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MAGAZINE.CO.UK

THE KALEIDOSCOPE ISSUE


BEHIND

double. W E M A K E D O U B L E / / W W W . D O U B L E M A G A Z I N E . C O . U K I N F O @ D O U B L E M A G A Z I N E . C O . U K WE CAN DESIGN, PHOTOGRAPH, STYLE, WRITE, COORDINATE EVENTS AND MARKET OUR BRAND AND YOURS. GET IN TOUCH NOW FOR SPECIAL PROJECTS, COLLABORATIONS OR CONSULTANCY. A R T D I R E C T I O N & D E S I G N / / Z O E J E N K I N F Z

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Z O E J E N K I N : FA S H I O N THIS MONTH I HAVE MOSTLY BEEN . . . finding brand spanking new designers for this month’s issue, getting burnt at Glasto and styling super hot boys (so hot he nearly fainted on set) in layers of sequinned hoodies, lycra and russian hats.. J A D E F R E N C H : M U S I C THIS MONTH I HAVE MOSTLY BEEN . . . pigeon and pope hunting in Poland followed by catching up with friends and the sunshine...

NATALIEDAVIES:MUSIC THIS MONTH I HAVE MOSTLY BEEN . . . Interviewing amazing DJ’s for this month’s issue.

J O S H G A R V E Y : M U I S C THIS MONTH I HAVE MOSTLY BEEN . . . with All My Friends watching LCD Soundsystem at Glastonbury.

L I A M C U R R A N : H A I R THIS MONTH I HAVE MOSTLY BEEN... ...working on shoots for Vogue & Double in the same month, as well as filming for the UK version of Zoe’s favourite show The Hills! Oh and soaking up the sunshine in London’s nicest parks. D A N W I LT O N : P H O T O G R A P H E R THIS MONTH I HAVE MOSTLY BEEN... in the bin with ZUUL & blubbing in a field with Stevie Wonder.

RORYDCS:PHOTOGRAPHER THIS MONTH I HAVE MOSTLY BEEN . . . Elusive.

Z O E KO R I T S A S : M A K E U PA R T I S T THIS MONTH I HAVE MOSTLY BEEN . . . working on shoots, covering models in paint until they shed a tear, getting saucy working on set for agent provocateur, adding to my tattoo family and sleeping on the floor with glasto on tv & a warm flat cider in my hand for my own version of the best fest ever.


///CLICK ME THERE IS NOTHING ELSE.


INSIDE

double. FASHION MUSIC ART PARTIES


EDITOR’S LETTER Hello Double Readers! Change occurs at a kaleidoscope rate. And not just changes in taste; one second you’re in a monocrome miniskirt bobbing around to The Small Faces and the next an electric blue power suit getting it on to Tainted Love. With one flick of the wrist the picture changes, the shapes and colours spin into a new path and all it takes is another flick for that to change again. It’s pretty rapid and sometimes a bit too much to take in without realising it’s happening around you. These colourful scatterings and kaleidoscopic heights are explored in this month’s Double magazine. The fashion pages explode in to a spectrum of trippy fashion editorials from Double vetren Rory DCS, and Double virgin Daniel Wilton. The phantasmagoric hair creations from Liam Curran burst into our minds and ensure we are all now craving rainbow weaves we never knew we needed! We catch up with Fashion’s most colourful and ever changing clothign conosuer Nova Dando. As well as packing in all the usual hot topics such as this month’s Wishlist, On the Radar, Designer Profile and loads more multicoloured fashion thrown into the mix. We sneek a look and listen to the dizzy ethnipop of Rainbow Arabia, the swirling requiems of Railcars and utter insanity of N-Dubz. We have a look at album art and get under the skin of The Girls. It’s about colour and shapes and getting into the spirit of change this month, so revamp your wardrobe, redecorate your house, change your career or get a new haircut. Make a change this month. Zoe & Jade xx

welcome to our


MUSIC

ODDSAC WORDS: WILL BROWN


So I’ve got my ticket for ODDSAC, the audio-visual album four years in the making between the hugely successful Animal Collective and film-maker Danny Perez, I’m pretty excited. We arrive at Mint Lounge, a well known gig venue that nestles comfortably in the Northern Quarter, Manchester’s very own hipster paradise. We’re all thinking the same thing in the queue - this is going to be fucking ace, there’s not doubt. We’re queuing for a new Animal Collective album and we’re the second group of people in the UK to see it only after those who booked tickets for the 6 o’clock showing 2 hours before us. Stoked doesn’t cut it. On entry my friend and I ignore the bar head straight for a seat, half because we want a good spot, and half because we’re dribbling enough in anticipation alone. No alcohol needed thanks. The compare announces the film and its makers, and the crowd goes wild. On screen: dimly-lit grass moving softly in a breeze, a few cuts and a build of sound. It’s loud and its definitely Animal Collective, and it doesn’t take long to realize that when they said conceptual, they meant it. There isn’t too much to be said about the content of the film, there are moments of greatness - at the film’s best moments it’s David Lynch, and at the films worst it’s laughable. Picture a family struggling to cope with a campfire and marsh-mellows, horror ensues when out of nowhere an ancient vampire attacks and kills the family. The vampire fails to time things well as he is defeated by a sunrise, slowly, and painfully. Do you remember Goosebumps the TV series based on the children’s books? It was a bit like that but less scary.

It frustrates me that I find myself commenting more on the visuals than the audio but it has to be said that the impact of what Animal Collective contributed wasn’t what I expected. The description is “an audiovisual album” but in reality it wasn’t an album, it was a bad film with a mediocre score, at times you can really hear glimmers of what make the band ace, there is a scene with what appears to be an aged person smashing drums to a typically genius vocal melody coupled with not much more than some well layered percussion. In the final scene both the film and the music come together most convincingly. Visually bringing the ridiculous and fractured narrative (if there was it was only the beginning and the end that was perceptively involved) to a full-circle, we see characters that belong half in a horror film and half in an episode of Dr. Who getting frustrated while cooking. Bizarrely the music works to create a real sense of despair that reminded my instantly of David Lynch’s short films, finally it felt like something it probably set out to. Too little too late, I’m afraid. The crowd seemed happy, but alas, I was not. Being a film in a gig-venue, I expected the film to revolve around the music, especially when it describes itself as an album and when the main attraction of the screening was, it has to be said, Animal Collective. If this film was to be reviewed as either a visual-album, a film, or just on the music, none would garner impressive appraisal. The problem was that it lacked focus, both Danny Perez and Avey Tare of Animal Collective agreed the film was neither based on the music nor the film, but more of a fifty/fifty collaboration, and I believe that this was ultimately it’s downfall. You can put avant-garde movies in a cinema, but if you’re gonna make avant-garde albums and play it in a club, then make it an album, not a mess.


