whites just until moistened; beat on low speed for 2 minutes. Fold in one carton of yogurt. Pour into a 13-in. x 9-in. x 2-in. baking dish coated with nonstick cooking spray. Bake at 350° for 30-35 minutes or until a toothpick inserted near the center comes out clean. Cool on a wire rack. Place remaining yogurt in a bowl; fold in whipped topping. Spread over cake. Store in the refrigerator. Yield: 15 servings. Nutrition Facts: 1 piece equals 230 calories, 8 g fat (2 g saturated fat), trace cholesterol, 255 mg sodium, 34 g carbohydrate, 1 g fiber, 3 g protein.

NEW YEAR, NEW YOU. Share your best lightened recipes with other readers. For Contributor Guidelines, see page 62. 20

Taste of Home • December/January 2007


Potluck Pleasers

Serve overnight holiday guests Italian Sausage Egg Bake, Apple ’n’ Pear Kabobs, Breakfast Patties and Citrus Cranberry Tea.

Why not welcome

Christmas or ring in 2007 with a cheery potluck brunch? Have relatives or friends bring one of the dishes that make up this festive menu, or ask them to contribute fruit juices, deviled eggs or a sweet holiday dessert. The more, the merrier when you serve this mouth-watering array…Santa will wish he had stayed for breakfast! (You’ll find the recipes on page 37 in handy card form.) • Wake up to all your breakfast favorites blended into one delicious Italian Sausage Egg Bake. Seasoned to please, this casserole is refrigerated overnight and ready to pop into the oven in the morning. Field editor Darlene Markham of Rochester, New York shared the recipe. • You can start just about any meal with refreshing Apple ’n’ Pear Kabobs from Robin Boynton of Harbor Beach, Michigan.The combination of www.tasteofhome.com

fresh fruit and warm butter pecan sauce is sweet and scrumptious.Try them for dessert, too! •“Breakfast Patties are quick and easy to make. What’s more, they’re lower in fat,” writes field editor Jo Ann Honey of Longmont, Colorado.“If you like hot and spicy sausage, simply use more cayenne.” • “My tangy Citrus Cranberry Tea makes such a pretty holiday beverage.I also like to serve it for afternoon tea or even after ball games when the weather is cool,” notes Pat Habiger, a field editor in Spearville, Kansas.

PASS THE WORD. Share your tried-and-true potluck recipes and any tips that you might have. For Contributor Guidelines, see page 62.

Potluck Safety Tips •Remember to keep hot foods hot and cold foods cold, and don’t let food sit at room temperature for more than 2 hours. •Keep food from spoiling by setting out smaller serving dishes. When replenishing your buffet table, wash or replace empty platters and bowls first to prevent contamination.

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My Mom’s Best Meal

Make memories with Ruby Kehoe’s menu featuring (clockwise from top left) Cranberry Gelatin Mold, Caramel-Crunch Pumpkin Pie, Sweet-Sour Red Cabbage, Rolled-Up Turkey and Peas in Cheese Sauce.


A

Turkey Dinner By June Blomquist Eugene, Oregon

My mom,

Ruby Kehoe (right), is the hardest worker I know. At 84, she still keeps busy… sewing, gardening and decorating her home in nearby Florence, Oregon. But of all the rooms in her house, the kitchen is where Mom spends most of her time, preparing appetizing meals, desserts and more. All of Mom’s meals are five-star, but the one I will always cherish is this turkey dinner that’s perfect for the holidays. Whenever I think about her impressive RolledUp Turkey, I can almost smell its wonderful aroma. It starts with a deboned turkey that’s flattened and rolled up with a scrumptious Southernstyle corn bread stuffing. For side dishes, Mom serves a colorful trio. The festive Cranberry Gelatin Mold is a tangy holiday favorite.The crunchy Sweet-Sour Red Cabbage gets its sweet-tart flavor from vinegar and maraschino cherry juice. And her Peas in Cheese Sauce is creamy and comforting. It’s difficult to leave room for dessert, but you can’t turn down a slice of her yummy CaramelCrunch Pumpkin Pie! (You’ll find the recipes at right and on p. 35.) Longtime Cook Mom’s had plenty of practice in the kitchen. She started cooking at the age of 12 for a family of 15 as well as relatives, friends and farmhands during threshing season. As a wife and mother, she cooked nourishing meals every day for our family—my dad; me; my sister, Gretchen; and my brother, Colin. Dad was a carpenter, and Mom often worked alongside him. She also sewed clothes for my sister and me…with matching outfits for our dolls. But she always found time to make cinnamon rolls, breads, cakes and pies.There were even baked goods on camping trips because the tent had a gas stove with an oven. www.tasteofhome.com

Mom still loves to cook and bake, especially homemade soups and desserts,and until a couple years ago, she canned fruit, vegetables and meat.But now the big,festive dinners are held at someone else’s house or at my niece’s restaurant. Our family must have caught the cooking bug from Mom. My brother and sister are both good cooks, and I was a cook at the University of Oregon for 15 years. Even my son,Daren,married a wonderful cook,Karen, who works as a food service manager. When Mom got married, she told my dad that a 50-pound bag of flour had top priority when they moved their belongings west from Oklahoma. I’m sure glad cooking was so important to her because we reaped the rewards! I hope you’ll reward your family by serving her meal.

Sweet-Sour Red Cabbage ❧ PREP: 15 min. COOK: 35 min. less fat, sugar or salt. Includes ✓ Uses Nutrition Facts and Diabetic Exchanges.

1 1 1/4 2 1/4 1/2 1/4 2

medium head red cabbage, shredded large onion, chopped cup canola oil medium apples, peeled and thinly sliced cup cider vinegar teaspoon salt teaspoon pepper tablespoons maraschino cherry juice, optional

In a large skillet, saute cabbage and onion in oil for 5-8 minutes or until crisp-tender. Add the apples, vinegar, salt, pepper and cherry juice if desired. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat; cover and simmer for 25 minutes or until cabbage is tender. Yield: 8 servings. Nutrition Facts: 2/3 cup (calculated without cherry juice) equals 112 calories, 7 g fat (1 g saturated fat), 0 cholesterol, 160 mg sodium, 13 g carbohydrate, 3 g fiber, 2 g protein. Diabetic Exchanges: 1 vegetable, 1 fat, 1/2 fruit.

Recall Your Mom’s Best? If we feature your mom’s meal, you’ll earn $75.00. Send at least four recipes with background information. See Contributor Guidelines on page 62 to find out more.

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RECIPE SECTION

People tend to get a little nutty during the holiday season…roasting chestnuts, baking nut-filled sweets and stuffings. (And don’t forget those annual performances of The Nutcracker!) So it seemed natural to celebrate almonds, pecans, walnuts and more in our holiday issue. Readers shelled out more than 2,600 entries for our recent “Go Nuts” recipe contest.They shared recipes for crunchy caramels and spiced

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nuts, stir-fries and pasta, and everything in between. For our taste-testing judges, selecting just 12 winners was a hard nut to crack. But in the end,they chose chewy Rustic Nut Bars from Barbara Driscoll of West Allis,Wisconsin as the Grand Prize winner. Barbara chose $500.00 as her prize. (See page 26 to meet Barbara and learn more about our fabulous prize options.) Mocha Nut Torte, submitted by Megan Shepherdson of Winnipeg, Manitoba,won the second-place prize.Megan won dinner for four at the restaurant of her choice. Ten runners-up each received a copy of our Contest Winning Annual Recipes 2005 cookbook. You’ll find all 12 winning recipes in

the Clip & Keep recipe card section beginning on page 27, along with 20 appetizing recipes from our readers and 1,000 field editors.You can easily lift out the 16 pages to place in a three-ring notebook. Next issue, along with more recipes from our field staff and readers, the winning recipes in our “Soup’s On!” contest will appear here. (See page 43 for details on how you can enter our latest national recipe contest.)

Turn to page 27 for 16 pages of recipes, including the winners of our “Go Nuts” contest, in “card” form you can clip for your file!


Nutty Nuggets…Here are some fun facts about nuts to chew on: ❥ The peanut is not a nut at all—it’s a legume and a member of the pea family. ❥ Cashews, which are related to poison ivy, grow on the bottom of pear-shaped fruit. ❥ Walnuts rank as the No. 1 nut in America. ❥ “Pecan” is an Algonquian Indian word that means “a tough nut to crack.” ❥ Macadamias have the hardest shell of any nut. ❥ Green almonds are considered a delicacy. They have a jelly-like inside, a fuzzy exterior and a subtle, fruity flavor. ❥ Some research suggests that eating nuts can boost your brainpower. ❥ Nuts are one of the world’s oldest foods and a good source of protein. But don’t overindulge. They’re high in fat…although it’s mostly the heart-healthy unsaturated kind.

Tips from the Test Kitchen

❥ The general rule of thumb for nut yields says 4 ounces of most nuts are equal to 1 cup chopped nuts. ❥ To eliminate bits of shell in freshly hulled nuts, place the nuts in a large bowl of cool water.The shells will float and can be poured or skimmed off.Drain and dry nuts thoroughly before using. ❥ Ground nuts are great in meatballs, meat loaf and burgers.

Snack on a ‘Pinecone’ The scales of this pretty “pinecone”

❥ Shelled nuts can be stored in an airtight container in a cool place for up to 4 months and frozen up to 8 months. It’s best not to chop nuts before storing because whole nuts stay fresh longer. ❥ Rancid nuts will ruin any dish, so always taste nuts before adding them. ❥ An easy way to toast nuts is in an ungreased skillet.Toast them for a few minutes over medium heat just until browned, stirring frequently.

are crunchy toasted almonds decorating a flavorful cheese spread! Kathy Johnson of Council Bluffs,Iowa shared this festive, eye-catching appetizer. “The recipe is over 25 years old,” Kathy says.“It wouldn’t be a holiday without it.We serve it with crackers, or just dip the nuts in the cheese.” If you wish, use more almonds and shingle them closer for an even more realistic illusion of a pinecone.

Pinecone-Shaped Blue Cheese Spread ❧ PREP: 40 min. + chilling 2 packages (8 ounces each) cream cheese, softened 1-1/4 cups process cheese sauce 1 cup (4 ounces) crumbled blue cheese 1/4 cup chopped green onions 1 tablespoon diced pimientos 1/2 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce 1-1/2 cups unblanched almonds, toasted Fresh rosemary sprigs, optional Assorted crackers or fresh vegetables In a large mixing bowl, beat the cream cheese, cheese sauce and blue cheese until smooth. Stir in the onions, pimientos and Worcestershire sauce. Cover and refrigerate until firm. On a serving platter, form cheese spread into a pinecone shape. Beginning at a narrow end, arrange almonds in rows. Garnish with rosemary if desired. Serve with crackers. Yield: 3-1/2 cups.

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‘Nutty’Tips

Grand Prize

From Our Readers ❥ Toast nuts for a richer, more flavorful product.To toast, spread nuts in a single layer on a shallow baking pan. Bake at 350° for 5-10 minutes or until golden brown, stirring once. —Janel Andrews, Jerome, Idaho ❥ If you prefer, you can toast nuts in the microwave. Place them in a single layer in a flat microwave-safe dish on high power for 1 minute and stir. Repeat until the nuts are toasted.Watch carefully so they do not scorch. —Lillian Julow, Gainesville, Florida ❥ To prevent nuts from developing off flavors or becoming rancid,store them in an airtight container in the refrigerator or in a cool, dry place. For longer storage, double bag nuts in resealable plastic freezer bags and store in the freezer. —Ginger George Gentry Sutherlin, Virginia

❥ For a fun way to serve nuts at parties, use festive paper muffin cup liners filled with a variety of nuts. Guests can easily pick up a liner and snack away while mingling. —Jennae LeFebvre, Aurora, Illinois ❥ To cool peanut brittle easily, line a baking sheet with foil, grease the foil and pour the brittle on it.Once cooled, you simply lift the foil and peel off the brittle. —Heidi Niclas Albuquerque, New Mexico

❥ If a recipe calls for ground nuts, be sure to grind them just until dry,not into nut butter. —Cindy Preston Fairfield, Iowa

❥ To toast and skin hazelnuts, place in a single layer on a baking pan at 350° for 10-15 minutes or until the skins blister. Remove from the oven, wrap in a kitchen towel and let them stand for 12 minutes.Rub the nuts together inside the towel to remove as much of the skins as possible. —Jan Elmore Los Molinos, California

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Judges Shell Out Prize to Her

Yummy Nut Bars Entering

our recent “Go Nuts”recipe contest was a given for Grand Prize winner Barbara Driscoll. She adds nuts to almost every kind of dish imaginable. “Nuts enhance and add interest to any recipe,” says Barbara,of West Allis,Wisconsin.“My layer cakes are nut-based.Most of my butter cookie recipes contain nuts,and I always add them to brownies. I also use them in salads,mix them with cooked vegetables and grind nuts to top chicken,pork and fish.” For our contest,Barbara chose her Rustic Nut Bars.“I found the recipe in a stack of clippings.I’ve made it only three times, but nothing I’ve come across says ‘Go Nuts’ more than this recipe.” Our judges were nuts about the prizewinning bars…the shortbread crust, gooey caramel and ample crunch from four varieties of nuts. “If you make them, buy extra pistachios,” Barbara suggests.“I found myself cracking the shells and saying,‘One for me, one for the recipe.’ “If cost is a factor for you, try a variety of peanuts instead.” Winning Streak Barbara isn’t new to contests.In the past year,she has received 17 awards,including top honors from the Wisconsin Beef Council and Hidden Valley Ranch.(A dinner roll recipe she entered will move on to Hid-

den Valley’s national contest.) “In 1999,I won a blue ribbon for a variety plate of cookies at the Wisconsin State Fair. A co-worker saw the cookies and asked me to make holiday cookies for her that year. Other people asked, too, and I found myself making literally thousands of cookies.Whatever payment I received went to our Holiday Giving Tree at work,” says Barbara, a graphic artist. “I’ve always liked to cook,but it wasn’t until I participated in the state fair that I gained an appreciation for precision and consistency.” Winning contests isn’t everything, though. While she considers her specialties cookies and layer cakes, Barbara enjoys preparing meals for her family—husband Dale, a computer programmer, and his son, Austin, who’s studying food science at Purdue University. “Winning contests is a thrill,” she adds, “but it’s my family’s vote that counts.” A Choice of Prizes! Like Barbara, each issue’s Grand Prize winner can select from two terrific prizes: $500.00 in cash or a KitchenAid 11-Cup Ultra Power food processor and KitchenAid Epicurean stand mixer together valued at $650.00! See page 43 to learn how you can enter Taste of Home’s next national recipe contest…then take your choice of prizes if you win! Taste of Home • December/January 2007


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Napoleon, Ohio

Furlong, Pennsylvania

Hot pepper sauce adds zip to these tender pecan-crusted chicken breasts,and the easy-fix peach chutney adds a sweet-sour accent.I serve this dish with rice on the side. —Carisa Bravoco

Pecan Chicken With Chutney

Here’s a fun, layered dessert that will appeal to all ages.And if you want it even nuttier, you can use chunky peanut butter. If you’re not a fan of cashews, substitute your favorite nut. —Barbara Schindler

RunnerUp

Winnipeg, Manitoba

My husband doesn’t like chocolate cake, but this spectacular three-layer torte is a favorite of his. I’ve been using this recipe for special occasions, such as birthdays, for many years. —Megan Shepherdson

❧ PREP: 40 min. + chilling ❧ BAKE: 20 min. + cooling

Mocha Nut Torte

❧ PREP: 15 min. ❧ COOK: 20 min.

“Go Nuts” Contest

“Go Nuts” Contest

Grand Prize

❧ PREP: 25 min. ❧ BAKE: 25 min. + chilling

Peanut Butter Pudding Dessert

West Allis, Wisconsin

Everyone will crunch with joy when they bite into these chewy, gooey bars.They’ll love the shortbread-like crust and the wildly nutty topping. —Barbara Driscoll

❧ PREP: 20 min. ❧ BAKE: 35 min. + cooling

Rustic Nut Bars

“Go Nuts” Contest

“Go Nuts” Contest

RunnerUp

2nd Place


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Taste of Home • December/January 2007

cup all-purpose flour cup cold butter, cubed cups chopped cashews, divided package (8 ounces) cream cheese, softened cup creamy peanut butter cup confectioners’ sugar carton (12 ounces) frozen whipped topping, thawed, divided cups cold milk package (3.9 ounces) instant chocolate pudding mix package (3.4 ounces) instant vanilla pudding mix milk chocolate candy bar (1.55 ounces), coarsely chopped

1 tablespoon plus 3/4 cup cold butter, divided 2-1/3 cups all-purpose flour 1/2 cup sugar 1/2 teaspoon baking powder 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 egg, lightly beaten Topping: 2/3 cup honey 1/2 cup packed brown sugar 1/4 teaspoon salt 6 tablespoons butter, cubed 2 tablespoons heavy whipping cream 1 cup chopped hazelnuts, toasted 1 cup roasted salted almonds 1 cup salted cashews, toasted 1 cup pistachios, toasted

Rustic Nut Bars

Place flour and butter in a food processor; cover and process until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Add 1 cup cashews;

1

1

2-2/3 1

1/3 1 1

1 1/2 1-1/2 1

Peanut Butter Pudding Dessert

Line a 13-in. x 9-in. x 2-in. baking pan with foil; grease the foil with 1 tablespoon butter. Set aside. In a large bowl, combine the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt; cut in remaining butter until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Stir in egg until blended (mixture will be dry). Press firmly into prepared pan. Bake at 375° for 18-20 minutes or until edges are golden brown. Cool on a wire rack. In a large heavy saucepan over medium heat, bring the honey, brown sugar and salt to a boil; stir until sugar is dissolved. Boil without stirring for 2 minutes. Add butter and cream. Bring to a boil; cook and stir for 1 minute. Remove from the heat; stir in the hazelnuts, almonds, cashews and pistachios. Spread over crust. Bake at 375° for 15-20 minutes or until topping is bubbly. Cool completely on a wire rack. Using foil, lift bars out of pan. Discard foil; cut into squares. Yield: about 3 dozen.

DECEMBER JANUARY 2007

pulse a few times until combined. Press into a greased 13-in. x 9-in. x 2in. baking dish. Bake at 350° for 25-28 minutes or until golden brown. Cool completely on a wire rack. In a small mixing bowl, beat the cream cheese, peanut butter and confectioners’ sugar until smooth. Fold in 1 cup whipped topping. Spoon over crust. In another bowl, whisk milk and both pudding mixes for 2 minutes. Let stand for 2 minutes or until soft-set. Spread over cream cheese layer. Top with remaining whipped topping. Sprinkle with chopped candy bar and remaining cashews. Cover and refrigerate for at least 1 hour before serving. Yield: 12-16 servings.