MUSIC

BITCHES

AINT SHIT WORDS: JOSH GARVEY


Rappers on The Pyramid Stage, ey? Two years ago Michael Eavis’ decision to name Jay-Z as a headliner brought with it a barrage of criticism, fronted by Manchester’s favourite hook nosed boff head Noel Gallagher. So it is, two years later, another rapper is set to bring the gang signs to Worthy Farm. Enter stage right; Snoop Dogg. This time round, thanks in part to Jay-Z successfully bossing The Pyramid, there is no uproar amongst the festival goers. Granted he’s not a headliner. In fact, the only real concern was whether ‘The Doggfather of Rap’ would be allowed to enter the country. “It’s been a while since I been here,” grins the lanky rapper, right before set opener ‘The Next Episode’ bowls in. The stage is hammered, yet each attendee makes enough space to bounce both arms up and down like Snoop’s favourite Chevrolet Impala ’64. Radio favourites like ‘Signs’ are present, but it’s the early 90’s classics like ‘Bitch Please’ and ‘Gin & Juice’ that bring out the ‘old’ Snoop. The swagger is still there, it always has been, but it’s a little less misogynistic than it used to be. ‘Beautiful’ is dedicated to “all the beautiful women”. There’s a lot more contentment and relaxation to the Snoop of today, a far cry from the man who has stood trial for murder. This might have something to do with copious inhalation of “some of that sticky icky”. His words, not mine. Dizzee Rascal and Damon Albarn were in attendance at the side of the stage to

watch the D O double G strut across The Pyramid as if he owned the place. The power stance, the pout, the slight tilt of the head, it all added to the general feeling that people were baring witness to something special. The habitual dedication to Tupac Shakur is thrown in too, although not many people know the songs that Snoop is paying homage too. Then Snoop shows a great deal of humility in performing ‘Pass Out’, bringing Tinie Tempah on to the stage. Tempah brings an increase in pace to the set as he runs around frantically high fiving everybody in sight, probably counting his lucky stars that he has the good fortune to grace the main stage at Glastonbury with a bonafide legend like Snoop. ‘Drop It Like It’s Hot’ brings a chorus of “Snoooooops” from the crowd before ‘What’s My Name’ brings this amazing set to a close. Snoop’s not finished there though. Before departing he asks three things of Glastonbury; 1.) The first thing it has to do in morning? “Brush yo teef!” 2.) Promote peace and love. 3.) “SMOKE WEED EVERY DAY!” A wave of laughter engulfs Snoop as he exits, the smoothest man anybody is likely to see all weekend. He isn’t the only one to exit, as the throngs of crowds depart leaving what seems to be half the number of people to watch festival main stays Vampire Weekend. Such is the draw of the rake like rapper. A festival highlight if ever there was one.


MUSIC

BUN YOUR CHEAP TALK ... WORDS: JOSH GARVEY


It is common knowledge that when it comes to Glastonbury, Michael Eavis is King. The Lord of the Manor. Yet, as with every kingdom, a court jester is required. At Glastonbury 2010, this was none other than the infamous Dappy, poster child of N-Dubz. After being cajoled into making the journey to witness this modern ghetto spin on stand-up comedy, I found my opinions to be wavering. Whilst I still have no time for their actual music I respect them; in a way. There are still certain occurrences I do not care for, with one in particular still leaving a bad taste in my mouth. In January of this year, Radio 1 listener and mother Chloe Moody text in to the Chris Moyles show, branding Dappy “vile” and a “little boy with a silly hat”. His reaction was despicable and well documented. For this I have no time. The man has purposefully placed himself in the eye of the public, and with that recognition there is the old adage of “opinions being like arseholes, everybody has one”.

This is how it is with N-Dubz. You change the channel and they’re gone. Yet after a few months and determination on their part, you change the channel and they’re on the next one. Then the next one. And so on, and so on. Until that horrific day when after you change the channel you find yourself going “Na na niiiiii.” Society always loves a good success story. From ‘rags to riches’ and all that. It’s all the more poignant when that story is tied to a hint of tragedy too. Three years ago Dappy found his father Byron dead on the couch in their family home. He was also female band member Tulisa’s uncle. Byron, or ‘Uncle B’, was a former bassist for band Mungo Jerry and had fought tirelessly to help the band achieve their dream of success. Two years after his death N-Dubz achieved their chart topping single with Tinchy Stryder’s ‘Number 1’.

They simply won’t go away.

With this dedicated drive behind them the band has gone from strength to strength. Dappy has tidied up his ham-fisted vocals, whilst still managing to retain the lethargic delivery. Adidas have come sniffing and they’re currently the focal point of a Channel 4 series “Being…NDubz”. It’s nothing short of remarkable. The naysayers can point to the fact that were grime not the current flavour of the week, thanks to more talented and inventive artists such as Wiley and Skepta, then N-Dubz wouldn’t have a pot to piss in. Yet sometimes, it’s not about being the best, it’s about having the hindsight to see something big coming. To strategically place yourself in a position to reap the benefits. There is nothing wrong with wanting to succeed in life, so that life in itself is more comfortable.

The first time I bore witness to their eventual juggernaut was on ‘Channel U’. Most of the music videos on the channel were low budget and nearly all of them were utter tripe. Yet there was this trio whose videos continually stood out to me. Of course you know who I’m on about. The reason for that was this snarling little mutt that was more pug in a cute hat than pit bull in a harness. There were obvious ‘bigger dogs’ on the channel, but like bigger dogs in real life, their bark scared the shit out of you and you’d want nothing more to do with them after that.

Watching them at Glastonbury, I did feel a degree of shame. More so because I raised the average age by about eight years, Looking around you could see people laughing, pretending to take it all as a joke, feeling as though they were too ‘cool’ to genuinely like or respect N-Dubz. I understand these feelings, but ultimately, they’re bullshit. If the people were too cool to watch them, then why be there in the first place? I’m not about to stand here and proclaim the trio to be the saviour of British music. Yet, with all the costume changes and stage production, they are interesting to watch. It’s car crash music.

It’s the little annoying dogs in life that tend to have staying power. Whilst they peck head, a mere shove and they’re out of your consciousness. Yet you can bet your bottom dollar that they’ll come back.

They’ve worked hard to be where they are, which is refreshing. In an industry filled with bell ends like Pete Doherty who have God given talent yet proceed to piss it all away; a success story lined with hard graft is much needed.

Despite his eventual apology, this reaction exhibits a distinct lack of class on Dappy’s part. For that reason, I can never hold my hands up and say “you know what? I actually like N-Dubz”. Therein lays the irony. My refusal to fully embrace them will always be hindered by their attitudes, yet it is their attitude that earns my curiosity. Their music will never be endearing to me because it isn’t really my cup of tea. It is their sheer force of will that affords them my acknowledgement.


MUSIC

ON THE RADAR: WORDS: JADE FRENCH OUCH MY EARS ARE BLEEDING… With the sublime sound of noisy, crashing slow-motion lo-fi music. Yum. It’s not as bad as it sounds. Railcars one man machine, Aria Jalali, slips and slides all over the musical spectrum with reworkings by No Age, Xiu Xiu and Jeans Wilder all being made into a free record. The 6 minuet long piece de resistance ‘Cathedral with No Eyes’ will drag you in faster than a freight-train on speed. You may recoil at first; you may really want to bang your head against a wall to get rid of the fuzzy vision this song may induce but keep with it because as little 1min50seconds in something will happen and you’ll slot into place. Dreamy melodies appear like a vision of St. Francis of Assisi (or similar Saintly figure) in the midsts of a dark, degenerated soul. The album of the same name (‘Cathedral with No Eyes’) retells the life of Edmund the Martyr by layering drums, feedback, samples and vocals over one another. There is evidently more depth to Railcars than other-worldly crescendo’s and breakneck tempo. Now I’m not going to confess to knowing a great deal about Edmund but a little digging reveals he basically stood up to the Danes, refused to renounce his religion and became a martyr in the process. And within the album issues of a modern Medieval are dealt with. ‘Castles’ teams fuzzy vocals with the electronic glitching whilst the No Age rework gives a layer of indistinguishable instrumental and a searing synth melody. The Lucky Dragons remix gives a more positive spin with an uplifting jangle and vocals which although still indistinguishable now are shouting as if with good news. Just like a Medieval martyr might?

On the go since 2008 Railcars teamed with Jamie Stewart of Xiu Xiu and toured and toured and toured. It’s hard to imagine that previous songs from EP ‘Cities vs. Submarines’ could be less aggressive than ‘Cathedral…’- it’s almost as if engrained on the vinyl groove is a skein of dust which makes the record jump and skip naturally. But ‘Bohemia Without a Sea’ is a less aggressive affair and a slight shift downwards with familiar washed-out-with-feedback vocals and a more uplifting beat… Then switch to ‘Concrete Building’ and it’s an almost Strokes affair mixed with a dash of DD/MM/YYY. And after tackling the issues of Edmund where would Railcars spin to next? You might think that a reworking of Chaucerian literature might be on the horizon or a retelling of the fated love affair of Helen and the fall of Troy. But instead fast-forward a couple of thousand years and pin your ears on a full rework of Kate Bush’s ‘Hounds of Love’ album. Definitely one to keep an eye on!


INTERVIEW:

KASTLE/B.RICH

WORDS: NATALIE ESQUIRE

After dominating worldwide dancefloors with his high calibre of heavy bass bangers and remixes, it seems Party Like Us Records’ B. Rich is taking time to embrace his ‘inner calm’. A new alias, Kastle, is the perfect output for his new incredibly current 2 steppy, RnB tinged sound, and recent up-tempo refixes of Sade’s ‘Solider of Love’ and Bjork’s ‘I Miss You’ have secured Kastle a sky high spot in the ranks of producers to watch in the upcoming months... Already signed to Seclusiasis with a new single and highly awaited EP packed full of fresh Kastle material on the way, we at Double thought it was time to catch up with the Pittsburgh resident and chat about Diddy yacht parties, lamb heart tartare and 90s music. Beautiful!


MUSIC Q: Tell us more about yourself and your musical multi-personality disorder....whats going on in camp Kastle and B. Rich? A: [laughs] Yeah it does seem like I have a disorder, doesn’t it? Well, a brief background on me.... I’ve been a music producer for 14 years now and have done all sorts of music over the years. But I’ve been doing the B. Rich heavy bass/dubstep thing for a few years now and the Kastle project was a fresh start for 2010. I’ve got tons of things going on... my white board is so full. Working on the next B. Rich single for Party Like Us, followed by a full EP. Also my Kastle debut single (‘Better Off Alone’) on Seclusiasis drops July 26th, which will also be followed by a full Kastle EP. I just got done with 2 months of very steady travelling so right now I’m slaving in the studio. Q: How did you end up producing music? Was it something you strived to do or just stumbled upon by accident? A: I mostly thank the internet. I was really young when I was introduced to it in like ‘94 and it was all due to listening to streaming audio on websites and trading music on IRC/EFnet channels like #techno and #mp3rave. I suppose I did stumble upon it by accident but I instantly fell in love and it has been my passion since. I always loved music immensely growing up as a little kid... so it fit.  

Q: What inspired you to create a separate musical persona? How does it differ to your previous work? A: Well, the B. Rich stuff is obviously club/party music and I just really wanted to do some music that was a bit deeper and more personal. People were getting confused when I’d do something as B. Rich and it wasn’t a big club banger. So I needed that separation and distinction. The Kastle sound is much more musical... much more dynamic and relaxed. Best way to put it is that it is more ‘me’. Q: How do you feel working with vocalists? Is it something you enjoy doing?   A: Oh I love working with vocalists and I’ve worked with a lot of great people lately. Armanni Reign in Atlanta has done amazing work with me both on B. Rich & Kastle tracks. I work a lot with Domonique in Boston, she did the vocal hook on an upcoming Kastle tune, ‘Walking Away’ for my EP and she also covered these two R&B songs that I’m revamping. Don’t want to spoil it just yet... but she nailed it! Also, it was an absolute pleasure working with the Virus Syndicate boys on the Kastle - Need U tune for Scion. Big up Manchester!   Q: Which fellow producers and DJs are you rating at the moment? A: Starkey’s latest album was just phenomenal. James Blake gets best producer of the year


award from me. On a Kastle tip I’m really loving the sounds of Deadboy, Hackman, Dark Sky, Ikonika, etc. In B. Rich sets you’ll hear me playing a lot of Udachi, J. Rabbit, AC Slater, Flinch, 12th Planet, Boogaloo Crew, Drop the Lime...Music is at an all-time high right now in so many ways. Q: Let’s pretend its 1995 again....what are you listening to? (And we want the truth, especially if it’s a bonafide guilty pleasure!) A: Oh man... 1995 was a big year. This was the year of Radiohead - The Bends, Moby Everything Is Wrong, 2pac - Me Against The World... didn’t Pennywise - About Time come out around then too? These were all purchased on cassette, mind you. Basically I was just listening to a lot of old rave music, Metallica, Aphex Twin and Bone Thugs and Harmony.   Q: What do you prefer - plush leather sofa, cocktail in hand style clubs or grimey (borderline illegal) warehouse raves with a real element of danger? A: Both really...I like the contrast. When I think of a “real element of danger” at a warehouse rave I just think of trying to dodge shirtless sweaty dudes chewing their face off as I make my way through a crowd. My biggest nightmare ever.   Q: It’s pretty obvious that you love food.  Tell us your ideal meal...with all the trimmings. A: [laughs] Its amazing what some twitpics can tell about a person! One of my favourite dishes to make myself is lemon pepper chicken marinated for a bit in Italian dressing. Also I bake some scallops to go with it. Simple procedure, just fresh bread crumbs, pepper, salt, butter and minced garlic. For a vegetable I cook up some asparagus with balsamic vinegar and pineapple. Nice glass of wine and that is pretty much perfect...then a Dunkin Donuts coffee for dessert.   Q: And what is the most ‘adventurous’ thing you’ve ever eaten? A: I dunno...I eat a lot of food but honestly I need to get more on the ‘adventurous’ tip. I recently had some lamb heart tartare and bone marrow that was really good. But when I think adventurous I think of like monkey brains and weird bugs. I’d try anything once, maybe when I’m over in Asia I can up my game. I really