DECEMBER JANUARY 2007

Line three 9-in. round baking pans with waxed paper; set aside. Place egg whites in a large mixing bowl; let

7 eggs, separated 1 cup sugar, divided 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1-1/4 cups ground walnuts 1-1/4 cups ground pecans 1/4 cup dry bread crumbs 1 teaspoon baking powder 3/4 teaspoon salt, divided Filling: 1 cup heavy whipping cream 1/2 cup confectioners’ sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla extract Mocha Frosting: 1/4 cup butter, cubed 4 squares (1 ounce each) unsweetened chocolate 1/2 cup brewed coffee 2 teaspoons vanilla extract 3 to 3-1/4 cups confectioners’ sugar Pecan halves, optional

Mocha Nut Torte

cup all-purpose flour teaspoon salt teaspoon pepper eggs cup buttermilk teaspoon hot pepper sauce cup finely chopped pecans cup dry bread crumbs boneless skinless chicken breast halves (6 ounces each) 2 tablespoons butter 2 tablespoons vegetable oil Peach Mango Chutney: 2 cups sliced peeled fresh or frozen peaches, thawed 1 cup mango chutney

3/4 1/8 1/8 2 1/3 1/8 1 3/4 6

Pecan Chicken with Chutney

stand at room temperature for 30 minutes. Meanwhile, in another mixing bowl, beat egg yolks until slightly thickened. Gradually add 1/2 cup sugar, beating until thick and lemon-colored. Beat in vanilla. Combine nuts, crumbs, baking powder and 1/2 teaspoon salt; stir into yolk mixture until combined. Add remaining salt to egg whites; beat on medium speed until soft peaks form. Gradually beat in remaining sugar, about 2 tablespoons at a time, on high until stiff glossy peaks form and sugar is dissolved. Gradually fold into batter just until blended. Divide among prepared pans. Bake at 375° for 20-25 minutes or until tops spring back when lightly touched. Invert pans; cool for 20 minutes. Remove from pans to wire racks; cool completely. Remove waxed paper. In a small mixing bowl, beat cream until it begins to thicken. Add confectioners’ sugar and vanilla; beat until stiff peaks form. Cover and refrigerate until assembling. In a large saucepan, melt butter and chocolate over low heat. Remove from the heat. Stir in coffee, vanilla and enough confectioners’ sugar to achieve frosting consistency. Spread filling between layers. Frost top and sides of cake. Garnish with pecans if desired. Yield: 12 servings.

DECEMBER JANUARY 2007

In a shallow bowl, combine the flour, salt and pepper. In another shallow bowl, whisk the eggs, buttermilk and hot pepper sauce. In a third bowl, combine pecans and bread crumbs. Flatten chicken to 1/4-in. thickness. Coat the chicken with flour mixture, then dip in egg mixture and coat with pecan mixture. In a large skillet over medium heat, cook chicken in butter and oil for 8-10 minutes on each side or until juices run clear. Meanwhile, in a small saucepan, combine peaches and chutney. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat; simmer, uncovered, for 1520 minutes or until heated through. Serve with chicken. Yield: 6 servings (1-3/4 cups chutney).

DECEMBER JANUARY 2007


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Clearfield, Utah

A cookie crumb crust,delectable layers of praline and cream cheese, and a chocolate glaze make this rich dessert a showstopper. It freezes well, too. —Korrie Bastian

❧ PREP: 25 min. + chilling ❧ BAKE: 10 min. + cooling

Praline Chocolate Dessert

Lincoln, Nebraska

Sweet, buttery frosting and a sprinkling of chopped nuts top this yummy cake that’s loaded with banana and pecan flavor. Serve it with a steaming cup of coffee or a cold glass of milk. —Marlene Saunders

❧ PREP: 20 min. ❧ BAKE: 30 min. + cooling

Banana Nut Cake

“Go Nuts” Contest

“Go Nuts” Contest

RunnerUp

RunnerUp

Wadsworth, Ohio

Looking for a sweet ending to a special meal? This attractive pecan pie is bound to please with its traditional sugary filling and honey-glazed pecans. A storebought crust helps this recipe go together with ease. —Cathy Hudak

❧ PREP: 25 min. ❧ BAKE: 45 min. + cooling

Honey Pecan Pie

Brookville, Indiana

Kick up your parties and get-togethers with these well-seasoned snacks. They’re sweet, salty, crunchy...and oh, so munchable! —Martha Fehl

❧ PREP: 15 min. ❧ BAKE: 50 min. + cooling

Roasted Cumin Cashews

“Go Nuts” Contest

“Go Nuts” Contest

RunnerUp

RunnerUp


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Taste of Home • December/January 2007

1/2 cup butter, softened 1 cup sugar 2 eggs 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract 1-1/4 cups all-purpose flour 3/4 teaspoon baking soda 1/2 teaspoon salt 3/4 cup mashed ripe banana 1/2 cup chopped pecans, toasted Butter Pecan Frosting: 1/2 cup butter, softened 1/4 cup milk 1 teaspoon vanilla extract Dash salt 2 to 2-1/2 cups confectioners’ sugar 1 cup finely chopped pecans, toasted Additional chopped pecans, optional

Banana Nut Cake

In a small bowl, combine cookie crumbs and

2 cups cream-filled chocolate sandwich cookie crumbs 1/2 cup butter, melted 1 cup chopped pecans Praline: 1-1/2 cups butter, cubed 1 cup packed brown sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla extract Filling: 2 packages (8 ounces each) cream cheese, softened 1/2 cup confectioners’ sugar 1/3 cup packed brown sugar Ganache: 1 cup (6 ounces) semisweet chocolate chips 1/2 cup heavy whipping cream Pecan halves

Praline Chocolate Dessert

In a large mixing bowl, cream butter and sugar. Add eggs, one at a time, beating well after each addition. Stir in vanilla. Combine the flour, baking soda and salt; add to creamed mixture, beating just until combined. Fold in banana and pecans. Pour into a greased 8-in. square baking dish. Bake at 350° for 30-35 minutes or until a toothpick inserted near the center comes out clean. Cool on a wire rack. In a small mixing bowl, cream butter. Beat in the milk, vanilla, salt and enough confectioners’ sugar to achieve spreading consistency. Stir in toasted pecans. Frost cake. Garnish with additional pecans if desired. Yield: 9 servings.

DECEMBER JANUARY 2007

butter. Press onto the bottom of a greased 9-in. springform pan. Place on a baking sheet. Bake at 350° for 10 minutes. Cool on a wire rack. Sprinkle with pecans. In a large saucepan over medium heat, bring butter and brown sugar to a boil, stirring constantly. Reduce heat; simmer, uncovered, for 10 minutes. Remove from the heat; stir in vanilla. Pour over pecans. Refrigerate for 1-2 hours or until set. In a large mixing bowl, beat filling ingredients until smooth. Spread over praline layer. Refrigerate for 1-2 hours or until set. For ganache, in a microwave-safe bowl, melt chocolate chips with cream; stir until smooth. Cool slightly; spread over filling. Refrigerate for 1-2 hours or until set. Carefully run a knife around edge of pan to loosen; remove sides of pan. Garnish with pecan halves. Refrigerate leftovers. Yield: 14-16 servings.

DECEMBER JANUARY 2007

1 egg white 1 tablespoon water 2 cans (9-3/4 ounces each) salted whole cashews 1/3 cup sugar 3 teaspoons chili powder 2 teaspoons salt 2 teaspoons ground cumin 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper

Roasted Cumin Cashews

4 eggs 1 cup chopped pecans 1 cup light corn syrup 1/4 cup sugar 1/4 cup packed brown sugar 2 tablespoons butter, melted 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 unbaked pastry shell (9 inches) Topping: 3 tablespoons butter 1/3 cup packed brown sugar 3 tablespoons honey 1-1/2 cups pecan halves

Honey Pecan Pie

In a large bowl, whisk egg white and water. Add cashews and toss to coat. Transfer to a colander; drain for 2 minutes. In another bowl, combine the remaining ingredients; add cashews and toss to coat. Arrange in a single layer in a greased 15in. x 10-in. x 1-in. baking pan. Bake, uncovered, at 250° for 50-55 minutes, stirring once. Cool on a wire rack. Store in an airtight container. Yield: 3-1/2 cups.

DECEMBER JANUARY 2007

In a large bowl, combine the eggs, pecans, corn syrup, sugars, butter, vanilla and salt. Pour into pastry shell. Bake at 350° for 30 minutes. In a small saucepan, melt butter over medium heat. Stir in the brown sugar and honey until combined. Stir in pecan halves until coated. Spoon over pie. Bake 15-20 minutes longer or until bubbly and golden brown. Cool completely on a wire rack. Refrigerate leftovers. Yield: 8 servings.

DECEMBER JANUARY 2007


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Danbury, Iowa

For old-fashioned flavor,you can’t beat this attractive nut roll.The recipe makes four rolls, so you’ll have enough to serve family and friends all through the holiday season. —Elleen Oberreuter

❧ PREP: 45 min. + rising ❧ BAKE: 20 min. + cooling

Maple Walnut Rolls

Peru, Indiana

I altered the original recipe for these creamy caramels by substituting condensed milk for part of the whipping cream and cutting back on the sugar.Everybody raves about them,and they make an ideal holiday gift.You can’t eat just one! —Patsy Howell

❧ PREP: 20 min. ❧ COOK: 35 min. + cooling

Pecan Caramels

“Go Nuts” Contest

“Go Nuts” Contest

RunnerUp

RunnerUp

Sharon, Pennsylvania

A buttery shortbread crust holds a delectable filling made with chocolate and a mix of chopped pistachios, almonds and pecans. It’s impressive yet easy to prepare. I guarantee that it will become one of your most requested desserts. —Debbie Cross

❧ PREP: 20 min. ❧ BAKE: 35 min. + cooling

Mixed Nut Chocolate Tart

Austin, Texas

A refreshing pineapple salsa complements these crispy golden fillets that are special enough to serve company. I like to garnish each fillet with whole macadamia nuts. —Jennifer Fisher

❧ PREP: 20 min. ❧ BAKE: 15 min.

MacadamiaCrusted Tilapia

“Go Nuts” Contest

“Go Nuts” Contest

RunnerUp

RunnerUp


32

Taste of Home • December/January 2007

Line a 13-in. x 9-in. x 2-in. pan with foil; grease the foil with butter. Set aside. In a large heavy saucepan, combine the sugar, corn syrup and 1 cup cream. Bring to a boil over medium heat. Cook and stir until smooth and blended, about 10 min-

tablespoon butter, softened cup sugar cup light corn syrup cups heavy whipping cream, divided 1 can (14 ounces) sweetened condensed milk 2 cups chopped pecans 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1 1 1 2

Pecan Caramels

In a large mixing bowl, combine 2 cups flour, sugar, yeast and salt. In a small saucepan, heat sour cream, butter and water to 120°-130°;

6 to 7 cups all-purpose flour 3 tablespoons sugar 2 packages (1/4 ounce each) active dry yeast 1 teaspoon salt 1 cup (8 ounces) sour cream 1 cup butter, softened 1/2 cup water 3 eggs, lightly beaten Filling: 3/4 cup butter, melted 1/2 cup sugar 3 tablespoons maple syrup 5 cups ground walnuts Icing: 2 cups confectioners’ sugar 2 to 3 tablespoons milk

Maple Walnut Rolls

Editor’s Note: We recommend that you test your candy thermometer before each use by bringing water to a boil; the thermometer should read 212°. Adjust your recipe temperature up or down based on your test.

utes. Stir in milk and remaining cream. Bring to a boil over medium-low heat, stirring constantly. Cook and stir until a candy thermometer reads 238° (soft-ball stage), about 25 minutes. Remove from the heat; stir in pecans and vanilla. Pour into prepared pan (do not scrape saucepan). Cool. Using foil, lift candy out of pan; cut into 1-in. squares. Wrap individually in waxed paper. Yield: about 2-1/2 pounds.

DECEMBER JANUARY 2007

add to dry ingredients. Beat on medium speed for 2 minutes. Add eggs and 1/2 cup flour; beat 2 minutes longer. Stir in enough remaining flour to form a soft dough. Turn onto a floured surface; knead until smooth and elastic, about 6-8 minutes. Place in a greased bowl; turn once to grease top. Cover and let rise in a warm place until doubled, about 1-1/4 hours. Punch dough down; divide into four portions. Roll each portion into a 14-in. x 12-in. rectangle. In a large bowl, combine the butter, sugar and syrup; stir in walnuts. Sprinkle 1 cup over each rectangle. Roll up each, jelly-roll style, starting with a long side; pinch seams to seal. Place seam side down on greased baking sheets. Cover; let rise in a warm place until doubled, about 45 minutes. Bake at 350° for 20-25 minutes or until lightly browned. Remove from pans to wire racks to cool. Combine icing ingredients; drizzle over rolls. Yield: 4 rolls (14 slices each).

DECEMBER JANUARY 2007

eggs teaspoon cayenne pepper cup all-purpose flour cups macadamia nuts, finely chopped 4 tilapia fillets (6 ounces each) 1 tablespoon butter, melted Pineapple Salsa: 1 cup cubed fresh pineapple 1/4 cup chopped sweet red pepper 3 tablespoons thinly sliced green onions 2 tablespoons sugar 1 jalapeno pepper, seeded and chopped 1 tablespoon lime juice 1/2 teaspoon minced fresh gingerroot 2 tablespoons minced fresh cilantro

2 1/8 1 1-3/4

Macadamia-Crusted Tilapia

cups all-purpose flour cup sugar cup plus 1 tablespoon cold butter tablespoons heavy whipping cream 1-1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract Filling: 1 cup pistachios 1 cup pecan halves 3/4 cup unblanched almonds 3 eggs 3/4 cup light corn syrup 1/4 cup packed brown sugar 1/4 cup butter, melted 1-1/2 teaspoons almond extract 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 cup milk chocolate chips Whipped cream

1-1/2 1/4 1/2 6

Mixed Nut Chocolate Tart

Editor’s Note: When cutting or seeding hot peppers, use rubber or plastic gloves to protect your hands. Avoid touching your face.

In a shallow bowl, whisk eggs and cayenne. Place flour and macadamia nuts in separate shallow bowls. Coat tilapia with flour, then dip in egg mixture and coat with nuts. Place on a greased baking sheet; drizzle with butter. Bake at 375° for 15-20 minutes or until fish flakes easily with a fork. Meanwhile, in a small serving bowl, combine the pineapple, red pepper, onions, sugar, jalapeno, lime juice and ginger; sprinkle with cilantro. Serve with fish. Yield: 4 servings (1-1/2 cups salsa).

DECEMBER JANUARY 2007

In a small bowl, combine flour and sugar; cut in butter until mixture resembles fine crumbs. Add cream and vanilla, tossing with a fork until dough forms a ball. Press onto the bottom and up the sides of an ungreased 11-in. tart pan with removable bottom; set aside. Place nuts in a food processor; cover and process until chopped. In a large bowl, whisk the eggs, corn syrup, brown sugar, butter and extracts until smooth. Stir in chocolate chips and nut mixture; pour into crust. Place pan on a baking sheet. Bake at 350° for 35-40 minutes or until center is set. Cool on a wire rack. Store in the refrigerator. Garnish with whipped cream. Yield: 12-14 servings.

DECEMBER JANUARY 2007


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Featured on page 14

Truman, Minnesota

I make this recipe for almost every holiday and often take it to potlucks. Usually, I make the pilaf ahead to allow the flavors to blend and then reheat it in the microwave before serving.This also makes for more room in the oven and less chaos when you are putting out a big holiday meal. —Dianne Bettin

❧ PREP: 1 hour ❧ BAKE: 25 min.

Wild Rice Pilaf

Featured on page 14

Truman, Minnesota

Editor ’s Meal

Editor ’s Meal

After trying this tasty side dish, I think you’ll agree that it is holiday-special. Sweet peaches and crunchy cashews really enhance the sweet potatoes. —Dianne Bettin

My favorite entree for Christmas and other special occasions, a crown roast is easy to prepare. Both its elegant appearance and excellent flavor are sure to impress your friends and family. (Call ahead to order a crown roast from your butcher or supermarket meat department.) —Dianne Bettin

Featured on page 14

Truman, Minnesota

My family calls this festive dessert “turtle cake” because of the delectable candy bits in the moist cake layers and the gooey-good frosting.It’s an impressive-looking cake but quite easy to make, as you’ll see from the recipe. —Dianne Bettin

❧ PREP: 40 min. ❧ BAKE: 25 min. + cooling

Devil’s Food Caramel Torte

Featured on page 14

Truman, Minnesota

❧ PREP: 45 min. ❧ BAKE: 40 min.

Cashew-Peach Sweet Potatoes

❧ PREP: 15 min. ❧ BAKE: 3 hours + standing

Crown Roast Of Pork

Editor ’s Meal

Editor ’s Meal


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Taste of Home • December/January 2007

1 tablespoon dried parsley flakes 1 tablespoon vegetable oil 1 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon pepper 1 pork crown roast (14 ribs and about 8 pounds) Foil or paper frills for rib ends

Crown Roast of Pork

2 cans (14-1/2 ounces each) chicken broth 3/4 cup uncooked wild rice 1 cup uncooked long grain rice 1 large onion, chopped 2 medium carrots, halved lengthwise and sliced 1 garlic clove, minced 1/2 teaspoon dried rosemary, crushed 1/2 cup butter, cubed 3 cups fresh broccoli florets 1/4 teaspoon pepper

Wild Rice Pilaf

In a small bowl, combine the parsley, oil, salt and pepper; rub over roast. Place on a rack in a large shallow roasting pan. Cover rib ends with pieces of foil. Bake at 350° for 3 to 3-1/2 hours or until a meat thermometer reads 160°. Transfer roast to a serving platter. Let stand for 10-15 minutes. Remove foil. Garnish rib ends with frills.Cut between ribs to serve. Yield: 14 servings.

DECEMBER JANUARY 2007

In a large saucepan, bring broth to a boil. Add wild rice; reduce heat. Cover and cook for 30 minutes. Add long grain rice; cook 20-25 minutes longer or until liquid is absorbed and rice is tender. Meanwhile, in a large skillet, saute the onion, carrots, garlic and rosemary in butter until vegetables are tender. Stir in the rice, broccoli and pepper. Transfer to a greased shallow 2-qt. baking dish. Cover and bake at 350° for 25-30 minutes or until broccoli is crisp-tender. Fluff with a fork before serving. Yield: 10 servings.

DECEMBER JANUARY 2007

DECEMBER JANUARY 2007

medium sweet potatoes cup packed brown sugar cup coarsely chopped cashews teaspoon salt teaspoon ground ginger can (15-1/4 ounces) sliced peaches, drained 3 tablespoons butter

6 1/2 1/3 1/2 1/4 1

Cashew-Peach Sweet Potatoes

Place sweet potatoes in a large saucepan or Dutch oven; cover with water. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat; cover and cook for 3045 minutes or just until tender. Drain and cool slightly; peel and cut into cubes. In a small bowl, combine brown sugar, cashews, salt and ginger. Place half of the sweet potatoes in an ungreased 11-in. x 7-in. x 2-in. baking dish; top with half of the peaches and brown sugar mixture. Repeat layers; dot with butter. Cover and bake at 350° for 30 minutes. Uncover; bake 10 minutes longer or until bubbly and heated through. Yield: 10 servings.

DECEMBER JANUARY 2007

low speed for 30 seconds. Beat on medium for 2 minutes. Combine 1 cup candies and cocoa; fold into batter. Pour into prepared pans. Bake at 350° for 25-30 minutes or until a toothpick inserted near the center comes out clean. Cool for 10 minutes before removing from pans to wire racks to cool completely. Remove waxed paper. In a small mixing bowl, beat cream until it begins to thicken. Add caramel topping; beat until stiff peaks form. Fold in remaining candies. Place one cake layer on a serving plate; spread with chocolate frosting. Top with remaining cake layer; frost top and sides of Line two 9-in. round baking pans with torte with cream mixture. Garnish with adwaxed paper; grease the paper and set ditional candies if desired. Refrigerate until aside. In a large mixing bowl, combine the serving. Yield: 12 servings. cake mix, buttermilk, oil and eggs. Beat on

1 package (18-1/4 ounces) devil’s food cake mix 1 cup buttermilk 1/2 cup vegetable oil 3 eggs 1 package (7 ounces) milk chocolate turtle candies, chopped, divided 1 tablespoon baking cocoa 1-1/2 cups heavy whipping cream 1/3 cup caramel ice cream topping 1 can (16 ounces) chocolate frosting Additional milk chocolate turtle candies, broken, optional

Devil’s Food Caramel Torte


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35

Featured on page 22

Eugene, Oregon

My mom dresses up convenient frozen peas with a quick-to-fix cheese sauce that our family loves. —June Blomquist

My Mom’s Best Meal

Featured on page 22

Eugene, Oregon

Mom’s special holiday pie is both creamy and crunchy, thanks to the addition of whipping cream and chopped walnuts. —June Blomquist

❧ PREP: 15 min. ❧ BAKE: 50 min. + cooling

❧ PREP/TOTAL TIME: 20 min.