wanna try live octopus, I’ve had it grilled but I heard its fun fighting your food while you chew it! Q: Girly Teen Vogue style question alert...P Diddy’s holding one of his ridiculously opulent yacht parties and you just happen to be invited.   Which RnB honey would you take as your arm candy? A: Well... I’d take my girlfriend. She’s been to some of his parties before so maybe she can give me some pointers!   Q: What does the next 6 to 12 months in music have in store for you...any exciting projects or upcoming tours? A: I’m doing a B. Rich North American tour in August to support my next single. Then I’ll be doing a world tour all throughout November/ December. When I get back from there it’ll be straight into USA/Canada shows. Definitely looking to go into 2011 with a bang.


ART

THE GIRLS FEATURED ARTIST Q&A

WORDS: JADE FRENCH

The Girls are Zoe Sinclair and Andrea Blood, dubbed ‘The Girls’ during their years at St Martins. Their work is a kaleidoscopic menagerie of different ideas and issues usually presented through selfportraiture. Take for example the ‘Smurfette’ portrait shoot. On the face a funny little stab at female perceptions of beauty wrapped up in the kitschness of the Smurfs… But it also has a lot to say about celebrity, faded glamour, aging and self-image. The off-beat humour of the Girls counteracts the ‘serious’ messages which may lurk beneath the veneer and engages people quickly. Their foray into performance art resulted in a ‘Nyotaimori’ (where a Japanese woman lies naked covered in sushi for the delectation and delight of diners) inspired piece with a girl dressed in food with British connotations with a priestly purveyor watching on. There are very English symbols in the teapots, iced buns and swiss rolls- very 1970s jubilee. There are eyes and fingers prodding at the food. It’s a comment on our relations with food; it’s a comment on our opinions on women- ultimately our attitude and execution of pleasure. With their collaborative work taking a seven year break they are now back having finished ‘The Paper Eaters: Long Live the Photo-Story!’ with bigger plans on the way and tongues firmly placed in cheeks.


JF: Can you give a brief introduction to The Girls? AB: We are an artist duo who have been making work together since 1996. However we had a seven year hiatus so second time around our work is more focused. We now concentrate on making surreal self-portraiture. ZS: Essentially, we create private performances and record them as photographs or video. We are also the founders and editors-in-chief of our own magazine, ‘The Paper Eaters - Long Live the PhotoStory!’, launched during our month long residency in Selfridges’ Ultralounge earlier this year. JF: Do you feel by using the collaborative name ‘The Girls’ you are making a comment on identity or femininity? It’s quite an evocative name in its simplicity! ZS: We were given the nickname by the Photography staff at St Martins in the mid 90’s. It stuck! It’s easy to remember and ambiguous. AB: It is evocative a bit like a lot of our work. I hope that even when we are older the name will still inspire us to view the world with fresh youthful eyes. JF: How does coming back to work as a duo after seven years apart feel? Are you bringing new ideas to the table as individuals or have you just slipped back into a familiar groove? ZS: It feels great to be older and wiser! I think both, as surely one’s character is pretty much formed in your twenties? AB: I think we are still evolving and growing as artists and individuals and it’s great to be able to bring different life experience and points of view to the table. I think we challenge each others ideas more now. The way we work is similar and we’re similarly drawn to each other personalities and humour. There is also something lovely about being older and more confident to trust your gut and voice your opinions. I think we’re more honest this time around. A lot of our new work really bares the soul, something we weren’t comfortable doing in our 20s. JF: What types of comment do you try and make with you art? What are its major themes? ZS: We like to leave room for the viewer to make their own mind up. The female body, women’s relationship with food, eroticism, childhood. JF: How did the Japanese idea of ‘Nyotaimori ‘ impinge on your very English performance piece ‘Garden Party’? Did anyone try and take the food?! ZS: People have indeed tried to steal food, particularly the Swiss rolls. But the woman is not supposed to react.

AB: Yes! Non reaction from the human platter is key! She always does exceedingly well and it really pays testament to all the hard training involved. JF: Do you think performance art affects the viewer in a different way to other art? Does the viewer feel more involved in the art or more estranged? ZS: I think it makes the viewer feel more involved, as their reaction becomes part of the work. The energy created can be very thrilling. AB: People are also encouraged to take their own snaps of the live event. So sometimes that paparazzilike frenzy that happens after the big reveal really does become part of the performance. JD: What drew you to self-portraiture? What influences your work? AB: We’ve have both always loved dressing up since childhood and have been hugely encouraged by our parents to make our own outfits and fantasy scenarios. There is something endlessly thrilling and fascinating about becoming someone else. It’s so liberating! ZS: At St Martins there was an annual self-portrait photography competition for first years, which we won. We went in a different direction to the other students, who were all determined to be as glamorous and sexy as possible, we became scary. It felt so natural we continued. We are influenced by our enormous collections of ephemera, celebrity culture, the internet, our childhoods. JF: What plans do you have for the future? Lots! A book, we’re currently working on issue 4 of ‘The Paper Eaters - Long Live the Photo-Story!’ magazine, we’ve been invited to give a workshop at Tate Britain as part of Loud Tate on 21 August, Wayne Hemingway has invited us to do performance art at his new festival ‘Vintage at Goodwood’ in mid August. We’ve been invited to be the artists-in-residence at the Affordable Art Fair, London, in Spring 2011, and we’ll have a solo London show at some point next year. Postcard packs and boxed sets of The Paper Eaters magazine will be for sale online from next month from thegirls.co.uk. The best way to stay in touch is by signing up to our e-newsletter on our website, thegirls.co.uk JF: Your work seems fun and engaging- are there any hidden, more serious comments being made? ZS: Again, that’s for the viewer to decide. I will say that we both have very dark senses of humour! AB: There are serious issues and comments being made than may first appear and these are important to us. They often form the base of a project before we layer it up with personality and humour. If by looking at our work the viewer is engaged and challenged by those issues, then great. But it isn’t crucial to us that the viewer ‘gets’ what we were thinking. People get enjoyment on different levels from our work and we don’t want to dictate to the viewer about what they ‘should’ be seeing. We like to let the work speak for itself.