Featured on page 22

Caramel-Crunch Pumpkin Pie

My Mom’s Best Meal

less fat, sugar or salt. Includes ✓ Uses Nutrition Facts and Diabetic Exchanges.

Eugene, Oregon

Tangy and fruity, this festive gelatin mold is not only easy to prepare but pretty, too.Once they’ve tried it, your family will request it again and again. —June Blomquist

❧ PREP: 15 min. + chilling

Cranberry Gelatin Mold

Peas in Cheese Sauce

Featured on page 22

Eugene, Oregon

Whenever I think of this appealing rolled turkey filled with Mom’s moist corn bread stuffing, I can almost smell the aroma of it baking in the oven. It’s just delicious! —June Blomquist

❧ PREP: 30 min. ❧ BAKE: 2 hours + standing

Rolled-Up Turkey

My Mom’s Best Meal

My Mom’s Best Meal


36

Taste of Home • December/January 2007

DECEMBER JANUARY 2007

In a large saucepan, melt butter over low heat. Stir in the flour, salt and pepper until smooth. Gradually add milk. Bring to a boil; cook and stir for 2 minutes or until thickened. Add the cheese; stir until melted. Stir in peas; cook 1-2 minutes longer or until heated through. Yield: 8 servings.

DECEMBER JANUARY 2007

bine bread and corn bread; add celery mixture, 1/2 teaspoon salt and sage. Stir in enough broth to moisten. Spoon 2 cups stuffing over turkey breast to within 1 in. of edges. Roll up jelly-roll style, starting with a long side. Tie with kitchen string at 1-1/2-in. intervals. Place on a rack in a large shallow roasting pan. Spoon 1 cup stuffing over each thigh section to within 1 in. of edges. Roll up each jelly-roll style, starting with a short side. Tie with kitchen string; place on a rack in another shallow roasting pan. Brush turkey with oil; sprinkle with pepper and remaining salt. Bake turkey breast at 325° for 2 to 2-1/2 hours or until a meat therUnroll turkey on a large cutting board. With mometer reads 170°; bake thighs for 1-1/2 a sharp knife, remove the wings (save for to 1-3/4 hours or until a meat thermometer another use). Flatten turkey to 3/4-in. thickreads 180°. Let turkey breast stand for 15 ness. Cut between the turkey breast and minutes before slicing. Yield: 8 servings. thighs to separate into three sections. Editor’s Note: Ask the butcher to debone the In a large skillet, saute celery and onion in butter until tender. In a large bowl, com- turkey for you.

1 turkey (12 pounds), deboned and giblets removed 1 cup chopped celery 1 medium onion, chopped 1/2 cup butter, cubed 5 cups cubed white bread 1-1/2 cups coarsely crumbled corn bread 1 teaspoon salt, divided 1/2 teaspoon rubbed sage 3/4 to 1 cup chicken broth 3 tablespoons vegetable oil 1/4 teaspoon pepper

Rolled-Up Turkey

teaspoons butter teaspoons all-purpose flour teaspoon salt teaspoon white pepper cups milk cup cubed process cheese (Velveeta) 2 packages (10 ounces each) frozen peas, thawed

4-1/2 4-1/2 1/4 1/8 1-1/2 3/4

Peas in Cheese Sauce

In a large bowl, dissolve gelatin in boiling water. Stir in cranberry sauce and lemon juice until blended. Chill until partially set. Stir in pineapple and celery. Pour into a 6-cup ring mold coated with nonstick cooking spray. Refrigerate until firm. Unmold onto a serving platter. Yield: 8 servings.

2 packages (3 ounces each) raspberry gelatin 3 cups boiling water 1 can (16 ounces) whole-berry cranberry sauce 2 tablespoons lemon juice 1 can (8 ounces) unsweetened crushed pineapple, drained 1/2 cup finely chopped celery

Cranberry Gelatin Mold

3/4 cup packed brown sugar, divided 1/2 cup finely chopped walnuts 2 tablespoons butter, melted 1 unbaked pastry shell (9 inches) 3 eggs 1 cup canned pumpkin 1 teaspoon rum extract 3/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon ground mace 1/4 teaspoon ground ginger 1-1/2 cups heavy whipping cream Whipped cream and additional chopped walnuts, optional

Caramel-Crunch Pumpkin Pie

Nutrition Facts: 3/4 cup (prepared with sugarfree gelatin) equals 174 calories, trace fat (trace saturated fat), 0 cholesterol, 479 mg sodium, 33 g carbohydrate, 1 g fiber, 12 g protein. Diabetic Exchanges: 2 fruit, 1/2 starch.

DECEMBER JANUARY 2007

In a small bowl, combine 1/4 cup brown sugar, walnuts and butter. Press onto the bottom of pastry shell. In a large bowl, whisk the eggs, pumpkin, extract, cinnamon, salt, mace, ginger and remaining brown sugar until blended; stir in cream. Pour into pastry shell. Cover edges loosely with foil. Bake at 400° for 10 minutes. Reduce heat to 350°; bake 40-45 minutes longer or until a knife inserted near the center comes out clean. Remove foil. Cool on a wire rack. Garnish with whipped cream and additional walnuts if desired. Refrigerate leftovers. Yield: 8 servings.

DECEMBER JANUARY 2007


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37

Featured on page 21

Spearville, Kansas

Stir up some holiday spirit with this hot, tangy brew that’s full of fruit flavor. —Pat Habiger

❧ PREP/TOTAL TIME: 30 min.

Citrus Cranberry Tea

Featured on page 21

Rochester, New York

Po t l u c k P l e a s e r s

Po t l u c k P l e a s e r s

Featured on page 21

less fat, sugar or salt. Includes ✓ Uses Nutrition Facts and Diabetic Exchanges.

Longmont, Colorado

While looking for lower-fat,highprotein breakfast options, I took an old sausage recipe and made it new again. —Jo Ann Honey

❧ PREP/TOTAL TIME: 30 min.

Breakfast Patties

Featured on page 21

Harbor Beach, Michigan

Instead of a fruit platter, serve these fun kabobs drizzled with a warm butter pecan sauce.These juicy treats will definitely perk up your party spread. —Robin Boynton

❧ PREP/TOTAL TIME: 30 min.

❧ PREP: 20 min. + chilling ❧ BAKE: 50 min.

This hearty entree warms up any breakfast or brunch menu with its savory herb flavor. —Darlene Markham

Apple ’n’ Pear Kabobs

Italian Sausage Egg Bake

Po t l u c k P l e a s e r s

Po t l u c k P l e a s e r s


38

Taste of Home • December/January 2007

quarts water cups sugar cinnamon sticks (3 inches) cups cranberry juice cups orange juice cup lemon juice

8 slices white bread, cubed 1 pound Italian sausage links, casings removed and sliced 2 cups (8 ounces) shredded sharp cheddar cheese 2 cups (8 ounces) shredded partskim mozzarella cheese 9 eggs 3 cups milk 1 teaspoon dried basil 1 teaspoon dried oregano 1 teaspoon fennel seed, crushed

Italian Sausage Egg Bake

4 1-1/2 6 8 4 1/3

Citrus Cranberry Tea

Place bread cubes in a greased 13-in. x 9in. x 2-in. baking dish; set aside. In a large skillet, cook sausage over medium heat until no longer pink; drain. Spoon sausage over bread; sprinkle with cheeses. In a large bowl, whisk the eggs, milk and seasonings; pour over casserole. Cover and refrigerate overnight. Remove from the refrigerator 30 minutes before baking. Bake, uncovered, at 350° for 50-55 minutes or until golden brown. Let stand for 5 minutes before cutting. Yield: 12 servings.

DECEMBER JANUARY 2007

In a Dutch oven or large kettle, combine water, sugar and cinnamon. Bring to a boil; reduce heat. Cover; simmer for 25 minutes. Discard cinnamon sticks. Stir juices into tea. Serve warm. Yield: 32 servings (8 quarts).

DECEMBER JANUARY 2007

pounds lean ground turkey teaspoons salt teaspoon dried sage leaves teaspoon pepper teaspoon ground ginger teaspoon cayenne pepper

5 medium apples, cut into 1-inch chunks 4 medium pears, cut into 1-inch chunks 1 tablespoon lemon juice Butter Pecan Sauce: 1/3 cup packed brown sugar 2 tablespoons sugar 4 teaspoons cornstarch 3/4 cup heavy whipping cream 1 tablespoon butter 1/2 cup chopped pecans

Apple ’n’ Pear Kabobs

Crumble turkey into a large bowl. Add the salt, sage, pepper, ginger and cayenne. Shape into sixteen 2-1/2-in. patties. In a large skillet, cook patties over medium heat for 4-6 minutes on each side or until meat is no longer pink. Yield: 16 patties.

2 1-1/2 1 1 1/2 1/2

Breakfast Patties

Toss apples and pears with lemon juice. Thread fruit alternately onto 12 metal or soaked wooden skewers; place on an ungreased baking sheet. Bake at 350° for 15-20 minutes or until tender. Meanwhile, in a small saucepan, combine sugars and cornstarch. Gradually stir in cream until smooth. Bring to a boil, stirring constantly; cook and stir for 2-3 minutes or until slightly thickened. Remove from the heat; stir in butter until smooth. Add the pecans. Serve warm with kabobs. Yield: 12 servings.

DECEMBER JANUARY 2007

Nutrition Facts: 2 patties equals 85 calories, 5 g fat (1 g saturated fat), 45 mg cholesterol, 275 mg sodium, trace carbohydrate, trace fiber, 10 g protein. Diabetic Exchanges: 2 very lean meat, 1/2 fat.

DECEMBER JANUARY 2007


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39

Spirit Lake, Iowa

This rich and creamy dish is one I make for special occasions.You can substitute low-fat ingredients, and it turns out just as good. —Liz Lorch

❧ PREP: 30 min. ❧ BAKE: 35 min.

Chicken Manicotti

less fat, sugar or salt. Includes ✓ Uses Nutrition Facts and Diabetic Exchanges.

Hallock, Minnesota

While this delicious soup is great for large groups, I also like to freeze it in meal-sized portions to use on days when I have zero time to cook. —Marcia Severson

❧ PREP: 1 hour ❧ COOK: 40 min.

Hearty Beef Soup

Bonus Card

Cooking for a Crowd

Glentana, Montana

I serve this cheesy chowder every Christmas or New Year’s Eve.Throughout the year, I substitute broccoli for the potatoes and clams and find that even the grandchildren enjoy the taste. —Joy Schuster

❧ PREP: 15 min. ❧ COOK: 30 min.

Christmas Clam Chowder

Nathrop, Colorado

Comforting and easy, this is one of my favorite recipes for bread pudding. Its texture is neither soggy nor dry, and everyone loves the lemony sauce drizzled on top. —Loreta Dressel

❧ PREP: 20 min. ❧ BAKE: 50 min.

Bread Pudding For 40

Bonus Card

Cooking for a Crowd


40

Taste of Home • December/January 2007

4 pounds boneless beef top sirloin steak, cut into 1/2-inch cubes 4 cups chopped onions 1/4 cup butter 4 quarts hot water 4 cups sliced carrots 4 cups cubed peeled potatoes 2 cups chopped cabbage 1 cup chopped celery 1 large green pepper, chopped 8 teaspoons beef bouillon granules 1 tablespoon seasoned salt 1 teaspoon dried basil 1 teaspoon pepper 4 bay leaves 6 cups tomato juice

Hearty Beef Soup

2 packages (3 ounces each) cream cheese, softened 1 cup (8 ounces) sour cream 1/4 cup minced fresh parsley 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon pepper 4 cups cubed cooked chicken 1 medium onion, finely chopped 1 can (8 ounces) mushroom stems and pieces, drained 1 tablespoon butter 14 manicotti shells, cooked and drained Sauce: 6 tablespoons butter 6 tablespoons all-purpose flour 1/4 teaspoon salt 3-1/2 cups milk 3 cups (12 ounces) shredded Monterey Jack or cheddar cheese

Chicken Manicotti

Nutrition Facts: 1 cup (prepared with reducedfat butter and reduced-sodium bouillon) equals 123 calories, 4 g fat (2 g saturated fat), 34 mg cholesterol, 428 mg sodium, 10 g carbohydrate, 2 g fiber, 12 g protein. Diabetic Exchanges: 2 vegetable, 1 lean meat, 1/2 fat.

In two Dutch ovens or one large soup kettle, brown beef and onions in butter in batches; drain. Add the water, vegetables and seasonings; bring to a boil. Reduce heat; cover and simmer for 20 minutes. Add tomato juice; cover and simmer 10 minutes longer or until the beef and vegetables are tender. Discard bay leaves. Yield: 32 servings (8 quarts).

DECEMBER JANUARY 2007

In a large mixing bowl, beat cream cheese until fluffy. Beat in the sour cream, parsley, salt and pepper. Stir in chicken. In a small skillet, cook onion and mushrooms in butter until tender; add to chicken mixture. Stuff into manicotti shells. In a large saucepan, melt the butter. Stir in flour and salt until smooth. Gradually whisk in milk. Bring to a boil; cook and stir for 2 minutes or until thickened. Stir in 2-1/2 cups Monterey Jack cheese and 2 tablespoons Parmesan cheese just until melted. Spread about 1/2 cup cheese sauce in each of two greased 11-in. x 7-in. x 2-in. dishes. Top with stuffed shells and remaining sauce. Cover and bake at 350° for 25 minutes. Uncover; sprinkle with remaining cheeses. Bake 10-15 minutes longer or until bubbly and cheese is melted. Yield: 7 servings.

4 tablespoons shredded Parmesan cheese, divided

DECEMBER JANUARY 2007

cups cubed red potatoes cups water medium carrot, grated small onion, chopped teaspoons chicken bouillon granules teaspoon dried parsley flakes teaspoon pepper tablespoons all-purpose flour cup cold water cans (6-1/2 ounces each) chopped clams, drained cup cubed process cheese (Velveeta) can (12 ounces) evaporated milk

eggs, lightly beaten cups milk cup butter, melted cups sugar teaspoons salt teaspoons vanilla extract teaspoons ground cinnamon loaves (1 pound each) day-old white bread, cubed 4 cups raisins Lemon Sauce: 3 cups sugar 6 tablespoons cornstarch Dash salt 2 cups cold water 1-1/2 cups lemon juice 6 tablespoons butter, cubed 3 tablespoons grated lemon peel

16 12 1 3 4 4 2 4

Bread Pudding for 40

1

2/3

1 1/2 2 1/2 3

4 3 1 1 2

Christmas Clam Chowder

In a very large bowl, combine the eggs, milk and butter. Whisk in the sugar, salt, vanilla and cinnamon until combined. Gently stir in bread cubes and raisins. Transfer to four well-greased 13-in. x 9in. x 2-in. baking dishes. Bake, uncovered, at 350° for 50-55 minutes or until a knife inserted 1 in. from edges comes out clean. Meanwhile, in a large saucepan, combine the sugar, cornstarch and salt. Gradually stir in water and lemon juice until smooth. Bring to a boil; cook and stir for 10 minutes or until thickened. Remove from the heat. Stir in butter and lemon peel until blended. Serve warm with bread pudding. Yield: 40 servings (7-1/2 cups sauce).

DECEMBER JANUARY 2007

In a large saucepan, combine the first seven ingredients. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat; cover and simmer for 20 minutes or until potatoes are tender. In a small bowl, combine flour and cold water until smooth. Stir into potato mixture. Bring to a boil; cook and stir for 2 minutes or until thickened. Reduce heat. Add clams and cheese; cook and stir until cheese is melted. Stir in milk; heat through. Yield: 9 servings (about 2 quarts).

DECEMBER JANUARY 2007


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41

Phoenix, Arizona

My husband was pleasantly surprised when he tried my new twist on beets.The orange and ginger are a nice complement, making this vegetable a wonderful addition to any holiday table. —Marion Tipton

❧ PREP: 10 min. ❧ BAKE: 70 min.

Gingered Orange Beets

Dover, Ohio

My family loves pierogies, so I decided to create my own version. I took them to a Christmas party,and they won rave reviews. I left with an empty pan, not a crumb to be found. —Kim Wallace

❧ PREP: 30 min. ❧ BAKE: 30 min.

Pierogi Pasta Shells

Bonus Card

Bonus Card

Stoneboro, Pennsylvania

Friends and family love this spin on pizza. It’s a tomatoey pasta casserole packed with cheeses and meats. It always goes fast. —Nancy Foust

❧ PREP: 20 min. ❧ BAKE: 30 min.

Pizza Casserole

Medicine Hat, Alberta

This guaranteed crowd-pleaser can be served all year long. In summer I grill it, and in winter I roast it in the oven. Delicious! —Elaine Seip

+ standing

❧ PREP: 20 min. ❧ BAKE: 1-1/2 hours

Seasoned Pork Loin Roast

Bonus Card

Bonus Card


42

Taste of Home • December/January 2007

51 uncooked jumbo pasta shells 2 packages (32 ounces each) refrigerated mashed potatoes 2 tablespoons dried minced onion 1/2 teaspoon onion powder 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder 4 cups (16 ounces) shredded cheddar cheese, divided 1/2 cup chopped green onions

Pierogi Pasta Shells

1-1/2 pounds whole fresh beets (about 4 medium), trimmed and cleaned 6 tablespoons olive oil, divided 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon white pepper 1 tablespoon rice wine vinegar 1 tablespoon orange juice concentrate 1-1/2 teaspoons grated orange peel, divided 1/2 teaspoon minced fresh gingerroot 1 medium navel orange, peeled, sectioned and chopped 1/3 cup pecan halves, toasted

Gingered Orange Beets

Cook pasta shells according to package directions; drain and rinse in cold water. Place mashed potatoes in a large microwave-safe bowl. Cover and microwave on high for 4 minutes, stirring once. Add the minced onion, onion powder and garlic powder. Stir in 2 cups of the cheese until blended. Stuff into shells. Place in two greased 13-in. x 9-in. x 2-in. baking dishes. Sprinkle with the green onions and remaining cheese. Cover and bake at 350° for 20 minutes. Uncover; bake 10 minutes longer or until heated through. Yield: 17 servings.

DECEMBER JANUARY 2007

Brush beets with 4 tablespoons oil; sprinkle with salt and pepper. Wrap loosely in foil; place on a baking sheet. Bake at 425° for 70-75 minutes or until fork-tender. Cool slightly. In a small bowl, whisk vinegar, orange juice concentrate, 1 teaspoon orange peel, ginger and remaining oil; set aside. Peel beets and cut into wedges; place in a serving bowl. Add orange sections and pecans. Drizzle with orange sauce and toss to coat. Sprinkle with remaining orange peel. Yield: 4 servings.

DECEMBER JANUARY 2007

cups uncooked spiral pasta pounds ground beef medium onion, chopped cans (8 ounces each) mushroom stems and pieces, drained can (15 ounces) tomato sauce jar (14 ounces) pizza sauce can (6 ounces) tomato paste teaspoon sugar teaspoon garlic powder teaspoon onion powder teaspoon dried oregano cups (16 ounces) shredded mozzarella cheese, divided package (3-1/2 ounces) sliced pepperoni cup grated Parmesan cheese

2 teaspoons garlic salt 2 teaspoons garlic-pepper blend 2 teaspoons lemon-pepper seasoning 1 boneless rolled pork loin roast (about 5 pounds) Basting Sauce: 3 cups water 2 tablespoons lemon juice 1-1/2 teaspoons dried minced onion 1/2 teaspoon garlic salt 1/2 teaspoon garlic-pepper blend 1/2 teaspoon lemon-pepper seasoning 1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes 1/2 teaspoon grated lemon peel

Seasoned Pork Loin Roast

1/2

1

1 1 1 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2 4

3 2 1 2

Pizza Casserole

Combine the garlic salt, garlic-pepper and lemon-pepper; rub over roast. Place on a rack in a shallow roasting pan. Bake, uncovered, at 325° for 1-1/2 to 2 hours or until a meat thermometer reads 160°. Meanwhile, in a large saucepan, combine the basting sauce ingredients. Bring to a boil; reduce heat. Simmer, uncovered, for 10 minutes. Brush over roast occasionally while baking. Let the roast stand for 10 minutes before slicing. Yield: 15-18 servings.

DECEMBER JANUARY 2007

Cook pasta according to package directions. Meanwhile, in a Dutch oven, cook beef and onion over medium heat until meat is no longer pink; drain. Stir in the mushrooms, tomato sauce, pizza sauce, tomato paste, sugar and seasonings. Drain pasta; stir into meat sauce. Divide half of the mixture between two greased 11-in. x 7-in. x 2-in. baking dishes; sprinkle each with 1 cup of mozzarella cheese. Repeat layers. Top with pepperoni and Parmesan cheese. Cover and bake at 350° for 20 minutes. Uncover; bake 1015 minutes longer or until heated through. Yield: 2 casseroles (8 servings each).

DECEMBER JANUARY 2007


Enter Our Recipe Contest

Festive Holiday Baking

Many of you are prob-

ably elbow-deep in baking this time of year. So it’s a perfect time to announce our new contest,“Holiday Baking Bonanza.” We’d like you to enter recipes for those goodies coming Your most “prized” from your oven this season. treats could win! For this contest, we’re looking for recipes that are a little more festive than your everyday confections. • Which eye-catching Christmas cookie gets rave reviews at the cookie exchange? • Is there a traditional holiday stollen you love to serve? • Do you bake a fancy quick bread that makes a great gift? • Have you an outstanding torte or cake that makes people go wild with anticipation? Spark our attention with delectables that take a little extra time, but are well worth the effort. Our judges have visions of sampling special puddings,eye-catching cookies,luscious tortes, fruited scones, decorated cakes, crunchy biscotti, tempting tea breads, butter horn rolls, mouth-watering pies and more! Be sure to include directions for icings and glazes. Also mention any preparation,decorating or packaging tips—a simple technique you discovered might be new to other TOH readers. The “Holiday Baking Bonanza”contest will close on February 15, 2007.Winners will be featured in the Oct/Nov ’07 issue. GREAT PRIZES! The Grand Prize winner will receive a

RECIPE CONTEST RULES: You may enter more than one recipe. Be sure to include the contest topic and your name, address and phone number on each recipe. It’s easy to enter at www.tasteofhome.com. Click on “Submit a Recipe” to find a handy form with space for the contest title (“Holiday Baking Bonanza”), your ingredients, directions and comments. Be specific with measurements and sizes of cans, packages and pans. Please include a few words about the recipe and a bit about yourself. Or, type or print each recipe on one side of an 8-1/2- x 11inch sheet of paper. Send entries to “Holiday Baking Bonanza,” Taste of Home, 5925 Country Lane, Greendale WI 53129. Remember to include your name, address and phone number on each entry. Entries become the property of Reiman Publications. Recipes that are not among the contest winners may be published in a future issue of TOH, in a cookbook or on our Web site (www.tasteofhome.com). KitchenAid stand mixer and food processor, together valued at $650.00, or $500.00 in cash. The second-place prize is dinner for four at the restaurant of the winner’s choice. Each runner-up will receive a free copy of our Contest Winning Annual Recipes 2006 cookbook.

and leave a big impression on the taste buds. E-mail entries by December 15, 2006, to recipes@taste ofhome.com. Please write your favorite December 15, 2006. “Potluck Pleasers” on the subcrowd-pleasing dishes for our We’ll consider appetizers, ject line and include your “Potluck Pleasers” recipe salads, main dishes and name and street address. Or contest, which will close on desserts that serve at least 12 send your entry to “Potluck

Last Chance to Enter Your...

Potluck Prize-Winner Round up

www.tasteofhome.com

Pleasers,” Diane Werner,Associate Food Editor, 5925 Country Lane, Greendale WI 53129. See the contest announcement above for a general guide. 43


Touring Country Kitchens

Sized Right for Company Size.

By Renee Williams Chesapeake, Virginia

18’

Double Oven

Breakfast Table

26’

Open to Family Room

Island Dishwasher

Open to Family Room Pantry

44

Refrigerator

That was our main consideration when my husband, Dave, and I planned the kitchen for our new home, in 2003. We designed the entire house from scratch…and it all centered on the kitchen. At some point, every get-together we have ends up in the kitchen. My dream was to have a big prep area in a space the size of a garage to accommodate large gatherings.We’ve hosted Christmas parties for our Sunday school class, church potlucks and Super Bowl parties.We even transformed the kitchen into a concession stand for our children’s movie theater-themed birthday party. Our son, Jonathan, is 7, and our daughter, Marie, is 6. To keep traffic f lowing when the house is full of guests, we designed two entrances into the kitchen from the family room. There is also a handy passthrough window. In addition to room for entertaining, I wanted an eat-in area as well as plenty of space to bake, prepare meals and store

all my kitchen necessities. The large white cabinets provide lots of storage space.We chose them for their easy maintenance and classic style. Plus, the all-white woodwork is a nice change from the dark wood throughout the rest of the house. Versatile Island Like most cooks, I value my island, which has a built-in vegetable sink.At 4 by 6 feet, the island is not only great for buffet-style dining, but also a wonderful work space that’s easily accessible to other parts of the kitchen.We designed it with an overhang for seating, so the kids could do their homework there while I make dinner. I’m a stay-at-home mom,so I cook every night. (Dave, who works as a logistics branch head for the Navy, stresses the importance of eating together as a family.) I bake something for almost every meal,so the double oven comes in handy. I also cook for families that may need a little Taste of Home • December/January 2007


“comfort”when some family members are sick.My most-requested specialty is chocolate chip cookies. Lots of Light Ample lighting for this large room was critical, so we turned to my dad, who works in the custom kitchen industry, for design ideas.We chose charming pendant lights over the island,recessed lights in the ceiling and under-cabinet lighting. Dad also helped us with the rope crown molding on the cabinets. My mom lent a hand, too, creating the pretty, plaid kitchen valances. Black wool rugs with a pattern of www.tasteofhome.com

vines and fruit pick up the colors in the curtains and warm up the wood floors. At first,I was hesitant when my friend Marion suggested I paint my kitchen red, but the color really warms up the big room.And it makes decorating for Christmas a breeze. We complement the deep, rich red with green garlands strung in the eating area and on the pendant lights.One year,

we decided to add ribbons to our Christmas tree and added them to the light fixtures as well. I’ve been collecting our Christmas dishes since we married in 1989.We start using the china the day after Thanksgiving to help us get into the spirit. At holiday time and throughout the year, our kitchen is the welcoming center of our home.

SHARE YOUR CHRISTMAS KITCHEN. If you deck your kitchen for the holidays or know someone who goes all out, please send us details and color photos. If we feature your kitchen or one that you suggest in a future issue, we’ll pay you $75.00. For Contributor Guidelines, see page 62.

45

Food for Thought: Food is an important part of a balanced diet. —Anonymous

Photos: David B. Hollingsworth

It’s easy to catch the Christmas spirit in the Williams family’s kitchen, with its deep-red walls and festive green garlands. Renee and Dave (at left with son Jonathan and daughter Marie) host Christmas parties, church potlucks and other events in the spacious, welcoming room.


A Complete Meal in Minutes

Snap Steak in a

QUICK! We want your favorite fast-to-fix recipes. Visit our Web site, www.tasteofhome.com, or see page 62 for Contributor Guidelines.

46

Busy days

of cookie baking and gift wrapping leave little time for dinner preparation.This simple but satisfying meal, consisting of three reader favorites, can be on the table in just 30 minutes…and still win raves from your family! • “Saucy Skillet Steaks couldn’t be easier to make,” says Karen Haen of Sturgeon Bay,Wisconsin.“Though I prefer these juicy rib eyes, I have also used this recipe for chicken breasts, fish, veal and hamburgers.”

Taste of Home • December/January 2007


❧ PREP/TOTAL TIME: 30 min. 4 beef rib eye steaks (3/4 inch thick) 1 large onion, chopped 4 garlic cloves, minced 1/4 cup butter, cubed 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard Salt and pepper to taste 1/3 cup beef broth 1 tablespoon minced fresh parsley In a large nonstick skillet, brown steaks over medium-high heat for 1-2 minutes on each side. Remove and keep warm. In the same skillet, saute onion and garlic in butter until tender, stirring to loosen browned bits. Brush the steaks with mustard; sprinkle with salt and pepper. Return to the pan. Stir in broth. Cook for 5-7 minutes on each side or until meat reaches desired doneness (for medium-rare, a meat thermometer should read 145°; medium, 160°; welldone, 170°). Spoon the onion mixture over steaks; sprinkle with parsley. Yield: 4 servings.

Holiday Green Beans ❧ PREP/TOTAL TIME: 15 min. 1 package (16 ounces) frozen cut green beans 1 teaspoon grated orange peel 1/2 cup dried cranberries 1/2 cup real bacon bits 2 tablespoons honey Cook the green beans according to package directions, adding the orange peel during cooking; drain. Add the cranberries, bacon and honey; toss to combine. Yield: 4 servings.

Cheddar Bread Twists ❧ PREP/TOTAL TIME: 25 min.

•“To make my Holiday Green Beans festive red and green, I add dried cranberries,” notes field editor Darlene Brenden of Salem, Oregon.“A touch of sweet honey complements the cranberries’ tartness.” • Serve the quick-to-fix Cheddar Bread Twists as a side dish or as an appetizer with dip.Tracy Travers of Fairhaven, Massachusetts shared the recipe.

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1 sheet frozen puff pastry, thawed 1 egg white 1 tablespoon cold water 1/2 cup shredded cheddar cheese Dash salt Place the puff pastry on a greased baking sheet. In a small bowl, beat the egg white and water; brush over pastry. Sprinkle with cheese and salt. Cut into ten 1-in. strips; twist each strip three times. Bake at 400° for 10-13 minutes or until golden brown. Yield: 10 breadsticks.

Time-Savers Grease Job. I always hated greasing a pan because the solid shortening got all over my hands.So I now use my pastry brush. It’s fast and easy, with no messy hands. —Wavelene Carpenter, London, Kentucky Burn Out. When you burn something in a pan and it leaves a crust, cover the burn with about an inch of water, add a teaspoon of cream of tartar and bring to a boil.The black crust will flake off and leave you with a pan that’s easy to wash out. —Geri Humpal, Seaside, Oregon Instant Bacon Bits. To dice bacon with ease, I cut the uncooked bacon with my kitchen shears and brown as usual. —Sue Seymour, Valatie, New York Hasty Pudding. Once a loaf of white bread is down to the last few slices, I cube the bread, put it in a freezer bag and place in the freezer.I keep adding to the bag, so when I want to make bread pudding (or stuffing), the cubes are ready to go. —Helen Rosenberger Rockton, Illinois

Blender Bread. I always puree bananas in my blender when making banana bread. It takes only seconds and ensures no surprise lumps in the finished product. Sometimes, I put all of the liquid ingredients in the blender with the bananas so I can add them all at once to the dry ingredients. —Nancy Weinkauf Mukwonago, Wisconsin

Extra Onions. If a recipe calls for sauteed onions, I make extra and store in a covered container in the refrigerator.During the next few days, if I’m making rolls or bread, I sprinkle some of the onions on top before baking.The flavor and aroma —Lisa Varner are just wonderful! Greenville, South Carolina

HAVE A TIME-SAVING TIP? To share a handy kitchen shortcut you rely on to save time, visit our Contributor Guidelines on page 62.

47

For another quick meal with a holiday theme, visit www.tasteofhome.com/plus.

Saucy Skillet Steaks


Just Desserts

Merrymaking is sweet with Yuletide Pound Cake (top), Cranberry-Topped Lemon Tarts and Cappuccino Truffles.


A

Sumptuous Finish Cranberry-Topped Lemon Tarts ❧ PREP: 45 min. + chilling ❧ BAKE: 20 min. + cooling “The delicious combination of colors and tangy-sweet flavors make this a pretty, very special dessert,” says Ruth Lee from Troy, Ontario. “If your family and friends are like mine, you’ll be receiving lots of compliments on these tasty tarts.” 2 cups all-purpose flour 3 tablespoons sugar 3/4 teaspoon salt 1 cup cold butter Topping: 3 cups fresh or frozen cranberries 1-1/4 cups sugar 1/4 cup water Filling: 5 eggs 1-1/2 cups sugar 3/4 cup lemon juice 1/3 cup butter, softened 4 teaspoons grated lemon peel Garnish: 1 medium lemon, cut into 1/4-inch slices 1/2 cup sugar 1/4 cup water In a bowl, combine the flour, sugar and salt; cut in butter until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Stir until dough forms a ball. Divide into eight portions; press each onto the bottoms and up the sides of eight 4-in. tart pans. Cover and refrigerate for 20 minutes. Bake at 350° for 20-25 minutes or until golden brown. Cool on wire racks. In a large saucepan, combine the cranberries, sugar and water. Cook over medium heat until berries have popped, about 20 minutes. Meanwhile, in a small saucepan, www.tasteofhome.com

whisk eggs. Stir in the sugar, lemon juice, butter and lemon peel. Cook and stir over medium heat for 20-25 minutes or until filling is thickened and reaches 160°. Transfer to a small bowl; cover and refrigerate for 1 hour. Transfer berry topping to another bowl; refrigerate until serving. Spoon filling into tart shells. Chill, uncovered, until set. For the garnish, in a small saucepan, bring lemon slices, sugar and water to a boil. Reduce heat; simmer, uncovered, for 20-25 minutes or until lemon is tender. Cut slices in half; chill. Just before serving, spoon cranberry topping over tarts. Garnish with lemon slices. Yield: 8 servings.

Yuletide Pound Cake ❧ PREP: 15 min. ❧ BAKE: 45 min. + cooling Lorraine Caland of Thunder Bay, Ontario serves this popular Bundt cake each year when her family decorates their Christmas tree. “We enjoy it with a cup of hot chocolate,” she notes. 1 1/2 3 5 1 1 3 1 1 Glaze: 1 2

cup butter, softened cup shortening cups sugar eggs teaspoon vanilla extract teaspoon rum extract cups all-purpose flour teaspoon baking powder cup (8 ounces) sour cream cup confectioners’ sugar to 3 teaspoons milk

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter, shortening and sugar until light and fluffy, about 5 minutes. Add eggs, one at a time, beating well after each addition. Beat in extracts. Combine flour and baking powder; add to creamed mixture alternately with sour

cream. Beat just until combined. Pour into a greased and floured 10-in. fluted tube pan. Bake at 350° for 45-50 minutes or until a toothpick inserted near the center comes out clean. Cool for 10 minutes before removing from pan to a wire rack to cool completely. Combine glaze ingredients; drizzle over cake. Yield: 12-16 servings.

Cappuccino Truffles ❧ PREP: 30 min. + chilling Dark chocolate, coffee and cinnamon flavors make a tantalizing trio in these rich, smooth truffles from Ellen Swenson of Newport Center, Vermont. “I could eat them all in one sitting!” she relates. 1 tablespoon boiling water 2 teaspoons instant coffee granules 2-1/2 teaspoons ground cinnamon, divided 1/3 cup heavy whipping cream 6 squares (1 ounce each) bittersweet chocolate, chopped 2 tablespoons butter, softened 3 tablespoons sugar In a small bowl, combine the water, coffee and 1 teaspoon cinnamon; set aside. In a small saucepan, bring cream just to a boil. Remove from the heat; whisk in chocolate and butter until smooth. Stir in coffee mixture. Press plastic wrap onto surface. Refrigerate for 1 hour or until easy to handle. In a small bowl, combine sugar and remaining cinnamon. Shape chocolate into 1-in. balls; roll in cinnamon-sugar. Refrigerate for at least 2 hours or until firm. Yield: 1-1/2 dozen.

FABULOUS FINALES. Have a delicious dessert? Share it with other Taste of Home readers. To submit your recipe, see Contributor Guidelines on page 62.

49

Find more holiday dessert recipes and tips on holiday entertaining, visit www.tasteofhome.com/plus.

Dazzle your guests with these ambrosial after-dinner delights.


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Taste of Home • December/January 2007


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Getting in the Theme of Things

By Laurel Leslie Sonora, California

As a holiday

get-together for our gourmet group, my husband, Bob, and I had a lot of fun hosting “Brunch with Rudolph.” We lined the entry to our home with potted cedar trees and our friends got a good laugh when Bob and I greeted them wearing deer-antler headbands! Whetting Appetites We began with appetizers. Clam Fondue in a Bread Bowl was a warm and flavorful start. The seafood filling is baked right in the bread bowl, and you serve this appetizer straight from the oven. Another taste-tempter we enjoyed was Herbed Dip for Veggies.This robust dip is perfect served with a colorful selection of raw vegetables. Everyone got a taste of the Southwest when I served Green Chili Egg Puff. The chilies add a pleasant zip to this delicious brunch casserole. My sister, Barbara, gave me the recipe for Warm Potato Salad.With its red potatoes and green beans,this salad is a great pick for the holidays.

Cozy lodge atmosphere sets the stage for memorable party.

54

Cooking Wild Playing off our Rudolph theme, one of the couples brought elk kabobs for everyone to try. This unexpected treat complemented the rest of the menu. I really got everyone’s attention when I brought out Praline Cheesecake.This showstopper has a vanilla wafer crust, a creamy center and an ooey-gooey caramel-pecan topping. The tables enhanced our woodsy setting. I used a plaid fleece throw on the buffet table and plaid napkins with miniature pinecone napkin holders at the place settings. For centerpieces, I “spruced up” old fishing creels with pine boughs, pinecones and eucalyptus sprigs. Our “Rudolph” party was a tremendous success.We had so much fun sharing this holiday theme meal with our friends, who all like to cook and share good food. Our group (pictured left) has been meeting since 1978, and we’ve all grown very close over the years. Taste of Home • December/January 2007


❧ PREP: 25 min. ❧ BAKE: 40 min. 3 cans (6-1/2 ounces each) minced clams 2 packages (8 ounces each) cream cheese, cubed 1 tablespoon minced fresh parsley 2 teaspoons lemon juice 2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce 2 teaspoons minced chives 1/2 teaspoon salt 6 drops hot pepper sauce 2 round loaves (1 pound each) sourdough bread Drain two cans of clams and discard liquid. Drain remaining can, reserving the liquid. In a food processor, combine the clams, cream cheese, parsley, lemon juice, Worcestershire sauce, chives, salt, hot pepper sauce and reserved clam juice; cover and process until smooth. Cut the top fourth off one loaf of bread; carefully hollow out loaf, leaving a 1-in. shell. Set the removed bread aside. Fill shell with clam mixture; replace top. Wrap tightly in heavy-duty foil; place on a baking sheet. Bake at 350° for 40-45 minutes. Meanwhile, cut reserved bread and the second loaf into cubes. Wrap in heavy-duty foil; place in oven during the last 15 minutes of baking. Unwrap bread bowl and remove top. Serve with bread cubes. Yield: 3-1/2 cups.

Herbed Dip for Veggies ❧ PREP: 15 min. + chilling 1 cup mayonnaise 1/2 cup sour cream 1 tablespoon minced chives 1 tablespoon grated onion 1 tablespoon capers, drained 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon lemon juice 1/2 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce 1/4 teaspoon minced fresh parsley 1/4 teaspoon paprika 1/8 teaspoon curry powder Dash garlic salt Assorted fresh vegetables In a bowl, combine the first 12 ingredients. Cover and refrigerate for 1 hour. Serve with vegetables. Refrigerate leftovers. Yield: 1-1/2 cups.