MUSIC

INTERVIEW:

WORDS: JADE FRENCH

RAINBOW ARABIA ARE A CONGLOMERATION OF AFRICAN INFLUENCES, BREAK BEATS AND SCATTERING VOCALS WHICH HUM INTO THE BRAIN AND LODGE FOR THE LONG-HAUL. MIXING A THOUSAND DIFFERENT INFLUENCES HAS LED TO THEIR UNIQUE GENRE SPOT BEING “ENTHNOTRONIC”. THEY SAY THEY ARE “JUST MAKING MUSIC FOR PEOPLE TO ENJOY AND COMMUNICATE WITH”, YET THEIR SOUND HAS CERTAINLY GOT TONGUES WAGGING AS TO JUST WHAT THEY’RE TRYING TO SAY. WITH VIDEO’S SET EVERYWHERE FROM DESERTED DESERTS TO BRAZILIAN TOWNS WITH MICHAEL JACKSON LOOKA-LIKES THERE IS A VISUAL EXPLOSION WITHIN THEIR MUSIC WHICH IS HARD TO BEAT. WE TUFFED AT THEIR MULTI-COLOURED SLEEVES TO SEE WHAT’S GOING ON WITH THEM AT THE MOMENT...


Can you give us a quick introduction to Rainbow Arabia and your influences (whether music, art, film etc)? We are Danny and Tiffany Preston and have been married for 5 years. We were in separate bands when we first met and didn’t start playing music together until about seven years after we met. Between the two of us, the influences range all over the place. Joy Division and Bauhaus to King Tubby and Lee Perry. OMD and New Order to Metallica and Slayer. African and Syrian music to Willie Nelson and Hank Williams. I think this love of so much different music made what Rainbow Arabia is now. It seems like people are finding it hard to fit your sound into a genre- was a conscious decision to make your music elusive? Do you feel like you want to have a label attached to your sound? We didn’t really have a plan at first. Our sound comes from so many influences, from so many genres, that it turned into a melting pot of all of them. Today, there are lots of bands that are hard to pin down to a label. A good label for us would be enthnotronic. How do you create your songs? Is there a difference for you between playing live and recording? We have many techniques in creating our songs. Sometimes we will make a beat on the computer or drum machine and jam live with it until we come up with a song idea. Then we record the parts in the computer and work it out from there. Other times, we do everything in computer, from start to finish. Our live show is pretty close to the recordings. We use the drum and bass tracks and play the keyboards, guitar, percussion and vocals live. Who do you usually get compared to musically and is it a fair representation of your sound?

Gang Gang Dance and MIA were mentioned a lot. Which is a compliment. We love both of them. We didn’t intentionally try to, but there are definitely lots of similarities. We have also been compared to the Knife with our new songs, which they have been a big influence on us lately. Your music seems to hold evocations of a lot of different places; do you feel at any point influenced by coming from California? Are there other bands I think the different places are just all the styles of music we like and are influenced from. I’m not sure what the California sound is. There are many great bands that live here in LA., in particular Echo Park. Fool’s Gold, Hecuba, Weave, We are the World and recently High Places. Where is the best place you’ve played so far? Definitely, Brazil. The people, music, weather and food were all amazing. Can’t wait to go back. Do you feel visual media and imagery is a large/important part of what you do? I think our music has a lot of imagery in it on it’s own and it inspired the directors of our music videos to come up with some crazy concepts. The artwork from Kabukimono was also influenced from our sound. I wouldn’t say that imagery is an important part of us, but it does help communicate the music. What does the future holds for the band? In June, we are doing the Monday residency at The Echo, here in LA. We put together all the bands to play, like, Gary Wilson, Japanther, Former Ghosts, Weave, Tearist, and DJ sets by ORO11 and Fool’s Gold. In July, we are playing a few festivals in Europe. We are finishing up our full length album and it should be out late this year.


MUSIC

SLEIGH

BELLS

WORDS:WILL BROWN


LIVE REVIEW: Alexis Krauss screams into her microphone, screeching like a falling bomb. She knows what she’s doing. Derek Miller’s guitar smashes everybody’s ears and I’m sweating and drunk. The crowd behind me looks like an overflowing kaleidoscope of fans, hungry for the explosions that Sleigh Bells are providing. There are way too many people for this venue, but who could have predicted such a turn out for a band whose album, treats, was only released a few days previous. The album title fits well, it really is a treat, but in more of a Tim Burton’s Nightmare Before Christmas kind of way. Hold on… Sleigh Bells, Treats, Nightmare Before Christmas?! The sound putting smiles on everybody’s faces is loud and obnoxious, with a helping of strawberry vocals and hip hop beats. Behind the scenes so I’m told, they’re given aid by the majestic hand of MIA. The music is heavy, but with an overwhelming sense of optimism, all accessible at the same time. Alexis really has something to shout about. When I meet the two, I expect New York to have rubbed its dirty hands all over them. I expect rhetoric about how they rebel against the machine and hang deeper than the underground. I am hugely mistaken. Alexis and Derek welcome me with pleasant smiles and beer. Derek wears a denim jacket and Alexis just looks plain hot. Apparently they met at a café in 2008, Alexis’ mother struck up a conversation with Derek and ended up on the subject of music. Derek wanted to find a female vocalist and Alexis just happened to have sung in groups in the past. If Carlsberg did band beginnings. Explaining that the complete control they enjoy over the music comes with the small numbers in the band, Derek feels more comfortable than he ever did musically, having played in the band Poison The Well in previous years. I mention ‘noise pop’ as the popularly given genre for Sleigh Bells and Derek is quick to dismiss this. Quickly and with little reason, the two decide that their music should be given a description that incorporates an ability to induce labour in pregnant women. I guess this works. The sound that make Sleigh Bells turns out to be an accident, using $20 drum machines, the two were forced to turn up the distortion to hide the sound that without the heaviness would “sound like shit” and “not in a cute way”. And let’s be honest, the stage presence would be amiss without such a gripping, fiercely original sound. And so it was the night I enjoyed Sleigh Bells in not only their music but in conversation, it was with huge contradiction. My ears were battered by the gig, and were bathed by conversation. Everybody should meet these guys.