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Green Chili Egg Puff ❧ PREP: 15 min. ❧ BAKE: 35 min. 10 1/2 1 1/2 4

eggs cup all-purpose flour teaspoon baking powder teaspoon salt cups (16 ounces) shredded Monterey Jack cheese 2 cups (16 ounces) small-curd cottage cheese 1 can (4 ounces) chopped green chilies

In a large mixing bowl, beat eggs on medium-high speed for 3 minutes or until light and lemon-colored. Combine the flour, baking powder and salt; gradually add to eggs. Stir in the cheeses and chilies. Pour into a greased 13-in. x 9-in. x 2-in. baking dish. Bake, uncovered, at 350° for 35-40 minutes or until a knife inserted near the center comes out clean. Let stand for 5 minutes before serving. Yield: 12 servings.

Warm Potato Salad ❧ PREP: 25 min. ❧ COOK: 15 min. 2 pounds small red potatoes 1/4 pound fresh snow peas, halved 1/2 pound sliced fresh mushrooms 1/2 cup diced fully cooked ham 1 medium green pepper, julienned 1 celery rib, diced 3 tablespoons chopped green onions 2 tablespoons minced fresh parsley Dressing: 1/2 cup olive oil 3 tablespoons white wine vinegar 2 tablespoons lemon juice 1 teaspoon dried oregano 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon pepper 1 tablespoon minced fresh parsley 4 red lettuce leaves Place potatoes in a large saucepan and cover with water. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat; cover and cook for 10 minutes. Add snow peas; cook, uncovered, 1 minute longer or until potatoes are tender. Drain. When cool enough to handle, quarter potatoes into a large bowl. Add the mushrooms, ham, green pepper, celery, onions and parsley. In a small bowl, combine the oil, vinegar, lemon juice, oregano, salt and pepper. Pour over potato mixture and toss gently. Sprinkle with parsley. Serve warm in a lettuce-lined bowl. Yield: 7 servings.

Fishing creels filled with pine and eucalyptus, and pinecone-tied napkins, enhanced cozy lodge setting for Laurel Leslie’s party.

Praline Cheesecake ❧ PREP: 20 min. ❧ BAKE: 55 min. + chilling 1-1/2 cups crushed vanilla wafers (about 50) 1/4 cup sugar 1/4 cup butter, melted 16 whole vanilla wafers Filling: 3 packages (8 ounces each) cream cheese, softened 1 cup sugar 1/2 cup sour cream 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 3 eggs, lightly beaten Topping: 25 caramels 2 tablespoons milk 1/2 cup chopped pecans, toasted In a small bowl, combine the wafer crumbs, sugar and butter. Press onto the bottom of a greased 9-in. springform pan. Stand whole wafers around edge of pan, pressing lightly into crumbs; set aside. In a large mixing bowl, beat the cream cheese, sugar, sour cream and vanilla until smooth. Add eggs; beat on low speed just until combined. Pour into crust. Place pan on a baking sheet. Bake at 325° for 55-60 minutes or until center is almost set. Cool on a wire rack for 10 minutes. Carefully run a knife around edge of pan to loosen; cool 1 hour longer. Refrigerate overnight. Place caramels and milk in a microwavesafe bowl. Microwave, uncovered, on high for 1 minute; stir until smooth. Remove sides of springform pan. Drizzle caramel mixture over cheesecake; sprinkle with pecans. Refrigerate leftovers. Yield: 12 servings. Editor’s Note: This recipe was tested in a 1,100-watt microwave.

55

Food for Thought: All happiness depends on a leisurely breakfast. —John Gunther

Clam Fondue in A Bread Bowl


with a zippy barbecue-style sauce.You might have to make extras!

Budget Meal

• “I always take my Cottage Cheese Yeast Rolls to potlucks, where they disappear quickly,” writes Angie Merriam of Springfield,Ohio.“These rolls are nice and light, so they go well with many dishes. Just be sure to serve them with butter.” • Using fresh spinach instead of frozen really enhances the f lavor of classic Creamed Spinach, shared by Ann Van Dyk of Wrightstown, Wisconsin. The hint of nutmeg makes this side dish even more appealing.

Chicken Spareribs $1.07 ❧ PREP: 5 min. ❧ COOK: 30 min. 8 2 1 2/3 2/3 1/2 1/4 2 2 1

bone-in chicken thighs tablespoons vegetable oil cup water cup packed brown sugar cup soy sauce cup apple juice cup ketchup tablespoons cider vinegar garlic cloves, minced teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger 2 tablespoons cornstarch 2 tablespoons cold water

Save even more with bonus recipes that are fast and frugal at www.tasteofhome.com/plus.

$1.9 0

Thrifty ‘Ribs’

In a Dutch oven, brown chicken in oil in batches on both sides; drain. Return all of the chicken to the pan. In a bowl, combine the water, brown sugar, soy sauce, apple juice, ketchup, vinegar, garlic, pepper flakes and ginger; pour over chicken. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat; cover and simmer for 20 minutes or until chicken juices run clear. Remove chicken to a platter and keep warm. In a small bowl, combine cornstarch and cold water until smooth; stir into cooking juices. Bring to a boil; cook and stir for 2 minutes or until thickened. Spoon over chicken. Yield: 4 servings.

Serve this appetizing, If real spareribs don’t fit in your budlow-cost menu get this time of year,try a lip-smacking— Cottage Cheese Yeast Rolls economical—substitute along with for just $1.90 a plate. and 1 two satisfying sides.Your family will ask for them again and again. • Janice Porterfield of Atlanta,Texas turns chicken thighs into Chicken Spareribs

56

❧ PREP: 30 min. + rising ❧ BAKE: 10 min. per batch

2 packages (1/4 ounce each) active dry yeast 1/2 cup warm water (110° to 115°)

Taste of Home • December/January 2007


2 2 1/4 2 1/2 4-1/2

Ask Our

cups cottage cheese eggs cup sugar teaspoons salt teaspoon baking soda cups all-purpose flour

Test Kitchen Team

In a large mixing bowl, dissolve yeast in warm water. In a small saucepan, heat cottage cheese to 110°-115°. Add the cottage cheese, eggs, sugar, salt, baking soda and 2 cups flour to yeast mixture; beat until smooth. Stir in enough remaining flour to form a firm dough (dough will be sticky). Turn onto a floured surface; knead until smooth and elastic, about 6-8 minutes. Place in a greased bowl, turning once to grease top. Cover and let rise in a warm place until doubled, about 1 hour. Punch dough down. Turn onto a lightly floured surface; divide into 30 pieces. Shape each piece into a roll. Place 2 in. apart on greased baking sheets. Cover and let rise until doubled, about 30 minutes. Bake at 350° for 10-12 minutes or until golden brown. Remove to wire racks. Yield: 2-1/2 dozen.

Creamed Spinach ❧ PREP/TOTAL TIME:

71¢

25 min.

3/4 pound fresh spinach, torn 2 tablespoons olive oil 6 tablespoons butter, cubed 1/4 cup chopped onion 1/4 cup all-purpose flour 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg 1-1/2 cups milk In a Dutch oven, cook spinach in oil for 3 minutes or until wilted. Transfer to a cutting board; chop. Melt butter in the Dutch oven. Add onion; saute for 2 minutes or until crisp-tender. Stir in flour, salt and nutmeg until combined. Gradually whisk in milk until blended. Bring to a boil; cook and stir 2 minutes or until thickened. Add chopped spinach. Reduce heat to low; cook, uncovered, for 5 minutes or until heated through. Yield: 4 servings.

CENT-SIBLE EATING. Send your thrifty recipes to “Budget Meal” at editors@tasteofhome. com. For Contributor Guidelines, turn to page 62.

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Dry Roast Beef My daughter prepared a beautiful large cut of beef for a prime rib dinner. She seared it, placed it fat side up in a pan with 1/2 cup water and covered the pan. The roast baked to a nice, pink color, yet it was as dry as an overcooked chicken breast. What went wrong? —E.L., Milton, Pennsylvania

Typically, a rib eye roast is the cut of beef used when preparing a prime rib dinner. Because the rib area gets the least exercise, these cuts are the most tender. It is likely that the roast your daughter chose was from a less tender area,such as the round. She should choose a rib eye or rib roast that feels firm to the touch and is a bright red color and well marbled.Marbling is a good indicator of tenderness. To prepare a 4- to 5-pound rib roast, place on a rack in a shallow roasting pan with fat side up. Insert an oven-safe thermometer in the thickest portion of the muscle without touching bone or fat. Or use an instant-read thermometer toward the end of the roasting time. Roast without liquid, uncovered, at 325° for 2 to 2-1/2 hours or until meat reaches desired doneness (for mediumrare, a meat thermometer should read 145°; medium, 160°; well-done, 170°). Since the internal temperature will rise after the roast is taken out of the oven, remove it when it is 5° to 10° below desired doneness.Tent loosely with foil, and let the roast stand 15 minutes before slicing and serving. Enjoy! Baking Chips What are cinnamon chips? I recently saw them called for in a recipe. I’ve asked everywhere, but no one seems to have heard of them. Can you help? —P.H., Manchester, Georgia Hershey makes a baking chip called

Meet a Team Member:

Sue Jurack Not all kids can say they acquired an international palate growing up, but our sons can. My husband, Jim, worked for a global manufacturing company, and our family lived overseas, in England and Switzerland, for 11 years. As a home economist and a cooking demonstrator for a national television show, I embraced our new living experiences with gusto. In Switzerland, I taught a cooking class to other expatriates,and at home,I was always preparing a new dish for all of us to try. Travel to Asia introduced me to authentic Chinese food, which is still a favorite of our now-grown sons, P.J. and Jason.They especially like chicken with five-spice powder as well as potstickers. I’ve been at Reiman Publications for 10 years.As Senior Recipe Editor, I am most passionate about the readability,accuracy and safety of our recipes. When I’m not at work, I enjoy time with our three beautiful grandchildren, along with volunteering at church,entertaining guests and traveling. Cinnamon Chips, sold in 10-ounce packages.The product is available to all retailers and found in the baking supplies section of stores. Unfortunately, because shelf space is limited, your retailer may stock the chips only for the fall baking season, September through December. We also found that The Baker’s Catalogue from King Arthur Flour carries Cinnamon Mini Baking Chips, available in a 16-ounce bag. To request a catalog, call 1-800/827-6836 or visit us at www. tasteofhome.com/links to order.

STUMPED? If you have a food-related question, turn to page 62 for our Contributor Guidelines or E-mail us at editors@tasteofhome.com.

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Get 10 more of our editors’ favorite Christmas cookie recipes FREE at www.tasteofhome.com/plus.

Does Anyone Have...

Readers looking for recipes turn here for your help.

If you can

answer any of these requests, write directly to the person seeking information. If you have a question, send it to “Does Anyone Have…?”, Taste of Home, 5925 Country Lane, Greendale WI 53129, or E-mail us at editors@taste ofhome.com. (Make sure to include your street address.) We’ll use as many as possible. These readers may receive hundreds of responses and may not be able to personally thank everyone for their generosity. Rest assured, they appreciate your help. Someone once made peanut butter chocolate balls for our family reunion that tasted like the peanut butter eggs you can buy at Easter. I’ve looked everywhere for the recipe and would love to have it. —Susan Grubaugh 12406 Crain Hwy. Brandywine MD 20613

I’m trying to find a recipe for sweet,cake-style corn bread.It was a specialty at a restaurant in Maysville, Kentucky in the early 1980s. Can you help? —Jane Schiavoni 2600 Willow Crest Ct. Bedford TX 76021

When I was a little girl, my mom made a gelatin salad with flavored mini marshmallows, mandarin oranges, cottage cheese and either sour cream, whipped cream or mayonnaise. I loved this salad as a kid but never got the recipe. Now, I have children 58

of my own and would like to share it with them. I hope someone has it. —Mandy Shea 16006 Kirsten Nicole Rd. Charlotte NC 28278

the recipe. Could you send it to me? —Barbara Johnson 149 S. Lincoln St., Keene NH 03431

My grandma used to make a dried peach pie that was my favorite. I inherited her cookbook, but it wasn’t in there. If anyone could send a recipe to me, I’d be thrilled. —Flora Childress 9209-78th St. SW Lakewood WA 98498

My mother used to bake an old-fashioned Christmas cake with pecans, raisins, candied cherries, candied pineapple and brandy flavoring. She’d store it for several weeks before the holidays. Might you have the recipe? —Pamela Little 10721 Linwood Rd. Pleasant City OH 43772

Does anyone have a recipe for German potato balls? —Diane Sumner 1174 Fourth St. NW Watertown SD 57201

I’ve searched everywhere but can’t find a recipe for creamy Vidalia onion dressing. If anyone could share theirs, I’d appreciate it. —Barry Keippel

Years ago, my favorite Italian restaurant sold something called egg balls. I don’t know if egg balls are a common Italian specialty or a creation of the restaurant, but I’d sure like to have the recipe. —Barbara Ripley

N1383 Super Dr. Campbellsport WI 53010

5285 Jack Brack Rd. St. Cloud FL 34771

I’m looking for a stuffing recipe that’s made in bread pans and sliced when it’s ready to eat. I was told it’s made with a lot of eggs. Does anyone have it? —Amy Ramelli Box 123 Connoquenessing PA 16027

My mother-in-law made a great salad that used lettuce leaves, pineapple slices and possibly a sweetened mayonnaise dressing. I’ve misplaced

I have lost an old recipe for cheesecake with a ground walnut crust. I remember adding cream cheese, an egg and vanilla to the filling.Could someone please share this recipe with me?—Joann Pelczynski 127 Roland Ave. Lackawanna NY 14218

My brother-in-law grew up in Milwaukee,Wisconsin,and his grandmother made “snowball” chicken and dumplings, a German recipe. Could you send me a copy? —Virginia Reed 11099 Bus. Hwy. 25 Dexter MO 63841

I’d love a recipe for chocolate peanut butter fudge. —Cathie Ballard 165 Flower Ln., Lexington VA 24450

I am looking for the recipe for a German cookie that you spread with currant jelly and top with a coconut mixture. I lost the recipe when I moved. Please help. —Bernice Wolnick 1511 S. Mansfield Stillwater OK 74074

Might anyone have a recipe for prune bars that was printed on the side of a prune box in the 1970s? I’ve tried other recipes for prune bars, but there’s none like this one. —Andrea Flores, 4880 Wilt #3 Las Cruces NM 88011

Need a Quick Reply? Because we receive hundreds of requests for “Does Anyone Have…?”, it could be quite a while before you see your particular question in print. So if you need your answer fast, check out www.tasteofhome. com on the Internet. Our on-line Bulletin Board is the perfect place to ask your questions. Friendly, helpful readers quickly respond to queries about recipes, ingredients, cooking techniques and more in this practical, easy-to-use service. To access, click the “Community” link on the Taste of Home Web site or visit http://bbs.reimanpub.com. Or you can search our new on-line Recipe Finder, containing over 27,000 kitchen-tested recipes.

Taste of Home • December/January 2007


Stir Up a Little Romance

Cooking for One or Two

Woo the one

you love with a special dinner this season. The rich-tasting entrees shown above are perfectly sized for the two of you, and they look splendid in the firelight or next to glowing candles. Add a holiday touch to your table—and get ready for a memorable evening!

Broccoli Chicken Fettuccine ❧ PREP/TOTAL TIME: 25 min. Elaine Mizzles from Ben Wheeler, Texas makes this creamy and comforting dish when her grandson visits. “I served this with Chive Garlic Bread from the April/May 2001 issue, and my finicky-eating, 6-year-old grandson absolutely loved it!” she says. 4 ounces uncooked fettuccine 1/2 pound boneless skinless chicken breasts, cut into 1-inch pieces 1 small onion, halved and sliced 4 garlic cloves, minced 2 tablespoons butter 1 can (10-3/4 ounces) condensed cream of chicken soup, undiluted 1 cup chicken broth 1-1/2 cups frozen broccoli florets, thawed www.tasteofhome.com

1 can (4 ounces) mushroom stems and pieces, drained 1 teaspoon onion powder 1/2 teaspoon pepper 1/4 cup shredded Parmesan cheese Cook fettuccine according to package directions. Meanwhile, in a large skillet, saute the chicken, onion and garlic in butter until no longer pink. Stir in the soup, broth, broccoli, mushrooms, onion powder and pepper. Bring to a boil. Drain fettuccine; add to chicken mixture. Reduce heat; cover and simmer for 5 minutes or until heated through. Sprinkle with Parmesan cheese. Yield: 2 servings.

Seafood Potpies ❧ PREP: 15 min. ❧ BAKE: 30 min. If you like crab and shrimp, you’ll really like this family favorite sent in by Carol Hickey of Lake St. Louis, Missouri. “These individual potpies taste gourmet, even though they’re super easy to make,” she writes.

1 sheet refrigerated pie pastry 1 can (6 ounces) crabmeat, drained, flaked and cartilage removed 1 can (4-1/4 ounces) tiny shrimp, rinsed and drained 1/2 cup chopped celery 1/2 cup mayonnaise 1/4 cup chopped green pepper 2 tablespoons diced pimientos 1 tablespoon lemon juice 1-1/2 teaspoons chopped onion 1/4 teaspoon seafood seasoning 1/4 cup shredded cheddar cheese On a lightly floured surface, roll out pastry to 1/8-in. thickness. Cut out two 7-in. circles (discard scraps or save for another use). Press pastry circles onto the bottom and up the sides of two ungreased 10-oz. custard cups. Place on a baking sheet. Bake at 425° for 7-10 minutes or until golden brown. Reduce heat to 375°. In a small bowl, combine the crab, shrimp, celery, mayonnaise, green pepper, pimientos, lemon juice, onion and seafood seasoning. Spoon into hot shells. Sprinkle with cheese. Bake for 20-25 minutes or until bubbly and cheese is melted. Yield: 2 servings.

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Food for Thought: The way to a man’s heart is through his stomach. —Fanny Fern

Table for two? Seafood Potpies (left) and Broccoli Chicken Fettuccine offer satisfying comfort.


What I Add

My ‘Secret’Ingredient

Put pizzazz in everyday recipes with the special additions these readers use. Creative Cookies. “I was mixing up a double batch of chocolate chip cookies and didn’t have enough vanilla,so I made one batch with the vanilla and the other with maple flavoring,” says Ruth Fredericksen from Georgetown,Texas.“I use about 1/4 teaspoon maple flavoring for 1 teaspoon vanilla.We really like them.” Stick-to-Your-Ribs Chili. Mary Denise Espiritu of Columbus, Georgia relates, “Occasionally, I make vegetarian chili, but if often seemed too watery. By adding a can of refried beans shortly before serving, I’m able to make the chili much thicker and heartier without compromising the flavor.”

The Right Stuff. “Instead of stuffing, I put drained sauerkraut inside a chicken before roasting it,” writes Marge Hughes of Corte Madera, California. “I’ve also had roast chicken stuffed with cooked rice and cut-up canned peach slices. Both taste great!” Exotic Spaghetti. “Whether I make homemade spaghetti sauce or use the store-bought kind, I like to add about a teaspoon of curry powder along with

Great Grilled Cheese. “Instead of buttering the outside of the bread,I spread it with mayonnaise when I make grilled cheese sandwiches,” Richard Ward writes from Sun City, Arizona. “Be sure to use regular mayonnaise because the low-fat and fat-free varieties will not toast the bread properly.”

HAVE A SECRET INGREDIENT? Have an interesting ingredient you use to spark up “everyday” foods? Write to “Secret Ingredient,” Taste of Home, 5925 Country Lane, Greendale WI 53129 or send an E-mail to editors@taste ofhome.com. For Contributor Guidelines, see page 62.

Our Family’s

Favorite Grace Many families

like to say a favorite table grace before dinner.This thoughtful collection encompasses a variety of prayers. Some might make you chuckle; others might get you misty-eyed. Regardless of their effect, these prayers are very meaningful to the people who submitted them. Maybe you’ll find one that you’d like to share with your family, too. • “One morning, I fixed a piece of toast for my 2-year-old son, gave him half and put the other half on the counter,” Rebekah Weaverling writes from Salina, Kansas.“We sat down to say grace, and this was his prayer.” Dear Jesus, thank You for my food, and Jesus, could You help me get that other piece of toast over there? Amen. •“I wrote the following grace for my family on Christmas,” recalls Maxine Spates of Houston,Texas. Bless You, Lord, for all the food You have given us on the table today. Bless You, Lord, for all the past days of our existence, and for whatever future days we may have left. Bless You, Lord, for all the things You have bestowed on us—the good and the bad—for that is Your way of testing us. Bless You, Lord, for the memory You leave with us of our loved 60

the more traditional seasonings,” notes Lorraine Hilton from Coventry, Rhode Island.

ones who are no longer with us, and for the ones who are still with us, but could not be here today. But most of all— Bless You, Lord, for Your patience, understanding, wisdom and love. For without these, we would not exist. Amen. •“I’m an immigrant from Italy,having come to America with my parents and brother at the age of 5,” writes Anna Santacroce of Steubenville, Ohio.“My dear father, who has loved Americans ever since they came to rescue our village from the Nazis, says this special grace in Italian.” God bless this bounty, which we are about to receive, and provide for those who have nothing. Amen. • “I was proud and delighted when our 3-year-old granddaughter, Janna,asked to say the prayer before dinner,”Norene Craig relates from Tucson, Arizona.“With all the sincerity she could muster, she said:” Dear Lord, please make Grandma’s food be good. Amen. • Paula Lehmann of Orange Park,Florida was at her son’s home for Christmas when her 2-year-old granddaughter, Annalise, wanted to say grace.“This prayer was one her older sister had learned in preschool,” says Paula.“Although Annalise had trouble pronouncing her Ls,she still forged ahead.It was priceless!” We ’ove our bread, we ’ove our butter, but most of all, we ’ove each other.

PRAY TELL. Please share your family’s favorite grace with us. Send it to “Grace,” 5925 Country Lane, Greendale WI 53129 or editors@tasteofhome.com. For Contributor Guidelines, see page 62.

Taste of Home • December/January 2007


Pumpkin Torte Takes Top Honors Pretty layers

of cheesecake and pumpkin star in this prize-winning torte from Taste of Home field editor Ruth Ann Stelfox (above) of Raymond, Alberta. Not only is this delicious treat a favorite with her family, but Ruth Ann’s dessert won first prize in a baking contest sponsored by the Lethbridge Herald. “I was honored to have my recipe featured in the newspaper’s Christmas cookbook,” says Ruth Ann. “It’s perfect for Thanksgiving or Christmas. Not too heavy, it goes nicely with a big holiday meal like our roast duck with stuffing, mashed potatoes and brussels sprouts.” She also takes it to church potlucks and other social gatherings. With its buttery graham cracker crust and luscious spiced layers,it’s no wonder this winter treat is gobbled up whenever Ruth Ann serves it. “The proof is in the pudding.There’s never a morsel left,” she says. HAVE YOU WON? Send your award-winning recipe and story to “My Recipe Won.” See Contributor Guidelines on page 62.

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Layered Pumpkin Dessert ❧ PREP: 40 min. + cooling ❧ BAKE: 15 min. + chilling 1-1/2 cups graham cracker crumbs 1/3 cup sugar 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/3 cup butter, melted Cream Cheese Filling: 12 ounces cream cheese, softened 1 cup sugar 3 eggs Pumpkin Filling: 1 can (15 ounces) solid-pack pumpkin 3 eggs, separated 3/4 cup sugar, divided 1/2 cup milk 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 envelope unflavored gelatin 1/4 cup cold water Topping: 1 cup heavy whipping cream 3 tablespoons sugar 1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract In a large bowl, combine the crumbs, sugar and cinnamon; stir in butter. Press into an ungreased 13-in. x 9-in. x 2-in. baking dish. In a large mixing bowl, beat cream cheese until smooth. Beat in sugar and eggs until fluffy.

Pour over crust. Bake at 350° for 15-20 minutes or until set. Cool on a wire rack. In a large saucepan, combine the pumpkin, egg yolks, 1/2 cup sugar, milk, cinnamon and salt. Cook and stir over low heat for 10-12 minutes or until mixture is thickened and reaches 160°. Remove from the heat. In a small saucepan, sprinkle gelatin over cold water; let stand for 1 minute. Heat over low heat, stirring until gelatin is completely dissolved. Stir into pumpkin mixture; cool. In a large heavy saucepan, combine egg whites and remaining sugar. With a portable mixer, beat on low speed for 1 minute. Continue beating over low heat until mixture reaches 160°, about 12 minutes. Remove from the heat; beat until stiff glossy peaks form and sugar is dissolved. Fold into pumpkin mixture. Pour over cream cheese layer. Cover and refrigerate for at least 4 hours or until set. Just before serving, in a large mixing bowl, beat cream until it begins to thicken. Add sugar and vanilla; beat until stiff peaks form. Spread over pumpkin layer. Yield: 15 servings.

Blue-Ribbon Builder Guenther Hille from Canfield, Ohio spent hours crafting this candy-studded gingerbread house, which immediately caught the attention of judges at the Canfield County Fair. “I thought I had something pretty good, so I entered it and took home the blue ribbon,” says Guenther. After the fair, he wrapped the winning entry in plastic to store it until the holiday season. Then, Guenther’s masterpiece was the center of conversation at his home. “Our guests said it was beautiful, and the grandkids really loved it,” Guenther relates. Since his winning day at the fair, Guenther has continued to make gingerbread houses, including a Scandinavian design with a shreddedwheat thatch roof.

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Food for Thought: Anyone who burns the candle at both ends is probably trying to read the menu.

My Recipe Won


Readers share comments and feedback from their kitchens.

TOH Cookbook Is “Awesome” I just received The Taste of Home Cookbook,and I must tell you, it’s awesome! Never did I expect such a wonderful, well-put-together book. It has everything you’d ever want to make, plus most of the ingredients are right in the cupboard. Every woman in the world should order one! —Mary Smeal, Youngstown, New York Editor’s Note: Big and brand-new, The Taste of Home Cookbook has over 1,200 recipes and more than 1,300 color photos. Learn more about it on page 52. It makes a great Christmas gift! A Slice of Heaven I made the Mocha Layer Cake (Aug/Sept) for my CONTRIBUTOR GUIDELINES

Want to send in your favorite recipe or handy tip, fun idea or photo to share with other readers? We’d love to hear from you. Here’s how to get involved: 1. When sending recipes, please be specific with directions, measurements and sizes of cans, packages and pans. You can send recipe cards or photocopies of family cookbooks, and they can be hand-printed or typed on a sheet of paper…whatever is easiest for you. Also, please share a few words about the recipe and yourself. (For recipe contest entries, please follow the directions that appear on page 43.) 2. Send your materials by mail or E-mail. If you would like mailed materials returned, please enclose a stamped, self-addressed envelope. 3. After you send materials, please be patient. Due to the large volume, it can take our small staff several months to review materials. We may hold your material without informing you, but we will let you know if we publish something you submitted. Materials that won’t fit in Taste of Home may be considered for cookbooks, promotions and other publications, including our Web sites. 4. By submitting material for publication, you grant Reiman Media Group, Inc., its parent company, subsidiaries, affiliates, partners and licensees use of the material, including your name, hometown and state. We reserve the right to modify, reproduce and distribute the material in any medium and in any manner or appropriate place. We test recipes submitted to us and reserve the right to alter them as needed. We may contact you via phone, E-mail or mail regarding your submission. 5. Send submissions to Taste of Home, 5925 Country Lane, Greendale WI 53129 or E-mail them to editors@tasteofhome.com. If you have a particular department or feature in mind, please print it on the front of the envelope or type it in the subject line of your E-mail message. You can also use the convenient form on our Web site at www.tasteofhome.com. Just click on “Submit a Recipe.”

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granddaughter Eliza’s 12th birthday (above). She was absolutely thrilled with this delicious and beautiful cake.—Evelyn Jackson, Augusta, Kansas Game to Cook Thank you so much for including the venison recipes in the Oct/Nov issue.With hunting season upon us, I’m looking forward to a freezer full of pheasant, quail and wild turkey as well as deer. I’m going to look up the Taste of Home Hunting & Fishing Cookbook that was mentioned. —Brenda Bunk, Monroe Center, Illinois Discover Plus I just have to tell you how wonderful the E-newsletter that you’re sending me for being a subscriber is. I love the “Top Searched —Kathy Joyner Recipes” option. Annandale, Virginia

Editor’s Note: Subscribers! Log on to www.taste ofhome.com/plus for more information. Sweet Surprise I use your magazine at least two or three times a week. Recently, I was asked to make special desserts for a church luncheon. I went to my Aug/Sept issue and chose Chunky Apple Cake, Caramel Apple Crisp, Cinnamon Apple Cheesecake, Poppy Seed Torte and Mocha Layer Cake. The whole fellowship hall wanted to know which bake shop we used! —Gil Rowe, cooking for the First United Methodist Church in Winter Park, Florida

Birthday Bouquet When my daughter, Maria, requested “cookies on a stick” for her under-the-sea-themed birthday party, I used the Almond-Butter Cookie Bouquet recipe from April/May. The cookies tasted so good, and the dough was simple to work with.As you can see in the photo (right),this was a birthday party my 7-year-old will never —Angie Heisel, Cincinnati, Ohio forget. Taste of Home • December/January 2007


Here’s Part of Meet the 1,000 Cooks Who Our Staff: Help Edit This Magazine! We’d like you Look to see which field editors are from your area. Alabama: Mary Dixson, Decatur; Lisa Francis, Elba; Peggy Key, Grant; Lisa Allen, Joppa; Grace Weeks, Kinston; Laura Tessier, Madison; Gloria Lowther, Mobile; Roxana Quarles, Ralph; Hazel Holley, Samson; Christine Ledbetter, Shelby; Noble Yeager, Tuscaloosa; Gene Pitts, Wilsonville. Alaska: Isabel Fowler, Anchorage; Cindi Paulson, Anchorage; Waunita Ann Roggenbuck, Anchorage; Carol Ross, Anchorage; Anna Free, Fairbanks; Evelyn Gebhardt, Kasilof; Marg Austin, North Pole; Linda Fox, Soldotna; Pat Hockett, Wrangell. Arizona: Sue Ross, Casa Grande; Letah Chilston, Cottonwood; Lynne Beykirch, Green Valley; Diane Thompson, Nutrioso; Ann Perry, Sierra Vista; Clarice Schweitzer, Sun City; Linda Turner, Sun City; Marcia Spitler, Tombstone; Edna Coburn, Tucson; Linda Lambert, Wittmann. Arkansas: Carolyn Kyzer, Alexander; Iola Egle, Bella Vista; Martha Poplin, Cabot; Jill Whalen, Centerton; Nicki Evans, Conway; Eva Hickman, Crossett; Frances Owens, El Dorado; Ozela Haynes, Emerson; Bettie Hartman, Fayetteville; Jacqueline Wilson, Gravette; Renee Gee, Hamburg; Wanda O’Neal, Murfreesboro; Katherine Cruthis, Roe; Donna Long, Searcy; Awynne Thurstenson, Siloam Springs; Judith Gordon, Texarkana; Linda Emery, Tuckerman; Kristin Reynolds, Van Buren; Glenda Adams, Vanndale. California: Peggy Louise Pruneau, Auberry; Marina CastleHenry, Burbank; Anita Curtis, Camarillo; Vicki Schlechter, Davis; Janet Troxel, Delano; Susan Edwards, El Dorado; Lisa Bacon, Fontana; Keri Scofield Lawson, Fullerton; Sandy Thorn, Jamestown; Tina Fox, Lake Arrowhead; Shirley Goehring, Lodi; Alcy Thorne, Los Molinos; Laurie Mace, Los Osos; Marilyn Klag, Mill Valley; Bob Brown Korbel, Morgan Hill; Linda Svercauski, Murietta; Sally Grisham, Oxnard; Don Burns, Sacramento; H. Ross Njaa, Salinas; Ken Churches, San Andreas; Sandra Vanthoff, San Diego; Janis Engle, San Jose; Michelle Ramos, San Jose; Annette Traverso, San Rafael; Barbara Brittain, Santee; Myrtle Albrecht, Shingle Springs; Kim Gilliland, Simi Valley; Tiffany Mitchell, Susanville; Linda Kuecker, Tahoe Vista; Mary Jane Cantrell, Turlock; Billie Moss, Walnut Creek. Colorado: Rally Van Ostrand, Aurora; Ruth Marie Lyons, Boulder; Janet Lebar, Centennial; Nancy Schmidt, Center; Shelly Korell, Eaton; Sandra Titus, Denver; Ruth Fury, Dove Creek; Audrey Benson, Flagler; Cheri Eby, Gunnison; Karen Gorman, Gunnison; Phyllis Herlocker, Highlands Ranch; Crystal Jo Bruns, Iliff; Jo Ann Honey, Longmont; Christine Halandras, Meeker; Judith Miller, Parker; Trina Benson, Stratton; Naomi Giddis, Two Buttes; Lucy Meyring, Walden; Betty Sitzman, Wray. Connecticut: Jill Fellows, Coventry; Ellen Baczek Amodeo, Derby; Jan Mead, Milford; Chava Karlovich, Monroe; Dennis Vitale, New Preston; Sue Smith, Norwalk; Barbara Stewart, Portland; Chris Dolan, Seymour; Ruth Hartunian-Alumbaugh, Willimantic; Betty Sparks, Windsor. Delaware: Traci Wynne, Bear; Beth Satterfield, Dover; Jan Walls, Dover; Peggy West, Georgetown; Lisa Spiegel Westbrook, Georgetown; Ronda Weber, Greenwood; Cynthia Bent, Newark; Kimberley Pittman, Smyrna; Betty Jean Boyd, Wilmington. Florida: Jane Walker, Bradenton; Kelly Ward Hartman, Cape Coral; Marjorie Carey, Freeport; Julia Livingston, Frostproof; Lillian Julow, Gainesville; Lynn Newman, Gainesville; Tracy Mauti, Jacksonville; Nancy Larkin, Maitland; Laura Wheeler, Malone; Allison Loo, Merritt Island; Mary Lou Robison, Miami; Diane Hixon, Niceville; Barbara Carlucci, Orange Park; Kerry Dingwall, St. Augustine; Marsha Manley, Sebring; Kathy Kruse, Thonotosassa; Terry Bray, Winter Haven; Julie Hayden, Winter Park; Anna Minegar, Zolfo Springs. Georgia: Meredith Barrett, Atlanta; Ann Chan, Augusta; Hannah Lamb, Austell; Colette Jaworski, Buford; Jacqueline Graves, Cumming; Susan Auten, Dallas; Joyce Kramer, Donalsonville; Kay Rainwater, Fayetteville; Joy Allen, Forsyth; Henrietta Brumbaugh, Hiawassee; Suzanne Cleveland, Lyons; Janis Garrett, Macon; Carolyn Griffin, Macon; Merle Bates, Meansville; Pat McLendon, Roswell; Laura Dierking, St. Marys; Ani Kramer, Snellville; Tina Gay, Statham; Nancy Reichert, Thomasville; Jean Rhodes, Tignall. Hawaii: June Hasbimoto, Honolulu; Sharon Aweau, Kapolei; Shirley Watanabe, Kula. Idaho: Anne Boesiger, Boise; Mandy Saras, Boise; Donna Shipley, Boise; Glenna Tooman, Boise; Betty Albee, Buhl; Carol Wells, Buhl; Renae Moncur, Burley; Ella Faulks, Caldwell; Robin Falck, Eagle; Trisha Kruse, Eagle; Shannon Crowther, Franklin; Julia Powell, Jerome; Cindy Worth, Lapwai; John Nydegger, Lewiston; Donna Wall, Nampa; Raymonda Furness, Newdale; Brenda Clark, Rexburg; Rhea Orr, St. Anthony; Signa Hutchison, Weiser. Illinois: Christine Wall, Bartlett; Marjorie Lampe, Campbell Hill; Jann Braun, Chatham; Stephanie Ward, Chicago; Rosella Bauer, Cissna Park; Denise Albers, Freeburg; Andrea Johnson, Freeport; Sue Mackey, Galesburg; Yvette Raschke, Geneseo; Dix-

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ie Terry, Goreville; Julie Sterchi, Harrisburg; Kristi Starbuck, Highland; Kathy Hawkins, Ingleside; Mary Houchin, Lebanon; Millie Vickery, Lena; Ruth Hastings, Louisville; Geneva Evans, Marshall; Kim Marie Van Rheenen, Mendota; Kimberly Kronenberg, Milledgeville; Donna Musser, Pearl City; Janet Mooberry, Peoria; Ann Schilling, Peoria; Florence Grawe, Quincy; Evelyn Kennell, Roanoke; Gayle Becker, Rockton; Debbie Fisher, Royalton; Carol Sinclair, St. Elmo; Donetta Brunner, Savanna; Amber Sampson, Somonauk; Leona Kuhns, Sullivan; Martha Zumwalt, Warsaw; Marilyn Clay, Wheeling; Patricia Rutherford, Winchester. Indiana: Sue Call, Beech Grove; Fancheon Resler, Bluffton; Martha Fehl, Brookville; Amy Church, Camby; Brandi Fentress, Chandler; Nancy Johnson, Connersville; Sonia Croucher, Decatur; Inez Orsburn, Demotte; Nancy Jo Leffler, Depauw; Shawn Robey, Evansville; Dolores Lucken, Ferdinand; Anna Mayer, Fort Branch; Nancy King, Greenfield; Edna Hoffman, Hebron; Carolyn Gochenaur, Howe; Bertha Johnson, Indianapolis; Donna Lisby, Indianapolis; Pauline Miller, Indianapolis; Virginia Phillips, Indianapolis; Kathy Allen, Knox; Kelly Williams, La Porte; Alma Dinsmore, Lebanon; Norene Wright, Manilla; Harriet Stichter, Milford; Linda Ault, Newberry; Joan Truax, Pittsboro; Karen Owen, Rising Sun; Bernadine Stine, Roanoke; Cynthia Kolberg, Syracuse; Trudy Ludwick, Winchester; Maryellen Hayes, Wolcottville; Ruth Burrus, Zionsville. Iowa: Bernadine Bichel, Carson; Dorothy Bahlmann, Clarksville; Sharon Evans, Clear Lake; Midge Scurlock, Creston; Karen Kreider, Cumming; Jackie Heyer, Cushing; Eunice Stoen, Decorah; Judy Thams, Denison; Waldine Marshall, Des Moines; Bea Aubry, Dubuque; Marna Heitz, Farley; DeEtta Rasmussen, Fort Madison; Sharon Mensing, Greenfield; Linda Mullen, Guernsey; Tammy Neubauer, Ida Grove; Salina Bontrager, Kalona; Shirley Hochstedler, Kalona; Sue Phillips, Knoxville; Pat Schaffer, Lake City; Audrey Groe, Lake Mills; Patricia Staudt, Marble Rock; Mavis Diment, Marcus; Helen Koehler, Marshalltown; Carolyn Pope, Mason City; Wendy Taylor, Mason City; Becky Ruff, Monona; Sherry Adams, Mt. Ayr; Mary Loops, North Liberty; Jo Groth, Plainfield; Mary Ann Taylor, Rockwell; Sharon Holdiman, Waterloo; Dorothy Jennings, Waterloo; Marion Karlin, Waterloo; Denise Nebel, Wayland; Jack Spratt, Webster City; Leona Luecking, West Burlington; Gayle Olson, Winfield; Kathi Kuhl-Martin, Winterset. Kansas: Myra Innes, Auburn; Marietta Slater, Augusta; Page Alexander, Baldwin City; Carole Schlender, Burrton; Michelle Beran, Claflin; Norma Felsburg, Gaylord; Karen Ann Bland, Gove; Margaret Shauers, Great Bend; Shannon Wade, Kansas City; Heather Campbell, Lawrence; Kathy Kittell, Lenexa; Jeanette Urbom, Louisburg; Peggy Paul, Olathe; Leona Therou, Overland Park; Pat Habiger, Spearville; Merrill Powers, Spearville; Melanie Eddy, Syracuse; Angela Oelschlaeger, Tonganoxie; Linnea Rein, Topeka. Kentucky: Randal Wilson, Bellevue; Marcia Blaha, Bowling Green; Jan Woodall, Cadiz; Tammy Hensley, Canmer; Lucille Terry, Frankfort; Carlene Jolley, Fulton; Crystal Christopher, Hustonville; Sherry Hulsman, Louisville; Naomi Cross, Millwood; Billie Wilson, Murray; Rena Nabours, Olaton; Jackie Roof, Paducah; Christine Johnson, Ricetown; Jean Gaines, Russellville; Connie Bryant, Wallingford; Anna Jean Allen, West Liberty; Jill Evely, Wilmore. Louisiana: Brenda Melancon, Baton Rouge; Sundra Hauck, Bogalusa; Rachel Garcia, DeRidder; Blanchie Morrison, Elmer; Edith Betz, Ethel; Pam Holloway, Marion; Kathleen Drott, Pineville; Betty Janway, Ruston; Sandi Pichon, Slidell; Codie Ray, Tallulah; Dwight Landreneau, Washington; Tonya Fitzgerald, West Monroe. Maine: Kathi Grenier, Auburn; Emily Chaney, Blue Hill; Jan Buck, Buckfield; Audrey Nemeth, Chesterville; Kami Horch, Frankfort; Lee Ann Lowe, Gray; Susan Kanak, Moody; Cheryl Greeley, Pittsfield; Valerie Jones, Portland; Pam Brooks, South Berwick; Heidi Harrington, Steuben; Brenda Deveau, Van Buren. Maryland: James Forcum, Baltimore; Beverly Sprague, Baltimore; Margaret Adina O’Bryon, Bel Air; Alice Krohn, Catonsville; Debbie Belote, Columbia; Cassandra Corridon, Frederick; Priscilla Weaver, Hagerstown; Michele Ferrario, Ijamsville; Debbie Wilkerson, Lusby; Charles Keating, Manchester; Rosemary Pryor, Pasadena; Nancy Saffield, Pasadena; Judith McGhan, Perry Hall; Bertille Cooper, St. Inigoes; Barbara Davis, Severna Park; Betsy Hedeman, Timonium; Gail Buss, Westminster. Massachusetts: Laurinda Johnston, Belchertown; Lynn Hartigan, Bradford; Elizabeth Montgomery, Cambridge; Joanie Elbourn, Gardner; Arden Billings, Greenfield; Christine Omar, Harwich Port; Judy Kimball, Haverhill; Charlotte Baillargeon, Hinsdale; Mary West, Marstons Mills; Helen Malwitz, Merrimac; Maria Mulligan, Methuen; Nancy LoRe, Rockland; Maria Continued on page 64

to meet a couple of our 1,000 field editors from across North America.These cooks are not professionals who test foods in highrise office buildings.They practice their trade at home, day in and day out, for family and friends. In fact, they’re probably a lot like you!