MUSIC

Nuits WORDS: JOSH GARVEY

Sonores


When asked to reel off a list of festivals on mainland Europe, one tends to think of ‘EXIT’, ‘Sonar’, ‘Rock AM Ring’ and the accursed “Brits on tour” offering, ‘Benicassim’. The more curious fellow will take pride in listing Gothenburg’s ‘Way out West’ or ‘Hove’ in Norway. You’d be hard pressed to hear somebody mention ‘Nuits Sonores’ though. The electro festival is located in Lyon, France. It’s organised by Arty Farty and has been running since 2002 and has gradually welcomed more and more dance orientated limbs through its gates with each passing year. In order to entice the gathered throngs, this years line-up boasted the likes of Simian Mobile Disco, Vitalic, Busy P, UNKLE, 2ManyDJs, Gang of Four, Uffie, Lindstrom & Christabelle, Laurent Garnier, The Go! Team, Ivan Smagghe, Booka Shade, Liars, Jesse Rose and The Juan Maclean. An impressive roll call indeed. Perhaps even more impressive is the set-up and layout of the festival. For four days, the city becomes one big festival site, with nine electro stages located all over the shop offering up all kinds of opportunities for attendees to dance and get up to mischief. Lyon is literally your oyster. One highlight was during a daytime party. Situated in what was no more than a ginnel sandwiched between two apartment blocks, revellers were treated to a live M.C., several DJ’s, alcohol and food. One of the DJ’s had a revelation and dropped ‘54-46 Was My Number’ and the little square turned into a right angle of reverie. The main kicks are to be had within the festival’s main site. Honourable mention goes to Laurent Garnier and Uffie; however the weekend’s plaudits are reserved for Busy P and 2ManyDJs.

Busy’s energetic to-ing and fro-ing during his set caused a frenzy amongst the small numbers that came with the sole intention of “…their tits off” (insert whichever verb you feel is relevant). The former Daft Punk manager raised false hope when he began to throw what appeared to be money into the crowd. Disappointed grabbers were met with pieces of paper instead. The dejection turned to elation when A-Trak’s remix of ‘Heads Will Roll’ was catapulted out of the speakers. The mantle of ‘Best Fucking Set’ is saved for 2ManyDJs. Shelving their mainstream set for Warehouse Project and Sankeys, the Dewaele brothers proceeded to melt the purist’s faces with heavy electro. For three fucking hours! Poignant moments included the effervescent ‘Flat Beat’, the teasing intro to ‘A Milli’ by Lil’ Wayne and the unavoidable elephant in the room, which came in the form of their remix of ‘Kids’. A humorous scene involved a case of crossed wires. During the opening moments of ‘Rock The Casbah’ by The Clash, one confused reveller was to be heard shouting “IT’S WILLENIUM!” So, for those of you who want to attend a festival where good music and a friendly atmosphere isn’t tainted by annoying “rah on a gap yah” types or loutish indie fans then Nuits Sonores is definitely the place for you. Lyon, J’Taime.


ART

FEATURED ARTIST:

WORDS: JADE FRENCH After being intrigued by Railcars album art we tracked down its creator Claudia O’Steen who is currently based in Nashville, Tennessee. Her work incorporates tonnes of imagery and haunting undertones. It’s kinda hard to disentangle her work from Railcars music, which is a testament to her style and ability to seep up another’s artistic vision. Claudia says: Most of my recent work deals with perception and how our individual translation of sensory information constructs and alters everything around us. I try to work out why I perceive things the way that I do, so that i may then create work that will give the viewer a sense of my perceptual abnormalities. My work often feels detached or hazy in order to portray the derealization that affects my reality. When creating work for other people I address the same subject, but from altered viewpoints... Like creating the Railcars “cathedral with no eyes” cover; I listened to the music and the story it told, and then gave my Saint Edmund character his own consciousness. One thing that I love about Aria’s music is how is conjures such vivid imagery for me. The scenes in “cathedral with no eyes” just played out in my mind and I could feel the vast landscapes and the still cold air. Playing with this idea of perception helps me to make sense of my surroundings....like trying to find order in chaos.


ART

WORLD: THE TIME HAS COME TO GALVANISE We turn our telescopic kaleidoscopes to look at what is great and good out there in the world… Israel: Broken Fingaz http://brokenfingaz.com/ A graffiti, illustration and graphics team from Israel their recent stop-start animation is amazing. (WATCH HERE: http://vimeo.com/10555187). Their blend of vintage comic imagery and bright colours mean that their work is instantly as engaging as it is fun…. Belgium: Christopher Copper Magazines are there to be read and devoured, to rip pages out and stick on your wall... To be transformed into a piece of art? Christopher Coppers subverts the magazine form and makes explosive, floral, firework patterns. Twisting and turning Coppers show’s how the same object can create different perceptions and redefine itself. Japan: Fuco Ueda http://www.fucoueda.com/ Using acrylics Ueda depicts dreamscape worlds where femininity dominates in the subtlest of ways and surrealist motifs run throughout. Carnivalesque with animals running through the worlds of pretty girls with long hair- delicate but with an inner awareness. Mumbai: Shilpa Gupta http://www.flyinthe.net/about.htm With a mix of interactive videos, installation and websites Gupta is a seriously hands-on artist. With a belief that audience participation can make a piece of art have more substance Gupta

encourages people to steal from her shows (as in the case of performance and installation piece “there is no explosive here”). Tackling issues such as religion, identity and feminism with a driving focus in changing perceptions, Gupta is an extremely relevant artist. Melbourne: Liesl Pfeffer http://www.lieslpfeffer.com/home.html Pfeffer’s collages use photo montage and block shapes to create idyllic landscapes. Mixing photography and line drawing her work heralds back to a straightforward existence with a childish, relaxing feeling of simplicity.


TRAVEL

K R A K O W TRAVEL-LOG PHOTOS: JADE FRENCH


FASHION

SPIN THE WORLD FROM THE LIGHT PHOTOGRAPHY: RORY DCS STYLING: Zoe Jenkin


Silk Tunic and belt worn around head by Something Else at Urban Outfitters


Embelleshed printed playsuit and leggings worn as a turban by Faye Chamberlain


Tube top by Faye Chamberlain, Shorts by Intisaar Mukadem


Acrylic shoulder piece by MAria Lazari, Long sleeved printed blouse by Charlotte Boden.


Embelleshed printed playsuit shorts by Faye Chamberlain and printed silver edged vest by Charlotte Boden


Waterfall front coat by Intisaar Mukadem, leggings by Faye Chamberlain, shoes by Maria Lazari. Opposite: Embellished printed haletr top by Faye Chamberlian, Leggings by Intisaar Mukadem.


EmTrousers and cropped top by Charlotte Boden, PVC circle cut out top by Maria Lazari


Shorts and shirt (worn underneath) both by Maria Lazari, silk printed Poncho-cape by Avsh Alom Gur

everycolourandeveryhueisepresentedbymeandyou.


Vest and shorts by Charlotte Boden, Striped oven shirt with glass ball detail by Maria Lazari.


FASHION

K ALEID O WA R R I O R Photography & Photo Manipulation: Jayesh Pankhania Hair Stylist: Liam Curran. Make Up Artist: Mira Parmar Model: Shelby @ FM Retoucher: Imre Fejes


FASHION

s t a y

PHOTOGRAPHER:

HATTIE

R.