Vera Reid Laramie, Wyoming Personal profile: Husband

Jack, two daughters, 15 grandchildren, one greatgranddaughter.Vera has been a massage therapist for 14 years and is semiretired. Jack is a retired carpenter. “I learned to cook from my mother. She was our 4-H cooking leader, so I had to do well. Since we live in ‘cold country,’ I like preparing soups. I also like collecting cookbooks; my favorites are those done by a community or organization. “This past summer, I was involved in dinner theater. I’m active in our senior theater and the Red Hat Society. I also like to read and take naps.”

Linda Thompson High Point, North Carolina Personal profile: Husband Dennis,

two children, two grandchildren. Linda works as a bank teller. Her husband owns a video business. “Cooking is therapy to me. The bigger the meal, the happier I am. I guess that’s why I enjoy my church work so much (I’m head of the hospitality committee), because it usually means preparing meals for 200 to 300 people. Of course, I have some great ladies who help me. “I have done some cake decorating and enjoy baking cakes. I also catered with a friend for a while, but gave it up to help my husband on weekends videotaping weddings and other occasions.”

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Our 1,000 Editors: (continued from page 63) Regakis, Somerville; Kaye Gooch, Sudbury; Judith Sumner, Worcester. Michigan: Patricia Thomet, Alto; Ted Pottle, Berrien Springs; Betty Korcek, Bridgman; Peggy Burdick, Burlington; Lynn Miracle, Burton; Shirley De Lange, Byron Center; Teri Rasey-Bolf, Cadillac; Diane Pickel, Comstock Park; Connie Simon, Durand; Susan Falk, Eastpointe; Marti VanOrder, Evart; Deborah Amrine, Grand Haven; Casey Stellini, Grand Junction; DiAnn Mallehan, Grand Rapids; Barb Ruis, Grandville; Jackie Riley, Holland; Anne Heinonen, Howell; Sharon Merchant, Ithaca; Linda Knoll, Jackson; Ruth Peterson, Jenison; Marcy Cella, L’Anse; Sondra Bergy, Lowell; Virginia Ferris, Lyons; Geraldine Grisdale, Mt. Pleasant; Shirley Beachum, Shelby; Jessie Strobbe, Smiths Creek; Kathy Dorman, Snover; Marsha Ransom, South Haven; Christina Till, South Haven; Dona Erhart, Stockbridge; Marian Christensen, Sumner; Winifred Winch, Wetmore; Suzanne Veverka, White Cloud. Minnesota: Joan Taylor, Adrian; Linda Nilsen, Anoka; Barbara Wellnitz, Ashby; Patricia Axelsen, Aurora; Sandy McKenzie, Braham; Ruth Smith, Brooklyn Center; Judi Oudekerk, Buffalo; Mary Kay Morris, Cokato; Judy Schiro, Cosmos; Ann Botten, Courtland; Marlene Muckenhirn, Delano; Connie Johnson, Detroit Lakes; Tami Escher, Dumont; Renee Schwebach, Dumont; Deanna Richter, Elmore; Nancy Nord, Goodhue; Julianne Johnson, Grove City; Marcia Severson, Hallock; Katie Koziolek, Hartland; Mary Jo O’Brien, Hastings; Lucille Taylor, Luverne; Shirley Kidd, New London; Dotty Egge, Pelican Rapids; Pat Walter, Pine Island; Kari Rosenow, Roseau; LaVonne Hegland, St. Michael; Jeane Jenson, Stillwater; Dianne Bettin, Truman; Dawn Fagerstrom, Warren; Bethel Walters, Willow River; Barb Stanton, Winona. Mississippi: Anne Glidewell, Booneville; DeLois Douglas, Charleston; Peggy Tucker, Fulton; Kristy Allen, Hattiesburg; Shirley Glaab, Hattiesburg; Nancy Jernigan, Laurel; Linda Finn, Louisville; Rita Futral, Starkville. Missouri: Barbara Lovercamp, Alma; Linda Wilson, Anderson; Debbie Johnson, Centertown; Jeanette Fuehring, Concordia; Sasha Cummings, Hazelwood; Geralyn Gloe, Hermann; Oleta Cone, Holden; Dan Quade, Joplin; Cheryl Neale, Kansas City; Beverly Plymell, Keytesville; Virginia Watson, Kirksville; Karren Chamberlain, Linn Creek; Bernice Morris, Marshfield; Sonja Blow, Nixa; Tammy Breen, O’Fallon; Carol Reed, Salisbury; Helen Lamb, Seymour; Anna Bargfrede, Sweet Springs; Judy Marshall, Waverly. Montana: Kerry Bouchard, Augusta; Donna Mosher, Augusta; Dixie Lee Harmon, Baineville; Nancy Fettig, Billings; Shari McKinney, Birney; Kandy Clarke, Columbia Falls; Gail Kuntz, Dillon; Doris Galleske, Fairview; Jan Roat, Grass Range; Carolyn Weinberg, Hardin; Beverly Stiger, Helena; Marie Hoyer, Lewistown; Joy Maynard, St. Ignatius; Janet Loomis, Terry. Nebraska: Ellen Teter, Arapahoe; Bonnie Myers, Callaway; Ina Schmillen, Elkhorn; Judy Wilhelm, Elmwood; Alice Tatro, Geneva; Shirley Engstrom, Genoa; Deb Waggoner, Grand Island; Kathy Scott, Hemingford; Jenny Hughson, Mitchell; Judy Kamalieh, Nebraska City; Judy Katskee, Omaha; Amy Moylan, Omaha; Verona Koehlmoos, Pilger; Denise Goedeken, Platte Center; Georgia Hennings, Scottsbluff; Susan O’Brien, Scottsbluff; Joie Youngs, Scottsbluff; Dee Falk, Stromsburg; Betty Ruenholl, Syracuse. Nevada: Karen Sikora, Dayton; Jenece Howard, Elko; Rebecca Cook Jones, Henderson; Barbara Murphy, Incline Village; Nancy Beckerbauer, Las Vegas; Sharon Peterson, Las Vegas; Joan Schroeder, Mesquite. New Hampshire: Phyllis Hickey, Bedford; Nancy Gaver, Brookfield; Ruth Bolduc, Conway; Karen Clough, Danville; Colleen Palmer, Epping; Linda Harrington, Hudson; Inge Schermerhorn, Kingston; Margaret Drye, Plainfield; Tracy Weber, Swanzey. New Jersey: Nancy Zimmerman, Cape May Court House; Helga Schlape, Florham Park; Lisa Finnegan, Forked River; Jean Finkbeiner, Gibbstown; Sally Treonze, Hillsborough; Sandra Csippan, Lafayette; Grace Yaskovic, Lake Hiawatha; Roberta Strohmaier, Lebanon; Stephanie Hanisak, Port Murray; Nancy Negvesky, Somerville. New Mexico: Phyllis Bailey, Albuquerque; Catherine Hayes, Albuquerque; Judy Parker, Albuquerque; Conita Derstine, Belen; Molly Seidel, Edgewood; Pamela Huntley, Grants; Carol Mead, Los Alamos; Karen Armatys, Raton; Alpha Wilson, Roswell; Gloria Valdez, Tijeras. New York: Louise Beatty, Amherst; Sandy Starks, Amherst; Marilee Merle, Attica; Judy Losecco, Buffalo; Nancy Breen, Canastota; Margaret Gage, Cherry Valley; Rebecca Gage, Cobleskill; Dolores Hayes, Fort Plain; Janice Arnold, Gansevoort; Karen Buhr, Gasport; Arlene Mawn, Holley; Patti Mitchell, Horseheads; Helen Phillips, Horseheads; Cheryl Barney, Le Roy; Mary Malinowski, Lee Center; Kathy Petrullo, Long Island City; Frances Boise, Marion; Lucia Johnson, Massena; Linda-Ann Wargo, North Massapequa; Estelle Keefer, Olean; Rosemary White, Oneida; Andrea Holcomb, Oxford; Darlene Markham, Rochester; Michele Van Dewerker, Roseboom; Barbara Talbot, Salamanca; Kristine Chayes, Smithtown; Penney Kester, Springville; Penny Sands Fersko, Staten Island; Susan Seymour, Valatie; Harmony Tardugno, Vernon Center; Kathy Anderson, Wallkill.

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North Carolina: Cindy Winter-Hartley, Apex; Gerry Beveridge, Beaufort; Doris Jennette, Buxton; Beverly Gottfried, Candler; Katie Sloan, Charlotte; Doris Heath, Franklin; Paula Bass, Greenville; Sigrid Hice, Hickory; Linda Thompson, High Point; Doris McMahon, Morgantown; Mary Strickland, Nashville; Jane Needham, River Bend; Hilda Pardue, Ronda; Rosalie Yopp Hylander, Sneads Ferry; Dorothy Baker, Southern Pines. North Dakota: Jeri Dobrowski, Beach; Marshelle Greenmyer-Wagner, Englevale; Rita Christianson, Glenburn; Patricia Burris, Grand Forks; Ann Marie Moch, Kintyre; Lisa Morman, Minot; Amy Loeb, Raleigh; Lois Flaten, Ray; Carla Hodenfield, Ray; Marilyn Hodenfield, Ray; Alice Kaldahl, Ray; Sarah Goetz, Richardton; Lillian Domres, Towner; Lavonne Hartel, Williston; Elmeda Johnson, Williston; Trish Gehlhar, Ypsilanti. Ohio: Doris Taekett, Alger; Ruth Glick, Apple Creek; Mabel Courtney, Archbold; Bev Spain, Bellville; David Klein, Berkey; Diane Turner, Brunswick; Sherry Masters, Cincinnati; Kimberly Rice, Cincinnati; Ruth Stoops, Cincinnati; Sheila Jarrells, Dayton; Betty Heinold, Delaware; Kim Wallace, Dennison; Patricia Aurand, Findlay; Freda Becker, Garrettsville; Carole Finney, Harrisville; Miriam Hershberger, Holmesville; Betty Spencer, Hopedale; Irene Thurston, Huber Heights; Catherine Dawe, Kent; Linda Miller, Lowell; Debra Dohy, Massillon; Tammy Logan, McComb; Diane Shipley, Mentor; Ben and Arie Coblentz, Millersburg; Maudie Raber, Millersburg; Polly Coumos, Mogadore; Marilyn Storck, New Carlisle; Marilyn Bick, Norwalk; Julie Mosier, Perrysville; Shirley Heston, Pickerington; Eldora Willford, Plymouth; Dolores Ann Thorp, Salineville; Robert Breno, Stongsville; Phyllis Jarman, Warren; Vikki Rebholz, West Chester; Mary Detweiler, West Farmington; Lavonn Bormuth, Westerville; Pat Waymire, Yellow Springs. Oklahoma: Denise Vineyard, Ardmore; Alberta McKay, Bartlesville; Barbara Shepherd, Edmond; Peggy Goodrich, Enid; Flo Burtnett, Gage; Kay Curtis, Guthrie; Stacey West-Feather, Jay; Donna Brockett, Kingfisher; Nancy Johnson, Laverne; Deanne McCarty, Midwest City; Terri Kearns, Oklahoma City; Marcia Nelson, Ponca City; LaDonna Reed, Ponca City; Christine Eilerts, Tulsa. Oregon: Christy Freeman, Central Point; Susan Snyder, Condon; Lynda Byrd, Dallas; Sherri Ann Gentry, Dallas; Lu Ann Kessi, Eddyville; Deb Darr, Falls City; Naomi Pollard, Gladstone; May Clark, Grants Pass; Mickey Turner, Grants Pass; Stephanie Wilson, Helix; Leann Meeds, Klamath Falls; Cathee Bethel, Lebanon; Dala Steward, Lebanon; Sandra Geissel, Milton-Freewater; Christine Brinkman, Molalla; Kathleen Jones, Newberg; Carolyn Allison, Pleasant Hill; Shannon Burroughs-Campbell, Portland; Mary Anne Thygesen, Portland; Krista Frank, Rhododendron; Laura Nickles, Rosebury; Darlene Brenden, Salem; Virginia Crowell, Stayton; Carol Baker, Summerville; Marie Hattrup, The Dalles; Bobbie Talbott, Veneta; Grace Dickey, Vernonia; Earlene Ertelt, Woodburn; Marilyn Paradis, Woodburn. Pennsylvania: Sharon Allen, Allentown; Barbara McCalley, Allison Park; Betty Claycomb, Alverton; Millie Rogers, Annville; Amanda Dunham, Bristol; Janice Burkholder, Chambersburg; Beth Ask, Cogan Station; Clarann Gafrarar, Columbia; Helen Hassler, Denver; Lorraine Armstrong, Downingtown; Susan Schneller, Doylestown; Lillian Heston, Easton; Patty Kile, Elizabethtown; Rita Reifenstein, Evans City; Pat Rimmel, Ford City; Lena Esh, Gordonville; Lydia Garcia, Hanover; Charlotte Goldberg, Honey Grove; Tina Repak, Johnstown; Laura Stoltzfus, Leola; Deb Moyer, Liberty; Bradley Moritz, Limerick; Patricia Mele, Lower Burrell; June Sangrey, Manheim; Janet Thomas, McKees Rocks; Joyce Guth, Mohnton; Melody Mellinger, Myerstown; Mary Landis, New Cumberland; Elaine Anderson, New Galilee; Becky Darling, Nicholson; Kathy Peters, North Versailles; Ann Nace, Perkasie; Joyce Daubert, Pine Grove; Marlene Barker, Pitcairn; Debra Latta, Port Matilda; Catherine Cremers, Pottstown; Alta Rodgers, Pottstown; Cherie Sechrist, Red Lion; Pat Kreitz, Richland; Romaine Wetzel, Ronks; Darla Germaux, Saxton; Christine Wilson, Sellersville; Gladys Moran, Shohola; Lucinda Walker, Somerset; Michelle Wise, Spring Mills; Nancy Foust, Stoneboro; Dolores Skrout, Summerhill; Sandra Johnson, Tioga; Ray Hoene, Tunkhannock; Irene Delbaugh, York. Rhode Island: Julie Davis, Bristol; Heidi Quinn, Carolina; Yvette Carozza, Central Falls; Janice Hemond, Lincoln; Pat Medeiras, Tiverton; Nancy Lewis, Warwick; Barbara Lynch, West Warwick. South Carolina: Kelly Ann Gray, Beaufort; Sharon Bickett, Chester; Alaina Showalter, Clover; Brenda Leonard, Columbia; Katherine Moss, Gaffney; Lisa Varner, Greenville; Jeanie Jenkins, Greenwood; Ollie Jackson, Inman; Claudia Grier, Lancaster; Lynn Parnell, Lexington; Loretta Cergol, Myrtle Beach; Elizabeth Hunter, Prosperity; Nancy Bridgeman, Summerville; Melanie Thurston, Williamston. South Dakota: Joan Antonen, Arlington; Judy Jungwirth, Athol; NanCee Maynard, Box Elder; Sharon Nichols, Brookings; Pam Hofer, Carpenter; Nina Vilhauer, Mina; Maxine Smith, Owanka; Annette Hill, Pierre; Lisa Thomsen, Rapid City; Glenda Goldade, Seneca; Helen Cluts, Sioux Falls; Frances Poste, Wall; Roxy Wilfahrt, Watertown; Sarah Woodruff, Watertown. Tennessee: Sue Ashford, Blountville; Vivian Walker, Crossville; Margaret McNeil, Germantown; Kathy Knight, Greeneville; Beth Fugate, Knoxville; Eleanor Harris, Knoxville; Suzanne Whitaker, Knoxville; Kim Randall, Kodak; Marjorie Green, Livingston; Kathleen Fuller, Murfreesboro; Shellee Harrison, Savannah; Mildred Troupe, Shelbyville; Sharon Manus, Smyrna; Andrea Bolden, Unionville. Texas: Christine Groves, Archer City; Nila Towler, Baird;

Join the Team Our volunteer editors regularly share recipes, cooking tips and ideas with our home-office staff. In turn, their names appear here, and they receive a free subscription to Taste of Home. Interested in joining our team of field editors? If you’re a good cook and would like to be considered, send several of your favorite recipes, plus details about you and your cooking background, to “Join the Team,” Taste of Home, 5925 Country Lane, Greendale WI 53129. Tonya Jones, Brenham; Sue Broyles, Cherokee; Evelyn Hroch, Corpus Christi; Denise Baumert, Dalhart; Tina Mills, Dallas; Luann Carlson, El Paso; Cindy Bertrand, Floydada; Jeanne Brady, Fort Worth; Susan Garoutte, Georgetown; Pat Stevens, Granbury; Martha Sue Stroud, Greenville; Gay Nell Nicholas, Henderson; Rebecca Liao, Keller; Becky Duncan, Leming; Linda Clapp, Live Oak; Rita Leonard, Longview; Linda Rainey, Monahans; Ann Cousin, New Braunfels; Joan Hallford, North Richland Hills; Mary Anne McWhirter, Pearland; Shonie Castaneda, Pharr; Penny Spearman, Pickton; Marilyn Katcsmorak, Pleasanton; Helen Suter, Richmond; Mildred Sherrer, Roanoke; Mary Lou Roberts, San Angelo; Jackie Fremming, San Antonio; Billie Jeane Garner, Southlake; Dorothy Pritchett, Wills Point. Utah: Edie DeSpain, Logan; Paula Zsiray, Logan; Lesli Dustin, Nibley; Arlene Butler, Ogden; Lucile Proctor, Panguitch; Karen Allen, Park City; Keri Witte, Provo; Donna Higbee, Riverton; JoLynn Hill, Roosevelt; Barbara Birk, St. George; Rebecca Baird, Salt Lake City; Stacey Christensen, Salt Lake City; Gaylene Anderson, Sandy; Debbie Mace, Sandy; Roni Goodell, Spanish Fork. Vermont: Patricia Le Blanc, East Hardwick; Virginia Breitmeyer LaPierre, Greensboro Bend; Harriet Dumas, Hartland; Joan Finley, Hartland; Patricia Bixby, Morrisville; Ellen Swenson, Newport; Susan Greenall, Windsor. Virginia: Margaret Wagner Allen, Abingdon; Dorothy Showalter, Broadway; Teresa Mears, Chincoteague; Donna Rivera, Colonial Beach; Angie Colwell, Fredericksburg; Ila Alderman, Galax; Esther Shank, Harrisonburg; Carol Strong Battle, Heathsville; Rosemarie Forcum, Heathsville; Eugene Presley, Honaker; Angela Leinenbach, Mechanicsville; Kyra Pulliam, Stephens City; Carrie Long, Suffolk; Virginia Gentry, Sutherlin; Theresa Morris, Toano; Betsey Bishop, Warrenton. Washington: Frank Anderson, Bainbridge Island; Bonnie Waliezer, Brush Prairie; Janie Cooper, Chelan; Carol Beyerl, East Wenatchee; Margie Snodgrass, Gig Harbor; Patricia Crandall, Inchelium; Carolyn Popwell, Lacey; Perlene Hoekema, Lynden; Janis Plagerman, Lynden; Margery Bryan, Moses Lake; Virginia Massey, Olympia; Hollis Mattson, Puyallup; Patte Nattrass, Richland; Alice and Jake Weber, Ritzville; Diane Sardeson, Seattle; Aljene Wendling, Seattle; Beverly Kearns, Selah; Marian Platt, Sequim; Carolyn Eastham, South Bend; Nina Hall, Spokane; Ferne Carter Chapman, Tacoma; Dolores Scholz, Tonasket; Marty Rummel, Trout Lake; Janet Brinkman, Vancouver; Lila Scheer, Vancouver; Tyffany Fries, Yakima. West Virginia: Lori Daniels, Beverly; Jesse and Anne Foust, Bluefield; Amy Short, Lesage; Cheryl Maczko, Reedsville; Elsie Mace Daugherty, Spencer; Jodi Zickefoose, Tallmansville; Irmgard Koscielniak, Terra Alta. Wisconsin: Sue Gronholz, Beaver Dam; Amy Voights, Brodhead; Gloria Warczak, Cedarburg; Ruth Jungbluth, Dodgeville; Kathleen Taugher, East Troy; Dennis Dolan, Fitchburg; Stephen Baseley, Fond du Lac; Nancy DeMaster, Fond du Lac; Carrie Sherrill, Forestville; Bernie Bellin, Franklin; Lisa Feld, Grafton; Jean Ecos, Hartland; Donna Gorman, Lone Rock; Arlene Haupt, Madison; Holly Basford, McFarland; Gail Sykora, Menomonee Falls; Mari Anne Warren, Milton; Charlene Griffin, Minocqua; Jeanette Pederson, Monico; Janelle Lee, Neenah; Darlene Alexander, Nekoosa; Lois Fetting, Nelson; Chris Kohler, Nelson; Carol Smith, New Berlin; Lauren Heyn, Oak Creek; Judy Skaar, Pardeeville; Mary Martin, Park Falls; Sandra Baratka, Phillips; Ardyce Piehl, Poynette; Mark Trinklein, Racine; Linda Rock, Stratford; Doris Sather, Strum; Karen Jarosz, Waterford; Vicki Raatz, Waterloo; Betty Vondran, Wauwatosa; Mary Steiner, West Bend; Darlis Wilfer, West Bend. Wyoming: Lulu Shuler, Cody; Jo Maasberg, Farson; Ardis Rollefson, Jackson Hole; Lori Couthard, Laramie; Vera Reid, Laramie; Bertie Jones, Lusk; Denise Smith, Lusk; Arlene Zerbst, Newcastle; Claudia Meyer, Pinedale; Bonnie Hiller, Powell; Carolyn Walton, Smoot; Bobbi Miller, Thermopolis. Alberta: Joan Rose, Calgary; Connie Tiesenhausen, Demmitt; Florence Barnes, Drumheller; Lori Stefanishion, Drumheller; Orien Major, Hinton; Margaret Steacy, Lethbridge; Karen Bourne,

Taste of Home • December/January 2007


Magrath; Lise Thomson, Magrath; Joy Butler, Pincher Creek; Ruth Ann Stelfox, Raymond; Frieda Meding, Trochu. British Columbia: Joan Baskin, Black Creek; Brenda Read, Burns Lake; Mary Dice, Chemainus; Merle Dyck, Elkford; Leigh Moore, Heffley Creek; Deborah Maki, Kamloops; Doreen Martin, Kitimat; Patty Burk, Nanaimo; Danielle Belanger, Victoria. Manitoba: Mina Dyck, Boissevain; Marge Reimer-Toews, Steinbach; Debbie Clark, Winnipeg; Linda Grienke, Winnipeg; Alice Szarkiewicz, Winnipeg. New Brunswick: Nancy Biddington, Boudreau-Ouest; France Couturier, Edmundston; Marilu Hynes, McLeod Hill. Newfoundland: Margot Nash, Mt. Pearl; Joan Kane, Trinity. Nova Scotia: Lois Bent, Bridgetown; Cathy Longaphy, Coldbrook; Celine Munroe, Guysborough; Wendy Dowling, Queens County; Kelly Kirby, Westville. Ontario: Joannah Jarman, Almonte; Pat Roberts, Cookstown; Mary Ellen Agnew, Dundalk; Donna Klein Gebbinck, Elmvale; Nancy Horsburgh, Everett; Linda Russell, Exeter; Wendy Masters, Grand Valley; Janet Tigchelaar, Jerseyville; Sarah Weber, Kitchener; Elda Hall, Oro Station; Lois Taylor Caron, Ottawa; Kathy Wakefield, Peterborough; Nancy Bergeron, Powassan; Janis Plourde, Smooth Rock Falls; Raymonde Bourgeois, Swastika; Loralee Hanes, Troy; Lynne Wilhelm, West Hill. Prince Edward Island: Connie Sanders, Belle River; Nancy Coughlin, Charlottetown; Tammy Clements, Murray Harbour. Quebec: Anne MacWhirter, Hope; Diana Frizzle, Knowlton; Linda Johnson, Pointe Claire. Saskatchewan: Betty Abrey, Imperial; Del Mason, Martensville; Norma Harder, Melfort; Margaret Clark, Regina; Carol Funk, Richard; Val Lefebvre, Rosetown; Joanne Shewchuk, St. Benedict; Peggy Gwillim, Strasbourg.

Let Them Eat...

CastleCake! This whimsical pan from NordicWare lets you create a castle-shaped cake for any occasion. The Castle Bundt Pan has been the springboard for princess and knight cakes, sand castles, haunted houses and gingerbread houses (like the one below). Just pick a theme and let your creative juices flow! The Castle Bundt Pan is made of durable cast aluminum, which provides superior baking performance and uniform browning. You’ll also enjoy a premium nonstick surface that assures quick release and easy cleanup. Suggested retail is $35 each. Even if you don’t win one, you can still visit www.nordicware. com for information on this fun castle cake pan and other NordicWare products.

Ted’s Toothpick Contest

Chocolaty Ghost Hides Toothpick Find the hidden drawing, and you could win!

“Boo!” writes Judy Anderson from Bridgeport, Ohio.“What a cute place to hide the toothpick.” Judy is referring to Ted’s Toothpick, which mysteriously appeared on the stick of a ghost lollipop on page 22 of the Oct/Nov issue. Jean Wortman of Montpelier,Vermont says her candy-making hobby led her straight to the hiding spot.“I was especially interested in the chocolate goblins...Hence, my discovery,” she notes. And Mary Acosta took an altogether different approach. The Abilene,Texas reader says,“It was the autumn issue, so I figured finding the toothpick would be like finding a needle in a haystack. I flipped back to the bundles of hay on page 22, and as I looked, something caught my eye. It was the toothpick on the lollipop stick!” Our little game of hiding a drawing of a toothpick in each issue adds a challenge for sharp-eyed readers. If you’re new to Taste of Home, here’s the story behind our contest:Ted is an imaginary character who accidentally drops his toothpick after sampling one of the dishes in each issue. Unfortunately, Ted’s not very good at finding his toothpick…so he counts on Taste of Home subscribers to help him out. Where Did It Land? A drawing of a toothpick is hidden somewhere in every copy of each issue,including the one you’re reading right now. It may be anywhere—tucked into a photo or stuck in a drawing…in a margin…even used as an exclamation point at the end of a headline. It resembles a real-life flat toothpick and looks like this…

The toothpick above is just an example—not the one hidden for this issue’s contest.We’ve concealed it elsewhere, and it could be a different color or size. If you find the toothpick and want to enter our contest, go to www.tasteofhome. com and click on the “Ted’s Toothpick” link. Or, mail a postcard or note saying,“I found Ted’s toothpick on page ___” with your name and address printed on it to: “Attn.Toothpick,” Taste of Home,5925 Country Lane,Greendale WI 53129.Share an anecdote about the fun you had locating it, if you wish. Whether you enter on-line or through the mail, you have an equal opportunity to win.We combine all entries (on-line and mail), then draw the prize-winners’ names at random. 100 Valuable Prizes This time,20 winners will receive the popular Castle Bundt Pan from NordicWare (left). Eighty more winners will receive our Best of Country Appetizers cookbook. Please do not include subscription checks or change-of-address notes with your mailed-in entry. The first entries received are not necessarily the winners, so you need not use express delivery. We’ll conduct the drawing in January. Good luck! Winners Listed On-Line From those who correctly identified the toothpick’s location last time,10 lucky readers won either a Pumpkin or Bell Pepper Casserole dish from Le Creuset and 90 more received our Best of Country Appetizers cookbook. For a list of winners, log on to our Web site at www.taste ofhome.com.

www.tasteofhome.com

Where Was That Toothpick?

?

In the Oct/Nov issue,Ted’s toothpick was hidden on the stick of a ghost lollipop on page 22.

65


Bright Holiday Ideas

Beefy Dog Treats

Best Friend

Remember Your

Your pooch

and other pet friends will be smacking their lips when they get a whiff of these yummy homemade dog treats at Christmastime. A recipe from Lori Kimble of Mascoutah, Illinois, these healthy, meat-flavored biscuits make perfect gifts for pets. Don’t forget to leave a few for Santa’s reindeer, too! “Roxie” eagerly shakes her paw for Beefy Dog Treats. A West Highland white terrier, this cute pup is best friends with Mark Hagen, senior editor for TOH books.

CAN I EAT THIS? Spruce up your spread with this frosted “gift” cake. It’s tied with a bow you can actually eat! Betty Smith of Pell City, Alabama sent in this photo of her granddaughter Kaitlyn’s yummy handiwork. Kaitlyn used watermelon fruit leather for the ribbon and bow on her festive, holiday-friendly cake. 66

❧ PREP: 20 min. ❧ BAKE: 25 min. + cooling 1 1/4 1 2 2-1/2 1 1 1 1 1

package (1/4 ounce) active dry yeast cup warm water (110° to 115°) teaspoon beef bouillon granules tablespoons boiling water cups all-purpose flour cup nonfat dry milk powder cup whole wheat flour cup cooked long grain rice envelope unflavored gelatin jar (4 ounces) vegetable beef dinner baby food 1 egg 2 tablespoons vegetable oil

In a small bowl, dissolve yeast in warm water. In another small bowl, dissolve bouillon in boiling water. In a large bowl, combine the all-purpose flour, milk powder, wheat flour, rice and gelatin. Stir in the baby food, egg, oil, yeast mixture and bouillon mixture until combined; knead until mixture forms a ball. Turn onto a lightly floured surface; roll to 1/4-in. thickness. Cut with a floured 2-in. bone-shaped cookie cutter. Place 1 in. apart on ungreased baking sheets. Bake at 300° for 25-30 minutes or until set. Remove to wire racks to cool. Let stand for 24 hours or until hardened. Store in an airtight container. Yield: about 3 dozen.

MERRY POT HOLDERS Elizabeth Blondefield from San Jose, California could not resist sharing this photo of her husband, Paul, and his Christmas pot holders. Each year, Paul’s friends bring him pot holders to add to his collection.“We get so many positive comments on his annual display. It’s a very unique hobby, indeed!” Elizabeth says. Taste of Home • December/January 2007


Index

•December/January 2007

APPETIZERS & SNACKS Apple ’n’ Pear Kabobs, 37 Apple Snack Mix, 12 Buffalo Chicken Dip, 17 Cheddar Bread Twists, 47 ✔Chicken Taco Cups, 19 Chorizo Date Rumaki, 17 Clam Fondue in a Bread Bowl, 55 Ham ’n’ Broccoli Triangles, 16 Herbed Dip for Veggies, 55 ✔Hot Crab Pinwheels, 19 Pinecone-Shaped Blue Cheese Spread, 25 Roasted Cumin Cashews, 29 ✔Roasted Eggplant Spread, 18 Seaside Prawn Kabobs, 17 Smoked Salmon Tomato Pizza, 17 ✔Tomato and Onion Salmon, 19

37

Simple Stollen, 8 White Chocolate Cranberry Bread, 10

BREAKFAST & BRUNCH Green Chili Egg Puff, 55 Italian Sausage Egg Bake, 37 Maple Walnut Rolls, 31

CANDY Cappuccino Truffles, 49 Christmas Hard Candy, 12 Layered Mint Fudge, 13 Peanut Butter Pretzel Bites, 13 Pecan Caramels, 31

CONDIMENTS Homemade Almond Paste, 11 Walnut Cranberry Butter, 11

DESSERTS

Cakes & Tortes Apple Butter Cake Roll, 9 Banana Nut Cake, 29 ✔Black Cherry Cake, 20 Devil’s Food Caramel Torte, 33 Mocha Nut Torte, 27 Yuletide Pound Cake, 49

BEVERAGES Citrus Cranberry Tea, 37

BREADS, MUFFINS & ROLLS Cottage Cheese Yeast Rolls, 56 Cranberry Almond Coffee Cake, 11 Cream Cheese Cranberry Muffins, 10

Cookies & Bars Cherry Almond Cups, 6 Chocolate Linzer Cookies, 7 Decorative Ginger Cookies, 9 Festive Stars, 7 Lemon Butter Spritz, 6 Mincemeat Cookies, 7 Pistachio Cranberry Biscotti, 13 Rustic Nut Bars, 27

✔ Recipe includes Nutrition Facts and Diabetic Exchanges

www.tasteofhome.com

27

✔Breakfast Patties, 37

Sour Cream Cutouts, 6

Miscellaneous Bread Pudding for 40, 39 Layered Pumpkin Dessert, 61 Peanut Butter Pudding Dessert, 27 Praline Cheesecake, 55 Praline Chocolate Dessert, 29 Steamed Chocolate Pudding, 8

Pies & Tarts Caramel-Crunch Pumpkin Pie, 35 Cranberry-Topped Lemon Tarts, 49 Honey Pecan Pie, 29 Mixed Nut Chocolate Tart, 31 Peppermint Freezer Pie, 68

DOG TREATS Beefy Dog Treats, 66

MAIN DISHES Broccoli Chicken Fettuccine, 59 Chicken Manicotti, 39 Chicken Spareribs, 56 Crown Roast of Pork, 33 Macadamia-Crusted Tilapia, 31 Pecan Chicken with Chutney, 27 Pizza Casserole, 41 Rolled-Up Turkey, 35 Saucy Skillet Steaks, 47 Seafood Potpies, 59

Seasoned Pork Loin Roast, 41

SALADS ✔Cranberry Gelatin

Mold, 35 Warm Potato Salad, 55

SIDE DISHES ✔Broccoli with Mock

Hollandaise, 20 Cashew-Peach Sweet Potatoes, 33 Creamed Spinach, 57 Gingered Orange Beets, 41 Holiday Green Beans, 47 Peas in Cheese Sauce, 35 Pierogi Pasta Shells, 41 ✔Sweet-Sour Red Cabbage, 23 ✔Two-Tone Potato Wedges, 20 Wild Rice Pilaf, 33

SOUPS Christmas Clam Chowder, 39 Hearty Beef Soup, 39 ✔ Create scrumptious memories at holiday time and 349 SCRUMPTIOUS any time with the 352 tempting recipes in Taste of Home’s BestLoved Cookies & Bars cookbook. You’ll also enjoy hundreds of color photos plus tips and how-to’s for successful cookie baking. Find this 192-page, softcover volume wherever magazines are sold. Or order at www.ShopTasteofHome.com.

COOKIE RECIPES!

hundreds of color photos step-by-step directions handy hints & how-to’s from easy to elegant

FROM

AMERICA’S #1 COOKING MAGAZINE

67

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JANUARY 22, 2007 $9.99 U.S. / $12.99 Canada


Peppermint Freezer Pie PREP: 40 min. + freezing

Refreshing peppermint ice cream plus fudgy chocolate plus fluffy meringue equals the perfect pie for the holidays! Kelli Bucy of Massena, Iowa shares this lovely dessert that has become a Christmas tradition.You can make and freeze the pie well in advance, then add the meringue and bake for a few minutes just before serving. 2 squares (1 ounce each) unsweetened chocolate 2 tablespoons butter 1 cup sugar 2/3 cup evaporated milk 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 quart peppermint ice cream, softened 1 pastry shell (9 inches), baked Meringue: 3 egg whites 6 tablespoons sugar 1 tablespoon water 1/4 teaspoon cream of tartar 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract 3 tablespoons crushed peppermint-stick candy In a heavy saucepan, melt chocolate and butter over low heat. Stir in sugar and milk. Cook and stir for 8 minutes or until sugar is dissolved. Remove from the heat; stir in vanilla. Cool completely. Spread half of the ice cream into pastry shell; freeze until firm. Spread half of the chocolate mixture over ice cream; freeze until set. Repeat layers. Freeze for several hours or overnight. In a heavy saucepan, combine the egg whites, sugar, water and cream of tartar. With a portable mixer, beat on low speed for 1 minute. Continue beating over low heat until mixture reaches 160°, about 12 minutes. Remove from the heat. Add vanilla; beat until stiff glossy peaks form and sugar is dissolved. Fold in peppermint candy. Spread over top of pie. Cover and freeze until serving. Pie may be frozen for up to 2 months. Yield: 6-8 servings.

Next Issue’s Menu... Wonderful comfort food coming up in Taste of Home’s Feb/Mar issue will fill the tummy and have you and your family feeling safe and warm… • Ladle up prize-winning soups from our national recipe contest—they’re guaranteed to chase the chill! • What’s great with soup? Sandwiches, of course! We’ve gathered an appealing array of easy, interesting reader favorites. • Hearty casseroles that taste like home are also in the lineup.The savory selection is full of flavorful ideas for family meals and potlucks. • Whipped cream is at its peak in fabulous desserts. Believe us, they go down easy! • Vroom, vroom! NASCAR fans will love this theme party.Wait ’til you see the fun race track cake. • Plus, the Feb/Mar issue will include a St. Patrick’s Day supper for two…a darling butter lamb to make for Easter dinner…and many more outstanding recipes shared by good cooks from coast to coast. It’s almost ready!


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