STYLIST:

SIOBHAN

WITTER

HAIR:

LIAM

CURRAN

MAKE MODEL:

UP:

BEA

JESS

CRAVEN

SWEET @

storm


Body William Tempest Trousers Holly Fulton Shoes yellow KG by Kurt Geiger


Shoulders Sass & Bide, Mesh bodysuit Marjan pajoski, Bikini bottoms Versace, Shoes Nicholas Kirkwood


Dress Jean Pierre Braganza, Socks 40 denier knee highs (flo pink 100% nylon) Pamela Mann from My tights, Shoes Nicholas Kirkwood


Metallic Jacket KTZ, Bikini bra Versace, Leggings American Apparel, Briefs Twenty8twelve, Shoes Nicholas Kirkwood


Mesh Body American Apparel, Trousers Sass & Bide (underneath), Metallic trousers KTZ, Shoes Louise Goldin, Wrist Guards Stylists own


Dress Alexander McQueen, Shorts Topshop, Trousers Tu Tu Blu at Topshop, Shoes pink Carvela


FASHION

CHROMATIC photographer: dan wilton www.danwilton.co.uk stylist: zoe jenkin hair & make-up: zoe koritsas models: rory and james from m&p models with special thanks to carly ellis and ralph joseph marcos rovero


acrylic chain crop top by carly ellis, zigzag harem’s from urban outfitters, reebok hightops


leggings by faye chamberlain, soft-toy head piece by piers atkinson


leggings by carly ellis, zip triangle top by Ralph Joseph Marcos Rovero


shorts by carly ellis, patchwork coat by intisaar mukadam, headress stylist’s own.


sequin trousers by carly ellis, tshirt from urban outfitters


plastic chain jacket by carly ellis


hat by i dream of wires, zip triangle shorts by Ralph Joseph Marcos Rovero


joggers by carly ellis, leggings worn as top by faye chamberlain, triangle yellow jacket with pockets by Ralph Joseph Marcos Rovero


purple pvc by carly ellis, zip sweater by Ralph Joseph Marcos Rovero


FASHION

P H A N TASMA GORIA Photography&Post Production: Daniel Pires Styling&Art Direction: Kalina Pulit Hair&Make-up: Sunanda Mesquita Photography Assistance: Clara Pais Styling Assistance: Alise Miksta Model: Toto Bridgens


Jacket by Rebecca Jeffs | Headpiece by Suzi Ovens


Waistcoat by Beatrice Newman


Half Jacket by EUPHEMIA by Millie Cockton at Machine-A


Knitted Jacket by Alise Miksta


Cape by Rebecca Jeffs


Chain bra by EUPHEMIA by Millie Cockton at Machine-A | Dress by Suzi Ovens


PHOTOGRAPHER:

ALIS PELLESCHI WORDS: ZOE JENKIN


FASHION This month our radar is firmly fixed on one Alis Pelleschi... a girl who spends most of her time developing negative of hot naked boys whilst wearing her treasured Giraffe suit. But her one woman mission to photograph 80 naked men, is just one of many wild ventures Alis is involved in. Since childhood Alis has always had her fingers in controversial pies; when invited to take part in an exhibition at Leeds Art Gallery at just 13, she proceeded to create a massive montage of self portrait photos taken on disposable cameras, intermingled with crisp packets, tampons and mentions of her monobrow. This was obviously a step in the right direction as since then she has has work published in SuperSuper, Spindle, Inspire, Disorder and GrungeCake. We met up with our favourit new female photographer for a coffee and a quick chat... Zoe Jenkin: Hey Alis, tell us what are your three favourit things in life...? Alis Pelleschi: Hey! Definately chip butties. Dancing. Deers. ZJ: Is there anyone in particular you would love to work with? Or magazines which you aspire to work for more than any other? AP: There’s so many interesting smaller mags just starting right now and they tend to be the ones doing the most exciting things, which is a shame, as obviously the money isn’t always there to keep it going. My favourite favourite favourite magazine is ROJO magazine based in Barcelona. I love BUTT magazine, but alas I’m not a gay man, so may struggle there. I would love to dress the Queen up and photograph her rolling around in glitter or something. ZJ: Oh my, that would be amazing, please make that your life mission! So what was your first ever job? Or maybe just the worst job you have ever had? AP: The worst job I ever had was working in a call centre selling mortgages. They gave us crab sticks as a treat for the week up to christmas. I hid them in loads of drawers around the office.

ZJ: You have just graduated yes? Did u find doing a degree useful or do u think you would still be in the same position without one? AP: I think the three years have given me the time I needed to push myself and do things that I probably wouldnt’ve had the time to do had I not gone to uni. But I think the degree in itself ZJ: Yeah I kind of agree from my experience with uni I feel the same thing. So what are your plans now you’ve graduated? AP: Well I literally just handed in everything yesterday, so right now I’m sat in a giraffe suit, watching Dog the Bounty Hunter and eating a chip butty. But yeahh, considering being a lapdancer for a while to get some money together, then moving to London to work as a photographer’s assistant for a while and gradually get in the game! ZJ ANYTHING ELSE YOU’D LIKE TO TELL US? You can be whoever you want to be!........... Britney, Cindy or Frank!


FASHION

WORDS: ZOE JENKIN

FASHION PR GURU:

MICHAEL PEGRUM


So Peewee I am pretty sure you’re like a lot of other creatives in London and do about 10 different jobs all at once... is this true? Yes, bits of work seem to pop up anywhere and everywhere.

have come to understand it’s about hard work and creativity. The Glamour does happen, but it only lasts a short amount of time, and you have to get your nails dirty in order for it to be Glamourous.

What is your main job title? Traditionally known as Fashion PR, but what specifically is PR? I’m always more inclined to say Fashion Communication. ‘Communication’ sits better with my work as is a little bit of everything.

What’s the best bit about your job? The creative people that I am helping, the journalists that print me, the people that fill the parties and the clothes.

What do you actually do day-to-day? It’s all about creating a presence for a brand. That doesn’t just mean you send everything about the company, to everyone you know. As a good ‘PR’ you really need to devellop a unique strategy that captivates people making them seek out the brand, rather than the brand to just be thrown in front of your face. Day to day though my role is about getting a brand coverage in a variety of different media, my strengths at the moment is online, everything is going online so don’t ignore the change. Copywriting, organising parties and events, building a brand’s presence on a variety of different social media’s, commercial strategy, customer mailers and more. Oh and also downloading music illegally, eating food and drinking for free at as many parties you can get into. How old are you now if u dont mind spilling?! 52..... No I’m 25, oh god by this point my Mum and Dad had two kids, Oook! What was your first ever job? Working in Hambledon Village Shop. I was 12. I don’t even think I got paid for it. I did it cos I loved eating free fizzy cola bottles, nicking Benson and Hedges, and using the pricing sticker gun thingy. How did u get from there to where you are today? Well i’m still nicking cigarettes, I’ve moved to Marlboro Lights now though. Well yeah I’ve come an awful long way. I grew up in a small village in the countryside went to a posh school and had quite a sheltered view on life. I used to think Fashion was Glamourous and working in it would be easy as I had a posh voice and if I was wearing sequinned top, but I

And what’s the worst? The money (at the moment) Are there any common misconceptions about your job or is it all true? That PR is about taking people out fir lunch. You have to be more clever than that nowadays. I can’t bear also the ways that reality TV and shows like Fugly Betsy (which I hate) show that everyone in the Fashion industry is bitchy. It’s just not true, you just have to be tough that’s all. What advice would you give ot anyone wanting to do this? Work hard, have unique strategy and smile. Smiling instantly makes people like you. What moment made you realise this was the right job for you? When, in my first job I realised I could do the job better than my boss. Is there any other roles you would like to work in the future? Joining a Cher tribute act maybe? No I think I’ve found my calling, I just have to push what I do even further. What do you want to be doing in 10 years? I want to have made my company international, with a diverse range of clients and brands from around the world. I would also like more tattoo’s, to own a boat and a house and be happy and well!


FASHION

TREND MONITOR :


:


DESIGNER PROFILE:

FASHION

Famous for their digital printed fabrics, what Basso & Brooke can’t do with colour and patterns probably isn’t worth doing. Neo-pop was the theme of Basso & Brooke’s Spring collection, exploring the wildly lurid work of Jeff Koons and it yet ensuring there was still a nod to the /Summerexpected psychedelic trippy adventures Basso & Brooke take us on each season. Basso & Brooke is the label of Bruno Basso and Christopher Brooke. They were the first ever winners of London’s prestigious Fashion Fringe Award in 2004. They won the competition with a collection that was sexuality exuberant, using digital prints that appeared classic and Liberty-esque but on closer inspection were an orgiastic carnival of sexual liberation and allegories of power. The Basso & Brooke aesthetic is based on advanced and highly complex digital prints combining to create a fabric-based fashion statement. Soon after winning the prize, Basso & Brooke entered a production and distribution agreement with the Aeffe Group, who also represent the Alberta Ferretti, Moschino, Narciso Rodriguez, Jean Paul Gaultier and Pollini brands.


Two people from very different cultures and design disciplines – Chris, fashion; and Bruno, Graphic design, create the label. They are the pioneers of the digital print process in fashion. Bruno Basso & Christopher Brooke, renowned for producing unique and inspired textiles and prints, have now embarked on taking over the art and interior design worlds too. Having travelled to Uzbekistan on one of four exchanges initiated by the British Council, the duo present their new capsule collection inspired by this journey in the Design Museum Tank outside the museum. Favoured by celebs including Michelle Obama, BeyoncÊ and Katy Perry, Basso & Brook have also launched a limited-edition interiors collection as part of their collaboration with Turning Leaf wines today, you can add some oomph to your sitting room with a vibrantly-printed armchair or a bold new lampshade. The collection, which will be sold exclusively at The Shop at Bluebird, in June, July and August, features two exclusive prints. The duo have also made limited-edition printed bottles of Turning Leaf wine, as well as a series of Al Fresco Dining Kits (which include a silk blanket, cushions, a lacquered case, engraved glasses and - you guessed it - more wine).


FASHION

BJORK WORDS: TORS BEEDLES

Known for her suggested noise levels and Icelandic roots, there are few media figure’s who whould wear a swan drenched around their neck to the oscars. Much of the adoring fashion audience are bemused whether to rejoice in her freedom choices, or run to the magazine shelves to satisfy their minds with the high-street hits they know too well. This outfit in-particular would serve joesph and his technicolor dreamcoat as a modest understudy. Accompanied by pom pommed ears, this outfit screams summer, personality and a wonderfully weird fashion icon. The lustrous china-faced girl is the queen of electronica avant garde style. Long before the diamond Ga-Ga thrusted us out of our denim shorts, Bjork has been a rainbow of eccentricity for over a decade. Hail Bjork!


FASHION George Cox & oki-ni Exclusive Hiking Sneaker £120.00

Maison Martin Margiela T-Shirt £99.00

Folk Rainmac £225

Timex Jumbo Watch £65.00

THE

BOYS WISHLIST

Alexander McQueen Overdyed All In One £570

Forgotten Future Aran Pullover £325.00

Raf Simons Tailored Show Sleeve Jacket £755

A.Coba.lt Calf Leather Trekking Boot - £1395.00


Vivienne Westwood and Melissa Jelly Wing Wedge £299

Claw Ring by Dominic Jones £225

MARC BY MARC JACOBS Dashiki Stripe jumpsuit £350 JUST CAVALLI Ruched-panel cotton mini dress £660

THE

GIRLS

See by Chloe Butterfly Dress £270

WISHLIST

ETOILE ISABEL MARANT Printed crinkled silk-crepe blouse £235

Rabbit Collarless Jacket G&G £1260

Chay Todd Cut Out Swimsuit £240


Hey YOUR MUMS HOUSE boys, tell us why you started the amazingness that is YOUR MUMS HOUSE... Your Mum’s House, was started to create a place for all types of people to come together, feel inspired & fit in no matter who or what they are. For us too many clubs & clubnights have become very ‘cliquey’ & YMH is about breaking the mold of what is supposed to be a ‘cool’ night, laying it on the table and opening it up to everyone. It’s about creating an environment where there is no judgment, no rules and where people are open to new experiences, meeting new and different types of people and where everyone can just have fun! Exactly what going out should be about! Our motto has, and always will be ‘come down, dress up, dress down, be yourself & do exactly what your mother told you not to! Cool. Thanks for explaining that...now we’re pretty lazy so can you do us a favour and finish these sentences for us... Three songs your will always hear at YMH are... something to make you laugh, something to make your cry & something to make you dance! You are most likely to see..... anything and everything at YMH. YMH is perfect for... meeting a diverse group of individuals & enjoying yourself to the maximum. The most outrageous thing thats happened at YMH was... nothing is ever too outrageous for YMH! The only thing missing from YMH is.... the rest of the world. Our dream guest/DJ for YMH would be... the whole world, we believe everyone should have a YMH experience at least once in their life! The fashion/outfits at YMH are... extremely varied!! it’s everything from high end couture with a 6 six inch heel to tracksuits, caps and hightops! You should come to YMH if... you want to feel at home no matter what’s going on!


WWW.DOUBLEMAGAZINE.CO.UK

Profile for ZOE  JENKIN

DOUBLE MAGAZINE - THE KALEIDOSCOPE ISSUE  

kaleidoscope issue

DOUBLE MAGAZINE - THE KALEIDOSCOPE ISSUE  

kaleidoscope issue

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